Ed Davey Portrait

Ed Davey

Liberal Democrat - Kingston and Surbiton

Liberal Democrat Spokesperson (Treasury)
21st Aug 2019 - 7th Sep 2020
Liberal Democrat Spokesperson (Social Justice)
6th Jan 2020 - 7th Sep 2020
Acting Leader, Liberal Democrats
13th Dec 2019 - 27th Aug 2020
Deputy Leader, Liberal Democrats
3rd Sep 2019 - 13th Dec 2019
Liberal Democrat Spokesperson (Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
21st Aug 2019 - 21st Oct 2019
Liberal Democrat Spokesperson (Home Affairs)
16th Jun 2017 - 21st Aug 2019
Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change
3rd Feb 2012 - 8th May 2015
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Innovation and Skills) (Employment Relations, Consumer and Postal Affairs)
17th May 2010 - 3rd Feb 2012
Liberal Democrat Spokesperson (Foreign Affairs)
18th Dec 2007 - 6th May 2010
Liberal Democrat Spokesperson (without Portfolio)
5th Dec 2006 - 18th Dec 2007
Liberal Democrat Spokesperson (Trade and Industry)
5th Mar 2006 - 10th Dec 2006
Liberal Democrat Spokesperson (Education)
10th May 2005 - 5th Mar 2006
Liberal Democrat Spokesperson (Office of the Deputy Prime Minister)
1st Jun 2002 - 10th May 2005
Liberal Democrat Spokesperson (Olympics and London)
1st Jun 2000 - 1st Jun 2003
Liberal Democrat Spokesperson (Chief Secretary to the Treasury)
1st Jun 2001 - 1st Jun 2002
Liberal Democrat Spokesperson (Treasury)
1st Jun 1997 - 1st Jun 2001
Treasury Committee
22nd Nov 1999 - 11th May 2001
Treasury Sub-committee
22nd Nov 1999 - 11th May 2001
Liberal Democrat Whip
1st Jun 1997 - 1st Jun 2000
Procedure Committee
7th Nov 1997 - 14th Feb 2000


There are no upcoming events identified
Division Votes
Wednesday 22nd September 2021
Compensation (London Capital & Finance plc and Fraud Compensation Fund) Bill
voted Aye - in line with the party majority
One of 7 Liberal Democrat Aye votes vs 0 Liberal Democrat No votes
Tally: Ayes - 52 Noes - 292
Speeches
Thursday 16th September 2021
AUKUS

As consistent internationalists, Liberal Democrats welcome this enhanced co-operation with our Australian allies, especially because it is for our mutual …

Written Answers
Friday 15th October 2021
Health Professions: Training
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the impact on …
Early Day Motions
Monday 19th July 2021
Negotiating a peace settlement on the Korean Peninsula
That this House notes the work by Congressman Brad Sherman to encourage new efforts towards formally ending the state of …
Bills
Wednesday 22nd July 2020
Coronavirus Inquiry Bill 2019-21
A Bill to require the Prime Minister to establish a public inquiry into the Government’s handling of the coronavirus pandemic.
Tweets
None available
MP Financial Interests
Monday 1st February 2021
3. Gifts, benefits and hospitality from UK sources
Name of donor: National Liberal Club
Address of donor: 1 Whitehall Place, London SW1A 2HE
Amount of donation or nature …
EDM signed
Tuesday 21st September 2021
South Western Railway proposed timetable changes
That this House acknowledges the new timetable proposed by South Western Railway, due to come into effect in December 2022; …
Supported Legislation
Prime Minister (Confidence) Bill 2017-19
The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Ed Davey has voted in 246 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Ed Davey Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Boris Johnson (Conservative)
Prime Minister, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, and Minister for the Union
(67 debate interactions)
Jesse Norman (Conservative)
(10 debate interactions)
David Davis (Conservative)
(8 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Cabinet Office
(55 debate contributions)
HM Treasury
(36 debate contributions)
Department of Health and Social Care
(12 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Ed Davey's debates

Kingston and Surbiton Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petitions with highest Kingston and Surbiton signature proportion
Petitions with most Kingston and Surbiton signatures
Ed Davey has not participated in any petition debates

Latest EDMs signed by Ed Davey

20th September 2021
Ed Davey signed this EDM as a sponsor on Tuesday 21st September 2021

South Western Railway proposed timetable changes

Tabled by: Sarah Olney (Liberal Democrat - Richmond Park)
That this House acknowledges the new timetable proposed by South Western Railway, due to come into effect in December 2022; laments that the proposed timetable amounts to a significant reduction in services; notes that current passenger behaviour is not yet representative of post-pandemic demand for public transport; further notes the …
8 signatures
(Most recent: 21 Sep 2021)
Signatures by party:
Liberal Democrat: 7
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
6th September 2021
Ed Davey signed this EDM on Wednesday 15th September 2021

The Ministerial Code and the conduct of the Prime Minister

Tabled by: Dawn Butler (Labour - Brent Central)
That this House believes that trust in the ministerial code has been eroded by the actions of the Prime Minister; further believes that the Prime Minister should no longer be the guardian of the code as he has been shown to lack the moral aptitude needed; and therefore calls for …
96 signatures
(Most recent: 22 Sep 2021)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 40
Scottish National Party: 37
Liberal Democrat: 10
Independent: 3
Plaid Cymru: 3
Social Democratic & Labour Party: 2
Alliance: 1
Alba Party: 1
Green Party: 1
View All Ed Davey's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Ed Davey, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


1 Urgent Question tabled by Ed Davey

Ed Davey has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

8 Bills introduced by Ed Davey

Introduced: 19th December 2012

Following agreement by both Houses on the text of the Bill it received Royal Assent on 18 December. The Bill is now an Act of Parliament (law). To make provision for or in connection with reforming the electricity market for purposes of encouraging low carbon electricity generation or ensuring security of supply; for the establishment and functions of the Office for Nuclear Regulation; about the government pipe-line and storage system and rights exercisable in relation to it; about the designation of a strategy and policy statement; for the making of orders requiring regulated persons to provide redress to consumers of gas or electricity; about offshore transmission of electricity during a commissioning period; for imposing further fees in respect of nuclear decommissioning costs; and for connected purposes.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Wednesday 18th December 2013 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 19th December 2012

Following agreement by both Houses on the text of the Bill it received Royal Assent on 18 December. The Bill is now an Act of Parliament (law). To make provision for or in connection with reforming the electricity market for purposes of encouraging low carbon electricity generation or ensuring security of supply; for the establishment and functions of the Office for Nuclear Regulation; about the government pipe-line and storage system and rights exercisable in relation to it; about the designation of a strategy and policy statement; for the making of orders requiring regulated persons to provide redress to consumers of gas or electricity; about offshore transmission of electricity during a commissioning period; for imposing further fees in respect of nuclear decommissioning costs; and for connected purposes.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Wednesday 18th December 2013 and was enacted into law.


A Bill to require Her Majesty’s Government to seek a two-year extension of the implementation period under Article 132 of the Withdrawal Agreement; to repeal the prohibition on agreeing to such an extension under section 33 of the European Union (Withdrawal Agreement) Act 2020; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading (Commons)
Wednesday 20th May 2020

A Bill to require the Prime Minister to establish a public inquiry into the Government’s handling of the coronavirus pandemic.


Last Event - 1st Reading (Commons)
Wednesday 22nd July 2020

A Bill to repeal sections 60, 60AA and 60A of the Criminal Justice and Public Order Act 1994 in so far as they apply to England and Wales.


Last Event - 1st Reading (Commons)
Wednesday 24th June 2020

A Bill to require employers to make reasonable adjustments to enable employees with caring responsibilities for people with disabilities to provide that care.


Last Event - 1st Reading (Commons)
Wednesday 10th June 2020

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to remove financial requirements and fees for applications for indefinite leave to remain in the United Kingdom from foreign or Commonwealth members of the armed forces on discharge and their families; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 12th March 2019
(Read Debate)

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to make provision about end of life care and support for homeless people with terminal illnesses, including through the provision of housing for such people; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 7th February 2018
(Read Debate)

410 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
9 Other Department Questions
20th Jul 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Prime Minister's oral contribution of 15 July 2020, Official Report, col. 1514, what the annual budget will be of the independent inquiry on the Government's response to the covid-19 outbreak.

COVID-19 is the biggest challenge the UK, together with nations around the world, has faced in decades. The Government has always been clear that there will be opportunities to look back, analyse and reflect on all aspects of COVID-19. As the Prime Minister has said, this will include an independent inquiry at the appropriate time.

The fact that this is a new virus has been a key feature of the response from the start. It has inherently been a continuous and active process of learning, reviewing, adapting and responding as more is discovered about how the virus works in light of the latest scientific research and available data. Further details will be set out in due course and announced in the usual way.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
20th Jul 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Prime Minister's oral contribution of 15 July 2020, Official Report, col. 1514, how many civil servants will be allocated to supporting the independent inquiry on the Government's response to the covid-19 outbreak.

COVID-19 is the biggest challenge the UK, together with nations around the world, has faced in decades. The Government has always been clear that there will be opportunities to look back, analyse and reflect on all aspects of COVID-19. As the Prime Minister has said, this will include an independent inquiry at the appropriate time.

The fact that this is a new virus has been a key feature of the response from the start. It has inherently been a continuous and active process of learning, reviewing, adapting and responding as more is discovered about how the virus works in light of the latest scientific research and available data. Further details will be set out in due course and announced in the usual way.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
20th Jul 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Prime Minister's oral contribution of 15 July 2020, Official Report, col. 1514, which Department will have responsibility for establishing the independent inquiry on the Government's response to the covid-19 outbreak.

COVID-19 is the biggest challenge the UK, together with nations around the world, has faced in decades. The Government has always been clear that there will be opportunities to look back, analyse and reflect on all aspects of COVID-19. As the Prime Minister has said, this will include an independent inquiry at the appropriate time.

The fact that this is a new virus has been a key feature of the response from the start. It has inherently been a continuous and active process of learning, reviewing, adapting and responding as more is discovered about how the virus works in light of the latest scientific research and available data. Further details will be set out in due course and announced in the usual way.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
20th Jul 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Prime Minister's oral contribution of 15 July 2020, Official Report, col. 1514, if he will ensure that the panel members for the independent inquiry on the Government's response to the covid-19 outbreak are from diverse groups.

COVID-19 is the biggest challenge the UK, together with nations around the world, has faced in decades. The Government has always been clear that there will be opportunities to look back, analyse and reflect on all aspects of COVID-19. As the Prime Minister has said, this will include an independent inquiry at the appropriate time.

The fact that this is a new virus has been a key feature of the response from the start. It has inherently been a continuous and active process of learning, reviewing, adapting and responding as more is discovered about how the virus works in light of the latest scientific research and available data. Further details will be set out in due course and announced in the usual way.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
20th Jul 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Prime Minister's oral contribution of 15 July 2020, Official Report, col. 1514, when he plans to publish a (a) timetable for the establishment of and (b) a draft terms of reference for the independent inquiry on the Government's response to the covid-19 outbreak; and if he will make a statement.

COVID-19 is the biggest challenge the UK, together with nations around the world, has faced in decades. The Government has always been clear that there will be opportunities to look back, analyse and reflect on all aspects of COVID-19. As the Prime Minister has said, this will include an independent inquiry at the appropriate time.

The fact that this is a new virus has been a key feature of the response from the start. It has inherently been a continuous and active process of learning, reviewing, adapting and responding as more is discovered about how the virus works in light of the latest scientific research and available data. Further details will be set out in due course and announced in the usual way.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
29th Jun 2020
To ask the Prime Minister, how much correspondence he received on his Special Adviser Mr Dominic Cummings in each month of 2020.

This information is not centrally held, and would incur disproportionate cost to collate. My office receives over 3,000 letters and emails every week covering a broad spectrum of issues.

Boris Johnson
Prime Minister, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, and Minister for the Union
18th Jun 2020
To ask the hon. Member for Perth and North Perthshire, representing the House of Commons Commission, how many hand sanitising stations there were on the Parliamentary Estate in each of the last five years.

Prior to March 2020 hand sanitiser was not centrally supplied or offered as standard. Individual departments (eg Security) sometimes had their own supply according to their requirements. In total there are 49 freestanding units and 28 wall-mounted dispensers across the House of Commons estate.

Pete Wishart
Shadow SNP Leader of the House of Commons
18th Jun 2020
To ask the hon. Member for Perth and North Perthshire, representing the House of Commons Commission, how many Parliamentary staff have tested positive for covid-19; what support is available to those staff members; and if he will make a statement.

Testing is available to all staff of the House where they or a member of their household are symptomatic. Testing is arranged directly by the individual, who then receives the results directly. The records held by the House will only indicate whether the member of staff is available for work or not. The full range of HR and wellbeing support remains available for staff at all times.

Pete Wishart
Shadow SNP Leader of the House of Commons
15th Jun 2020
To ask the Attorney General, how much energy her departmental buildings have used in (a) each of the last five years and (b) 2020 to date.

The Attorney General’s Office (AGO) is unable to provide information on its building energy usage as it is currently sharing a building and there is no way of identifying the AGO’s energy usage.

The Government Legal Department (GLD) and HM Crown Prosecution Service Inspectorate (HMCPSI), who are GLD’s tenants, have used the following:

Energy Consumption (MWh)

2015-16

2016-17

2017-18

2018-19

2019-20

2020-to-date (end of May 2020)

3,359

3,433

3,399

3,304

4,935

441

GLD publish this data in their Annual Report and Accounts. The 2019-20 publication can be found here. Please note that the 2019-20 total also covers the period of commissioning, decommissioning and relocating GLD’s Head Office from One Kemble Street to 102 Petty France and consequently includes the GLD proportion of energy usage for both buildings during this period..

The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) have used the following:

Energy Consumption (MWh)

2015-16

2016-17

2017-18

2018-19

3,359,251

3,433,141

3,399,001

3,303,878

CPS publish these figures in their Annual Report and Accounts. The 2018-19 publication can be found here. The figures for 2019-20 will be available in the CPS 2019-20 Annual Report and Accounts once it is published. Please note that The Ministry of Justice Estates Sustainability Team is responsible for reporting and managing sustainability in the CPS. Their data is gathered and validated by the Estates Sustainability Team and Building Research Establishment on behalf of DEFRA. The CPS is unable to report data from locations where property owners are not obliged to provide it. All data is UK only.

The Serious Fraud Office (SFO) routinely publishes details of its energy use in their Annual Report and Accounts which can be found here. The data for the most recent financial year 2019/2020 is due to be published in the near future.

Michael Ellis
Paymaster General
10th Jun 2020
To ask the Attorney General, how many staff in her Office had caring responsibilities in each of the last five years.

The Annual Civil Service People Survey includes a question on caring responsibilities. The affirmative responses to this question for the Government Legal Department (GLD), Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) and Serious Fraud Office (SFO) are listed below. The Attorney General’s Office (AGO) and HM Crown Prosecution Service Inspectorate (HMCPSI) responses are not included due to the small number of staff and the risk of individuals being identified.

Please note that figures collected from the People Survey may not fully represent the number of carers as it is reliant on responses to the question. The CPS and SFO do not hold records of the responses to the question for all of the past five years. The CPS cannot provide data before 2018, the SFO cannot provide data before 2019 and GLD is also unable to provide data for 2018 as those data stores are no longer accessible and records were not held by the departments. Please also note that the wording of the question in 2016 and 2019 were different and the higher figures are likely due to the inclusion of childcare responsibility in those years.

Government Legal Department (GLD):

2015 – 266 out of 1,602 who responded stated they had caring responsibilities

2016 – 580 out of 1,530 who responded stated they had caring responsibilities

2017 – 300 out of 1,780 who responded stated they had caring responsibilities

2018 – No data

2019 – 482 out of 2,214 who responded stated they had caring responsibilities

Serious Fraud Office (SFO):

2015 – No data

2016 – No data

2017 – No data

2018 – No data

2019 – 84 out of 448 who responded stated they had caring responsibilities

Crown Prosecution Service (CPS):

2015 – No data

2016 – No data

2017 – No data

2018 – 1,359 out of 3,974 who responded stated they had caring responsibilities

2019 – 1,102 out of 3,720 who responded stated they had caring responsibilities

Michael Ellis
Paymaster General
23rd Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what recent progress he has made on the commencement of the public inquiry into the handling of the covid-19 outbreak.

On 12 May, the Prime Minister confirmed to this House that a public inquiry into COVID-19 would be established on a statutory basis, with full formal powers, and that it will begin its work in spring 2022.

Further details, including terms of reference, will be set out in due course.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
23rd Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what progress he has made on the commencement of the public inquiry into covid-19.

On 12 May, the Prime Minister confirmed to this House that a public inquiry into COVID-19 would be established on a statutory basis, with full formal powers, and that it will begin its work in spring 2022.

Further details, including terms of reference, will be set out in due course.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
24th Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the planned timescale is for the review on covid-19 vaccine passports.

As set out in the COVID-19 Response - Spring 2021, published on 22 February, the Government will review whether COVID-status certification could play a role in reopening our economy, reducing restrictions on social contact and improving safety. The Government will set out its conclusions ahead of Step 4 of the roadmap, which will happen no earlier than 21 June.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what advice his Department provides to other Departments on the threshold required to be met before a public inquiry can be convened; and if he will make a statement.

Section 1 of the Inquiries Act 2005 sets out the extent of ministers’ powers to establish an inquiry under that Act. Inquiries may also be established on a non-statutory basis, for which no legislative threshold applies.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
20th Jul 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, when the investigation into allegations of bullying by the Home Secretary (a) commenced and b) is planned to be published.

As the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster set out to the House on 2 March, the Government takes complaints relating to the Ministerial Code seriously. In line with the process set out in the Code, the Prime Minister asked the Cabinet Office to establish the facts. To protect the interests of all involved the Government does not comment on the specifics of such ongoing work.

The Prime Minister will make any decision on the matter public once the work has concluded, and the Independent Adviser publishes an Annual Report. I refer the Rt. Hon. member to the most recent report.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
20th Jul 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Prime MInister's oral contribution of 15 July 2020, Official Report, col. 1514, when he plans to announce who the chair will be of the independent inquiry on the Government's response to the covid-19 outbreak.

The Government has always been clear that there will be opportunities to look back, analyse and reflect on all aspects of COVID-19. As the Prime Minister has said, this will include an independent inquiry at the appropriate time. For now the Government is focused entirely on responding to the pandemic and saving lives. Further details will be set out in due course and announced in the usual way.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
20th Jul 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Prime Minister's oral contribution of 15 July 2020, Official Report, col. 1514, whether people who have lost friends and family as a result of the covid-19 outbreak will be able to participate in the independent inquiry on the Government's response to the disease.

The Government has always been clear that there will be opportunities to look back, analyse and reflect on all aspects of COVID-19. As the Prime Minister has said, this will include an independent inquiry at the appropriate time. For now the Government is focused entirely on responding to the pandemic and saving lives. Further details will be set out in due course and announced in the usual way.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
20th Jul 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Prime Minister's oral contribution of 15 July 2020, Official Report, col. 1514, whether the independent inquiry on the Government's response to the covid-19 outbreak will be held under the powers of the Inquiries Act 2005.

The Government has always been clear that there will be opportunities to look back, analyse and reflect on all aspects of COVID-19. As the Prime Minister has said, this will include an independent inquiry at the appropriate time. For now the Government is focused entirely on responding to the pandemic and saving lives. Further details will be set out in due course and announced in the usual way.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
20th Jul 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what discussions he has had with his Cabinet colleagues on holding s public inquiry on the UK's response to the covid-19 outbreak; and if he will make a statement.

The Government has always been clear that there will be opportunities to look back, analyse and reflect on all aspects of COVID-19. As the Prime Minister has said, this will include an independent inquiry at the appropriate time. For now the Government is focused entirely on responding to the pandemic and saving lives. Further details will be set out in due course and announced in the usual way.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
20th Jul 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether he plans to include economic impact in the next cross-departmental exercise on disaster management; and if he will make a statement.

As has been the case for some time, exercises are part of the UK approach to developing and validating resilience capabilities against a range of risks and impacts. It is a principle of the exercise programme that it achieves over time a balanced coverage of different risks and resilience capabilities, exercises the different phases of crisis and emergency management and recovery, and also reflects on lessons identified from previous crises to ensure they are learned for the future. Recovery management and associated considerations of economic impact will be included in the future exercising programme, and HM Treasury has been part of previous exercises.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
8th Jul 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many of his Department's redundant buildings have been converted into housing in each of the last five years; and what proportion of those conversions were made into affordable housing.

No energy from renewable sources has been produced from these buildings, but the Cabinet Office electricity provider is one of the UK’s leading renewable energy companies, owning 35 wind farms – including two offshore wind farms – and one of the largest operational battery storage units in Europe.

All Department’s buildings have a DEC Certificate - ranging from G to C ratings.

Energy for these buildings has not been purchased through a renewable energy tariff although there will be a significant proportion of renewable energy in the supply. All departments are mandated to purchase their energy via the CCS framework.

Information on carbon produced by all Government Departments is included in the Greening Government Commitment Annual Reports.

A number of projects carried out at each site have included energy efficiency elements such as the installation of new or upgraded boilers, BMS and lighting but these typically form part of wider lifecycle upgrade or refurbishment projects. Costs specifically related to the energy efficiency element are not recorded separately or held centrally in the form requested.

The Display Energy Certificate rating has improved in each of the last 5 years for 2 out of 5 buildings.

No buildings that we manage have been converted to housing.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
8th Jul 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many of his Department's buildings have had their Display Energy Certificate rating improve in each of the last five years.

No energy from renewable sources has been produced from these buildings, but the Cabinet Office electricity provider is one of the UK’s leading renewable energy companies, owning 35 wind farms – including two offshore wind farms – and one of the largest operational battery storage units in Europe.

All Department’s buildings have a DEC Certificate - ranging from G to C ratings.

Energy for these buildings has not been purchased through a renewable energy tariff although there will be a significant proportion of renewable energy in the supply. All departments are mandated to purchase their energy via the CCS framework.

Information on carbon produced by all Government Departments is included in the Greening Government Commitment Annual Reports.

A number of projects carried out at each site have included energy efficiency elements such as the installation of new or upgraded boilers, BMS and lighting but these typically form part of wider lifecycle upgrade or refurbishment projects. Costs specifically related to the energy efficiency element are not recorded separately or held centrally in the form requested.

The Display Energy Certificate rating has improved in each of the last 5 years for 2 out of 5 buildings.

No buildings that we manage have been converted to housing.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
8th Jul 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how much his Department has spent on energy conservation measures for its buildings in each of the last four years.

No energy from renewable sources has been produced from these buildings, but the Cabinet Office electricity provider is one of the UK’s leading renewable energy companies, owning 35 wind farms – including two offshore wind farms – and one of the largest operational battery storage units in Europe.

All Department’s buildings have a DEC Certificate - ranging from G to C ratings.

Energy for these buildings has not been purchased through a renewable energy tariff although there will be a significant proportion of renewable energy in the supply. All departments are mandated to purchase their energy via the CCS framework.

Information on carbon produced by all Government Departments is included in the Greening Government Commitment Annual Reports.

A number of projects carried out at each site have included energy efficiency elements such as the installation of new or upgraded boilers, BMS and lighting but these typically form part of wider lifecycle upgrade or refurbishment projects. Costs specifically related to the energy efficiency element are not recorded separately or held centrally in the form requested.

The Display Energy Certificate rating has improved in each of the last 5 years for 2 out of 5 buildings.

No buildings that we manage have been converted to housing.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
8th Jul 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how much carbon has been produced by his Department’s activities in each of the last five years.

No energy from renewable sources has been produced from these buildings, but the Cabinet Office electricity provider is one of the UK’s leading renewable energy companies, owning 35 wind farms – including two offshore wind farms – and one of the largest operational battery storage units in Europe.

All Department’s buildings have a DEC Certificate - ranging from G to C ratings.

Energy for these buildings has not been purchased through a renewable energy tariff although there will be a significant proportion of renewable energy in the supply. All departments are mandated to purchase their energy via the CCS framework.

Information on carbon produced by all Government Departments is included in the Greening Government Commitment Annual Reports.

A number of projects carried out at each site have included energy efficiency elements such as the installation of new or upgraded boilers, BMS and lighting but these typically form part of wider lifecycle upgrade or refurbishment projects. Costs specifically related to the energy efficiency element are not recorded separately or held centrally in the form requested.

The Display Energy Certificate rating has improved in each of the last 5 years for 2 out of 5 buildings.

No buildings that we manage have been converted to housing.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
8th Jul 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether all of his Department's buildings are purchasing energy through a renewable energy tariff.

No energy from renewable sources has been produced from these buildings, but the Cabinet Office electricity provider is one of the UK’s leading renewable energy companies, owning 35 wind farms – including two offshore wind farms – and one of the largest operational battery storage units in Europe.

All Department’s buildings have a DEC Certificate - ranging from G to C ratings.

Energy for these buildings has not been purchased through a renewable energy tariff although there will be a significant proportion of renewable energy in the supply. All departments are mandated to purchase their energy via the CCS framework.

Information on carbon produced by all Government Departments is included in the Greening Government Commitment Annual Reports.

A number of projects carried out at each site have included energy efficiency elements such as the installation of new or upgraded boilers, BMS and lighting but these typically form part of wider lifecycle upgrade or refurbishment projects. Costs specifically related to the energy efficiency element are not recorded separately or held centrally in the form requested.

The Display Energy Certificate rating has improved in each of the last 5 years for 2 out of 5 buildings.

No buildings that we manage have been converted to housing.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
8th Jul 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many of his Department's buildings have a Display Energy Certificate rating; and what that rating is for each of those buildings.

No energy from renewable sources has been produced from these buildings, but the Cabinet Office electricity provider is one of the UK’s leading renewable energy companies, owning 35 wind farms – including two offshore wind farms – and one of the largest operational battery storage units in Europe.

All Department’s buildings have a DEC Certificate - ranging from G to C ratings.

Energy for these buildings has not been purchased through a renewable energy tariff although there will be a significant proportion of renewable energy in the supply. All departments are mandated to purchase their energy via the CCS framework.

Information on carbon produced by all Government Departments is included in the Greening Government Commitment Annual Reports.

A number of projects carried out at each site have included energy efficiency elements such as the installation of new or upgraded boilers, BMS and lighting but these typically form part of wider lifecycle upgrade or refurbishment projects. Costs specifically related to the energy efficiency element are not recorded separately or held centrally in the form requested.

The Display Energy Certificate rating has improved in each of the last 5 years for 2 out of 5 buildings.

No buildings that we manage have been converted to housing.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
8th Jul 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how much energy from renewable energy sources has been produced from his departmental buildings in each of the last five years.

No energy from renewable sources has been produced from these buildings, but the Cabinet Office electricity provider is one of the UK’s leading renewable energy companies, owning 35 wind farms – including two offshore wind farms – and one of the largest operational battery storage units in Europe.

All Department’s buildings have a DEC Certificate - ranging from G to C ratings.

