Leaving the EU: Meaningful Vote
John Bercow Excerpts
Monday 22nd October 2018

(1 year, 4 months ago)

Commons Chamber
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Department for Exiting the European Union
Dominic Raab Portrait Dominic Raab - Parliament Live - Hansard

I do not think there was a question there, but as the right hon. Lady will know, the selection of amendments and what the House can discuss is a matter for the Speaker. [Interruption.]

Mr Speaker Hansard
22 Oct 2018, 4:23 p.m.

Order. People can take whatever view they like, but, to be fair, the Secretary of State is always an estimably courteous individual in the Chamber, and we must hear the fella.

Mr Jacob Rees-Mogg Portrait Mr Jacob Rees-Mogg (North East Somerset) (Con) - Hansard
22 Oct 2018, 4:23 p.m.

Will my right hon. Friend confirm once again that the choice in the meaningful vote is clear—either to accept the Government’s proposition or to leave without a withdrawal agreement?

Break in Debate

Dominic Raab Portrait Dominic Raab - Hansard

I do not think that the hon. Lady was right in either of her key points. The memorandum that we published sets out very clearly that there will be a substantive motion. It will be, in our view, subject to amendments. What we cannot have is a vote that renders meaningless the outcome of the referendum.

Mr Speaker Hansard
22 Oct 2018, 4:26 p.m.

There has been much reference to the Procedure Committee, of which the hon. Member for Gainsborough (Sir Edward Leigh) is of course a distinguished ornament.

Sir Edward Leigh Portrait Sir Edward Leigh - Parliament Live - Hansard
22 Oct 2018, 4:27 p.m.

The evidence given to the Procedure Committee last week was very clear. If there is no deal under section 13(4) of the European Union (Withdrawal) Act, there will be a vote on a neutral motion. If there is a deal, there must be a meaningful vote under section 13(1). That motion is amendable, and amendments must be taken first, unless the Government produce their own business statement, and there has to be a vote on it. That is the procedure.

The important point to understand, however, is that deal or no deal, meaningful vote passed or not, can only affect the deal; it cannot affect the outcome of Brexit, because that is in statute. Only the Government can introduce legislation, so only the Government can stop Brexit on 29 March. Will the Secretary of State therefore give an unequivocal declaration to the House that in no circumstances—deal or no deal, deal rejected by the House or accepted—will Brexit not proceed on 29 March?

Break in Debate

Several hon. Members rose—

Mr Speaker Hansard

Order. I will call a very small number of Members now, but colleagues will also have an opportunity to question the Prime Minister, who is always very committed to the House.

Mr Ben Bradshaw Portrait Mr Ben Bradshaw (Exeter) (Lab) - Parliament Live - Hansard
22 Oct 2018, 4:34 p.m.

What does the Secretary of State think the consequences would be if a majority in this House opposed the deal, opposed no deal and perhaps in those circumstances even supported a people’s vote if the Government tried to thwart the will of this House being expressed and implemented?

Break in Debate

Several hon. Members rose—

Mr Speaker Hansard

Order. I am sorry to disappoint remaining colleagues. My normal practice is to call everybody, but there are constraints of time and we must now move on. People will have the opportunity to question the Prime Minister.