Energy for these buildings has not been purchased through a renewable energy tariff although there will be a significant proportion of renewable energy in the supply. All departments are mandated to purchase their energy via the CCS framework.

Information on carbon produced by all Government Departments is included in the Greening Government Commitment Annual Reports.

A number of projects carried out at each site have included energy efficiency elements such as the installation of new or upgraded boilers, BMS and lighting but these typically form part of wider lifecycle upgrade or refurbishment projects. Costs specifically related to the energy efficiency element are not recorded separately or held centrally in the form requested.

The Display Energy Certificate rating has improved in each of the last 5 years for 2 out of 5 buildings.

No buildings that we manage have been converted to housing.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
8th Jul 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many data breaches his Department has reported to the Information Commissioner in each of the last five years.

All Information Commissioner Office (ICO) recordable breaches are recorded by the department and published in the Cabinet Office annual report. In the last five years, a total of 7 breaches have been reported to the Information Commissioner's Office. There have been 11 reportable incidents in the last 10 years.

2019/20 there were two breaches reported to the ICO

2018/19 there were two breaches reported to the ICO

2017/18 there were three breaches reported to the ICO

2016/17 there were no breaches reported to the ICO

2015/16 there were no breaches reported to the ICO

2014/15 there was one breach reported to the ICO

2013/14 there were two breaches reported to the ICO

2012/13 there was one breach reported to the ICO

2011/12 there was one breach reported to the ICO

2010/11 there were no breaches reported to the ICO

None of the reported breaches resulted in follow-up ICO action.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
8th Jul 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will place a copy in the Library of his Department's guidance on the benefits available to staff in his Department who are carers.

Support for those staff who are carers is managed through the Carers Passport. I will place a copy in the Library to assist the Rt. Hon. Member, and more information can be found on gov.uk.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
7th Jul 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what comparative assessment he has made of the number of deaths as a result of covid-19 in care homes in (a) the UK and (b) Germany; and if he will make a statement.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have therefore asked the Authority to respond.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
7th Jul 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many (a) Permanent Secretaries and (b) Cabinet Secretaries have left their posts in each of the last 15 years.

Lord Turnbull served as Cabinet Secretary from 2002 to 2005, Lord O'Donnell from 2005 to 2011, Lord Heywood of Whitehall from 2011 to 2018, and Sir Mark Sedwill from 2018.

Over the last fifteen years various permanent secretaries have left their posts including to other roles; some held more than one role during this period.

In 2014 the Coalition Government agreed that all new Permanent Secretaries (SCS4-level appointments) would be made on the basis of a 5 year fixed tenure, and that there would be no automatic presumption in favour of renewal.

The table below relates only to substantive first and second permanent secretaries; it does not include Directors General assigned on a short-term basis to cover temporary vacancies. It therefore includes the permanent secretary of the Department of Energy and Climate Change who left during the time while the Member for Kingston and Surbiton was Secretary of State, but not an official who left having filled the role on a temporary basis. Members of the Diplomatic Service, other than the Permanent Secretary to FCO, are also not included.

2005

12

2011

10

2017

9

2006

6

2012

8

2018

3

2007

11

2013

6

2019

7

2008

7

2014

4

2020 (to June)

6

2009

4

2015

9

2010

8

2016

4

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
23rd Jun 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many civil servants (a) in each ethnic group and (b) of each gender have been employed by each Government Department in each of the last five years.

The data requested for 2015-2018 is published here: https://www.ons.gov.uk/employmentandlabourmarket/peopleinwork/publicsectorpersonnel/datasets/civilservicestatistics

The data for 2019 is published here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/civil-service-statistics-2019

Note in all cases the data depends on self-declaration and a significant proportion of civil servants will choose not to do so.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
23rd Jun 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many people have been recruited into the Civil Service in each Government Department in each of the last five years, by (a) ethnicity and (b) gender.

The data requested for 2015-2018 is published here: https://www.ons.gov.uk/employmentandlabourmarket/peopleinwork/publicsectorpersonnel/datasets/civilservicestatistics

The data for 2019 is published here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/civil-service-statistics-2019

Note in all cases the data depends on self-declaration and a significant proportion of civil servants will choose not to do so.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
23rd Jun 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many LGBTQ+ people were employed as civil servants in each Government Department in each of the last five years.

The data requested for 2015-2018 is published here: https://www.ons.gov.uk/employmentandlabourmarket/peopleinwork/publicsectorpersonnel/datasets/civilservicestatistics

The data for 2019 is published here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/civil-service-statistics-2019

Note in all cases the data depends on self-declaration and a significant proportion of civil servants will choose not to do so.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
23rd Jun 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many civil servants employed by each Department were disabled in each of the last five years.

The data requested for 2015-2018 is published here: https://www.ons.gov.uk/employmentandlabourmarket/peopleinwork/publicsectorpersonnel/datasets/civilservicestatistics

The data for 2019 is published here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/civil-service-statistics-2019

Note in all cases the data depends on self-declaration and a significant proportion of civil servants will choose not to do so.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
17th Jun 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many (a) solar panels and (b) wind turbines his Department's buildings (a) have in 2020 and (b) had in each of the last five years.

There are no solar panels or wind turbines on buildings occupied by the Cabinet Office, nor have there been in any of the last five years.

Energy suppliers to the Cabinet Office are actively seeking to decarbonise their supply chains. The Cabinet Office electricity provider is one of the UK’s leading renewable energy companies, owning 35 wind farms – including two offshore wind farms – and one of the largest operational battery storage units in Europe.

The Cabinet Office is also committed to achieving the Government’s net zero by 2050 target and is actively working with the Government Property Agency to increase the use of renewable energy, particularly in the place of gas appliances.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
16th Jun 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many civil servants in each Government Department have used the Civil Service's Carers Passport in each of the last five years.

The Civil Service Carer’s Passport was launched in June 2018. We do not currently collect information centrally about civil servants completing a carer’s passport but are already looking to capture this data better in future.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
15th Jun 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how much energy the Prime Minister's departmental buildings have used in (a) each of the last five years and (b) 2020 to date.

The information requested is published in the Cabinet Office Annual Report and Accounts, the latest edition of which is available here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/819251/CO-ARA-2018-19-Final.pdf

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
15th Jun 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how much energy his departmental buildings have used in (a) each of the last five years and (b) 2020 to date.

The information requested is published in the Cabinet Office Annual Report and Accounts, the latest edition of which is available here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/819251/CO-ARA-2018-19-Final.pdf

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
12th Jun 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the Energy Performance Certificate rating was in each official Ministerial residence, in (a) 2015, (b) 2016, (c) 2017, (d) 2018, (e) 2019 and (f) 2020.
9th Jun 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many staff in his Department had caring responsibilities in each of the last five years.

The information requested is not held centrally.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
9th Jun 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many staff in his Department had caring responsibilities in each of the last five years.

The information requested is not held centrally.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
9th Jun 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many staff in his Office had caring responsibilities in each of the last five years.

The information requested is not held centrally.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
24th Feb 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what Andrew Sabisky's (a) role, (b) title and (c) salary was during his employment as a special adviser.

Further to the answer given by my Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Minister at Prime Minister’s Questions on 26 February 2020 (Official Record, Vol.672, Col 313), and the answers given by the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and myself to Oral Questions and Topical Questions on 27 February 2020 (Official Record, Vol.672, Col 456-457, 461-466), Andrew Sabisky was hired as a contractor between 10 and 17 February, and not as a Special Adviser.

Contractors are subject to the principles of the Civil Service Code. Information about the numbers of contingent labour workers in the Cabinet Office, which also covers 10 Downing Street, is published annually.

Government contractors are paid for from departmental budgets. The Government does not normally comment on individual personnel matters such as pay, or recruitment processes. The Government also does not normally disclose the names of individual line managers.

It has been the practice of successive administrations that the Government does not disclose details of internal meetings. Classified information is made available only to those with appropriate security clearance and whose responsibilities require it.

It would be inappropriate to comment further on the vetting status, checks or contractual arrangements of any individual.



Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
24th Feb 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many advisers have been hired under the same arrangements as Andrew Sabisky.

Further to the answer given by my Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Minister at Prime Minister’s Questions on 26 February 2020 (Official Record, Vol.672, Col 313), and the answers given by the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and myself to Oral Questions and Topical Questions on 27 February 2020 (Official Record, Vol.672, Col 456-457, 461-466), Andrew Sabisky was hired as a contractor between 10 and 17 February, and not as a Special Adviser.

Contractors are subject to the principles of the Civil Service Code. Information about the numbers of contingent labour workers in the Cabinet Office, which also covers 10 Downing Street, is published annually.

Government contractors are paid for from departmental budgets. The Government does not normally comment on individual personnel matters such as pay, or recruitment processes. The Government also does not normally disclose the names of individual line managers.

It has been the practice of successive administrations that the Government does not disclose details of internal meetings. Classified information is made available only to those with appropriate security clearance and whose responsibilities require it.

It would be inappropriate to comment further on the vetting status, checks or contractual arrangements of any individual.



Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
15th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that people buying toys for children who are prone to sensory overload and sensitivity can easily identify which toys are most suitable for their needs.

The safety and labelling requirements of the UK Toys (Safety) Regulations 2011 require manufacturers to provide general information on issues such age appropriateness to help consumers identify which toys are most suitable for their particular needs as well as requiring information be provided on the safe use of the toy.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the International Energy Agency’s report entitled Net Zero by 2050: A Roadmap for the Global Energy Sector, published in May 2021, what steps his Department is taking to cease investment in new fossil fuel projects.

As of 31 March 2021, the UK Government no longer provides any new direct financial or promotional support for the fossil fuel energy sector overseas, other than in limited circumstances, and is aligning its support to enable clean energy exports. The UK Government does not subsidise fossil fuel projects domestically.

As we move towards net-zero, oil and gas will play a smaller role in meeting UK energy demand. However, it will continue to play an important role. The independent Climate Change Committee has recognised the ongoing demand for oil and natural gas, including it in all scenarios it proposed for how the UK meets its target for achieving net zero emissions by 2050.

Even with continued licensing, the UK is expected to remain a net importer of oil and gas in the coming decades. This is because UK Continental Shelf (UKCS) production is declining rapidly as the basin matures, and fields being brought online at this stage in the UKCS’ maturity are generally small in comparison to elsewhere in the world. An orderly transition, underpinned by oil and gas, is therefore crucial to maintaining our energy security of supply.

Our review into the future of offshore oil and gas licensing concluded that a formal climate compatibility checkpoint, building on current practice, should be established. This will help ensure that any future licences are only awarded on the basis that they are aligned with the government’s broad climate change ambitions, including the UK’s target of reaching net zero by 2050. This checkpoint will be designed by the end of 2021 and will allow for an orderly transition, underpinned by ongoing production of oil and gas as long as we still require it domestically, while the sector increasingly bears down on its production emissions, and pivots to support the energy transition.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the Corporate Governance Code’s comply or explain regime.

The Financial Reporting Council (FRC) is responsible for the UK Corporate Governance Code. The FRC reviews the quality of reporting annually. The most recent review was published in November 2020 (Review of Corporate Governance Reporting) and assessed reporting of a sample of 100 companies in the FTSE350. This was followed by the publication in February 2021 of a report “Improving the quality of ‘comply or explain’ reporting” which encouraged companies to offer better transparency when departing from Code Provisions, and set out the elements to be included within a good quality explanation.

The FRC also works with independent organisations to research specific areas of reporting. This year two reports have been issued, one on remuneration reporting (May 2021) undertaken by the University of Portsmouth and the second an assessment of workforce engagement (June 2021) undertaken by Royal Holloway, University of London and the Involvement and Participation Association.

All these reports demonstrate areas of innovation, good practice and improved transparency by companies following the Code.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the International Energy Agency’s report entitled Net Zero by 2050: A Roadmap for the Global Energy Sector, published in May 2021, what steps his Department plans to take to tackle the (a) social and (b) economic effects on people and communities of achieving the UK’s climate change targets.

People from all over the UK are already doing their bit on climate change, and, with the Together for our Planet campaign, we aim to celebrate this and inspire even more of our fellow citizens to join them. The Government is already supporting people to adapt to new lower carbon technologies with initiatives such as Go Ultra Low and the Simple Energy Advice service.

On economic effects, we are determined to seize the once-in-a-generation economic opportunities of the net zero transition by creating new business opportunities and supporting up to 2 million green jobs by 2030 across all regions of the UK. HM Treasury will publish in full its Net Zero Review this Spring, and has already published an interim report. The review will set out how the transition to a net zero economy will be funded, and where the costs will fall.

In order to ensure we have the skilled workforce to deliver net zero, we have launched the Green Jobs Taskforce, working in partnership with business, skills providers and unions, to help us develop plans for new long-term good quality, green jobs by 2030. The Government will make sure that our growing green economy is inclusive, benefitting people across the UK, supporting workers as industries transform and ensuring costs as well as the benefits are shared fairly, protecting consumers, workers and businesses.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
13th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to redirect biomass subsidies to solar and wind.

This Government has a long tradition of supporting clean electricity, and we have announced ambitious plans to support up to 12GW capacity of renewable electricity in the next allocation round of the Contracts for Difference (CfD) scheme, which would be double what was secured in the previous round.

The Government announced in March 2020 that onshore wind and solar projects will be able to bid for contracts in the next CfD allocation round, which is planned to open in December this year. The scheme has already awarded contracts to around 800MW of onshore wind and solar capacity combined.

We recently announced that coal-to-biomass conversions will be excluded from future CfD allocation rounds. This means there will be no new coal-to-biomass conversions under the scheme. We have no plans to remove support for biomass conversions prior to 2027 for generating stations that are already supported under the Renewables Obligation and CfD schemes.

In the Government’s response to the Climate Change Committee’s annual progress report to Parliament, we announced that we will publish a new Biomass Strategy in 2022. This strategy will review what amount of sustainable biomass could be available to the UK and how this resource could be best utilised across the economy to help eliminate the UK’s contribution to climate change by 2050.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential timescale for all UK internal flights to be able to be powered through (a) electric-battery, (b) hydrogen and (c) other such sustainable sources of energy; and if he will make a statement.

The Government has a wide range of programmes and challenges that can support research and technology on electric and hydrogen powered flight. These include the Aerospace Technology Institute (ATI) Programme (£1.95 billion public funding commitment, 2013 to 2026); Future Flight Challenge (£125 million public funding); Faraday Challenge (£246 million); and Driving the Electric Revolution Challenge (£80 million).

Our ATI progamme is supporting electric and hydrogen power flight projects, and our publicly funded FlyZero initiative, announced on 20 July, will bring together experts from across the aviation and aerospace sector to tackle issues in designing and building a commercially successful zero-emission aircraft.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
20th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department will work with interested parties in resuming the E-Fan X demonstrator project; and if he will make a statement.

We will make sure that the wider learning gathered during the E-FanX project, including important work with Cranfield University, is disseminated widely.

We continue to work with Rolls-Royce on the power generation system and ground testing, at Bristol, which was at the core of their element of the project. The learning at Rolls-Royce will be integrated into any future aircraft development requiring a hybrid-electric propulsion system. We are also working closely with Airbus and Rolls-Royce across a range of technologies including zero emissions aircraft.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
20th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what support his Department is allocating to the establishment of (a) electric and (b) hydrogen powered flight; and if he will make a statement.

The Government has a wide range of programmes and challenges that can support research and technology on electric and hydrogen powered flight. These include the Aerospace Technology Institute (ATI) Programme (£1.95 billion public funding commitment, 2013 to 2026); Future Flight Challenge (£125 million public funding); Faraday Challenge (£246 million); and Driving the Electric Revolution Challenge (£80 million).

Our ATI progamme is supporting electric and hydrogen power flight projects, and our publicly funded FlyZero initiative, announced on 20 July, will bring together experts from across the aviation and aerospace sector to tackle issues in designing and building a commercially successful zero-emission aircraft.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
8th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many of his Department's buildings have had their Display Energy Certificate rating improve in each of the last five years.

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy was formed in 2016. In each year since then the Display Energy Certificate rating for the Department’s headquarters building (1 Victoria Street, London) has improved, with the exception of 2018-19. The annual ratings are shown in the table below:

Year

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

2019/20

DEC rating

E – 117

E – 114

E – 115

E – 113

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
8th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the number of works of art in his Department's buildings that depict (a) former slave owners and (b) slave trade merchants; and if he will make a statement.

The artwork on display in the Department’s headquarters building at 1 Victoria Street, London, is supplied by the Government Art Collection. All works are Modern (post-1900) and contemporary pieces, and do not depict former slave owners or slave trade merchants.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
8th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many cyber-attacks have been conducted against his Department in each of the last five years; and how many of those attacks were successful.

Releasing details about cyber-attacks conducted against the Department may be detrimental to the Department’s security. On this basis, I am withholding the information requested as I deem that publication would not be in the public interest.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
8th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many settlement agreements were agreed between his Department and staff in each of the last five years; and how much was paid out in respect of such agreements.

The Department is interpreting the term “settlement agreement” to be an agreement that is reached and that is associated with a non-contractual payment, made in full settlement of a employee-related issue, that has arisen in the course of an employee’s employment with the Department.

The number of settlement agreements (cases) for each calendar year since the creation of the Department in July 2016 is as follows:

  • July 2016 – December 2016 – No cases;
  • January 2017 – December 2017 – No cases;
  • January 2018 – December 2018 – No cases;
  • January 2019 – December 2019 – No cases;
  • January 2020 to date – No cases.
Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
8th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many of his Department's (a) laptops, (b) memory sticks and (c) external hard drives have been lost in each of the last five years.

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy has lost laptops as follows:

Date

Number of Laptops Lost

2016 (from Mid-July)

N/A

2017

N/A

2018

15

2019

18

2020 (to end June)

6

Information about the loss of memory sticks and external hard drives is not held centrally and could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
8th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many data breaches his Department has reported to the Information Commissioner in each of the last five years.

The Department of Business Energy and Industrial Strategy was formed on 14 July 2016. Since that period, the Department has reported the following personal data breaches to the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) which met the ICO threshold for notification purposes:

2016 = 0

2017 = 0

2018 = 3

2019 = 1.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
8th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many of his Department's redundant buildings have been converted into housing in each of the last five years; and what proportion of those conversions were made into affordable housing .

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy has not disposed of any redundant buildings for conversion into housing since it was formed in July 2016.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
7th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will take steps to ensure that travel companies refund consumers in a more expedient manner; and if he will make a statement.

The Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) has issued guidance to explain to consumers and business the circumstances when refunds are due as a consequence of the disruption caused by the Covid-19 outbreak. The Government is clear that these refunds must be paid when asked for by the consumer.

The CMA has a programme of work to ensure refunds arising from the Covid-19 outbreak are paid. If the CMA finds evidence that companies are failing to comply with the law, the CMA will take appropriate enforcement action, which could include taking a firm to court if it does not address its concerns. The CMA has also set up a Covid-19 taskforce for consumers to register complaints, available through: https://www.coronavirus-business-complaint.service.gov.uk/.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
29th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the effect of Intu going into administration on job security in the retail sector; and if he will make a statement.

The Government recognises the impact that coronavirus is having on job security in the retail sector and we have put together a far-reaching package of support for businesses and for the economy.

We understand this will be a worrying time for Intu’s employees and their families and stand ready to support anyone affected in any way we can.

This is a commercial matter for the company and we hope the administrators will be able to secure as many jobs as possible.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
29th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions he has had with retail trade associations on the matter of Intu going into administration; and if he will make a statement.

We understand this will be a worrying time for Intu’s employees and their families and stand ready to support those who may be affected.

I hold regular calls with non-food retailers and business representative organisations where I have had the chance to speak to and hear directly from a wide range of organisations and businesses.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
29th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how much energy from renewable sources has been produced from his departmental buildings in each of the last five years.

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy was formed in 2016 and so the following table shows the energy generated from solar PV by the Department at its headquarters building (1 Victoria Street, London) for each of the last four financial years and the current financial year to the end of June.

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

2019/20

2020/21

Electricity - Solar PV (kWh)

1,377

1,894

2,106

2,406

975*


*Data for 2020/21 is for April – June inclusive.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
29th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether all of his departmental buildings are purchasing energy through a renewable energy tariff.

The Department purchases electricity through a renewable energy tariff for its London headquarters building (1 Victoria Street) and other London buildings containing departmental staff (151 Buckingham Palace Road, 10-18 Victoria Street, and Fleetbank House).

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
29th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how much carbon his Department’s activities have produced in each of the last five years.

The table below shows how much carbon the Department’s activities have produced in each of the last four reporting years since the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy was formed in 2016.

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

2019/20

Emissions tCO2e

2,529.24*

3,231.08

2,607.31

2,465.37

*Emissions for 2016/17 are based on energy consumed at the Department’s headquarters building (1 Victoria Street, London) and do not include emissions from other activities.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
29th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how much his Department has spent on energy conservation measures in his departmental buildings, in each of the last four years.

The Department is committed to reducing our carbon emissions and energy consumption wherever possible and in 2018 carried out an audit of its headquarters building (1 Victoria Street, London) to identify energy conservation measures.

The spend on energy conservation measures in 2019/20 was £1,817,037.48 which includes projects such as lighting upgrades to LEDs, installation of energy monitoring software, and replacement of building services plant.

Figures are not available for previous years as expenditure was captured against different headings.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
25th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions he has had with the Information Commissioner on pubs and restaurants being required to collect the names and addresses of customers after they reopen on 4 July 2020 as the covid-19 lockdown restrictions are eased.

The Department for Health and Social Care is responsible for the NHS Test and Trace programme. Following the announcement that some businesses will be asked to keep a temporary record of their customers and visitors, my Rt. Hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy hosted a meeting with representatives of the hospitality and hairdressing sector on 26 June. The Information Commissioner was involved in the discussions.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will list the dates of meetings he has held with pub and restaurant trade bodies to discuss their reopening on 4 July 2020.

The Government holds many meetings with companies, including representatives from the public house and restaurant trade bodies to discuss a wide range of business issues, including their reopening from 4 July 2020.

Details of meetings held by Ministers in the Department are recorded in our transparency data, which is published at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/beis-ministerial-gifts-hospitality-travel-and-meetings

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the ability of pubs and restaurants to collect, process and handle the data collection required of them as part of the plans for their reopening on 4 July 2020; and if he will make a statement.

The Department for Health and Social Care is responsible for the NHS Test and Trace programme. Following the announcement that some businesses will be asked to keep a temporary record of their customers and visitors, my Rt. Hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy hosted a meeting with representatives of the hospitality and hairdressing sector on 26 June. The Information Commissioner was involved in the discussions.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the effect of the covid-19 outbreak on medical research charities; and if he will make a statement.

Ministers in BEIS and officials have met regularly with the Association of Medical Research Charities and their members over the last months. The AMRC have shared information on the potential challenges as a result of Covid-19, in particular on the extent of cancer related research which they support in universities. We are aware of range of risks to the sustainability of universities research from potential loss of income from international students from other research funders, such as charities.

On 27th June, we announced a major package of support for universities to enable them to continue their research and innovation activities that are being impacted by Covid-19. From the Autumn, Government will provide a package consisting of low-interest loans with long pay-back periods, supplemented by a small amount of government grants, to cover up to 80% of a university’s income losses from international students for the academic year 20/21, up to the value of their non-publicly funded research activity. Universities will need to demonstrate how these funds are being utilised to sustain research in areas typically funded by charities and business.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
25th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the amount of nuclear waste transported from the UK to Russia in each of the last five years.

There have been no shipments or other transports of nuclear waste from the UK to Russia in the last five years.

The Government’s policy is to not allow the export of radioactive waste, except for treatment or processing, under the presumption it will be returned to the UK.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
25th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether it is Government policy to support the creation of the Future Circular Collider; and if he will make a statement.

As a member of CERN’s governing Council, the UK has agreed to the 2020 update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics, and to the commencement of a technical and financial feasibility study for a next-generation hadron collider.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
25th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the costs incurred to date of developing a UK satellite system similar to the European Galileo system; and if he will make a statement.

The purpose of any project engineering, design and development process is to research and understand what would best suit the UK’s requirements. We are taking the appropriate time to investigate the requirements, design specifications and costs as fully as possible.

The UK GNSS programme incurred costs of approximately £45.5m up to March 31st 2020.

For the period 1 April 2020 to 30 September 2020 the GNSS Programme is managing costs within its budget allocation of approximately £18.7m.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
25th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the Government's policy is on developing its own satellite system as a replacement for the Galileo system.

This Government has made clear its ambitions in space through a new ministerial level National Space Council and by developing a Space Strategy to bring long term strategic and commercial benefits for the UK. The Government recognises the contribution the space sector makes to our economy, national security, global influence and in helping the nation to tackle the COVID crisis.

The GNSS programme is currently in its Engineering Design and Development Phase to research and understand what would best suit the UK's requirements.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
17th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many (a) solar panels and (b) wind turbines his Department's buildings (a) have in 2020 and (b) had in each of the last five years.

At its headquarters building at 1 Victoria Street in London, the Department has 28 solar panels which each measure approximately 1.5m x 0.5m. The number of solar panels is the same for the last five years and for 2020. The Department does not currently have any wind turbines at its 1 Victoria Street headquarters building, or in the last five years.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
16th Jun 2020
What support his Department is providing to self-employed people to begin trading again after the covid-19 lockdown restrictions are eased.

I thank the Right Hon. Gentleman for raising this important issue. We have introduced an unprecedented package of support for the self-employed to get through this incredibly challenging period.

And our Self-Employment Income Support Scheme has been a success. As of 14 June, a total of 2.6 million claims have been made, worth £7.6 billion.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
16th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many (a) bed and breakfast, (b) hotel and (c) guest house owners have accessed the Retail, Hospitality and Leisure Grant Fund, by (i) region, (ii) local authority area and (ii) the value of that support.

Government is working closely with all local authorities to help them make payments to businesses in scope of the Retail, Hospitality and Leisure Grants Fund (RHLGF) as quickly and effectively as possible. As of 14 June, £10.36 billion has been paid out to over 844,000 business properties in scope of Small Business Grants Fund and Retail, Hospitality and Leisure Grants Fund. We do not hold data from local authorities broken down by sector. We have, however, published a full breakdown of grant funding allocated to and distributed by each local authority here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-grant-funding-local-authority-payments-to-small-and-medium-businesses.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
15th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will place in the Library a list of the workplace benefits that his Department provides to its staff with caring responsibilities.

The Department recognises the importance of supporting employees with caring responsibilities.

Our aim is to enable individuals to undertake their caring responsibilities while feeling engaged and productive in the work they do. In order to support this, the Department offers employees benefits and flexibilities. This includes flexible working arrangements, time off/leave, access to supportive programmes and networks, and Coronavirus specific Special Leave with pay. All requests for flexible working arrangements or non-statutory leave are considered in the context of business need.

We are responding to this question in relation to carers, as defined in our Carers Charter, as anyone who cares for a friend or family member who, due to illness, disability, a mental health problem, or an addiction, cannot cope without their support.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
15th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how much energy his departmental buildings have used in (a) each of the last five years and (b) 2020 to date.

This table shows the energy consumption of the Department at the 1 Victoria Street building for each of the last five financial years, and for 2020/21 to the end of May 2020.

Year (f/y)

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

2019/20

2020/21

Electricity (kWh)

5,276,261

5,120,293

5,120,995

4,935,780

4,765,755

484,023

Gas (kWh)

2,048,622

2,279,495

2,650,640

2,374,952

2,610,826

189,726

Electricity - Solar PV (kWh)

1,433

1,377

1,894

2,106

2,406

295*

* Does not include data for May 2020 as this is unavailable

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
9th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many staff in his Department had caring responsibilities in each of the last five years.

The table below shows the number of staff who responded positively to the question: ‘Do you look after or give help or support to any family members, friends, neighbours or others who have a long-term physical or mental illness or disability, or problems related to old age?’ in the Department’s annual People Survey from 2016 to 2019.

This is based on the number of people (rounded to the nearest 10) responding to the question and may not fully represent the number of carers in the Department.

Caring responsibilities may have changed as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic. The Department’s staff are being encouraged to reflect this in an amended or new Carer’s Passport.

Year

Number

2016

420

2017

430

2018

600

2019

720

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
6th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of using low-order underwater unexploded ordnance disposal technology in preparation for construction of offshore wind farms.

The Department does not assess or licence the clearance of unexploded ordnance for offshore windfarms. Licenses for the removal of unexploded ordnance are issued by the Marine Management Organisation which sits in Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra). As part of their licensing process they assess environmental and other issues related to the proposed clearance.

As part of the Offshore Wind Sector Deal, published on 7 March 2019, the department and Defra are working closely with the sector and wider stakeholders to address strategic deployment issues associated with offshore wind.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
6th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make an assessment of the (a) economic and (b) environmental effect of using low order underwater unexploded ordnance disposal technology to clear the seabed in preparation for construction of offshore wind farms.

The Department does not assess or licence the clearance of unexploded ordnance for offshore windfarms. Licenses for the removal of unexploded ordnance are issued by the Marine Management Organisation which sits in Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra). As part of their licensing process they assess environmental and other issues related to the proposed clearance.

As part of the Offshore Wind Sector Deal, published on 7 March 2019, the department and Defra are working closely with the sector and wider stakeholders to address strategic deployment issues associated with offshore wind.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what discussions he has had with (a) UK Sport and (b) British Gymnastics on recent allegations of physical and mental abuse of gymnasts; and if he will make a statement.

I wrote to British Gymnastics on 9th July, expressing my concerns at the emerging allegations of abuse.

It is vital that everyone participating in sport feels safe and secure and that where allegations of inappropriate or harmful behaviour are made, these are taken seriously. There is no place for abuse of any kind in sport and anyone responsible for such behaviour must be held accountable.

I therefore welcome the launch, on 25th August, of the Whyte Review which will look into allegations of mistreatment within the sport of gymnastics.

My department will follow the Whyte Review and its findings closely and will continue to work with Sport England, UK Sport and the Child Protection in Sport Unit to strengthen safeguarding provision.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps his Department is taking to work with the football authorities to help tackle racist abuse of players (a) in person and (b) online; and if he will make a statement.

Racism or any form of discrimination has no place in football or society, whether in person or online.

The Government continues to liaise closely with all the football authorities about their work to tackle discrimination. This includes actions targeted at and around football grounds, such as improving reporting systems, providing better training and support for referees and stewards, and improving the quality of CCTV around stadia.

What is unacceptable offline is also unacceptable online. As set out in the Online Harms White Paper, we intend to establish in law a new duty of care on companies towards their users which will be overseen by an independent regulator. The ‘duty of care’ will ensure companies take risk-based and proportionate steps to keep their users safe from harms including harassment and abuse.

The criminal law must be fit for purpose to deal with online harms. DCMS and the Ministry of Justice have engaged the Law Commission on a second phase of their review of abusive and offensive online communications. The Law Commission will review existing communications offences and make specific recommendations about options for reform, to ensure that criminal law provides consistent and effective protection against such behaviour. The Law Commission is also looking into the adequacy of protection offered by hate crime legislation, and this review is expected to report in 2021.

We will continue to work with all the football authorities to tackle discrimination in the game.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what estimate he has made of the loss of income to freelance photographers as a result of the covid-19 outbreak.

On 5 July, the Government announced a major £1.57 billion support package for key cultural organisations to help them through the coronavirus pandemic. Guidance has been published by Arts Council England, the British Film Institute, Historic England and the National Lottery Heritage Fund for applicants to the Culture Recovery Grants application rounds, and by Arts Council England for applicants to the Repayable Finance Scheme. Further details on eligibility and application processes are available in the published guidance.

This funding will provide targeted support to organisations across a range of sectors, with one of our core objectives being to support the cultural organisations that are crucial to places across the whole country. We will ensure that funding is distributed fairly, and that smaller organisations and cultural venues that are at the centre of their communities are protected.

We also recognise the crucial role that individuals play in making our arts and creative industries world-leading. As a result of these grants and loans, organisations will be more able to resume cultural activity, albeit in a socially distanced way, which will increase employment opportunities for freelancers.

20th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what discussions he has had with the BBC Director-General on protecting the future of (a) BBC Cymru Wales and (b) S4C.

The Government is committed to ensuring a strong and sustainable broadcasting system in all parts of the UK. Ministers meet regularly with the BBC and S4C to discuss a range of issues. The BBC and S4C are operationally and editorially independent of government. The future of BBC Cymru Wales is a matter for the BBC.

Both the BBC and S4C are regulated by Ofcom.

10th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps he will take to safeguard the welfare of gymnasts receiving UK Sport funding; and if he will make a statement.

It is vital that everyone participating in sport feels safe and secure and that where allegations of inappropriate or harmful behaviour are made, these are taken seriously. There is no place for abuse of any kind in sport and anyone responsible for such behaviour must be held accountable.

I wrote to British Gymnastics on 9th July, expressing my concerns at the emerging allegations of abuse. I welcome their decision to step aside from the review they had initially announced, and to allow UK Sport and Sport England to co-commission a fully independent review.

All organisations in receipt of public funding from Sport England and UK Sport have been required to meet the standards set out in the Code for Sports Governance since April 2017. The Code contains specific obligations around safeguarding, including a requirement for national governing bodies to adhere to the Standards for Safeguarding and Protecting Children in Sport, which are issued by the Child Protection in Sport Unit.

My department will follow the independent review and its findings closely and will continue to work with Sport England, UK Sport and the Child Protection in Sport Unit to strengthen safeguarding provision wherever possible.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
10th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many data breaches his Department has reported to the Information Commissioner in each of the last five years.

Data Protection legislation introduced on 25 May 2018 makes it clear that organisations need to report personal data breaches to the Information Commissioner’s Office where there is a high risk to people’s rights and freedoms following the breach.

The number of departmental data breaches that have been reported to the Information Commissioner during the last five years are as follows:

1 January 2015 to 31 December 2016: 1 case

1 January 2017 to 31 December 2017: 2 cases

1 January 2018 to 31 December 2018: 2 cases

1 January 2019 to 31 December 2019: 1 case

1 January 2020: 0 cases to date

29th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many meetings he has held with representatives of (a) the pub trade, (b) gym owners and (c) leisure centres in each of the last six months.

The SOS and I have regular discussions with sector and industry bodies to understand the full impact of COVID-19 on all areas across the Department's remit.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
29th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the effect of the covid-19 outbreak on tourism in London; and if he will make a statement.

We recognise the COVID-19 crisis has significantly impacted the coastal tourism industry. DCMS, DEFRA, MHCLG and VisitEngland remain in regular contact with tourism stakeholders and Destination Management Organisations (DMOs) in coastal regions to closely monitor the situation and to assess the economic effects.

The Chancellor has announced a host of measures to support businesses and individuals through the crisis, including those in the tourism sector. This includes the recently extended Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme and the Bounce Back Loans scheme.

Through VisitEngland, we announced a £1.3 million scheme to provide financial support to DMOs at risk of closure due to COVID-19. The DMO Resilience Fund has supported a number of coastal DMOs around the country, as well as the National Coastal Tourism Academy, enabling them to continue their vital business support work.

From 4 July, people will be allowed to enjoy holidays at the coast in England. To help coastal tourism businesses prepare, we have published reopening guidance on Gov.uk for the visitor economy as well as hotels and other guest accommodation.

We set up the Cultural Renewal Taskforce to help our sectors’ businesses prepare to reopen when it is safe to do so. Within this taskforce, I meet regularly with stakeholders through the Visitor Economy Working Group. We will continue to engage with the industry to assess how we can most effectively support the coastal tourism’s recovery.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
29th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the effect of the covid-19 outbreak on the tourist industry in coastal areas; and if he will make a statement.

We recognise the COVID-19 crisis has significantly impacted the coastal tourism industry. DCMS, DEFRA, MHCLG and VisitEngland remain in regular contact with tourism stakeholders and Destination Management Organisations (DMOs) in coastal regions to closely monitor the situation and to assess the economic effects.

The Chancellor has announced a host of measures to support businesses and individuals through the crisis, including those in the tourism sector. This includes the recently extended Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme and the Bounce Back Loans scheme.

Through VisitEngland, we announced a £1.3 million scheme to provide financial support to DMOs at risk of closure due to COVID-19. The DMO Resilience Fund has supported a number of coastal DMOs around the country, as well as the National Coastal Tourism Academy, enabling them to continue their vital business support work.

From 4 July, people will be allowed to enjoy holidays at the coast in England. To help coastal tourism businesses prepare, we have published reopening guidance on Gov.uk for the visitor economy as well as hotels and other guest accommodation.

We set up the Cultural Renewal Taskforce to help our sectors’ businesses prepare to reopen when it is safe to do so. Within this taskforce, I meet regularly with stakeholders through the Visitor Economy Working Group. We will continue to engage with the industry to assess how we can most effectively support the coastal tourism’s recovery.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
23rd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the effect of the covid-19 outbreak on the coastal tourism industry; and if he will make a statement.

We recognise the COVID-19 crisis has significantly impacted the coastal tourism industry. DCMS, DEFRA, MHCLG and VisitEngland remain in regular contact with tourism stakeholders and Destination Management Organisations (DMOs) in coastal regions to closely monitor the situation and to assess the economic effects.

The Chancellor has announced a host of measures to support businesses and individuals through the crisis, including those in the tourism sector. This includes the recently extended Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme and the Bounce Back Loans scheme.

Through VisitEngland, we announced a £1.3 million scheme to provide financial support to DMOs at risk of closure due to COVID-19. The DMO Resilience Fund has supported a number of coastal DMOs around the country, as well as the National Coastal Tourism Academy, enabling them to continue their vital business support work.

From 4 July, people will be allowed to enjoy holidays at the coast in England. To help coastal tourism businesses prepare, we have published reopening guidance on Gov.uk for the visitor economy as well as hotels and other guest accommodation.

We set up the Cultural Renewal Taskforce to help our sectors’ businesses prepare to reopen when it is safe to do so. Within this taskforce, I meet regularly with stakeholders through the Visitor Economy Working Group. We will continue to engage with the industry to assess how we can most effectively support the coastal tourism’s recovery.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
23rd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the effect of covid-19 on the Cornish tourism industry; and if he will make a statement.

We recognise the COVID-19 crisis has significantly impacted tourism across the UK, including in Cornwall. Both DCMS and VisitEngland remain in regular contact with tourism stakeholders and Destination Management Organisations (DMOs) in the South West - including the South West Tourism Alliance and Visit Cornwall - to closely monitor the situation and to assess the economic effects.

The Chancellor has announced a host of measures to support businesses and individuals through the crisis, including those in the tourism sector. This includes the recently extended Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme and the Bounce Back Loans scheme.

Through VisitEngland, we announced a £1.3 million scheme to provide financial support to DMOs at risk of closure due to COVID-19. The DMO Resilience Fund has supported a number of DMOs in the South West, including £22,400 support for VisitCornwall, enabling them to continue their vital business support work.

From 4 July, people will be allowed to enjoy holidays in England. To help tourism businesses prepare, we have published reopening guidance on Gov.uk for the visitor economy as well as hotels and other guest accommodation.


We set up the Cultural Renewal Taskforce to help our sectors’ businesses prepare to reopen when it is safe to do so. Within this taskforce, I meet regularly with stakeholders through the Visitor Economy Working Group. We will continue to engage with stakeholders to assess how we can most effectively support tourism’s recovery across the UK.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
23rd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the effect of the covid-19 outbreak on tourism to London; and if he will make a statement.

We recognise the COVID-19 crisis has significantly impacted tourism across the UK, including in London. Both DCMS and VisitEngland remain in regular contact with tourism stakeholders and Destination Management Organisations (DMOs) to closely monitor the situation and to assess the economic effects in all regions of the UK. We also appreciate the importance of inbound tourism to London; we recognise that the current travel restrictions present difficulties for the sector.

In addition, the Government and the Mayor of London recently established the London Transition Board to discuss how the capital is responding to COVID-related challenges.

The Chancellor has announced a host of measures to support businesses and individuals through the crisis, including those in the tourism sector. This includes the recently extended Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme and the Bounce Back Loans scheme.

Through VisitEngland, we announced a £1.3 million scheme to provide financial support to DMOs at risk of closure due to COVID-19. The DMO Resilience Fund has supported a number of DMOs in the South East, including Visit Greenwich, enabling them to continue their vital business support work.

From 4 July, people will be allowed to enjoy holidays in England. To help tourism businesses in the capital prepare, we have published reopening guidance on Gov.uk for the visitor economy as well as hotels and other guest accommodation. We will continue to engage with stakeholders to assess how we can most effectively support tourism’s recovery across the UK.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
17th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many (a) solar panels and (b) wind turbines his Department's buildings (a) have in 2020 and (b) had in each of the last five years.

The Department’s energy is supplied by HMRC, from whom DCMS leases office space. The department has no buildings of its own.

16th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made on the effect of the covid-19 outbreak on orchestras; and if he will make a statement.

In order to support the sustainability of the Arts sector, including classical orchestras, DCMS has worked closely with Arts Council England (ACE) to provide a tailored package of financial support. In March, ACE announced a £160m emergency response package to complement the financial measures already announced by the Government and to ensure immediate resilience of this vital sector. In addition, ministers have continued to engage with leading members of the orchestral sector on specific guidance to enable orchestras to resume live performances as soon as possible, and how to safely resume activity within current regulations.

This package includes £140 million of support for artistic organisations including orchestras; and £20 million of financial support for individuals, including self-employed classical musicians, so they can better sustain themselves, and their work, in the coming months. More than 9000 individuals and organisations have been successful in applying for this emergency funding.

Furthermore, self-employed classical musicians are among the millions of people (including freelancers) who can now benefit from the Self-Employed Income Support Scheme, which will provide those eligible with cash grants worth up to £2,500 per month. We expect that the Self-Employed Income Support scheme will cover 95% of people who receive the majority of their income from self-employment.

16th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the effect of the covid-19 outbreak on tourism in each of the English regions; and if he will make a statement.

We recognise the COVID-19 crisis has significantly impacted tourism across England. Both DCMS and VisitEngland remain in regular contact with tourism stakeholders and Destination Management Organisations (DMOs) around the country to closely monitor the situation and to assess the economic effects.

The Chancellor has announced a host of measures to support businesses and individuals through the crisis, including those in the tourism sector. This includes the recently extended Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme and the Bounce Back Loans scheme.

Through VisitEngland, we announced a £1.3 million scheme to provide financial support to DMOs at risk of closure due to COVID-19. This allowed DMOs to continue their vital business support work, providing advice and guidance for tourism businesses across England.

My Department has established a Cultural Renewal Taskforce to help our sectors’ prepare to safely reopen. Within this taskforce, I chair a specific Visitor Economy Working Group which is developing guidance to help tourism businesses to safely reopen.

We will continue to engage with stakeholders to assess how we can most effectively support the tourism sector’s recovery from Covid-19. As soon as it is safe to do so, we will encourage people to book trips and support domestic tourism.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
16th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the effect of the covid-19 outbreak on bed and breakfast owners; and if he will make a statement.

We are aware that these are extremely difficult conditions for tourism businesses such as bed and breakfasts. My officials and I continue to hold detailed discussions with representatives of the holiday accommodation industry, including the Bed and Breakfast Association, to gather as much intelligence as possible on COVID-19’s economic impacts.

The UK Government has announced a comprehensive support package to protect businesses and workers, including B&B owners, against the current economic emergency. This includes the Self-Employed Income Support Scheme and the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme. We have also introduced a Bounce Back Loan scheme to help small businesses access loans of up to £50,000, with a 100% government-backed guarantee for lenders.

To accommodate certain small businesses previously outside the scope of the business grant funds schemes, the Government has allocated additional funding to Local Authorities in England in the form of a discretionary grant fund of up to £617m. The guidance pertaining to this fund specifically refers to Bed and Breakfasts that pay council tax as being in scope.

We are committed to helping tourism businesses through this crisis – and we will actively encourage people to book holidays as soon as it is safe to do so.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
15th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how much energy his departmental buildings have used in (a) each of the last five years and (b) 2020 to date.

The Department’s energy is supplied by HMRC, from whom DCMS leases office space. DCMS has no buildings of its own. As such we have no direct contact or relationship with any energy suppliers.

15th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if he will place in the Library a list of the workplace benefits that his Department provides to its staff with caring responsibilities.

DCMS recognises the importance of providing a supportive workplace for employees who have caring responsibilities. Our aim is to enable individuals to undertake their caring responsibilities while at the same time feeling engaged and valued in the workplace.

DCMS has adopted the Civil Service wide Carers' Charter and has the following workplace policies to support carers.

  • Flexible working and job sharing - to support employees’ work-life balance particularly those with caring responsibilities.

  • Special leave - policy sets out the provision and entitlements to paid special leave and unpaid career breaks to support employees.

  • Parental Leave - Parental leave available to working parents to look after their child or to make arrangements for the child’s welfare.

  • Carer’s Passport- which is a Charity for Civil Servants initiative to help civil servants with specific caring responsibilities.

  • Internal Carer’s Network - support for carers in the department enabling them to meet other carers and to share issues and information.

  • Employee Assistance programme - access to advice and counselling.

  • Foster Carers’ & Family and Friends Carers’ Leave - policy to support employees who care for children under a fostering or family and friends care arrangement.

9th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many staff in his Department had caring responsibilities in each of the last five years.

Each year DCMS participates in the Civil Service-wide People Survey, which includes the question ‘‘Do you look after or give help or support to any family members, friends, neighbours or others who have a long-term physical or mental illness or disability, or problems related to old age?”

The number of people responding positively to this question in each of the last 5 years is in the table below alongside the total respondents and the response rate.

The total respondents is the number of people in DCMS who completed the People Survey each year. The response rate is the total number of respondents in DCMS as a percentage of the DCMS workforce.

This information is not a workforce statistic, so only representative of those who completed the survey each year but is the best information available.

Year

Positive responses

Total respondents

Response rate

2015

80

509

96%

2016

84

652

98%

2017

109

788

98%

2018

Not available

1,037

91%

2019

170

1,161

97%

The number of positive responses in 2018 is not available as the granular data was not analysed by the Central Analysis Team who produced the information for the other years.

9th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many statues of former slave owners have been removed by local authorities in each of the last five years.

This information is not held by my Department.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
9th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what guidance his Department has issued to (a) universities and (b) colleges on the display of statues of former slave trade owners; and if he will make a statement.

No such guidance has been issued.

Historic England, as the Government’s adviser on the historic environment have set out their position on contested heritage. This highlights how removing difficult and contentious parts of the historic environment can risk harming our understanding of our collective past. Historic England recommends the use of clear, long-lasting and innovative reinterpretation to reflect historical objects’ changed context and contemporary understanding of them.

They and other heritage funding bodies invest significantly in improving public access to historical objects, providing contemporary interpretation of them and supporting diverse heritage projects around the country.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
12th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to improve the quality of digital education for elderly people in the UK during the covid-19 outbreak.

For adults (19+) with low-level or no digital skills, we have introduced a legal entitlement to study new Essential Digital Skills qualifications (EDSQs) at entry level and level 1 for free. EDSQs are a new qualification type, based on new national standards for essential digital skills, which will provide adults with the digital skills needed for life and work. The new digital entitlement mirrors the existing legal entitlements for English and maths and sets digital skills on an equal footing in the adult education system to English and maths, as a third basic skill.

The government is committed to making essential digital skills provision more accessible and flexible by building on the innovation in online learning implemented during the COVID-19 outbreak, ensuring that all adults can gain essential digital skills at a time and place that suits them.

We also continue to support the provision of basic digital skills training in community learning settings through the Adult Education Budget. This provision has strong participation from older learners.

The Skills Toolkit was created in response to the COVID-19 outbreak, primarily to help give workers who had been furloughed or were at risk of redundancy an opportunity to retrain. However, the courses are accessible to all and include free, high quality digital and numeracy courses.

Courses on offer cover a range of levels, from everyday maths and tools for using email and social media more effectively at work, to basic digital skills offered by Lloyds Bank, the Open University and Microsoft.

As of 30 May 2021, there have been an estimated 219,000 course registrations via The Skills Toolkit.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
30th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate his Department has made of the number of days of in-person learning that has been lost to pupils since schools reopened in March 2021 as covid-19 restrictions were eased.

The Department for Education publishes weekly attendance figures in the ‘Attendance in education and early years settings during the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak’ publication, including the number of children who were off school or self-isolating due to: a confirmed case of COVID-19, a suspected case of COVID-19, self-isolating due to potential contact with a case inside the school setting, self-isolating due to potential contact with a case outside the school setting, or their school being closed due to COVID related reasons.

The publication is available here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/attendance-in-education-and-early-years-settings-during-the-coronavirus-covid-19-outbreak.

Table 1B, which is an accompanying file available to download, has daily attendance figures which cover the period requested (March 2021-present).

30th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the effect on pupils attainment of the number of in-person learning days that have been lost to pupils since schools reopened in March 2021 as covid-19 restrictions were eased.

Understanding the impact of COVID-19 disruption on the attainment and progress of all pupils is a key research priority for the Government. The Department has commissioned Renaissance Learning to provide a baseline assessment of missed learning for pupils in schools in England and to monitor progress over the course of the year. The latest interim findings from this research were published on GOV.UK on 4 June 2021: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/pupils-progress-in-the-2020-to-2021-academic-year-interim-report.

Primary pupils were on average around 2 to 3.5 months behind expectations in March 2021 - similar to the amount pupils were behind expectations by when they returned to school in September 2020. The Department will be using the research to monitor progress for the rest of this year to further understand the continued impact of the COVID-19 outbreak on lost education and education recovery. The next phase of analysis will allow us to assess the impact of any disruption to education since schools reopened to all pupils in March 2021. The full report will be published once the study is completed in October 2021.

23rd Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the More Than A Score report, Drop the SATs for Good, published in 2021, whether he plans to implement any of the recommendations of that report.

Assessment is a crucial part of a child’s schooling and fundamental in a high performing education system. Statutory assessments at primary school are an essential part of ensuring that all pupils master the basics of reading, writing and Mathematics to prepare them for secondary school. Assessment data also enables parents, schools, and the Department to understand the impact of lost time in education and recovery initiatives. As such, the Department has no plans to cancel the statutory implementation of the Reception Baseline Assessment in September 2021, and the Department continues to plan for a return to a full programme of primary assessments in the 2021/22 academic year.

In 2017, the Government carried out a consultation into primary assessment in England. The consultation received over 4,000 responses from a diverse range of backgrounds and specialisms, providing a broad and informed range of views that informed policy on the current primary assessment system. In addition, the Department engages with relevant stakeholders on a regular basis to understand their views on primary assessment.

17th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of how students on practical university degree courses will be offered extra support before entering the job market to make up for lost teaching time during the covid-19 lockdown.

Education has always been a priority for this government, and we were committed to getting all students back into university as soon as the public health situation allowed. We prioritised the return of students on practical and practice-based courses because we realised the importance of them being able to return to their studies in person.

The higher education (HE) regulator in England, the Office for Students (OfS), has made it clear that all HE providers must continue to comply with registration conditions relating to quality and standards. This means ensuring that courses provide a high-quality academic experience, students are supported and achieve good outcomes, and standards are protected, regardless of whether a provider is delivering its courses through in person teaching, remote online learning, or a combination of both.

We have worked across the sector to understand what more we can do to support graduates who are looking to enter the labour market at this challenging time. We have worked closely with the Quality Assurance Agency, professional bodies and the OfS. Our message to employers and students is that standards have been maintained and that the qualifications awarded will be of the same academic standard as in previous years.

To provide additional support, we have also developed the graduate employment and skills guide, published on 10 May 2021 on the OfS website here: https://www.officeforstudents.org.uk/employment-and-skills/. The guide signposts graduates to public, private and voluntary sector opportunities, to help them build employability skills, gain work experience or enter the labour market, as well as providing links to further study options and resources on graduate mental health and wellbeing. To encourage graduates to take advantage of the support and resources available, we have worked with Universities UK to develop a sector statement of support and with HE providers to produce a collection of graduate employability case studies.

As part of the government’s skills recovery package ‘Plan for Jobs’, we are also investing an additional £32 million in the National Careers Service up to March 2022. This investment will support delivery of individual careers advice for over 500,000 people whose jobs or learning have been affected by the COVID-19 outbreak by the end of the 2021/22 financial year, representing an increase of 22%. The Service has introduced a range of new initiatives to continue to support all customers, working with a wide range of partners to offer careers guidance activities designed to support employers, furloughed workers, graduates, students, those who have recently lost their jobs and anyone whose career path has been impacted by the COVID-19 outbreak.

On 29 September 2020, we added additional courses to The Skills Toolkit covering digital, numeracy and employability skills. The new content includes a range of courses to develop ‘work readiness’ skills that employers report they value in their new recruits.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
17th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what guidance his Department has issued to universities on the provision of mental health support to students.

Student mental health and suicide prevention are key priorities for this government. We continue to work closely with the higher education (HE) sector to promote good practice. Universities are not only experts in their student population, but also best placed to identify the needs of their particular student body.

The Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) has overall policy responsibility for young people’s mental health. We continue to work closely with them to take steps to develop mental health and wellbeing support.

On 27 March 2021, DHSC published the ‘COVID-19 mental health and wellbeing recovery action plan’: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-mental-health-and-wellbeing-recovery-action-plan. It is backed by £500 million of funding, and its aims are to address waiting times for mental health services, to give more people the mental health support they need and to invest in the NHS workforce. £13 million will be used to accelerate progress to support young adults aged 18 to 25. This group includes university students and those not in education or training, who have reported worst mental health outcomes during the COVID-19 outbreak, and who sometimes currently fall between the gaps between children’s and adult services.

While it is for HE providers to determine what welfare and counselling services they need to provide to their students to offer that support, the government is proactive in promoting good practice in this area. We continue to work closely with Universities UK on embedding the Stepchange programme within the sector: https://www.universitiesuk.ac.uk/stepchange.

Stepchange calls on HE leaders to adopt mental health as a strategic priority and to take a whole-institution approach, embedding it across all policies, cultures, curricula and practice. The Stepchange programme relaunched in March 2020 as the Mentally Healthy Universities programme. The University Mental Health Charter, announced in June 2018, is backed by the government and led by the HE sector: https://www.studentminds.org.uk/charter.html. The charter, developed in collaboration with students, staff and partner organisations, aims to drive up standards of practice, including leadership, early intervention and data collection.

Since the beginning of the COVID-19 outbreak, I have stressed the importance of protecting student and staff wellbeing. We recognise that many students are facing additional mental health challenges due to the disruption and uncertainty caused by the outbreak. I have engaged with universities on this issue and have written to Vice Chancellors on numerous occasions during the past year, most recently last month, outlining that student welfare should remain a priority. I have also convened a working group of representatives from the HE and health sectors to specifically address the current and pressing issues that students are facing during the COVID-19 outbreak.

My hon. Friend, the Minister for Children and Families and I have also convened a Mental Health in Education Action Group to drive action to mitigate the impact of the outbreak on the mental health and wellbeing of children, young people and staff in nurseries, schools, colleges and universities.

We expect HE providers to continue to support their students, which has included making services accessible from a distance whilst restrictions have been in place. We encourage students to stay in touch with the welfare teams at their HE provider, as these services are likely to continue to be an important source of support. Many providers have bolstered their existing mental health services, and adapted delivery mechanisms including reaching out to students who may be more vulnerable. Staff at universities and colleges have been proactive in supporting their students, showing resourcefulness and there are many examples of good practice.

We have worked with the Office for Students (OfS) to provide Student Space, a dedicated mental health and wellbeing platform for students. Student Space has been funded by up to £3 million from the OfS in the 2020/21 academic year. We have also asked the OfS to allocate £15 million towards student mental health in 2021/22 through proposed reforms to Strategic Priorities grant funding to help address the challenges to student mental health posed by the transition to university, given the increasing demand for mental health services. This will target those students in greatest need of such services, including vulnerable groups and hard to reach students.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
10th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of the Institute for Fiscal Studies report entitled, Will universities need a bailout to survive the COVID-19 crisis, published 6 July 2020; and if he will make a statement.

The government recognises that the COVID-19 outbreak has brought significant financial challenges to the higher education (HE) sector, with losses of income across teaching, research, commercial and other activities, as published in the Institute for Fiscal Studies report on 6 July 2020. The government has already provided significant support to help providers through the financial challenges that COVID-19 has brought upon the sector. The HE package that we announced on 4 May, with its reprofiling of public funding and measures on admissions, has acted to stabilise the situation in England.

In June, we announced further UK-wide support in the form of the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy’s research stabilisation package. Alongside this, eligible HE providers can apply for the range of business support measures that the government has put in place to support our whole economy.

We recognise, however, that a high level of uncertainty remains around the scale of problems that HE providers, as a whole and individually, may face in the coming academic year. We need to be able to intervene, where there is a case to do so, to support providers whose future is at risk because of the financial impacts of COVID-19.

My right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education, announced further information about the higher education restructuring regime on 16 July. This will be deployed as a last resort, if a decision has been made to support a provider in England, when other steps to preserve a provider’s viability and to mitigate the risks of market exit have not proved sufficient. The overarching objectives that will guide the department’s assessment of cases will be protecting the welfare of current students, preserving the sector’s internationally outstanding science base and supporting the role that higher education providers play in regional and local economies through the provision of high quality courses aligned with economic and societal needs.

Financial support in the form of repayable loans will only be offered as a last resort measure, and with specific conditions, such as tackling low quality courses and reducing excessive Vice-Chancellor pay.

Details on the higher education restructuring regime can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/higher-education-restructuring-regime.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
10th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many data breaches his Department has reported to the Information Commissioner in each of the last five years.

The table below shows the number of data breaches that the Department reported to the Information Commissioner in the last 5 years.

Report year (April to March)

Number of data breaches reported to the Information Commissioner

2015/2016

1

2016/2017

1

2017/2018

2

2018/2019

2

2019/2020

3

6th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department is taking to (a) tackle the impact of lost teaching time for children in early years education and (b) ensure that the most disadvantaged children are prioritised.

Levelling up outcomes for disadvantaged children has long been a priority for government. That is why we have committed to reforms to the Early Years Foundation Stage, launched the Hungry Little Minds campaign, and since 2018, have committed more than £60 million to programmes to improve early language and literacy.

The most effective intervention government can take to address the impact of COVID-19 on early outcomes is to get children back into their nurseries.

Since 1 June, early years settings have been able to welcome back children of all ages. We want to ensure councils and early years providers are able to get children back into settings as quickly as possible, where they can be fully supported during this crucial period for their development. From 20 July, restrictions on group sizes will be lifted to enable nurseries to operate full capacity again. We will work with the sector to explore how best to continue to support children’s early development.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
6th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether his Department plans to ring-fenced financial support for the early years education sector in the next six months.

The early years education sector receives ring-fenced funding through the early years block of the Dedicated Schools Grant (DSG).

We have continued to pay local authorities their DSG funding for the childcare places they normally fund for 2 to 4-year-olds throughout the COVID-19 outbreak. This is worth a planned £3.6 billion in 2020-21 and will provide reassurance for early years settings at this time.

We expect local authorities to follow the department’s position and in general, to continue paying all childminders, schools and nurseries for the early years’ entitlements. We have produced guidance for local authorities on this:
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-early-years-and-childcare-closures/coronavirus-covid-19-early-years-and-childcare-closures#funding.

We continue to work closely with the early years sector to understand how it can best be supported to ensure that sufficient childcare is available for those who need it.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
6th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what (a) funding and (b) other support the Government has allocated to (i) the early years sector, (ii) primary schools, (iii) secondary schools; and (iv) further education institutions during the covid-19 outbreak.

On 17 March 2020, the Chancellor confirmed that the Government will continue to pay local authorities as normal for free early years entitlement places for 2, 3 and 4 year olds to support providers. On 18 March 2020, the Government also announced a business rates holiday for many nurseries in England for the 2020 to 2021 tax year.

Many early years providers also receive private income. The Government has therefore clarified the circumstances in which early years providers can seek support through the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS). It has also provided information to early years providers on the Small Business Grant Fund and the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan. Childminders are less likely to be employers, and therefore are less likely to be eligible for support via the CJRS. We have therefore directed childminders towards guidance for the Self Employment Income Support Scheme.

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/claim-a-grant-through-the-self-employment-income-support-scheme.

Local Authority maintained schools (including pupil referral units) and academies (including free schools) continue to receive their budgets as usual, regardless of any periods of partial or complete closure. This will ensure that they are able to continue to pay their staff, and meet their other regular financial commitments.

We have put in place additional support to help schools meet exceptional costs they may incur as a result of COVID-19. These costs may arise as result of keeping premises open during the holidays, providing support for free school meals for eligible children who are not attending school (where those costs are not covered by the national voucher scheme described below), and additional cleaning.

We have provided a centrally-funded national voucher scheme to make sure eligible pupils can continue to access free school meals, given they are not able to attend school, including through the Easter school holidays. We have also announced a COVID-19 Summer Food Fund which will enable children who are eligible for benefits-related free school meals to be supported over the summer holiday period.

We have made a commitment to boost remote education, including by providing devices and internet access for disadvantaged year 10 pupils, and those who receive support from a social worker and care leavers. We are ensuring every school that wants it has access to free, expert technical support to access Google and Microsoft’s education platforms, along with training on how to use the resources most effectively and peer support. We have also supported the Oak National Academy, which is a totally new initiative, assembling video lessons and resources for any teacher in the country to make use of if they wish to do so.

We have launched a £1 billion COVID-19 “catch-up” package to directly tackle the impact of lost teaching time, comprising £650 million to be shared across state primary and secondary schools over the 2020/21 academic year. Whilst headteachers will decide how the money is spent, the Government has supported the publication of the Education Endowment Foundation (EEF) guidance, which sets out a range of evidence-based approaches, including small group tuition.

A National Tutoring Programme, worth up to £350 million, which will increase access to high-quality tuition for the most disadvantaged young people, with delivery starting later in the autumn term.

Further Education and Apprenticeship providers include further education colleges, sixth form colleges, designated institutions, independent training providers, adult and community learning providers, and higher education institutions to the extent that they provide further education or apprenticeships. They are funded in 3 main ways: by grant; under a direct contract for services with the Education and Skills Funding Agency (ESFA); or through a funding agreement with the ESFA (where provision is delivered under a contract directly with an employer, or through advanced learner loan funded learning).

The ESFA will continue to pay grant funded providers their scheduled monthly profiled payments for the remainder of the 2019 to 2020 funding year. We have also published guidance on how providers can access the wider Government support packages, including the CJRS. Some providers may also be eligible for the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme or Coronavirus Large Business Interruption Loan Scheme, and we have directed them to guidance on eligibility. Where a provider receives Adult Education Budget (AEB), or apprenticeship funding, as part of a direct contract for services with the ESFA, and is at risk financially, they may be eligible for support (subject to meeting additional criteria) as part of the ESFA’s post-16 provider relief scheme.

On 8 July, my right hon. Friend, the Chancellor, announced a £1.6 billion package of investment in further education and skills. This investment will scale up employment support schemes, training and apprenticeships to help people looking for a job and, in doing so, will stimulate the further education market.

23rd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of the covid-19 outbreak on international students arriving to study at UK universities in the 2020-21 academic year; and if he will make a statement.

The government recognises that the COVID-19 outbreak will have an unparalleled impact on all elements of the global and UK economy. The higher education sector, including student recruitment, is no exception. We have been working closely with the sector to monitor the likely impacts of COVID-19 on international student numbers, including restrictions on travel.

The UK’s world-leading universities remain open to international students and we are working as a priority to make processes as flexible and easy as possible to allow students to study at UK institutions in the 2020-21 academic year.

On 22 June, with my counterparts in Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales, I wrote to prospective international students to outline the support and guidance that is available to students who are considering studying in the UK from the autumn. In the letter, I reiterated the temporary and targeted flexibilities that the government has announced for international students. These flexibilities include the visa guidance updated on 16 June, which provides greater certainty for international higher education students. The visa guidance includes the latest information for those who might have questions around visa expiry, switching visa category within the UK and distance learning. The government has also provided reassurances regarding distance learning, confirming that students will be permitted to study partially online for the 2020/21 academic year, provided that they transition to face-to-face learning as soon as circumstances allow. The government has also confirmed that those studying by distance learning or blended learning will be eligible to apply for the graduate route provided that they are in the UK by 6 April 2021 (and that they meet other requirements of the route). The government is applying discretion under the current circumstances to ensure international students are not negatively impacted if they find themselves in a position where they cannot comply with certain visa rules.

We are also in discussions with Universities UK and other sector representatives on a regular basis to ensure that we are united in welcoming international students to the UK. We expect international students - particularly those who will be subject to the 14-day self-isolation period - to be appropriately supported upon arrival by their chosen university during these unprecedented times. International students who are considering studying at a UK higher education provider from September 2020 should contact their chosen university to find out how they are adapting to the COVID-19 outbreak.

On Friday 5 June, the government also announced that Sir Steve Smith would be the UK’s new International Education Champion as part of the government’s International Education Strategy. Sir Steve will assist with opening up export growth opportunities for the whole UK education sector, which will include attracting international students to UK Universities. The International Education Strategy,?published in March 2019 by the Department for Education and the Department for International Trade, set out a commitment to review progress following its publication.??The review, which we intend to publish this autumn, will?ensure that the International Education Strategy?responds to the challenges that are?posed by COVID-19.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
23rd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate he has made of the number of (a) primary and (b) secondary school teachers by ethnicity in each of the last five years.

The numbers of teachers in state-funded nursery and primary schools and state-funded secondary schools from different ethnic groups for the last 5 years is attached.

17th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many (a) solar panels and (b) wind turbines his Department's buildings (a) have in 2020 and (b) had in each of the last five years.

The Department does not have any wind turbines, nor does it have any functioning solar panels. This has been the case across the last 5 years.

15th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will place in the Library a list of the workplace benefits that his Department provides to its staff with caring responsibilities.

The Department for Education provides the following workplace benefits to its staff with caring responsibilities:

  • A Flexible Working Policy which enables employees with caring responsibilities to achieve a more effective work/life balance. Flexible working offers a wide range of working patterns, for example: informal flexible working, part-time working, or remote/home working.
  • The DfE Carers Charter sets out the policies and helps managers to understand how they can best support employees with caring responsibilities.
  • A Special Leave Policy that offers a variation of leave which can be requested by employees who are carers: up to 5 days special leave with pay for domestic emergencies, statutory emergency leave for dependants, extended unplanned special leave
  • Career breaks which can be requested for a variety of reasons, including caring for dependants.

For the past five years the DfE has supported a Carers’ Support Network for its employees with a caring role. This group of volunteers provide emotional and practical support to carers as well as working to influence DfE HR Policy.

.

15th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much energy his departmental buildings have used in (a) each of the last five years and (b) 2020 to date.

The information on energy used by the Department for Education for the years 2015-16 to 2018-19 is available in the attached table. Information for 2019-20 is not available.

12th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether he will introduce a natural history GCSE; and if he will make a statement.

The exam board OCR has launched a consultation to gather views on what people think should be in a proposed GCSE in natural history. The Government has not made any commitment to introducing a GCSE in natural history, but we have indicated that we would consider any proposal put forward. Any such proposal would need to meet the same high standards and regulatory rules that we and the independent qualifications regulator Ofqual require from all GCSEs.

12th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate he has made of the number of temporary classrooms used in schools by each local authority for each of the last five years.

The number of temporary classrooms used in schools by each local authority is not held centrally within the Department.

The Department does collect information on the condition of the school estate through the Condition Data Collection programme. This information is collected at the school building level; as it does not collect information on individual classrooms, we do not have a central record of the number of temporary classrooms used by schools.

11th Jun 2020
To ask the hon. Member for Perth and North Perthshire, representing the House of Commons Commission, what percentage of art on display on the Parliamentary Estate is from (a) BAME, (b) LGBTQ+, (c) disabled and d) female artists.

This information is not currently held.

In future the form which is sent to all contactable artists whose work is added to the Parliamentary Art Collection collecting their personal information will be amended to allow them to declare any protected characteristics they wish to provide. This information will be added to the searchable database which holds information on all works of art in the Collection.

Pete Wishart
Shadow SNP Leader of the House of Commons
11th Jun 2020
To ask the hon. Member for Perth and North Perthshire, representing the House of Commons Commission, whether guidance has been issued to staff procuring art for display on the Parliamentary Estate encouraging them to choose pieces from (a) BAME, (b) LGBTQ+, (c) female and (d) disabled artists; and if he will make a statement.

The acquisition of artworks to the Parliamentary Art Collection is decided upon by the Speaker’s Advisory Committee on Works of Art.

It has been a focus of the Committee’s work over the past 15 or so years to actively improve diversity in the Collection, both in terms of the artworks and the artists represented. The curatorial staff work to enable this aspiration to be achieved by the Committee.

Recent examples of this focus are the acquisition of a bust of Olaudah Equiano, a commissioned portrait of Bernie Grant MP and works from the ‘209 Women’ project, all of which are on display in Portcullis House (Atrium and first floor corridor).

A new Committee has just been appointed and will be considering this matter further as they review policies and collecting priorities.

Pete Wishart
Shadow SNP Leader of the House of Commons
9th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many staff in his Department had caring responsibilities in each of the last five years.

The information requested is not held centrally. The Department does not collect information about how many of its staff have caring responsibilities. The Department for Education is committed to supporting its employees with caring responsibilities. It has an active carers network which has recently achieved 'Carer Confident' accreditation, one of 10 Civil Service organisations to have done so.

6th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps his Department has taken to ensure that UK food standards are maintained at their current level after the end of the transition period.

The Government has been clear that in all trade negotiations we will not compromise on our high environmental protection, animal welfare and food standards.

Legal protections for our standards will remain in place after the end of the transition period. The European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018 retains our standards on environmental protection, animal welfare, animal and plant health and food safety. This provides a firm basis for maintaining the same high level of protection for both domestic and imported products.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
10th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many data breaches his Department has reported to the Information Commissioner in each of the last five years.

There were no data breaches reported to the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) in all years except for the financial year 2018-19. In 2018-19, 11 personal data incidents were deemed sufficiently high risk to report to ICO, in line with the new data protection legislation introduced in May 2018.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
7th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent discussions he has had with representatives of water companies on ending the practice of overflow raw sewage being pumped into rivers; and if he will make a statement.

Combined sewer systems which collect waste water and rain water run-off account for the majority of sewerage systems in England. Such systems have a finite capacity and can be temporarily overwhelmed by significant rainfall. Sewer overflows are a feature of these systems and are designed to act as a safety valve to allow the excess waste water to discharge to local waters. This is to avoid waste water flooding streets, homes and other properties, including the sewage treatment plants themselves.

To prevent discharges, by the end of the year water companies will have installed monitors on up to 13,000 of the 15,000 sewer overflows in England, with more installations planned afterwards. These monitors will measure how often and for how long overflows operate, helping inform where improvement works are required and providing information to the public about spills. This information has been used to help develop the environmental programme that the water companies will be implementing over the next five years, which includes around £4 billion of investment to reduce pollution from sewage. This environmental programme resulted from discussions between Ministers and water companies.

In addition, the Environment Bill will place a statutory requirement on water companies to produce drainage and sewerage management plans, currently being produced on a non-statutory basis. This will further help water companies identify opportunities to better manage sewage discharges and tackle future risks.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
25th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of levels of pollution in the River Wye resulting from the farming of chickens; and if he will make a statement.

The River Wye in England is at risk of failing its conservation target for phosphate in the lower reaches. This is a complex issue and is partly influenced by factors upstream including the River Lugg which discharges into the Wye below Hereford. The Lugg is currently failing its conservation target for phosphate as determined by the EU Habitats Regulations.

Phosphate is the primary cause for many water quality failures and originates from two main sources: discharges from sewage treatment works in accordance with environmental permits and from diffuse agricultural pollution, principally livestock manure, including chicken farming, and nutrients washing into the river during rainfall events.

Permitted poultry farms are obliged to control manure. To protect water quality, the Environment Agency (EA) designates certain at-risk areas as Nitrate Vulnerable Zones which require landowners to follow rules for storing organic manure. The EA also uses Farming Rules for Water regulations which require farmers to keep livestock fertilisers and manures out of the water.

The EA is working with a range of stakeholders and partners, including those in Wales, to address the concerns about phosphate levels in the River Wye. The EA is aware that this is an issue of interest to many, especially as the River Wye Catchment is designated a Special Area of Conservation and Site of Special Scientific Interest.

In addition, the EA continues to investigate reports of algae blooms on the Wye and Lugg which can be toxic to wildlife, people and pets. It will follow these up where necessary.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
23rd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether his Department plans to participate in the European Parliament's inquiry into the transportation of live animals; and if he will make a statement.

We welcome the European Parliament's inquiry and we have previously made the European Commission aware of our concerns that the current regulations on protecting animal welfare in transport need to be amended to afford animals better protection. It would be inappropriate for the Government to participate in this inquiry as we are no longer a member of the European Union.

We have a manifesto commitment to end excessively long journeys for live animals going for slaughter and fattening, which is an opportunity we have gained through leaving the EU. We intend to issue a consultation on how we deliver on that commitment in due course.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the effect on the marine environment of supertrawlers fishing in UK waters; and if he will make a statement.

No specific assessments have been made of the impact of large trawlers on the marine environment. However, the impact of all fishing activities is taken into account when we assess the status of UK seas and set targets to achieve Good Environmental Status under the UK Marine Strategy. Assessments carried out for the 2019 UK Marine Strategy Part One showed that commercial fishing is one of the predominant pressures preventing good environmental status of UK seas from being achieved. At the end of the transition period, any access by non-UK vessels to fish in UK waters will be a matter for negotiation. Any vessels granted access to fish in our waters, regardless of nationality, will need to abide by UK rules including those on sustainability.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the effect of the covid-19 lockdown on the UK's natural environment; and if he will make a statement.

Our efforts to keep coronavirus under control have had follow-on impacts on our natural environment. It is too early to draw detailed conclusions about the impacts of the lockdown, but some trends are developing.

The unprecedented changes in living and working patterns during the coronavirus outbreak are likely to have had an effect on air pollution and could potentially lead to short-term improvements in air quality.

It has been encouraging to see reports that some of our wildlife, including our common mammals and ground nesting birds, may be doing well, venturing into areas where they would not normally be seen. It is similarly encouraging to see reports of wildflowers blooming on roadside verges and land that has not been mown during the lockdown.

Defra will continue to research and develop our understanding of the longer-term implications from these unprecedented changes in living and working patterns. This will ensure we apply that learning to delivering the Clean Air Strategy, 25 Year Environment Plan, the Environment Bill and our approach to the Government’s Net Zero commitment.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what the timeframe is for the implementation of the recommendations of the Benyon Review into Highly Protected Marine Areas; and if he will make a statement.

The Government welcomes the publication of the review into Highly Protected Marine Areas (HPMAs) on 8 June 2020. It is available at:

www.gov.uk/government/publications/highly-protected-marine-areas-hpmas-review-2019.

We will consider Richard Benyon’s report and issue a formal response to him in due course, recognising our immediate priority to support the cross-Government response to Covid-19. From there on, we have an opportunity to develop a programme of work to bring forward HPMAs for the first time in English waters. We would, of course, consult widely with the public and stakeholders before any decision to designate HPMAs.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many (a) solar panels and (b) wind turbines his Department's buildings (a) have in 2020 and (b) had in each of the last five years.

Defra has 83 sites with solar panels and six sites with wind turbines or direct drive wind pumps.

We also have 104 operational solar panels that directly power equipment such as remote cameras and sensors.

We have taken the department to mean those entities covered by our greening Government commitments. However, we are waiting for responses from Kew and the Forestry Commission.

Table 1: Year of installation

Type

Pre 2015-16

2015-16

2016-17

2017-18

2018-19

2019-2020

Solar Panels

68 sites

0 sites

0 sites

9 sites

5 sites

1 site

Wind

6 sites

We do not hold the information on the dates the operational panels for remote equipment were installed.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how much energy his departmental buildings have used in (a) each of the last five years and (b) 2020 to date.

The amounts of energy used by Defra Group on the estates that it manages in the last five years are included in an attachment.

This data has been taken from our annual report and accounts over the previous four years, with the 2019-20 data to be published shortly. This includes energy use in both the office and the operational estates.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will place in the Library a list of the workplace benefits that his Department provides to its staff with caring responsibilities.

In Defra we follow the Civil Service Carers Charter, which details the support available for employees who have caring responsibilities and helps managers understand how they can support carers in the workplace. This includes support such as flexible working, job sharing, special leave (paid and unpaid), career breaks and parental leave.

Defra has a carer’s passport which is used to help employees discuss caring responsibilities, at present or in the future, with their line manager.

Other support for employees who are carers is available from our Employee Assistance Programme offering independent advice, information and counselling from trained practitioners. Defra is also a member of Employers for Carers, the employers’ membership forum which is part of Carers UK.

Defra has an active employee-led Carers Network providing information, advice and support to all employees.

It is the intention to place the relevant documents in the Library.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
9th Jun 2020
To ask the hon. Member for Perth and North Perthshire, representing the House of Commons Commission, whether art depicting (a) former slave owners and (b) people involved in the slave trade is on display on the Parliamentary Estate.

The Parliamentary Art Collection has been built up by Members over the past 150 years. It documents the history and work of Parliament up to the present day, and includes portraits, satirical prints and group portraits featuring 17th, 18th and 19th century parliamentarians who, as predominately wealthy landowners and businessmen, were often directly involved in, and profited from, slavery and the slave trade, or came from families who had.

There is no definitive listing of individual MPs with close connections to the trade, but they will be numerous, and some will be included in artworks on display in Parliament. The intention of the artworks is not to venerate people who have supported and committed acts of atrocity, but to truthfully reflect the history of Parliament, our democracy and the people who played a part in it. In 2007 Parliament held a large public exhibition in Westminster Hall ‘Abolition, Parliament and the People’ to reflect on its own role in significantly shaping the progress and development of the transatlantic slave system through legislation, before responding to one of the first and most successful public campaigns which called for the abolition of the trade and then slavery itself. The 1807 Act of Parliament to abolish the British slave trade was followed in 1833 with the Slavery Abolition Act.

The Speaker’s Advisory Committee on Works of Art and the Lord Speaker’s Advisory Panel on Works of Art supported by the curatorial team are actively working to improve the diversity of the art collection, both in terms of the people portrayed and the artists commissioned, to ensure that the Collection reflects and celebrates the diversity of all who contribute to Parliament. The most recent example is the bust of Olaudah Equiano, a former enslaved African and abolitionist, which is currently on display in Portcullis House.

Pete Wishart
Shadow SNP Leader of the House of Commons
9th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many staff in his Department had caring responsibilities in each of the last five years.

The information requested is not held centrally and to obtain it would incur disproportionate costs

In Defra we follow the Civil Service Carers Charter, which details the support available for employees who have caring responsibilities and helps managers understand how they can support carers in the workplace. This includes support such as flexible working, job sharing, special leave (paid and unpaid), career breaks and parental leave.

We have a carer’s passport which is used to help employees discuss caring responsibilities, at present or in the future, with their line manager.

Other support for employees who are carers is available from our Employee Assistance Programme offering independent advice, information and counselling from trained practitioners, and our membership of Employers for Carers, the Employers Membership forum which is part of Carers UK.

Defra has an active employee-led Carers Network providing information, advice and support to all employees.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
6th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what guidance his Department has issued to the Marine Management Organisation on removal of unexploded ordnance from the seabed using low order disposal technology; and if he will make a statement.

Defra recognises the significant impact underwater noise from ordnance clearance and other activities can have on vulnerable marine species. We are working closely with the Marine Management Organisation (MMO), other Government departments including the Ministry of Defence, statutory nature conservation bodies and marine industries to manage and reduce underwater noise.

The underwater noise impact of using low order deflagration techniques for unexploded ordnance detonations is currently being researched by Hartley Anderson on behalf of the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy. The MMO is an active member of the Steering Group which is helping to progress this research. Closed water trials took place in 2019 and sea trials of the technology are planned for 2020. Defra does not expect to issue formal guidance on the use of low-order deflagration techniques until this research has been completed.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
6th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of (a) high and (b) low order unexploded ordnance disposal on marine wildlife; and if he will make a statement.

Defra recognises the significant impact underwater noise from ordnance clearance and other activities can have on vulnerable marine species. We are working closely with the Marine Management Organisation (MMO), other Government departments including the Ministry of Defence, statutory nature conservation bodies and marine industries to manage and reduce underwater noise.

The underwater noise impact of using low order deflagration techniques for unexploded ordnance detonations is currently being researched by Hartley Anderson on behalf of the Defra Group. The MMO is an active member of the Steering Group which is helping to progress this research. Closed water trials took place in 2019 and sea trials of the technology are planned for 2020. Defra does not expect to issue formal guidance on the use of low-order deflagration techniques until this research has been completed.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
6th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps his Department has taken in response to the recommendations of the SRUC Wildlife Unit's report of the Investigation into long-finned pilot whale mass stranding event, Kyle of Durness, 22 July 2011, published in 2015, on unexploded ordnance disposal; and if he will make a statement.

Defra recognises the significant impact underwater noise from ordnance clearance and other activities can have on vulnerable marine species. We are working closely with the Marine Management Organisation (MMO), other Government departments including the Ministry of Defence, statutory nature conservation bodies and marine industries to manage and reduce underwater noise.

The underwater noise impact of using low order deflagration techniques for unexploded ordnance detonations is currently being researched by Hartley Anderson on behalf of the Defra Group. The MMO is an active member of the Steering Group which is helping to progress this research. Closed water trials took place in 2019 and sea trials of the technology are planned for 2020. Defra does not expect to issue formal guidance on the use of low-order deflagration techniques until this research has been completed.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
10th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, how many data breaches her Department has reported to the Information Commissioner in each of the last five years.

DFID has not reported any data breaches to the Information Commission in each of the last five years.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
25th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what support her Department has allocated to the Ogoniland region of Nigeria for the clearing up of pollution resulting from oil extraction; and if she will make a statement.

The UK Government provided technical support to Nigerian institutions through DFID’s Foster programme from 2016 to 2018 and through the Conflict, Security and Stability Fund. UK support included project management, community participation in clean-up operations, and to government bodies to fulfil their responsibilities as well as monitoring of the overall project. Support was also given for alternative businesses e.g. cassava processing. We have no plans to provide further support at this time due to prioritisation of Aid projects and because the UN Environment Programme and other donors remain engaged through monitoring and advice.

17th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, how many (a) solar panels and (b) wind turbines her Department's buildings (a) have in 2020 and (b) had in each of the last five years.

DFID has two Headquarter buildings in the UK: one at 22 Whitehall and the other at Abercrombie House, East Kilbride.

Neither of the headquarter buildings have (a) solar panels nor (b) wind turbines.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
15th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, if she will place in the Library a list of the workplace benefits that her Department provides to its staff with caring responsibilities.

DFID encourages managers to take a positive, proactive approach in working together with employees to agree arrangements for caring, taking account of both caring and business needs. DFID has signed up to the Carer’s Charter and encourage managers and employees to record caring arrangements on our HR systems.

In terms of workplace benefits, DFID offers:

  • Flexible working to enable carers to combine their work and caring responsibilities. For those looking to move to working on a job share basis, we also promote use of the Civil Service job-share finder.
  • Access to various forms of leave for those who need it over and above annual leave (either on a short or longer term basis): short term discretionary leave; long term unpaid discretionary leave; parental leave.
  • Employee Assistance Programme: offers support for a range of scenarios. For caring, they can advise on sources of help and advice and provide counselling should people require it.

To strengthen our support and learn from best practice, we have also recently signed up to Employers for Carers.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
9th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, how many staff in her Department had caring responsibilities in each of the last five years.

The below table shows how many DFID staff voluntarily declared they have caring responsibilities in each of the last five years.

Year

No. of staff with caring responsibilities

2015

58

2016

52

2017

71

2018

70

2019

91

DFID supports our carers through robust discretionary leave, which we have used effectively in the context of COVID-19. In addition to this, we have an active Carers Network that works to provide support for our staff, and we are also members of Employers for Carers.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
10th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to her Written Statement HC WS339, whether she will publish the assessment that evaluated if Saudi Arabia had broken International Humanitarian Law; and if she will make a statement.

HM Government have no plans to publish the assessments to which the Rt Hon. Gentleman refers. Such assessments use all available sources of information – including some that are necessarily confidential and sensitive – so we are not able to provide details of the assessments.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
10th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what assessment she has made of the ability of the UK's ports to cope with smuggling at the end of the transition arrangements with the EU; and if she will make a statement.

HM Revenue & Customs (HMRC) are already tackling smuggling and they will continue to do so through intelligence-led targeting; the Department for International Trade (DIT) will not be making a statement on this issue. My Department continues to work closely with HMRC to make sure that the United Kingdom’s trade policy will be effectively operationalised at the border after the transition period ends.

Border controls on controlled goods will continue regardless of whether imports come from the European Union or Rest of the World countries. To ensure compliance with new customs procedures and controls at the border after transition period ends, my Rt Hon. Friend the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster recently announced a new infrastructure funding package that includes £470m to build the necessary infrastructure required.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
18th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what the (a) value and (b) amount was of goods listed in export licences granted for the export of (i) rubber bullets, (ii) tear gas, (iii) riot equipment and (iv) other small arms to (A) the US and (B) Saudi Arabia in each of the last five years.

HM Government publishes Official Statistics (on a quarterly and annual basis) about export licences granted, refused and revoked to all destinations on GOV.UK and these reports contain detailed information on export licences issued, refused or revoked, by destination, including the overall value, type (e.g. Military, Other) and a summary of the items covered by these licences.

The reports can be found at: gov.uk/government/collections/strategic-export-controls-licensing-data.

The data currently provides details of licences up to 31st December 2019. Information about the period 1st January to 31st March 2020 will be published in July 2020 and data covering the period 1st April to 30th September 2020 will be published in October 2020

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
18th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how many export licences were granted for export to (a) the Minneapolis Police Department, (b) the New York Police Department, (c) the Los Angeles Police Department and (d) other US law enforcement agencies in each of the last five years.

Our records show that no export licences were granted for export to the Minneapolis Police Department nor the Los Angeles Police Department. One Standard Individual Export Licence was granted for export to the New York Police Department in 2016.

The number of export licences that may have been granted to all other law enforcement agencies in the United States of America over the last five years can only be provided at disproportionate cost, due to the way in which licences are worded and information is held, which makes it generally possible to find the information only where a named end user is specified.

For completeness, it is important to note that – for some licences – the exports are to stockists, who then supply end users within that country. On others, specific end users are not listed, but they might instead have conditions that restrict exports to the armed forces and the police, for example.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
18th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how many export licences have been granted for the export of (a) rubber bullets, (b) tear gas, (c) riot equipment and (d) other small arms to (i) the US and (ii) Saudi Arabia in each of the last five years.

HM Government publishes Official Statistics (on a quarterly and annual basis) about export licences granted, refused and revoked to all destinations on GOV.UK and these reports contain detailed information on export licences issued, refused or revoked, by destination, including the overall value, type (e.g. Military, Other) and a summary of the items covered by these licences.

The reports can be found at: gov.uk/government/collections/strategic-export-controls-licensing-data.

The data currently provides details of licences up to 31st December 2019. Information about the period 1st January to 31st March 2020 will be published in July 2020 and data covering the period 1st April to 30th September 2020 will be published in October 2020

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
15th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how much energy her departmental buildings have used in (a) each of the last five years and (b) 2020 to date.

The Department for International Trade was formed in 2016 and only holds information relating to the financial years 2017/18, 2018/19 and 2019/20, which is provided in the table below.

Energy consumption by type (MWh)

2017/18

2018/19

2019/20

Electricity non renewable

0

0

0

Electricity renewable

1,766

1,928

1,989

Gas

483

538

619

Other Energy Sources

144

227

162

Total energy consumption

2,393

2,693

2,771

The figures relate to our 55 Whitehall and 3-5 Whitehall Place buildings. Information for other buildings occupied by the Department, but where we are not the main occupier (including overseas), are not reported by the Department.

Details of energy consumption for the Department’s buildings for 2017/18 and 2018/19 can also be found in its Annual Reports and Accounts which are published on GOV.UK (and, for completeness, the energy consumption details included in the 2018/19 Annual Report & Accounts differ from the above table because they were based on estimates that were available at the time of publication.)

Figures for 2020/21 to date are not currently available.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
15th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, if she will place in the Library a list of the workplace benefits that her Department provides to its staff with caring responsibilities.

The Department for International Trade is committed to supporting those members of our workforce with caring responsibilities. Building a diverse and inclusive department continues to be a key priority. For carers specifically we have adopted the Civil Service Carers Passport and aligned our policies to the Civil Service Carers Charter developed by Cabinet Office. We also have policies to support flexible working and provide access to special leave and career breaks. All employees have access to our Employee Assistance Programme and we have active employee networks for carers.

A library deposit has been made with a list of workplace benefits provided to the department’s staff with caring responsibilities.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
9th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how many staff in her Department had caring responsibilities in each of the last five years.

The Department for International Trade is committed to supporting those members of our workforce with caring responsibilities. Building a diverse and inclusive department

continues to be a key priority. For carers specifically we adopted the Civil Service Carers Passport and aligned our policies to the Civil Service Carers Charter developed by Cabinet Office. We also have policies to support flexible working and provide access to special leave and career breaks. All employees have access to our Employee Assistance Programme and we have active employee networks for carers and parents.

We do not hold data centrally on how many staff in the department have a specific caring responsibility as arrangements are managed locally between the individuals and their line manager.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
8th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether he issued a ministerial direction in relation to the temporary closure of the Manchester Piccadilly to Rose Hill Marple railway line.

Following my meeting with the operator on 4 September, and after reviewing its options, Northern is introducing two trains in the morning, Monday to Friday, for Rose Hill-Marple from today, which will help school children and morning commuters. There will be an additional afternoon service, arriving at Rose Hill-Marple at 1514 and arriving Manchester Piccadilly half an hour later. From the 26 October schools’ half-term, Northern will provide a regular service every 90 minutes during the day between Manchester Piccadilly and Rose Hill Marple.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
7th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will publish the impact assessment on the effect on local communities of the decision to suspend services on the Manchester Piccadilly to Rose Hill Marple Line.

Nationally all train operators have been asked to restore a timetable that maximises passenger travel opportunities, whilst maintaining good performance levels in services.

Having been alerted to the issues around the Rose Hill service by the Hon Member for Hazel Grove, I convened a meeting of local MPs and Northern Trains Ltd (NTL).

Like other operators, NTL has been working to an emergency timetable rather than its full service agreement timetable whilst the impacts of COVID-19 continue. Following the meeting outlined above, NTL is reviewing options again to see how it can support the affected communities and understands completely that the rapid return of a resilient timetable on this line is a Government priority.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
7th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether his Department plans as operator of last resort to instruct Northern Rail to maintain passenger services in accordance with its franchise agreement on the Manchester Piccadilly to Rose Hill Marple line.

Nationally all train operators have been asked to restore a timetable that maximises passenger travel opportunities, whilst maintaining good performance levels in services.

Having been alerted to the issues around the Rose Hill service by the Hon Member for Hazel Grove, I convened a meeting of local MPs and Northern Trains Ltd (NTL).

Like other operators, NTL has been working to an emergency timetable rather than its full service agreement timetable whilst the impacts of COVID-19 continue. Following the meeting outlined above, NTL is reviewing options again to see how it can support the affected communities and understands completely that the rapid return of a resilient timetable on this line is a Government priority.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
7th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will reopen the Manchester Piccadilly to Rose Hill Marple Line.

Nationally all train operators have been asked to restore a timetable that maximises passenger travel opportunities, whilst maintaining good performance levels in services.

Having been alerted to the issues around the Rose Hill service by the Hon Member for Hazel Grove, I convened a meeting of local MPs and Northern Trains Ltd (NTL).

Like other operators, NTL has been working to an emergency timetable rather than its full service agreement timetable whilst the impacts of COVID-19 continue. Following the meeting outlined above, NTL is reviewing options again to see how it can support the affected communities and understands completely that the rapid return of a resilient timetable on this line is a Government priority.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
20th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will make it his policy for all UK internal flights to be sustainably powered by 2030; and if he will make a statement.

It is critical that aviation plays its part in delivering the UK’s net zero ambitions.

The Transport and Business Secretaries co-chaired the new Jet Zero Council on 22 July which brought together senior leaders in aviation, aerospace and academia to drive high ambition in the delivery of new technologies and innovative ways to cut aviation emissions.

We will also consult on our position on aviation and climate change later this year.

10th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps his Department has taken to ensure that public transport remains accessible for disabled people during the covid-19 outbreak.

The Government remains as committed to delivering inclusive transport for all passengers as they were before the COVID-19 pandemic. Our expectation is that transport operators should continue to assist disabled passengers who need assistance. I made this clear in my open letter to the rail industry on 8 April 2020 (www.gov.uk/government/speeches/letter-from-the-rail-minister-to-the-rail-delivery-group-on-maintaining-accessibility-during-the-covid-19-outbreak) .

We have also made clear to local authorities that the Public Sector Equality Duty still applies and that they must continue to consider the needs of disabled people. An accessible public realm is vital to enabling disabled people to access public transport. On 9 May the Department published statutory guidance to local authorities on reallocating road space which makes clear that authorities must consider the needs of disabled people and those with other protected characteristics when making changes to their transport networks (https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/reallocating-road-space-in-response-to-covid-19-statutory-guidance-for-local-authorities/traffic-management-act-2004-network-management-in-response-to-covid-19). Public Sector Equality Duty requirements apply to temporary measures as they do to permanent ones.

I am meeting regularly with key disability stakeholders, including Disability Rights UK, Scope, Guide Dogs and Transport for All, to hear directly from them about the experiences of disabled people using transport. This means we will be able to take action quickly if we find that passengers are not receiving the assistance to which they are entitled.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
17th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many (a) solar panels and (b) wind turbines his Department's buildings (a) have in 2020 and (b) had in each of the last five years.

The information requested is as follows:

Year

Solar Panels

Wind turbines

2020

649

3

2019

649

3

2018

491

3

2017

476

3

2016

164

3

2015

164

3

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
16th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps his Department is taking to support electric short-haul flights in the UK; and if he will make a statement.

The Government supports the development of new aviation technology such as electric aircraft. We are providing £125m of funding to the Future Flight Challenge and supported the Civil Aviation Authority establish an Innovation Hub to engage with innovative aviation companies. Government will consult on Aviation and Climate Change later this year.

15th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how much energy his departmental buildings have used in (a) each of the last five years and (b) 2020 to date.

The information requested is as follows:

kWh

Electricity

Natural Gas

Oil

2015

31,382,315

37,923,270

1,779,302

2016

40,726,077

41,017,631

2,046,502

2017

36,791,494

38,266,104

1,298,068

2018

37,578,398

37,105,347

1,063,723

2019

33,752,594

33,677,336

1,665,576

2020 (to 31-03-20)

9,404,303

10,405,464

645,728

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
12th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what the (a) make and (b) fuel type is of cars allocated to each Minister.

In 2012, the Government Car Service introduced the Departmental Pool Car Service where cars and drivers are allocated to Government Departments as a shared resource. This service is managed by each individual Department to provide better utilisation; cars are no longer allocated to individual ministers.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
12th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many Government Car Service departmental pool cars are allocated to each Department; and what the fuel type is of each car.

The table below lists the number of Departmental Pool Cars allocated to each Government Department including fuel type:

Department

Number of Cars

Fuel Type

Cabinet Office

3

Battery Electric

Cabinet Office

3

Diesel

Cabinet Office

1

Petrol

BEIS

2

Petrol Hybrid

BEIS

1

Battery Electric

BEIS

1

Petrol

MHCLG

4

Petrol Hybrid

DCMS

1

Battery Electric

DCMS

2

Petrol Hybrid

DCMS

1

Petrol

DEFRA

1

Petrol Hybrid

DEFRA

1

Petrol

DFE

1

Battery Electric

DFE

1

Petrol

DFID

1

Battery Electric

DFID

1

Petrol Hybrid

DfT

3

Petrol Hybrid

DfT

1

Battery Electric

DHSC

2

Petrol Hybrid

DHSC

1

Petrol

DHSC

1

Battery Electric

HMT

1

Battery Electric

HMT

1

Petrol

Home Office

4

Petrol Hybrid

AGO

1

Battery Electric

AGO

1

Petrol Hybrid

DIT

1

Battery Electric

DIT

1

Petrol

DWP

2

Diesel

With the support of DfT, the Government Car Service (GCS) is replacing its fleet with Ultra Low Emission Vehicles (ULEVs) as vehicles become due for replacement. Currently 48% of the GCS fleet is now either battery electric, petrol/electric hybrid or hydrogen, and we are actively looking at options to accelerate this transition.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
9th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many staff in his Department had caring responsibilities in each of the last five years.

The Department for Transport (DfT) does not collect data on the number of people with caring responsibilities on its HR systems.

We are, however able to provide data on the numbers responding positively to the Civil Service People Survey question on caring responsibilities over this period. The total number for the Central DfT and its four agencies is broken down as follows:

Department / Agency

2019

2018

2017

2016

2015

Central DfT

535

409

322

209

267

Driver & Vehicle Licencing Agency (DVLA)

1329

1169

1099

1107

1096

Driver & Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA)

1153

906

702

582

659

Maritime & Coastguard Agency (MCA)

205

150

138

153

136

Vehicle Certification Agency (VCA)

33

27

19

17

24

Total

3255

2661

2280

2068

2182

This is not a workforce statistic and is only representative of those who completed the survey and the best available information DfT currently has.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
13th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment her Department has made of whether there has been a change in the average time taken to process Access to Work payments in the most recent period for which figures are available.

I refer to my response to PQN/21-22/2021/7311921-

Access to Work aim for customers to be paid within 10 days of receipt of claims and all supporting evidence.

Following postal delays during July and August, we are seeing payment clearance times returning to normal levels.

8th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps her Department is taking to reduce the time taken for beneficiaries to receive their Access to Work payments.

Access to Work aim for customers to be paid within 10 days of receipt of claims and all supporting evidence. During July and August postal delays held up payment claims being received into DWP.

We have introduced scanning of all claims on day of receipt improving payment times, and Access to Work are also developing a digital claim portal which will allow customers to submit their claim online and upload any supporting information. We expect to start testing this with some customers in December 2021.

6th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what the average length of time is for beneficiaries to receive Access to Work Payments in each of the last (a) 12 months and (b) five years; and if she will make a statement.

The average length of time for beneficiaries to receive Access to Work Payments in each of the last (a) 12 months and (b) five years is not readily available and to provide it would incur disproportionate cost.

20th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what estimate she has made of the number of people currently eligible to claim carers allowance.

Information on the number of people that (a) have an underlying entitlement to Carer’s Allowance and (b) receiving a payment for Carer’s Allowance by Parliamentary constituency is published and available at:

https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk

Guidance for users is available at:

https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/webapi/online-help/index.html

20th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people currently receive carers allowance.

As of November 2020, there were 937,000 people claiming Carer’s Allowance.

8th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if she will review the spare room subsidy policy to ensure that people who are unable to work as a result of illness are not obliged to pay that charge.

The ‘Removal of the Spare Room Subsidy’ policy has helped to encourage mobility within the social rented sector, strengthen work-incentives and make better use of available social housing.

There are no plans to amend the policy which already allows for the provision of an additional bedroom for disabled people and carers, foster carers, parents who adopt, parents of service personnel, and people who have suffered a recent bereavement. Additionally, those in receipt of pension age housing benefit are exempt.

If a claimants ability to mitigate any shortfall between their housing support and rent has changed, Discretionary Housing Payments (DHP’s) are available. DHPs can be paid to those in receipt of Housing Benefit or support with housing costs in Universal Credit who face a shortfall in meeting their rental housing costs. Since 2011 we have provided over £1 billion in DHP funding.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
3rd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people are (a) entitled to receive and (b) receiving carer's allowance, in the latest period for which data is available, by Parliamentary constituency.

As of February 2020, there were around 1070 carers in the Kingston and Surbiton constituency that were receiving Carer’s Allowance and in 2019/20 we spent approximately £3.8 million on Carer’s Allowance there. A further 310 carers had a claim to an underlying entitlement to Carer’s Allowance.

Information on the number of people that (a) have an underlying entitlement to Carer’s Allowance and (b) receiving a payment for Carer’s Allowance by Parliamentary constituency is published and available at:

https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk

Guidance for users is available at:

https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/webapi/online-help/index.html

The latest information on benefit expenditure by parliamentary constituency including Carer’s Allowance is also published and available at:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/920543/benefit-expenditure-by-parliamentary-constituency-2019-20.xlsx

10th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many habitual residence tests were carried out in each of the last five years; and what proportion of those tests were passed.

The table below gives the total number of Habitual Residency Tests (HRT) completed by Universal Credit (UC) full service claimants for the last five years, and the proportion of these HRT where a pass outcome was recorded.

Year UC claim declared

UC claims with an associated HRT

UC claims with an associated HRT that passed

Proportion of Passes

2015

50

50

100%

2016

4,600

4,100

89%

2017

51,400

44,800

87%

2018

245,900

201,900

82%

2019

417,400

364,100

87%

2020

231,400

211,900

92%

Table Notes:

  1. All figures rounded to 100, but 2015 figures are rounded to the nearest 50.
  2. Figures are taken from Management Information on Universal Credit Full Service claims and do not include Live Service claims for which HRT data is not available.
  3. The month used in this data is the month in which the UC claim was declared (regardless of when the UC claim passed the HRT).
  4. Subtracting the number of HRT passes from the total number of UC HRTs undertaken would not provide the number of HRT fails, as this also includes HRTs where the outcome could not be determined, for example, a claim was withdrawn before the HRT result was recorded.
  5. The year refers to the calendar year, January – December apart from 2015 data which only includes June-December 2015 data and 2020 data which only includes January-March 2020 data.
  6. Information on Universal Credit Full service claims may be subject to future change; this is because claim data may be entered retrospectively for past months. Any retrospective changes are most likely to affect recent months; for this reason, we have provided data up to the end of March 2020.
  7. The UC full service data supplied is derived from unpublished management information, which was collected for internal Departmental use only and has not been quality assured to National Statistics or Official Statistics publication standard. The data should therefore be treated with caution.
8th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how long an employment and support allowance decision is valid for.

An award of income-related ESA will be an indefinite award but it’s continued receipt is subject to the claimant meeting all the conditions of entitlement, and in particular that they continue to have, or be treated as having, Limited Capability for Work (LCW) or Limited Capability for Work and Work Related Activity (LCWRA).

An award of contributory ESA is for a period of 12 months except where the claimant has LCWRA. Where the claimant continues to have or is treated as having LCWRA the award will be indefinite subject to the claimant meeting all the conditions of entitlement.

8th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps her Department has taken to provide additional financial support to (a) employment and support allowance and (b) personal independence payment recipients during the covid-19 outbreak.

The Government has announced a suite of measures that can be quickly and effectively operationalised to benefit those facing the most financial disruption during the pandemic.

8th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps her Department has taken to financially support universal credit claimants during the five-week waiting period for their first payment.

Nobody has to wait five weeks for a payment under Universal Credit. New Claims Advances of up to 100% of potential entitlement can be requested at any point in the first assessment period. Advances are a mechanism to provide support during the first assessment period, allowing claimants to receive 13 payments over 12 months with up to 12 months to repay the advance.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
7th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, for what reason the emergency £20 top-up given to universal credit recipients in response to the covid-19 outbreak was not extended to people receiving employment and support allowance and personal independence payment.

I refer the Rt. Hon. Member to the answer given by the Minister for Welfare Delivery, my Hon. Friend Will Quince on 29 June 2020 to Question UIN 57361.

6th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether her Department plans to restart face-to-face assessments for claimants for (a) employment and support allowance and (b) personal independence payment when jobcentres reopen as the covid-19 lockdown restrictions are eased.

I refer the hon. Member to my Department’s press release of 6th July, on gov.uk, which confirms that face-to-face assessments remain suspended, but under regular review. We will announce any changes to this in due course.

29th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps she is taking to tackle the household income inequality between different ethnic groups in the UK; and if she will make a statement.

Our current focus is on supporting people financially during these unprecedented times. Our long-term ambition remains to build an economy that supports employment, ensuring opportunities for all to enter and progress in work where possible, whilst providing a strong welfare safety net for those that need it.

This approach is based on clear evidence about the importance of work in tackling poverty now and in the future. Working age adults in households where all adults are in work are six times less likely to be in absolute poverty (after housing costs) than adults in a household where nobody works.

We are also committed to levelling up skills and opportunities across the country. Using latest data from the Race Disparity Audit and DWP’s own analysis, we continue to help those under-represented in the labour market and are also investing £90m towards activities that address disparities in youth unemployment.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
23rd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, when she plans implement the decision of the Court of Appeal of 22 June 2020 in the case Johnson, Woods, Barrett and Stewart vs the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions; and if she will make a statement.

As I informed the House on Thursday 25 June 2020 in answer to the Urgent Question asked by Rt Hon Member for East Ham (Hansard Col. 1455, Vol. 677).

‘I hope Members will appreciate that as the judgment was passed down on Monday, it would be remiss not to afford more consideration before we press on, particularly when the Court has not called for immediate action. We will now begin the process of carefully considering possible solutions, and we will keep the House updated as progress is made.’

Full transcript available at: https://hansard.parliament.uk/Commons/2020-06-25/debates/9D5B55BA-F1F2-4A95-856A-565303FE04B5/UniversalCreditCourtOfAppealJudgment#contribution-C1A5CE72-B6A2-4D75-8C9E-289A31BC3475

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
17th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many (a) solar panels and (b) wind turbines her Department's buildings (a) have in 2020 and (b) had in each of the last five years.

The Department is not responsible for the management and maintenance of any wind turbines or solar panels in the properties it occupies currently, or during the last five years.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
15th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how much energy her departmental buildings have used in (a) each of the last five years and (b) 2020 to date.

The Department for Work and Pensions recently submitted its annual Greening Government Commitments (GGC) return for 2019/20. Whilst we await final confirmation from DEFRA, the indication is that we have met our carbon targets for departmental buildings for 2019/20.

COVID-19 has delayed confirmation of the post-2019/20 GGC targets. When these targets are received our view forward will be clearer, however in the meantime we are in the process of writing a Carbon Management Plan which makes reference to the Government’s Clean Growth Strategy, as well as the UK’s commitment to Net Zero Carbon by 2050 and the UKGBC’s Net Zero Carbon Framework. This will include recommendations to:

- Improve the operational performance of our estate;

- Invest in our estate to improve energy efficiency;

- Ensure we lease highly energy efficient buildings;

Ensure that energy efficiency standards are adhered to when we refurbish or fit out buildings

Energy consumption figures in kWh for buildings on the DWP Estate for the previous five financial years, and the current financial year to date:

2015/16

Electricity

Gas

Oil

kWh

142,938,047

172,577,338

4,546,526

2016/17

Electricity

Gas

Oil

kWh

137,911,182

178,514,275

6,203,224

2017/18

Electricity

Gas

Oil

kWh

134,436,097

178,514,275

4,579,998

2018/19

Electricity

Gas

Oil

kWh

122,279,492

165,419,232

3,113,567

2019/20

Electricity

Gas

Oil

kWh

116,856,847

178,964,821

3,672,365

2020/21 (YTD)

Electricity

Gas

Oil

kWh

8,552,288

17,368,769

153,920

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
15th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many claims for bereavement support payment were refused on the grounds that a co-habiting couple is not eligible, in each year since 2015.

The information requested is not available.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
15th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many claims for bereavement support payment were (a) made and (b) successful at the (i) higher and (ii) lower rate in each year since its introduction.

Experimental official statistics for Bereavement Support Payment (BSP) are published quarterly here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/dwp-statistical-summaries

The latest statistics were published in May 2020 and Table 1 provides the number of BSP claims received by month between April 2017 and December 2019 here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/dwp-benefits-statistics-may-2020

Additional BSP statistics are not currently available and will be published in due course, however, BSP caseload statistics, by rate, are published in the benefit expenditure and caseload tables here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/benefit-expenditure-and-caseload-tables-2020

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
15th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how much has been paid in bereavement support payments in each year since its introduction.

Annual Bereavement Support Payment expenditure statistics are published in the benefit expenditure and caseload tables here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/benefit-expenditure-and-caseload-tables-2020

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
15th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many bereavement support payment decisions were (a) appealed and (b) overturned at appeal in each year since its introduction.

The type and volume of tribunal cases received and disposed of are published quarterly by the Ministry of Justice here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/tribunals-statistics


Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
15th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many bereavement support payment claims were made more than three months after the related death, in each year since its introduction.

The information requested is not readily available and to provide it would incur disproportionate cost.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
9th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many staff in her Department had caring responsibilities in each of the last five years.

We use the annual Civil Service People Survey to understand how many of our staff have caring responsibilities.

The below table sets out the relevant question and answer from that survey back to 2015. It’s worth noting that the People Survey is voluntary, and the extent to which those who completed the survey are representative of the wider workforce is unknown, however this is the best available information that the department currently holds.

We recognise that caring responsibilities may have changed as a result of the current crisis and staff are being encouraged to reflect this in an amended or new Carer’s Passport.

.

Numbers of DWP staff who look after or give help or support to any family members, friends, neighbours or others who have a long-term physical or mental illness or disability, or problems related to old age: 2015 to 2019

DWP People Survey Completion Rate

2015

16,823

73%

2016

16,324

68%

2017

16,702

69%

2018

17,109

68%

2019

19,914

67%

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
9th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people were in receipt of carer’s allowance in each region of the UK by (a) ethnicity and (b) gender in (i) 2020 and (ii) each of the last five years.

The requested information is not available for (a) ethnicity as it is not routinely recorded for claimants of Carer's Allowance.

The number of people receiving Carer’s Allowance in each region of Great Britain broken down by (b) gender is shown in the below table. The latest data available is as at November 2019. To be aware Carer’s Allowance was devolved to Scotland in September 2018.

Nov-15

Nov-16

Nov-17

Nov-18

Nov-19

Male

Female

Male

Female

Male

Female

Male

Female

Male

Female

England

178,511

474,335

186,277

496,156

189,470

515,027

192,480

534,645

199,334

551,491

Wales

14,775

33,423

15,155

34,864

15,633

36,267

15,954

37,686

16,499

38,730

Scotland

21,162

45,901

22,185

48,397

22,833

50,108

23,372

52,068

24,320

53,522

North East

14,209

31,514

15,029

33,366

15,589

34,837

15,856

36,423

16,661

37,823

North West

33,124

74,985

34,199

78,050

34,748

81,061

35,149

83,757

36,110

86,049

Yorkshire &the Humber

21,705

52,406

23,050

55,814

23,618

58,225

24,013

60,847

24,899

62,999

East Midlands

15,848

41,792

16,608

43,620

16,879

45,405

17,348

47,463

18,076

49,241

West Midlands

22,303

58,837

22,979

61,118

23,112

63,390

23,534

65,827

24,734

68,087

East of England

15,115

46,078

15,829

48,099

15,956

49,865

16,182

51,771

16,660

53,321

London

22,280

68,810

23,513

71,840

23,821

73,930

24,256

76,011

25,102

78,139

South East

19,632

60,513

20,260

63,165

20,675

65,764

20,784

68,238

21,409

70,382

South West

14,302

39,401

14,809

41,090

15,071

42,549

15,356

44,310

15,678

45,459

TOTAL

214,449

553,665

223,614

579,418

227,935

601,403

231,809

624,399

240,148

643,743

The information requested on the number of individuals in receipt of Carer’s Allowance is published and available at:

https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk

Guidance for users is available at:

https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/webapi/online-help/Getting-Started.html

16th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the impact on applicants of Health Education England’s change in policy to require applicants to have two years of qualified practice before receiving funding.

We have made no such assessment.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
8th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what additional support his Department has put in place for young children and families that are quarantining in Government provided hotels.

The hotels selected for managed quarantine are able to meet the vast majority of requirements. Hotels will prioritise allocating larger or connecting rooms to families. Whilst there is no prescriptive list of support for young children and families, there are opportunities to exercise outside as arranged with the hotel security guards and staff will be available. Medical and mental health support is provided where needed, together with access to social workers for advice and support. Food is available throughout the day with a choice of menus accommodating dietary requirements, delivered to the hotel rooms. All rooms have televisions and free WiFi.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
8th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will make it his policy to waive the cost of covid-19 tests on compassionate grounds for people travelling internationally for (a) funerals, (b) caring duties and (c) medical reasons.

The Government is not currently considering whether to create policy to waive the costs of COVID-19 tests on compassionate grounds.

The costs of travel testing have fallen significantly since they were first introduced. Charging by private providers is based on a market model, with NHS Test and Trace testing at the mid-market level. We also offer deferred payment plans and hardship support for people who cannot afford to pay for the cost of managed quarantine and testing. In some circumstances this may be available to those who are not in receipt of income related benefits.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
24th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many carers accessed the Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) programme in (a) 2018-19, (b) 2019-2020 and (c) 2020-21.

The data is not held in the format requested. The Improving Access to Psychological Therapies data set does not record whether the person accessing therapies is a carer.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
24th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the recovery rate was for carers accessing the Improving Access to Psychological Therapies programme in (a) 2018-19, (b) 2019-20 and (c) 2020-21.

The data is not held in the format requested. The Improving Access to Psychological Therapies data set does not record whether the person accessing therapies is a carer.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
27th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to ensure that his Department implements an increase in annual social care funding of £3.9 billion by 2023–24 to meet demographic changes and planned increases in the National Living Wage.

We are providing councils with access to over £1 billion of additional funding for social care in 2021-22 on top of the significant support provided over the last year to support the sector to deal with COVID-19.This funding is designed to ensure key pressures are met, including demographic changes and increases in the National Living Wage and National Minimum Wage. Funding decisions on social care beyond 2021-22 will be decided at the next Spending Review.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
21st Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will waive the cost of covid-19 tests on compassionate grounds for people travelling internationally for (a) funerals, (b) caring duties and (c) medical reasons.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before prorogation.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
23rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether the Government has consulted organisations representing unpaid carers in drawing up guidance on vaccinating them against the coronavirus.

We are developing bespoke guidance for unpaid carers, set out in a Standard Operating Protocol, which has been co-produced with Carers UK, the Carers Trust, the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services and the Local Government Association. This will be published shortly.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
23rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when the Government plans to publish guidance on vaccinating unpaid carers against covid-19.

We are developing bespoke guidance for unpaid carers, set out in a Standard Operating Protocol, which has been co-produced with Carers UK, the Carers Trust, the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services and the Local Government Association. This will be published shortly.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
8th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will take steps to ensure care packages are re-implemented after the covid-19 outbreak without any requirement for further assessment.

Assessments of social care packages under the Care Act 2014 have been continuing during the pandemic in the majority of areas. The Care Act easements were introduced by eight local authorities in total, but no local authorities are currently implementing these easements. It is for local authorities to decide whether a review or reassessment is required. Where care packages are reduced during the COVID-19 outbreak, local authorities may review the changes to ensure that all needs are being met.

The Care Act 2014 requires that where an adult or carer appears to have care and support needs the local authority must carry out a care needs assessment. Once an eligibility determination has been made the local authority should then carry out a financial assessment to determine whether or not the person should pay anything towards their care.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
8th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans he has to collect data on carers’ assessments and carers’ respite provision at a national level; and if he will make a statement.

NHS Digital collect annual information from local authorities in England detailing support provided for both new and already known carers. This support can be the outcome of a carer assessment or a carer review. Carers are included if they were receiving ongoing support during the year, even if no review of those arrangements took place. Information is provided relating to the type of support offered to the carer - for example, direct support such as ‘direct payments’ or ‘Councils with Adult Social Services Responsibilities (CASSR) managed Personal Budget’, or if support was directly arranged by the local authority for the cared-for person. This includes respite services.

Those carers assessed during the year but provided no support are also counted. In addition, last November we commissioned the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services to run a survey with local authorities to capture data on the current status of day services nationally to understand and help overcome the challenges in reopening and extending day care opportunities to enable carers to access respite.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
8th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government on the resumption of local authority carers’ respite services.

Throughout the pandemic we have worked with local authorities to support them to maintain services and support for unpaid carers. After the first wave of the pandemic we worked with the Social Care Institute for Excellence to publish guidance on the safe reopening of day/respite services.

We have also enabled some of the money provided to local authorities through the Infection Control Fund to be used to help services reopen safely or be reconfigured to work in a COVID-19 secure way to continue to provide community and day support services, which we know in turn provide respite for carers. The restrictions on leaving home and gathering during the current lockdown have been drafted to ensure that day services can continue to operate with up to 15 service users per session and for people to leave home for respite and receive respite care in their own homes. These respite provisions apply to both unpaid carers and those they care for.

We know that day services and other forms of respite care are vital services and we are working with local authorities, in collaboration with the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services and Ministerial counterparts in the Ministry for Housing, Communities and Local Government to ensure, where possible, the safe resumption of services.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
8th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans he has to allow the resumption of close contact care home visits; and if he will make a statement.

In the face of a new variant of the virus we have acted to protect those most at risk in care homes and while advising how visits can go ahead safely in some form. As set out in updated visiting guidance, visits to care homes can continue to take place with arrangements such as substantial screens, visiting pods or behind windows. Close-contact indoor visits are not currently advised. As has been the case throughout the pandemic, visits in exceptional circumstances including end of life should always be supported and enabled.

We recognise how important it is to allow care home residents to meet their loved ones safely. We are looking to enable a wider range of visiting arrangements available when it is safe to do so. We will publish updated guidance as this period of national restrictions ends.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
19th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans he has in place to ensure people who are not registered with a GP surgery get vaccinated against covid-19 as soon as possible.

In planning for the vaccine programme, NHS England and NHS Improvement have considered those who are not registered or who are unable to reach a general practitioner. The agreement under which general practices will deliver COVID-19 vaccinations - The General Practice COVID-19 vaccination programme 2020/21 Enhanced Service Specification - enables practices, working within their Primary Care Network (PCN) groupings, to vaccinate unregistered patients provided they are eligible for a vaccination.

General practices, working in PCNs, form just one part of the plan for delivering COVID-19 vaccinations. They will operate as part of a system of providers, ensuring best possible coverage of the population. Each PCN grouping is required to work with their local regional team to understand the current healthcare provision for vulnerable groups.

More than 730 vaccination sites have already been set up across the UK and hundreds more are opening this week, taking the total to over 1,000.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
3rd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what meetings he has had with carers' organisations across the UK since March 2020.

The Secretary of State for Health and Social Care has had the following meetings with carers organisations since March:

- adult social care stakeholder roundtable event on 22 July 2020; and

- meeting with Professor Martin Green, Care England on 22 July 2020.

I have also met with a range of organisations representing those providing paid and unpaid care.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
3rd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to ensure that local authorities meet their duties under the Care Act 2014 and Children and Families Act 2014 to provide support to young carers.

During the COVID-19 outbreak adult social care providers and services should still be maintaining their responsibilities under the Care Act 2014 and Children and Families Act 2014 to ensure young carers are identified and referred to appropriate support if needed.

The Government has published guidance for both schools and local authorities on how best to support to families and protect vulnerable children during COVID-19. This is available on GOV. UK. Local authority duties to assess the needs of young carers, under Section 17 of the Children Act 1989, are unchanged.

The total number of young carers in England having received needs assessments in the last 12-month period is not available. However, as identified in the Characteristics of Children in Need: 2018 to 2019 statistics, there were 16,520 episodes of need assessments during the year ending 31 March 2019 where being a young carer was identified.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
3rd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many young carers in England have received needs assessments in the last 12 month period for which data is available.

During the COVID-19 outbreak adult social care providers and services should still be maintaining their responsibilities under the Care Act 2014 and Children and Families Act 2014 to ensure young carers are identified and referred to appropriate support if needed.

The Government has published guidance for both schools and local authorities on how best to support to families and protect vulnerable children during COVID-19. This is available on GOV. UK. Local authority duties to assess the needs of young carers, under Section 17 of the Children Act 1989, are unchanged.

The total number of young carers in England having received needs assessments in the last 12-month period is not available. However, as identified in the Characteristics of Children in Need: 2018 to 2019 statistics, there were 16,520 episodes of need assessments during the year ending 31 March 2019 where being a young carer was identified.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
12th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many children in London have been hospitalised with malnutrition since the beginning of the covid-19 outbreak in March 2020.

Information is not available in the format requested.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
1st Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what safeguarding provisions his Department has put in place for women who have been prescribed abortions at home during the covid-19 outbreak.

Safeguarding is an essential component of abortion services. All providers must comply with legal requirements and have regard to any statutory guidance relating to children, young people and vulnerable adults. Providers must ensure that all staff are trained in recognising the signs of potential abuse and know how to respond. Providers must have written guidance that staff are aware of and can easily refer to as well as easy access to a named lead in the organisation for guidance and advice. It is also a requirement that clinicians caring for women requesting abortion should be able to identify those who require more support than can be provided in the routine abortion service setting, for example young women, those with a pre-existing mental health condition, those who are subject to sexual violence or poor social support, or where there is evidence of coercion.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how much revenue has been collected in fines at NHS facilities as a result of parking infringements in each of the last five years.

The Estates Return Information Collection publishes data annually on income National Health Service trusts receive from car parking split between patients, and visitors and staff. Income from fines as a result of parking infringements is not identified separately.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many children (a) attended A&E and (b) were admitted to hospital as a result of self-harming in each of the last five years.

Data is not available in the format requested.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many children have been moved out-of-area for inpatient mental health hospital admissions (a) since 1 January 2020 and (b) in each of the last five years.

The information requested is not available in the format requested.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many children have been prescribed anti-depressants (a) since 1 January 2020 and (b) in each of the last five years.

The NHS Business Services Authority have announced the publication of experimental statistics on Medicines Used in Mental Health. These will include the number of children, aged 17 years or younger, that have been prescribed anti-depressants in each financial year from 2015/16 to 2019/20 and up to Q1 of 2020/21. The provisional release date for these statistics is 10 September.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many children have been referred to Improving Access to Psychological Therapies services (a) since 1 January 2020 and (b) in each of the last five years.

The data is not available is not available in the format requested.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many (a) nurses and (b) doctors there were in the NHS, by ethnicity, in each of the last five years.

NHS Digital publishes bi-annual statistics on diversity and inclusion as part of its NHS Digital Hospital and Community Health Service Workforce Statistics bi-annual publication. The following tables show the number of doctors and nurses and health visitors broken down by ethnicity, as at September each year for the last four years, plus latest data this year, as at March 2020 is the latest available data on ethnicity. Data is provided as at September each year to account for changes in the recruitment cycle.

Doctors

September 2016

September 2017

September 2018

September 2019

March 2020

Asian or Asian British

29,369

30,398

31,565

33,707

34,896

Black or Black British

3,966

4,256

4,664

5,443

5,960

Chinese

2,572

2,684

2,811

2,941

2,946

Mixed

3,056

3,271

3,431

3,733

3,988

White

60,884

61,809

61,281

61,958

62,359

Any Other Ethnic Group

4,054

4,259

4,477

5,029

5,367

Discontinued codes

38

36

35

31

30

Not Stated

6,753

6,931

7,774

8,458

8,746

Unknown

2,552

2,783

2,827

3,085

2,613

Total

113,244

116,427

118,865

124,385

126,905

Nurses and Health Visitors

September 2016

September 2017

September 2018

September 2019

March 2020

Asian or Asian British

25,829

27,054

28,949

32,389

35,709

Black or Black British

23,505

24,175

25,115

26,909

28,632

Chinese

1,197

1,129

1,117

1,110

1,112

Mixed

4,047

4,087

4,302

4,610

4,829

White

242,702

240,616

238,367

238,150

239,540

Any Other Ethnic Group

9,513

10,118

11,110

13,200

14,531

Discontinued codes

191

172

158

122

110

Not Stated

10,993

10,679

10,605

11,200

11,547

Unknown

2,137

1,994

2,644

2,799

3,130

Total

320,114

320,024

322,367

330,489

339,140

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to implement the recommendations of Baroness Cumberlege's Review on the Safety of Certain Medicines and Medical Devices; and if he will make a statement.

The Independent Medicines and Medical Devices Safety Review published its report on 8 July. All the report’s recommendations will be considered carefully.

The Government will provide an update in due course.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the progress of trials by NHS Highlands of drones being used to transport medical supplies; and what assessment he has made of the potential for the wider roll-out of that technology across the UK.

The NHS Long Term Plan is bringing new technologies into the National Health Service to improve patient care and save lives, and we continue to support testing of innovations such as convenient, faster technology to help frontline staff to give people world-leading treatment. This includes supporting NHS staff through the NHS Clinical Entrepreneur Programme, run by the Accelerated Access Collaborative, to develop their own innovative ideas, for example exploring the potential use of autonomous drone delivery systems within healthcare.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
10th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will urge the US Administration to reconsider their plans to withdraw from the World Health Organisation; and if he will make a statement.

The Department is regularly in discussions with other countries including the United States on a wide range of issues relating to the international response to COVID-19. The United States continues to play an important role on global health, and we will continue to work with the United States and other international partners to tackle the current crisis. The United Kingdom has a strong and committed relationship with the World Health Organization (WHO) and, as the second largest Member State donor, continues to work closely with the WHO. The United Kingdom has already contributed £75 million to help the WHO-led international efforts to stop the spread of the virus and end the pandemic and the UK has no plans to stop funding the WHO, which has an important role to play in leading the global health response to COVID-19.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
10th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has of the implications for his policies of the study on herd immunity entitled, Prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 in Spain (ENE-COVID): a nationwide, population-based seroepidemiological study, published in The Lancet; and if he will make a statement.

The response to COVID-19 continues to be guided by science and learning from domestic and international research is a key part of this.

In order to gain answers to critical questions such as those related to recovery from and potential immunity to COVID-19, the United Kingdom Government is conducting some of the biggest seroprevalence surveys in the world. This includes using lab-based tests to monitor the number of people that are presenting an antibody response and how this response changes over time.

The Government has made no assessment of the possibility of the UK population achieving herd immunity as it is not the Government’s policy, nor its aim for herd immunity to be achieved.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
10th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what discussions he has had with his Irish counterpart on that country's covid-19 track and trace app; and if he will make a statement.

We are working closely with the Republic of Ireland and our other international partners to build understanding and share learning across borders. There are many countries like the United Kingdom that are working on how best to deploy their apps while taking into account cultural and societal differences, and we have been proactive in exchanging ideas on how best to do this.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
7th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the threat to the UK of the G4 EA H1N1 virus; and if he will make a statement.

We continually assess the most significant threats that the United Kingdom and its citizens could face, including natural hazard risks such as a pandemic influenza.

The Government continues to review and improve surveillance for potentially zoonotic and new and emerging infections, with early detection through horizon scanning and epidemic intelligence activities, research, and continually improving diagnostic techniques for the identification of zoonotic pathogens.

In line with our standard practice, Public Health England is undertaking a risk assessment of the G4 influenza virus and we will take any appropriate action based on robust scientific and clinical advice.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
7th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will introduce screening for post-traumatic stress disorder for people who have survived covid-19; and if he will make a statement.

Emerging evidence suggests that some people recovering from the COVID-19 virus are likely to experience significant ongoing health problems, including mental health problems such as post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety and depression.

NHS England and NHS Improvement have worked with the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust to develop a digital, interactive, personalised recovery programme. The new ‘Your COVID Recovery’ service, which was announced on 5 July, forms part of National Health Service plans to expand access to COVID-19 rehabilitation treatments for those who have survived the virus but still have problems with mental health problems, breathing or other complications.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
7th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social care, what assessment the Government has made of the effect of the reopening of pubs on the covid-19 R rate; and if she will make a statement.

Ministers have taken into account scientific advice and assessments of the current position against the five tests. The changes, including the reopening of pubs, are a cautious next step in returning life to as normal, whilst limiting the transmission risk. The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy has published COVID-19 secure guidance on GOV.UK to help businesses put mitigations in place to minimise this risk. We will continue to monitor the R number and remain ready to put the brakes on and implement stricter measures if needed.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
7th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to secure supplies of remdesivir for the NHS in response to the US Government's decision to stockpile the drug; and if he will make a statement.

Remdesivir has been available to National Health Service patients with COVID-19 as part of clinical trials and through the Early Access to Medicines Scheme. Remdesivir has now been granted a conditional marketing authorisation for use in patients with COVID-19 and NHS England and NHS Improvement have published an interim commissioning policy, which states that NHS patients will be eligible for treatment in accordance with its licence. The NHS has sufficient stock for patients who need it.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
7th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of NHS access to remdesivir; and if he will make a statement.

Remdesivir has been available to National Health Service patients with COVID-19 as part of clinical trials and through the Early Access to Medicines Scheme. Remdesivir has now been granted a conditional marketing authorisation for use in patients with COVID-19 and NHS England and NHS Improvement have published an interim commissioning policy, which states that NHS patients will be eligible for treatment in accordance with its licence. The NHS has sufficient stock for patients who need it.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
25th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he has had discussions with his Singaporean counterpart on that country's track and trace covid-19 app; and if he will make a statement.

Our response to this virus has and will continue to be as part of an international effort. We have been in frequent contact with a number of countries, including Singapore, to share what we are learning and that will continue.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
25th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will take steps to end the practice of private social care workers being paid by the minute; and if he will make a statement.

All social care workers are entitled to be paid at least the national minimum wage or national living wage for the work that they do. Time spent caring for clients, travelling between appointments, and waiting to start the appointment should be included in the pay calculation. Further guidance on what counts as working time is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/minimum-wage-different-types-work

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what amount of dexamethasone (a) has been ordered in 2020 and (b) purchased in each of the last five years.

The information is not available in the format requested.

The Government has taken action to secure supply of dexamethasone in the United Kingdom, buying additional stocks ahead of time in the event of a positive trial outcome. These stocks have been procured centrally in addition to the business as usual stocks purchased regularly by National Health Service organisations. There is enough treatment for over 200,000 people from this stockpile alone.

The NHS Business Services Authority publishes Prescription Cost Analysis data covering prescriptions dispensed in the community in England at the following link:

https://www.nhsbsa.nhs.uk/prescription-data/dispensing-data/prescription-cost-analysis-pca-data

Data for calendar years 2015-2019, and January to March 2020 is currently available.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of the number of women who did not have a smear test which was due during the covid-19 lockdown; and if he will make a statement.

We do not hold data on the number of estimated screens per month. Information on cervical screening uptake rates is published quarterly by NHS Digital and can be found on its website at the following link:

https://digital.nhs.uk/data-and-information/publications/statistical/cervical-screening-programme/cervical-screening-programme-coverage-statistics-management-information

The last available data, published 21 April 2020, pertains to Q3 2019-20. The next set of data (Q4 2019-20) will be published in July 2020.

NHS England and NHS Improvement are aware that in some areas some providers of NHS Cervical Screening Programme services have, for operational reasons and to minimise risk to patients during the COVID-19 pandemic, rescheduled some invitations or appointments to a later date. NHS England and NHS Improvement have been working with them to ensure this is managed safely for patients and with a view to rescheduling as soon as possible.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many eye tests have been carried out by opticians in each month of 2020.

Data is not available in the format requested.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish the ambulance response times for each ambulance trust for each of the last 12 months.

Ambulance Quality Indicators including response times for each ambulance trust can be found in the data published monthly, by NHS England. This is available at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/statistics/statistical-work-areas/ambulance-quality-indicators/

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will list the dates of meetings (a) he and (b) his officials have had with representatives of Apple and Google to discuss their covid-19 tracing app.

We have worked closely with Apple and Google and will continue to do so as we focus our efforts on taking forward a solution that brings together our app, and their framework. The Secretary of State for Health and Social Care has had no meetings with Google or Apple to discuss the app. Departmental officials have met with Apple and Google to discuss the app, including but not limited to the following dates:

26 March;

10 April;

15 April;

19 April;

22 April;

27 April;

29 April;

4 May;

21 May;

4 June;

17 June;

22 June;

and 24 June.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many staff in his Department are working on a covid-19 tracing app.

There are currently 64 civil or crown servants working on the COVID-19 app.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the cost to the public purse was of the Isle of Wight pilot of the NHS covid-19 tracing app.

To date, the total cost of developing the National Health Service COVID-19 app is £10.8 million and our investment in the Isle of Wight phase has provided us with valuable information that we can combine with Google and Apple’s technology in a new solution to support the entire NHS Test and Trace service.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how much his Department has spent on developing the (a) NHS covid-19 app and (b) Apple/Google designed app.

To date, the cost of developing the National Health Service COVID-19 app is £10.8 million.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what discussions he has had with his German counterpart on their covid-19 contact tracing app; and if he will make a statement.

We have been in constant contact with a number of countries to share what we are learning and that will continue.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many smear tests were conducted in each of the last 12 months.

Information on cervical screening uptake rates is published quarterly by NHS Digital and can be found on its website using the following link:

https://digital.nhs.uk/data-and-information/publications/statistical/cervical-screening-programme/cervical-screening-programme-coverage-statistics-management-information

The last available data, published 21 April 2020, pertains to Q3 2019-20. The next set of data (Q4 2019-20) will be published in July 2020.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many dental consultations were carried out by NHS dentists in each month in 2020.

Data is not held in the format requested.

Data is collected and published on the number of National Health Service courses of treatment delivered. This data is published every six months broken down by quarter. The latest data available is for the period ending 30 September 2019 and is available at the following link:

https://digital.nhs.uk/data-and-information/publications/statistical/nhs-dental-statistics/2019-20-biannual-report

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many (a) solar panels and (b) wind turbines his Department's buildings (a) have in 2020 and (b) had in each of the last five years.

The Department has not had any buildings with wind turbines or solar panels in the last five years.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
16th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what amount of flu vaccine his Department (a) ordered in 2020 and (b) purchased in each of the last five years.

Public Health England (PHE) secures sufficient volume of flu vaccines used in the children’s flu programme to ensure that eligible children aged less than 18 years who present for vaccination can be offered an appropriate vaccine. Information on the number of doses procured by PHE is commercially sensitive.

General practitioners and community pharmacists are directly responsible for ordering flu vaccine from suppliers which are used to deliver the national flu programme to all other eligible groups.

In 2015/16 and 2019/20, around 400,000 doses of adult flu vaccine were procured as a contingency stock. We are currently considering stock levels for the 2020/21 season.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
16th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of expanding the flu vaccination programme to help prepare for a potential second wave of covid-19; and if he will make a statement.

The flu vaccination programme will be a critical part of preparing the United Kingdom for winter and as part of our planning should we see co-circulation of flu and COVID-19.

On 14 May we published the Annual Flu letter 2020/21, available at the following link:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/885281/The_national_flu_immunisation_programme_2020_to_2021.pdf

This indicated the main groups who are eligible for free flu vaccination.

We are planning for the flu season well in advance and further details will be published soon.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
16th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what (a) amount and (b) value of personal protective equipment has been received by the NHS from (i) foreign governments, (ii) donations from the public and (iii) UK businesses in 2020.

Eighty-seven PPE donations have been received from foreign governments, businesses and members of the public since 13 April 2020, this amounts to a total of 53,221,078 items of PPE (as of 27 June). The value of these donations is estimated to be £27,307,664.

UK businesses and members of the public have received one hundred and eighty-six PPE donations since 13 April 2020, this amounts to a total of 32,011,472 items of PPE (as of 27 June). These value of this is estimated to be £33,688,871.

To note: further to your previous question, the number seems low as it is for the previous financial year, and several of the purchases in February/March will not be reported until the end of the next financial year. I’ve fact checked the numbers with the team, and they’ve confirmed they are correct for this period.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
16th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many meetings (a) he and (b) Ministers in his Department have had with EU counterparts in 2020.

The Secretary of State and Ministers have met with their European Union counterparts including German counterparts on several occasions in 2020.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
16th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many meetings (a) he and (b) Ministers in his Department have had with German counterparts in 2020.

The Secretary of State and Ministers have met with their European Union counterparts including German counterparts on several occasions in 2020.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
16th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what discussions he has had with care providers on increased costs due to covid-19 being passed on to people in care homes; and if he will make a statement.

We recognise that COVID-19 is imposing significant pressures on the social care sector. We have now made £3.7 billion available to local authorities so they can address pressures on local services caused by the pandemic, including in adult social care. On 15 May we published details of an additional £600 million Infection Control Fund for Adult Social Care. This funding is to support adult social care providers in England reduce the rate of transmission in and between care homes and to support workforce resilience. This funding is intended to cover both the publicly funded and self-funded care markets.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
16th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the (a) amount and (b) value of personal protective equipment sent to the UK by foreign governments was in 2020.

Twenty-one personal protective equipment (PPE) donations from foreign governments have been received since 13 April 2020. This amounts to 34,341,800 items of PPE (as of 27 June). The value of these donations is estimated at £18,288,438.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how much energy his departmental buildings have used in (a) each of the last five years and (b) 2020 to date.

The amount of electricity and natural gas used by the Department’s buildings (in Kilowatt Hours) between 2015 and 2020 is shown in the following table.

Year

Gas (KwH)

Electricity (KwH)

2015

9,394,407

4,173,275

2016

9,666,697

4,059,868

2017

9,547,368

4,574,395

2018

7,703,745

3,854,409

2019

8,097,642

3,656,675

2020

3,333,391

1,978,644

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
11th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will list the dates of meetings (a) he and (b) his Ministers have had with (i) Professor Kevin Fenton, (ii) Professor John Newton and (iii) Chris Hopson, Chief Executive of NHS Providers since February 2020.

The Department of Health and Social Care ministers have meetings with many arms-length body officials and stakeholders in the conduct of their ministerial duties.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
11th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many meetings (a) he and (b) his Ministers have had with (a) Professor Kevin Fenton and (b) Professor John Newton.

The Department of Health and Social Care ministers have meetings with many arms-length body officials and stakeholders in the conduct of their ministerial duties.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
10th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of the report entitled Characteristics and outcomes of pregnant women admitted to hospital with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection in UK: national population based cohort study published in the British Medical Journal on 8 June 2020; and if he will make a statement.

The report, based on cases submitted to the National Institute for Health Research-funded United Kingdom Obstetric Surveillance System, found that more than half of pregnant women admitted to hospital with SARS-CoV-2 infection were from black or other ethnic minority groups, most women did not have severe illness and were admitted in the third trimester, and transmission of infection to infants of infected mothers may occur but is uncommon.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
9th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many staff in his Department had caring responsibilities in each of the last five years.

As part of our commitment to achieving a workforce representative of the society we service and providing equality of opportunity, we monitor representation of all protected characteristics across the Department. We also provide the opportunity for staff to self-declare if they have caring responsibilities.

Providing this information relies on employees voluntarily completing their diversity information on our electronic HR system and we continue to encourage staff to complete their self-declaration.

The declaration rate for caring responsibilities within the Department is 52.1% (as at 31 March 2020) and therefore, to note that the information provided is based on how many staff self-declared they had caring responsibilities in each respective year.

- 2016 – 703

- 2017 – 458

- 2018 – 410

- 2019 – 420

- 2020 – 388

It should be noted that the data is as of 31 March of each year. It includes civil servants only (permanent, fixed-term appointment and loan in) but excludes secondee in and loan out employees. It excludes contingent labour (contractors, consultants and agency workers) as we do not record this information for them.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
9th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what discussions officials in his Department have had with health officials in the New Zealand Government on that country's approach to tackling covid-19; and if he will make a statement.

The Department is regularly in discussions with other countries, including New Zealand, on a wide range of issues of issues relating to COVID-19 and has been throughout the pandemic. COVID-19 presents a global challenge which requires a collaborative response. The Department will continue to work with other countries throughout the crisis and beyond.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
4th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether any steps are being taken to enable personal protective equipment to be reused by the NHS and care sector.

This is an international challenge that many countries are experiencing. We are working around the clock to give the National Health Service and social care sectors the personal protective equipment and support they need to tackle this outbreak.

Public Health England published ‘COVID-19 personal protective equipment (PPE)’ updated guide on 17 April. This advises that suitable decontamination arrangements for some PPE items should be obtained from the manufacturer, supplier or local infection control. This guidance also included advice on when PPE can be reused.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
19th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what criteria his Department is applying to health and social care charities for the funding allotted by the Government for charities in response to the covid-19 outbreak.

On 8 April 2020 the Chancellor announced £750 million to support the charity sector in response to COVID-19 with £360 million to be allocated by central Government to charities in England based on evidence of service need. The initial announcement set out that up to £200 million of the total was support for hospices.

The Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport has been working with other Government departments to identify other charities that are critical to the COVID-19 response and to agree funding. On 22 May a further announcement was made which detailed the health and social care charities that would be in receipt of a further £22 million of that funding at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/22-million-awarded-to-life-saving-health-charities-during-virus-outbreak

The Department of Health and Social Care is engaging with the relevant charities directly to ensure the money goes out to the charities as quickly as possible.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
19th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the £360 million Government funding for the charity sector in response to covid-19 outbreak, whether his Department has received an allocation of that funding; what discussions his Department is having with charities in the health and social care sector on that funding; and what the criteria are for applying for that funding.

On 8 April 2020 the Chancellor announced £750 million to support the charity sector in response to COVID-19 with £360 million to be allocated by central Government to charities in England based on evidence of service need. The initial announcement set out that up to £200 million of the total was support for hospices.

The Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport has been working with other Government departments to identify other charities that are critical to the COVID-19 response and to agree funding. On 22 May a further announcement was made which detailed the health and social care charities that would be in receipt of a further £22 million of that funding at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/22-million-awarded-to-life-saving-health-charities-during-virus-outbreak

The Department of Health and Social Care is engaging with the relevant charities directly to ensure the money goes out to the charities as quickly as possible.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
27th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans he has to tackle the 122,000 job vacancies in the social care sector identified by Skills for Care in October 2019.

The Government recognises that adult social care employers can struggle to recruit and retain the right number of staff, with the right values and skills, and that vacancy and turnover rates across the sector are high. We are working alongside stakeholders in adult social care to support a growing workforce, with the values and skills to deliver high quality, compassionate care.

The Department has invested £7 million over the past two years in a national recruitment campaign designed to raise the profile of adult social care, encourage potential applicants to apply for job vacancies, and highlight opportunities for career development and progression. Through our continued funding of Skills for Care we have also provided a range of resources and practical toolkits for providers to help attract, train and retain staff.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
8th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what estimate he has made of the (a) number of Afghans offered Chevening Scholar places for the 2021-22 academic year, (b) number of those scholars who were evacuated from Afghanistan and (c) number who remain in Afghanistan.

We cannot provide details on the number and location of Chevening scholars from Afghanistan in order to ensure their and their families' safety. Between 15 and 29 August, the UK evacuated over 15,000 people from Afghanistan. This includes around 500 special cases of particularly vulnerable Afghans, including Chevening scholars, journalists, human rights defenders, campaigners for women's rights, judges and many others.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
25th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what plans he has to continue Conflict, Stability and Security Fund programmes in Sri Lanka after the end of 2021-22.

Information on the Conflict, Stability and Security Fund (CSSF) budget for 2020/21 will be published in the CSSF programme summary, which will be made publicly available before parliament rises for summer. Any future CSSF allocations will be subject to the outcome of the spending review.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
25th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what amount of the Conflict, Stability and Security Fund budget for programmes in Sri Lanka (a) was unspent in 2020-21, (b) is allocated for 2021-22; how the underspend was allocated from the 2020-21 budget; and if he will make a statement.

Information on the Conflict, Stability and Security Fund (CSSF) budget for 2020/21 will be published in the CSSF programme summary, which will be made publicly available before parliament rises for summer. Any future CSSF allocations will be subject to the outcome of the spending review.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
25th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, when he plans to respond to the International Truth and Justice Project’s submission to the Global Human Rights Sanctions Regime.

The Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO) is grateful for the submission from the International Truth and Justice Project in relation to Sri Lanka. The UK's Global Human Rights sanctions regime offers a powerful tool to hold to account those involved in serious human rights violations or abuses. We will keep all evidence, including the submission from the International Truth and Justice Project, and potential listings under review. However, it is not appropriate to speculate who may be designated in the future, as to do so could reduce the impact of the designation.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
25th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of the International Truth and Justice Project’s submission to the Global Human Rights Sanctions Regime regarding Sri Lanka.

The Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO) is grateful for the submission from the International Truth and Justice Project in relation to Sri Lanka. The UK's Global Human Rights sanctions regime offers a powerful tool to hold to account those involved in serious human rights violations or abuses. We will keep all evidence, including the submission from the International Truth and Justice Project, and potential listings under review. However, it is not appropriate to speculate who may be designated in the future, as to do so could reduce the impact of the designation.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
5th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, if he will impose Magnitsky-style sanctions on people based in the UK who are alleged sponsors of the Belarusian senior leadership.

The UK has been at the forefront of the international response towards the fraudulent election and human rights violations in Belarus. Alongside Canada, we led on implementing sanctions against Lukashenko and his inner circle under the UK's Global Human Rights Regime. We have also carried over the EU's Belarus sanctions regime into UK law. To preserve the integrity of the sanctions process, it would be inappropriate to speculate publicly on future designations.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
1st Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what recent assessment he has made of the political situation in Uganda.

GROUPED WITH PQ 146764.

The UK Government has significant concerns about the treatment of opposition candidates in the run-up to and since the Ugandan elections, as well as the internet shutdown immediately before and during the elections. This does not provide for an open political landscape, within which democracy can flourish. I [Minister Duddridge] set out our concerns in a statement on 17 January about the political climate surrounding the elections and have urged the Government of Uganda to meet its international human rights commitments. Our High Commissioner has met with both President Museveni and leader of the opposition, Robert Kyagulanyi (also known as Bobi Wine), to convey our concerns and discuss democratic process.

The UK Government supports programmes for civil society groups and organisations in Uganda that promote democracy and transparent elections. We have spent more than £30 million since 2014 helping to strengthen institutions in Uganda to uphold democratic freedoms and advocate for the equal treatment of all Ugandans according to the terms of the Ugandan constitution and laws. As a long-standing partner to Uganda, the UK will continue to follow post-election developments closely, and engage with the Ugandan Government and Ugandans to advocate for democracy.

1st Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assistance the UK is providing in Uganda to support the development of transparent and peaceful democratic processes.

GROUPED WITH PQ 146764.

The UK Government has significant concerns about the treatment of opposition candidates in the run-up to and since the Ugandan elections, as well as the internet shutdown immediately before and during the elections. This does not provide for an open political landscape, within which democracy can flourish. I [Minister Duddridge] set out our concerns in a statement on 17 January about the political climate surrounding the elections and have urged the Government of Uganda to meet its international human rights commitments. Our High Commissioner has met with both President Museveni and leader of the opposition, Robert Kyagulanyi (also known as Bobi Wine), to convey our concerns and discuss democratic process.

The UK Government supports programmes for civil society groups and organisations in Uganda that promote democracy and transparent elections. We have spent more than £30 million since 2014 helping to strengthen institutions in Uganda to uphold democratic freedoms and advocate for the equal treatment of all Ugandans according to the terms of the Ugandan constitution and laws. As a long-standing partner to Uganda, the UK will continue to follow post-election developments closely, and engage with the Ugandan Government and Ugandans to advocate for democracy.

30th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what support his Department is providing to tackle global child malnutrition during the covid-19 pandemic.

Prevention and treatment of malnutrition remains a priority for the UK as part of our commitment to end the preventable deaths of mothers, newborns and children, particularly as malnourished people are likely to be more severely affected by COVID-19. The wider impacts of COVID-19 are also predicted to increase malnutrition across Africa and Asia in particular.

The Foreign Secretary has appointed the UK's first Special Envoy on Famine Prevention and Humanitarian Affairs to make sure malnutrition is averted in countries where food insecurity, conflict and COVID-19 have increased risk. The FCDO is continuing to deliver programmes to address malnutrition in countries such as Somalia, Yemen, South Sudan and Ethiopia. We are also supporting UNICEF to maintain provision of treatment for child wasting and to adapt relevant services in light of the pandemic.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
20th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what steps he will take with his European counterparts to help protect the rights of LGBTQ+ people in Poland following the election of President Duda; and if he will make a statement.

The UK is implacably opposed to all forms of discrimination and committed to promoting and protecting the rights and freedoms of LGBT people in all circumstances. Our Embassy in Warsaw is working actively on this agenda: it is engaged in dialogue with both civil society and the Polish Government, as well as with our diplomatic partners. It will continue to work with the LGBT community in Poland to identify opportunities to tackle discrimination and promote inclusion.

The Embassy has established itself as one of the diplomatic missions in Warsaw that is most active on the LGBT agenda. During last year's Pride season, it brought the diplomatic community in Warsaw together to endorse a joint letter expressing support for LGBT equality and respect for human rights, which over 50 diplomatic missions signed. On 17 January, our Embassy in Warsaw hosted a roundtable on the role of business and NGOs in promoting LGBT+ rights. The roundtable brought together the Polish business and LGBT+ communities to discuss how to jointly build a more inclusive society. This year, the Embassy flew the rainbow flag over the weekend of 20/21 June as part of its activity to promote Pride month.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
7th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, whether he has made representations to the US Administration on the stockpiling of Remdesivir in the US for the treatment of patients with covid-19; and if he will make a statement.

The coronavirus outbreak is the biggest public health emergency in a generation, and needs a strong and coordinated global health response. The UK Government is working closely with our international partners, including the United States, to deliver a robust global response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Our Ministers and diplomatic network continue to galvanise international support and financial commitments to support research, development and equitable access to vaccines, treatments and tests, including through the G7, G20 and other international fora.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
7th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what representations he has made to the Chinese Government on the alleged practice of forced sterilisations among ethnic minority women in the Xinjiang region in China; and if he will make a statement.

We are aware of reports that the Chinese Government is using forced sterilisation to minimise Uyghur birth rates. I set out during an Urgent Question in the House of Commons on 29 June, these reports add to our concern about the human rights situation in Xinjiang and we are considering them carefully. On 9 March the Foreign Secretary raised our concerns about the human rights situation in Xinjiang with his Chinese counterpart, Foreign Minister and State Councillor Wang Yi. On 30 June, the UK read out a statement on behalf of 28 countries at the 44th session of the UN Human Rights Council highlighting concerns about arbitrary detention, widespread surveillance and restrictions in Xinjiang.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
29th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what assessment he has made of the potential for NSO's Pegasus software being used to target foreign journalists and campaigners; and if he will make a statement.

There have been allegations that this software has been used in a way that is not in line with UK Human Rights Standards. We continue to champion human rights and media freedom around the world. Given these allegations are subject to ongoing investigations, it would not be appropriate for us to comment further.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
23rd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what assessment he has made of the recent military skirmishes on the Himalayan border between India and China; and if he will make a statement.

The Prime Minister commented in Parliament on 24 June that we are monitoring the situation closely and that we encourage both India and China to engage in dialogue. The status of the India-China border is a bilateral issue and we welcome the call between Foreign Ministers Wang Yi and Jaishankar on 17 June, the meeting between Army Commanders on 22 June, and the agreement that both sides would take steps to de-escalate.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
17th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, how many (a) solar panels and (b) wind turbines his Department's buildings (a) have in 2020 and (b) had in each of the last five years.

Energy suppliers providing services to departments through Crown Commercial Service (CCS) agreements are supportive of any decarbonisation strategy that is applied. It is for each department to determine their strategy for decarbonisation and CCS agreements allow the identification, analysis and installation of any decarbonisation solution required across the department's estate. The Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) has no solar panels or wind turbines on its UK Estate, nor has it had in the last 5 years.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
16th Jun 2020
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what estimate she has made of the number of LGBTQ+ people being given conversion therapy in 2020 in each of the last five years; and if she will make a statement.

According to the Government’s 2017 National LGBT Survey which surveyed over 100,000 LGBT people across the UK, 2% of respondents said they had undergone conversion therapy, and a further 5% of respondents said they had been offered it.

The Government takes this issue very seriously and fundamentally disagrees with any attempt to forcibly change someone’s sexuality. I am working with colleagues across Government on this issue, and we will outline plans to end its practice in due course.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
16th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, whether he and his Ministers have made representations to their counterparts in the US on the issue of police brutality in that country following the murder of George Floyd; and if he will make a statement.

The Foreign Secretary has been clear that the death of George Floyd was appalling, inexcusable and deeply distressing. We hope and trust that justice will be done. The violence we've seen in the US around this is very alarming. We've been clear that people must be allowed to protest peacefully. Our Embassy in the US has raised the issue of the protests with the US Administration and have explained the very strong interest in this issue among the British public.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
15th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, how much energy his departmental buildings used in (a) 2020 and (b) each of the last five years.

Information relating to the FCO's commitment to reducing energy consumption can be found in the FCO Sustainability Report 2018/19 on the gov.uk website here. A breakdown of energy consumption by site can be found on page 34.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
12th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, whether he has held discussions with his US counterpart on the release of Michael White by Iran; what lessons his Department can apply from that case in relation to release of Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe; and if he will make a statement.

The release of Michael White is a matter for the US Government; we should not draw parallels between the different circumstances in each case. The permanent release of all arbitrarily detained dual nationals in Iran and their return to their families in the UK remains our top priority. While the further extension of Mrs Zaghari-Ratcliffe's temporary release is a welcome step, we continue to urge the Iranian Government to make it permanent so she can return to her family in the UK. We continue to raise their cases at the most senior levels, and discuss them at every opportunity with our Iranian counterparts. Our Ambassador in Tehran consistently raises all of our dual national detainees with the Iranian Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
10th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, how many staff in his Department had caring responsibilities in each of the last five years.

From the 2019 Civil Service People Survey, 2,855 employees in the Foreign and Commonwealth Office stated that they had caring responsibilities. This is from 11,466 respondents (85% of the organisation). Data on caring responsibilities previous to 2019 is not held centrally and to compile it would incur disproportionate cost.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
21st Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what guidance he plans to make to billing authorities on which businesses are eligible for support from the £1.5 billion business rate relief fund as announced on 25 March 2021.

Funding for businesses affected by the COVID-19 pandemic that have not otherwise been eligible for existing reliefs will be available once the legislation relating to material change in circumstance provisions has passed and Local Authorities (LAs) have established their own local relief schemes. The Government will support LAs to do this as quickly as possible, including through new burdens funding.

Formal guidance will follow in due course, setting out the specific considerations that Local Authorities (LAs) should have regard for when providing relief. Relief will be for LAs to award on a discretionary basis.

20th Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, when the £1.5 billion business rate relief fund, announced on the 25th March 2021, will be distributed to businesses.

Funding for businesses affected by the COVID-19 pandemic that have not otherwise been eligible for existing reliefs will be available once the legislation relating to material change in circumstance provisions has passed and Local Authorities (LAs) have established their own local relief schemes. The Government will support LAs to do this as quickly as possible, including through new burdens funding.

Formal guidance will follow in due course, setting out the specific considerations that Local Authorities (LAs) should have regard for when providing relief. Relief will be for LAs to award on a discretionary basis.

20th Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the potential value of unresolved business rate appeals that have been made on the grounds of material changes of circumstance due to the covid-19 outbreak for 2020-21.

The Government announced on 25 March that it intended to legislate so that market-wide economic changes to property values should be considered at general rates revaluations, and therefore would rule out COVID-19 related material change of circumstance (MCC) claims that could lead to appeals.

At that point, around 170,000 business rates assessments had claims made for MCCs (in England). Some businesses made multiple claims on the same property and this figure excludes those. No claims have progressed to formal appeal as yet (the claims are at the initial Check or Challenge stage of the process).

No cases have yet been settled by the Valuation Office Agency (VOA) and the value of any rating assessment reductions would depend on the facts of each individual property, and the value of any business rates bill reduction on any reliefs to which the ratepayer may be entitled.

20th Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the number of business which applied made business rate appeals under material changes of circumstances due to the covid-19 outbreak in 2020-21.

The Government announced on 25 March that it intended to legislate so that market-wide economic changes to property values should be considered at general rates revaluations, and therefore would rule out COVID-19 related material change of circumstance (MCC) claims that could lead to appeals.

At that point, around 170,000 business rates assessments had claims made for MCCs (in England). Some businesses made multiple claims on the same property and this figure excludes those. No claims have progressed to formal appeal as yet (the claims are at the initial Check or Challenge stage of the process).

No cases have yet been settled by the Valuation Office Agency (VOA) and the value of any rating assessment reductions would depend on the facts of each individual property, and the value of any business rates bill reduction on any reliefs to which the ratepayer may be entitled.

4th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the EU’s sustainable finance action plan; and what steps he plans to take to ensure that the financial services sector in the UK is competitive in sustainable finance.

The UK supported the development of the EU Sustainable Finance Action Plan whilst a member state and has committed to match its ambition in the UK. The Green Finance Strategy, published in 2019, set out a comprehensive approach to greening the financial system, mobilising finance for clean and resilient growth, and capturing the resulting opportunities for UK firms.

We have so far delivered on and exceeded the ambition set out in that Strategy: We havee set up the Green Finance Institute; become the first major country to mandate TCFD disclosures; committed to implement a green taxonomy; and signalled our intention to issue a Green Gilt at a total of £15bn and will also offer an innovative retail savings product alongside it.

We’ve augmented the Government’s Economic Objectives and the remit of the principal financial regulators to support environmental sustainability and the transition to net zero, and established the UK Infrastructure Bank with a mandate to tackle climate change.

On the international stage, taking advantage of our role as President, we recently secured commitment of the G7 to support moving towards mandatory climate-related financial disclosures, to bring others up to our level of commitment. As we work towards COP26 we have established the Glasgow Financial Alliance for Net Zero, to foster ambition and action for Net Zero in the finance sector and are supporting the convergence and development of international standards in sustainable finance through working with the IFRS and the International Platform on Sustainable Finance.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
12th May 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether his Department plans to provide support for self-employed individuals who were not aware that late filing of 2019-20 tax returns would obstruct their access to the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme.

At the Budget on 3 March, the Government announced the details of two further rounds of the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme (SEISS). Alongside this, the Government announced that HMRC will now use 2019-20 tax returns to determine the eligibility and award for the SEISS, provided these returns were submitted by 2 March.

This means that hundreds of thousands of people, many of whom became self-employed in 2019-20, may now be able to claim the fourth and fifth grants.

The Government has already given self-employed people more than a month after the statutory deadline to submit their returns. HMRC waived late filing penalties until 28 February. Self-employed individuals who did not file by 31 January will, where possible, have received a notification from HMRC that their return was late.

Allowing returns submitted after the terms and criteria of the SEISS grants were announced on 3 March would have created a significant incentive for fraud. The Government has a duty to protect the tax system from the small minority who would seek to exploit it. The 2 March cut-off point balances access for the vast majority of eligible self-employed individuals, with the Government’s duty to protect the taxpayer against fraud.

The SEISS continues to be just one element of a substantial package of support to the self-employed. The Government has also provided a wide range of loan schemes, business grants, business rates relief, tax cuts, mortgage holidays, increased welfare support, and the Kickstart and Restart schemes.

8th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to his Budget 2021 statement on 3 March 2021, whether the support packages for retail, hospitality and leisure businesses extend to the events and exhibitions sector.

The Government understands this is a difficult time for the events and exhibitions sector who have been acutely impacted by the pandemic.

From April business rate paying businesses in these sectors may be eligible for restart grants of up to £18,000 per business premises. Guidance for Local Authorities (LA) on the eligibility for these grants will be published shortly. In addition, the Government has announced LAs in England will receive a top-up worth a total of £425 million to their allocation from the Additional Restrictions Grant (ARG), which has already provided LAs with £1.6 billion. This funding is at the LAs discretion and is intended to support businesses which are not eligible for restart grants, but which are nonetheless experiencing a severe impact on their business.

The events and exhibitions sector will also benefit from the extension of the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS), the Self Employments Income Support Scheme (SEISS), the UK-wide Recovery Loan Scheme, and may also benefit from the £300m extension to the Culture Recovery Fund announced at Budget. This is in addition to the £1.57 billion provided in July 2020.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
2nd Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent estimate he has made of the amount of unspent (a) childcare vouchers and (b) money in tax-free childcare accounts.

We do not publish data on the amount of unspent childcare vouchers or money in Tax-Free Childcare accounts. Data on the number of unspent childcare vouchers would rest with each individual provider. However, I recognise that the number of parents with unspent childcare vouchers has increased as a result of the pandemic.

The Government is continuing to work with the childcare sector in order to understand how to best support them to ensure that safe, appropriate and affordable childcare is available for those returning to work now, and for all families who need it in the longer term.

Parents with Childcare Vouchers they do not need can seek to get a refund from their employer. However, whether the refund is possible depends on the contract between the voucher provider, employee and employer. Any amounts refunded would also be subject to the appropriate tax and NICs deductions.

Childcare Vouchers are now closed to new entrants. They have been replaced with Tax-Free Childcare (TFC). TFC is fairer as it makes access to childcare support available to more working families, including the self-employed and those working for employers who don’t offer vouchers. Lone parent households also receive the same support as those with more than one parent, unlike Childcare Vouchers where support is allocated per working parent. In addition, parents can withdraw the money they have paid in at any time, with the top-up going back to the Government.

Steve Barclay
Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
6th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what safeguards are in place to protect women from a higher job loss rate than men as a result of economic damage from the covid-19 outbreak.

To help protect people’s jobs, the Government announced the unprecedented Coronavirus Job Retention, or “furlough”, Scheme (CJRS) to help firms keep millions of people in employment. In total, up to 31 October, almost 4.5 million female jobs had been supported through the scheme. The CJRS has been extended until the end of April.

Alongside this, the government has announced additional support for working parents. Any working parent usually eligible for Tax Free Childcare or 30 hours free childcare in receipt of support through the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme or Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme will temporarily remain eligible if they fall below the minimum income requirement due to COVID-19. This supports parents with childcare commitments who are temporarily working less as result of Covid-19.

In its Plan for Jobs, the Government has announced unprecedented support to help unemployed people in Great Britain find a job. We are providing £1.2bn this year to significantly expand and enhance work search support, including doubling the number of work coaches, additional investment into the Flexible Support Fund to provide direct support at a local level, and using externally contracted provision to expand support even further.

This Spending Review builds on this by providing £3.6 billion additional funding in 2021-22 for DWP to deliver employment support to those who need it most – from helping the recently unemployed to swiftly find new work, to offering greater support for people who will find that journey harder.

These measures will help provide job opportunities to women.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
10th Jul 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of the measures announced in his summer economic update on the (a) UK's net zero emissions target and (b) Paris climate agreement; and whether he will make a statement.

Our world-leading Green Book guidance provides a robust framework for assessing the impact of interventions on achieving our environmental goals.

As part of the Plan for Jobs, the Chancellor announced over £3 billion of new funding for green buildings, including a £2 billion Green Homes Grant scheme to upgrade people’s homes and £1 billion to improve the energy efficiency of public sector buildings.

This accelerates our progress towards net zero, saving the equivalent of up to 0.6 MtCO2e per year, which is roughly equivalent to taking up to 270,000 cars off the road.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
10th Jul 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will take steps to stop HMRC treating employer supplied covid-19 testing kits as employee benefits in kind; and if he will make a statement.

The Government is introducing an income tax exemption and National Insurance (NICs) disregard to ensure that coronavirus antigen testing provided by an employer to employees outside the Government’s national testing scheme will not attract tax and NICs liabilities. The new exemption will apply across the United Kingdom for the current tax year 2020-21.

18th Jun 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the (a) quantity and (b) value was of healthcare personal protective equipment (i) exported from and (ii) imported to the UK in 2020.

HM Revenue & Customs (HMRC) are responsible for the collection and publication of data on UK imports and exports of goods to and from the UK. HMRC release this information monthly, as a National Statistic: the Overseas Trade in Goods Statistics.

There is aggregated trade data available for personal protective equipment (PPE) goods and for the periods requested on HMRC’s uktradeinfo.com website, under ‘Build your own data tables’. The site also contains a ‘Help’ function with information on how to extract trade data.

To search for trade data relating to any particular good, the commodity code of that good is required. HMRC maintain a list of COVID-19 products, including PPE goods, and their commodity codes on GOV.UK: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/890809/COVID-19_commodity_codes.csv/preview.

However, the trade data collected may not allow PPE goods classified under a particular commodity code to be distinguished from any non-PPE goods classified under that same commodity code.

17th Jun 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many (a) solar panels and (b) wind turbines his Department's buildings (a) have in 2020 and (b) had in each of the last five years.

HM Treasury have not installed any solar panels or wind turbines in 1 Horse Guards Road.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
16th Jun 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many businesses have accessed the Retail, Hospitality and Leisure Grant Fund since its inception, by region and local authority area; and what the total value is of grants provided under that fund to date.

As of 14th June 2020, over 844,000 business premises have received grants worth over £10.36 billion from the Retail, Hospitality and Leisure Grant Fund and the Small Business Grant Fund.

Every week, the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy publishes the combined figures for the number and value of grants paid out from the RHLGF and SBGF. These data are broken down by Local Authority and can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-grant-funding-local-authority-payments-to-small-and-medium-businesses.

These data are not published on a regional basis.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
15th Jun 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how much energy his departmental buildings used in (a) 2020 and (b) each of the last five years.

Details of HM Treasury’s energy use in 1 Horse Guard’s Road can be found in the Treasury’s Annual report and accounts: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/hmt-annual-report. Details on our energy use can be found on page 203.

The Annual Report for 2019-20 will be published later in the year and this will include the energy usage for 2019-20.

Details on the energy usage in the Treasury’s Norwich office is not readily available as this information is held by the landlord the Government Property Agency.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
10th Jun 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the effect of the covid-19 outbreak on household debt; and if he will make a statement.

The Government is conducting on-going work to understand and monitor the current and future effects of COVID-19 on consumer debt. This data is still under development.

Regulatory responsibility for the consumer credit market lies with the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA). The FCA continues to monitor the credit card market and stands ready to act wherever consumer detriment is identified.

The Government has taken steps to support individuals and businesses through this difficult time, including providing an additional £37.8 million for debt advice providers helping people affected by COVID-19.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
10th Jun 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent estimate he has made of the effect of the covid-19 outbreak on the level of credit card debt; and if he will make a statement.

The Government is conducting on-going work to understand and monitor the current and future effects of COVID-19 on consumer debt. This data is still under development.

Regulatory responsibility for the consumer credit market lies with the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA). The FCA continues to monitor the credit card market and stands ready to act wherever consumer detriment is identified.

The Government has taken steps to support individuals and businesses through this difficult time, including providing an additional £37.8 million for debt advice providers helping people affected by COVID-19.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
10th Jun 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many companies registered under each Standard Industrial Classification Code (a) applied for and (b) been awarded support through the (a) Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, (b) Small Business Grant Fund, (c) Self-Employment Income Support Scheme, (d) Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme, (e) Future Fund, (f) Bounce Back Loan and (g) Large Business Interruption Loan scheme; and what the amount of each of those awards was.

The four government backed loan schemes have seen over £40bn lent to hundreds of thousands of businesses, whilst, as of midnight 7th June, 8.9 million jobs had been furloughed through the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS), with a total of £19.6bn claimed, and 2.6 million claims had been made through the Self Employment Income Support Scheme (SEISS), with a total value of £7.5 bn. The VAT deferral is worth over £30 billion or 1.5% of GDP with £22.4bn deferred by 251,000 businesses so far.

The Government has published aggregate application and approval figures on the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme (CBILS), Coronavirus Large Business Interruption Loan Scheme (CLBILS) and Bounce Back Loan Scheme (BBLS) since 12 May but does not hold specific breakdown information relating to collective sectors or organisations which have accessed these schemes, including under the Standard Classification for Economic Activities (SIC). The Government is actively considering what further data can be made available in the future.

HMRC published Official Statistics for the CJRS and the SEISS, including a breakdown of sectoral recipients, on 11 June. These can be accessed at: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/891249/Coronavirus_Job_Retention_Scheme_Statistics_June_2020.pdf and https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/891603/SEISS_Official_Statistics_June_2020.pdf.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
10th Jun 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many staff in his Department had caring responsibilities in each of the last five years.

HM Treasury does not hold the information in relation to caring responsibilities for the last five years, this is because the Treasury does not collate information in this way.

Based on the most recent people survey questionnaire results from December 2019, 188 employees identified as a carer. This figure is based on the number of people responding to the question and may not fully represent the number of carers in the department.

Caring responsibilities may have changed as a result of the current crisis and staff are being encouraged to talk to their line manager about any change to circumstances including requests for special leave. These changes could be reflected in a revised or new Carer’s Passport.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many jobs have been furloughed under the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, broken down by (a) local authority and (b) parliamentary constituency.

Applications for the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS) opened on Monday 20th April. By midnight 31 May 2020, 1.1m employers had submitted claims to HMRC representing 8.7m furloughed employments and £17.5bn.

This is a new scheme and HMRC are currently working through the analysis they will be able to provide based on the data available. HMRC will make the timescales for publication and the types of data available in due course.

1st Jun 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many people have (a) submitted claims to and (b) received grants from the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme, broken down by (i) local authority and (ii) parliamentary constituency.

Applications for the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme (SEISS) opened on 13 May 2020. By midnight 31 May 2020, 2.5 million customers had submitted claims to HMRC representing £7.2 billion.

This is a new scheme and HMRC are currently working through the analysis they will be able to provide based on the data available. HMRC will make the timescales for publication and the types of data available in due course.

3rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what explicit provision she plans to make in the UK visa system to allow young people to come to the UK from the EU to work as an au pair.

As has been the case since 2008, the UK’s points-based immigration system does not include a dedicated visa route for au pairs. We will not introduce one for similar reasons to why successive governments deciding not to reintroduce a route for non-EEA nationals.

Those who have general rights to work in the UK, such as those who arrive under our Youth Mobility Schemes (YMS), as dependants of those settled in the UK or those who have settled status, would be able to undertake such roles.

We remain committed to operating and expanding our YMS, yet each YMS is based on a reciprocal arrangement with another country to reflect them delivering an element of exchange, they are not a one-way route for recruiting overseas.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
30th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department has taken to implement the comprehensive improvement plan, published in September 2020 in response to the Windrush lessons learned review.

I am committed to delivering lasting and meaningful change across the entire department to make sure that the Home Office better represents all the communities it serves, and to ensure that nothing like this happens again.

Work continues at pace to implement the comprehensive improvement plan and I will update Parliament on progress in the new year, ahead of Wendy Williams returning to assess our progress in September 2021.

Priti Patel
Home Secretary
13th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she made of the (a) adequacy of the two temporary Ministry of Defence sites being used to accommodate asylum seekers and (b) the effect of ongoing Ministry of Defence work at those sites on the health and wellbeing of those people being accommodated; and if she will make a statement.

The Home Office and Ministry of Defence conducted a scoping exercise which identified Napier Barracks and Penally Training Camp as both suitable and available for the temporary accommodation of asylum seekers.

The Home Office has since worked with its provider Clearsprings Ready Homes to put these sites into operation with accommodation provided to the required standards in accordance with the Asylum Accommodation and Support Contracts.

Napier Barracks and Penally Training Camp were handed over to the Home Office for use for up to twelve months and so there is no ongoing Ministry of Defence work at these sites.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
13th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she has taken to ensure the welfare of asylum seekers and refugees being housed (a) in temporary hotel accommodation and (b) at temporary Ministry of Defence sites.

We take the welfare of the asylum seekers we accommodate very seriously. We work closely with our service providers, local health teams and the voluntary sector to ensure that support is provided to vulnerable asylum seekers.

Service providers have welfare officers on hand at temporary accommodation sites and asylum seekers are encouraged to speak to them if they are concerned for their (or anybody else’s) welfare.

Anyone receiving asylum support can contact the Advice, Issue Reporting and Eligibility service, operated by Migrant Help 24 hours a day, 365 days a year if they need help, advice or guidance or are experiencing difficulties.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many children were detained in police cells under the Mental Health Act 1983 (a) since 1 January 2020 and (b) in each of the last five years.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
7th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many instances of (a) self-harm and (b) suicide there have been in immigration detention centres in each of the last five years.

Staff at all immigration removal centres are trained to identify those at risk of self-harm so that action can be taken to minimise the risk. All incidents of self-harm are treated very seriously, and every step is taken to prevent incidents of this nature. Formal risk assessments on initial detention and systems for raising concerns at any subsequent point feed into established self-harm procedures in every IRC, which are in turn underpinned by the Home Office Operating Standard on the prevention of self-harm and Detention Services Order 06/2008 Assessment Care in Detention Teamwork (ACDT).

Self-harm incidents requiring medical treatment in each immigration removal centre, for the last five years are shown in the table below. This is provisional management information that has not been assured to the standard of Official Statistics.

Year

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020
(up to 31 March)

Number of self-harm incidents

313

295

403

398

474

149

These are the number of incidents of self-harm requiring medical treatment; they do not necessarily equate to the number of individuals requiring medical treatment as one individual may have received treatment on more than one occasion.

Any death in immigration detention is subject to investigation by the police, the coroner (or Procurator Fiscal in Scotland) and the independent Prisons and Probation Ombudsman.

In the period 1 January 2015 to 8 July 2020 there have been three deaths of individuals detained in the immigration detention estate that have been determined by a coroner as a suicide on the balance of probabilities.

Since 2018, information on deaths in immigration detention has been included in published immigration statistics on an annual basis. Data on the number of deaths of people detained under immigration powers in each year from 2017, are published in table Det_05 of the Detention summary tables.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
7th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the longest amount of time is that a person has been detained in an immigration detention centre among those detainees currently being so detained.

The Home Office publishes data on people in detention in the ‘Immigration Statistics Quarterly Release’ (https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/immigration-statistics-quarterly-release). Data on the longest length of detention of a person in detention under immigration powers as at 31 March 2020 are published in Table Det_03d of the ‘Summary tables’ (attached). The ‘contents’ sheet contains an overview of all available data on detention.

A report on Statistics relating to Covid-19 and the immigration system, May 2020 (https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/statistics-relating-to-covid-19-and-the-immigration-system-may-2020), released on 28 May 2020, provides further high-level information relating to detention and Covid-19.

Figures as at 30 June 2020 will be released on 27 August 2020. Information on future Home Office statistical release dates can be found in the ‘Research and statistics calendar’ (https://www.gov.uk/search/research-and-statistics?content_store_document_type=upcoming_statistics&organisations%5B%5D=home-office&order=release-date-oldest).

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
7th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what representations she has received from the police on the reopening of pubs on 4 July 2020 as part of the easing of covid-19 lockdown restrictions; and if she will make a statement.

The Home Secretary holds daily meetings with policing partners about a range of issues linked to the response to Covid-19. This includes the measures in place to ease restrictions on 4th July with the reopening of pubs and premises.

We continue to work closely with the police to ensure the COVID secure guidelines for pubs, restaurants, cafes and bars set out the steps they should take to make sure people understand what they need to do to maintain safety. We expect people however to do the right thing and follow the guidance that will help keep us all safe.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
7th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many staff have been dismissed for abusing detainees in immigration detention centres in each of the last five years.

The Government expects the highest standards from those we entrust with the safety and welfare of those in detention.

Management information indicates that 20 detainee custody officers have been dismissed for either the inappropriate use of force or inappropriate behaviour towards a detained individual from 1 January 2015 to 18 July 2020. Of these 20 dismissals, 1 took place in 2015, 2 in 2016, 14 in 2017, 2 in 2018, 1 in 2019 and none in the year to date. These individuals have also had their certification revoked by the Home Office. This is provisional management information that is subject to change. It has not been assured to the standard of Official Statistics.

All complaints made by individuals detained at an immigration removal centre (IRC) are investigated by the IRC supplier in accordance with Detention Services Order 03/2015. Any allegations of serious misconduct made against staff at an IRC are also referred to the Home Office Professional Standards Unit for investigation. Where a detained individual, or someone on their behalf, alleges that a member of staff has committed a sexual offence against them the police will automatically be notified, even if the detained individual does not wish the matter to be reported or to make a formal complaint.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
25th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many and what proportion of victims of trafficking were referred to (a) legal and (b) housing support in each of the last five years.

Tackling human trafficking and modern slavery remains a top priority for this government and we are committed to stamping out this abhorrent crime.

The National Referral Mechanism (NRM) is the system for identifying and providing support to victims of modern slavery.

Whilst in the NRM system, confirmed adult victims of modern slavery can access a minimum of 90 days specialist support including accommodation, subsistence, counselling, access to mental, physical and dental health services, and signposting to legal support. In England and Wales, this support is provided through the Victim Care Contract (VCC), which is currently operated by The Salvation Army.

Potential and confirmed victims receiving support through the VCC are provided with accommodation if this is needed and the victim has no access to alternative accommodation via other services. Victims requiring access to legal support are offered assistance and signposting by their support worker.

The Home Office does not record specific data on the proportion of victims signposted for legal support or referrals to housing support provided outside the VCC.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
25th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many phone taps have been authorised for the (a) police and (b) security services in each of the last five years.

Between 2014 – 2018, there were 15,970 targeted interception warrants (including phone taps) authorised by a Secretary of State, or for a small number of cases relating to serious crimes, by a Minister of the Scottish Government:

2014 – 2,795

2015 – 3,057

2016 – 3,007

2017 – 3,535

2018 – 3,576

Due to the method in which the data is collected, it is difficult to attribute specific numbers to the police and the security services, respectively. The figures above cover all warrant-requesting organisations across Government.

Figures for 2019 are not yet available. They will be published in the 2019 Investigatory Powers Commissioner’s Annual Report.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
25th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many biometric records have been obtained by police forces using automatic facial recognition in each of the last five years.

No information is centrally held on the number of biometric records obtained by police forces using live facial recognition systems. Facial images of passers by which do not match facial images of suspects on a watchlist are deleted immediately.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
25th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answers of 24 June 2020 to Questions 59676, 59675 and 59674 on Police: Dismissal and Disciplinary Proceedings, if she will provide hyperlinks to where the information requested is located on www.gov.uk.

The information requested is not publicly available on www.gov.uk


Police dismissals (59676)
The Home Office collects and publishes information annually on the outcome of misconduct proceedings and criminal investigations involving officers, including the number of officers that have been dismissed following proceedings. However, information on the circumstances that led to a case being brought is not collected centrally by the Home Office

The latest data on the outcomes following misconduct proceedings, which covers cases in the year ending March 2019, is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-workforce-england-and-wales-30-september-2019.

The College of Policing publish data annually relating to those who have been dismissed from policing and placed on the Police Barred List. The most recent data shows that, in the period ending 31 March 2019, 11 officers were dismissed under the category ‘excess force’. This data is available here:
https://www.college.police.uk/News/College-news/Documents/Barred_List_2019.pdf.

Domestic Violence (59675 and 59674)
The Home Office also collects and publishes statistics on the number of arrests for notifiable offences, conducted by each police force in England and Wales, on an annual basis.

Data is held at the offence group level only (for example ‘Violence against the person’ offences). Information on the number of arrests there have been specifically as a result of domestic violence in the last five years is not held centrally.

Data is published in the ‘Police Powers and Procedures, England and Wales’ statistical bulletin, the latest of which can be accessed here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-powers-and-procedures-england-and-wales-year-ending-31-march-2019

The Home Office collects and publishes data annually on the primary function of police officers, as part of the ‘Police workforce, England and Wales’ statistical bulletins, which can be accessed here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/police-workforce-england-and-wales .

This data includes officers whose primary function is “Protecting Vulnerable People”, and officers with multiple responsibilities are recorded under their primary function.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
23rd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many police officers have been dismissed for sexual harassment in each of the last five years.

The Home Office collects and publishes information annually on the outcome of misconduct proceedings and criminal investigations involving officers, including the number of officers that have been dismissed following proceedings. However, information on the circumstances that led to a case being brought is not collected centrally by the Home Office

The latest data on the outcomes following misconduct proceedings, which covers cases in the year ending March 2019, are available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-workforce-england-and-wales-30-september-2019.

The College of Policing publish data annually relating to those who have been dismissed from policing and placed on the Police Barred List. The most recent data shows that, in the period ending 31 March 2019, 14 officers were dismissed under the category ‘sexual conduct towards a colleague’. This data is available here:
https://www.college.police.uk/News/College-news/Documents/Barred_List_2019.pdf.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many foreign nationals working in the NHS paid the NHS surcharge in each month of 2020.

This information is not readily available nor held centrally and could only be obtained at disproportionate cost due to the fact the IHS is payable across multiple application routes.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people have been granted asylum in the UK as a result of persecution for being LGBTQ+ in their home state in each of the last 15 years.

The Home Office is unable to state how many people have been granted asylum in the UK as a result of persecution for being LGBTQ+ in their home states in each of the last 15 years.

The Home Office remains committed to publishing information on the number of people claiming asylum on the basis of sexual orientation.

While the Department does not hold pre-July 2015 data in a reportable format and does not currently break down the data into the separate lesbian, gay or bisexual category, experimental data on asylum claims lodged on the basis of sexual orientation, including the number of claimants who were granted asylum, between July 2015 and August 2019 is available at SOC_00 and SOC_04 of the published immigrations statistics year ending March 2020 and is broken down by nationality:

www.gov.uk/government/publications/immigration-statistics-year-ending-march-2020/list-of-tables#asylum-on-the-basis-of-sexual-orientation.

The data does not represent the number of asylum claimants who define themselves as LGB. Having an identifier that an asylum case is based on sexual orientation does not indicate that a claimant has any particular sexuality or that sexual orientation is the reason for any grant or refusal of asylum. It also does not signify whether that aspect of the claim has been accepted. Sexual orientation as a basis of claim could be due to imputed assertions or association rather than a defining characteristic of the claimant.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she is taking in response to the Information Commissioner's report on police mobile phone data extraction; and if she will make statement.

The requirement for police and prosecutors to pursue all reasonable lines of enquiry should be balanced with victims feeling confident that they will be treated fairly and with dignity. The Home Office welcomes the Information Commissioner’s recent report into current practice in relation to data taken from mobile phones.

The College of Policing, which leads on providing guidance to police forces on operational activity and standards, are already in the process of developing guidance for investigators who make decisions on the use of mobile data extraction.

The Home Office will support the College on this work and, with other policing partners and the Crown Prosecution Service, will consider the recommendations made by the Information Commissioner.

Further to this, as part of work under the Governments Rape Review, evidence is being gathered to enable us to better understand how handling and outcomes for rape cases could be improved.? This includes looking at the impact of the number of victims withdrawing their support for prosecution and will be published later this year.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what guidance she has given to police forces on continuing rape investigations when victims refuse to hand over their mobile phones to the police because of privacy concerns; and if she will make a statement.

The requirement for police and prosecutors to pursue all reasonable lines of enquiry should be balanced with victims feeling confident that they will be treated fairly and with dignity. The Home Office welcomes the Information Commissioner’s recent report into current practice in relation to data taken from mobile phones.

The College of Policing, which leads on providing guidance to police forces on operational activity and standards, are already in the process of developing guidance for investigators who make decisions on the use of mobile data extraction.

The Home Office will support the College on this work and, with other policing partners and the Crown Prosecution Service, will consider the recommendations made by the Information Commissioner.

Further to this, as part of work under the Governments Rape Review, evidence is being gathered to enable us to better understand how handling and outcomes for rape cases could be improved.? This includes looking at the impact of the number of victims withdrawing their support for prosecution and will be published later this year.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to asylum claims, which countries her Department has assessed as persecuting LGBTQ+ people.

Our assessment of the situation for LGBTQ+ people in different countries is set out in the relevant country policy and information notes, which are available on the Gov.uk website.

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/country-policy-and-information-notes

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
17th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many (a) solar panels and (b) wind turbines her Department's buildings (a) have in 2020 and (b) had in each of the last five years.

The information requested is not held centrally.

The Home Office is committed to reducing its carbon emissions on a trajectory to Net Zero by 2050 or sooner; and has reduced its total emissions by 55% by 2019-20 compared to 2009-10. During 2020-21 a study will be commissioned to understand how Home Office will meet the Government’s net zero by 2050 target whilst working to make the estate more sustainable including opportunities to adopt renewable energy. Site specific renewables surveys are already underway to determine the scope for using a range of renewable technologies, including solar panels and wind turbines.

17th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much energy was used by her Department's buildings in (a) 2020 to date and (b) each of the last five years.

The amount of energy used by the Home Office in each of the last five years is as follows:

Financial Year

2015-16

2016-17

2017-18

2018-19

2019-20

Energy (MWh)

128,067

132,752

124,560

114,134

115,858

Data is not yet available for any part of 2020-21 as this is collated quarterly in arrears.

The department is committed to reducing its carbon emissions on a trajectory to Net Zero by 2050 or sooner; and has reduced its total emissions by 55% by 2019-20 compared to 2009-10.

16th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many arrests there have been as a result of domestic violence in (a) each of the last five years and (b) 2020.

This information is publicly available on www.gov.uk

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
16th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many police officers in each police force worked solely on domestic violence in each of the last five years.

This information is publicly available on www.gov.uk

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
16th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many police officers have been (a) dismissed and (b) disciplined for using excessive force in (i) each of the last five years and (ii) 2020, by police force.

This information is publicly available on www.gov.uk

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
11th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people have been cautioned or arrested by the police for urinating or defecating in a public place in each month of 2020.

Information on the number of arrests urinating or defecating in a public place is not held centrally, as it is not a notifiable offence.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
10th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many staff in her Department had caring responsibilities in each of the last five years.

The following numbers of Home Office staff have declared they had caring responsibilities in each of the last four years. No data is held for the period ending 31 Mar 16.

31-Mar-20

31-Mar-19

31-Mar-18

31-Mar-17

10,272

9,914

9,401

9,256

10th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many police officers (a) at and (b) above the rank of inspector there were in each police force by (i) ethnicity and (ii) gender in (A) 2020 and (B) each of the last five years.

This information is publicly available.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
10th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many police officers there were in each police force by (a) ethnicity and (b) gender in (i) 2020 and (ii) in each of the last five years.

This information is publicly available.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
12th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when she plans to respond to Questions 21877 and 21878 on the proposed point based immigration system, tabled on 27 February 2020.

The responses for UIN 21877 and 21878 were given on 10th June 2020.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
27th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether the care sector will be included in communication and engagement programmes to help UK employers understand the new points-based immigration system; and what those programmes will entail.

Following our departure from the European Union, Freedom of Movement is coming to an end and we are taking back control of our borders.

The Government published “The UK’s Points-Based System: Policy Statement” on 19 February. Senior care workers who meet the criteria will be able to come to the UK through the points-based system.

The Government has considered relevant views, evidence, and analysis. We are also working alongside employers across the whole of the UK to ensure the workforce has the right number of people to meet increasing demands and have recently launched a national recruitment campaign.

The Migration Advisory Committee (MAC) has been clear immigration is not the solution to addressing staffing levels in the social care sector. A point the Government agrees with as the vision for this sector cannot just be based on paying the lowest wages possible. Employers need to invest in technology, innovation and their existing workforce, focusing on making jobs more attractive for UK workers, especially considering the economic impact of Covid-19 where many may need to find new employment.

We will deliver a comprehensive programme of communication and engagement in the coming months.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
27th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, which organisations from the care sector her Department consulted while developing the proposed points-based immigration policy.

Following our departure from the European Union, Freedom of Movement is coming to an end and we are taking back control of our borders.

The Government published “The UK’s Points-Based System: Policy Statement” on 19 February. Senior care workers who meet the criteria will be able to come to the UK through the points-based system.

The Government has considered relevant views, evidence, and analysis. We are also working alongside employers across the whole of the UK to ensure the workforce has the right number of people to meet increasing demands and have recently launched a national recruitment campaign.

The Migration Advisory Committee (MAC) has been clear immigration is not the solution to addressing staffing levels in the social care sector. A point the Government agrees with as the vision for this sector cannot just be based on paying the lowest wages possible. Employers need to invest in technology, innovation and their existing workforce, focusing on making jobs more attractive for UK workers, especially considering the economic impact of Covid-19 where many may need to find new employment.

We will deliver a comprehensive programme of communication and engagement in the coming months.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many Government special advisers have been granted access to Porton Down in each of the last five years; and if he will make a statement.

The Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (Dstl) is one of several organisations based at the Porton Down. Each organisation manages and records its visitors separately.

Centrally-held visitor information records for Dstl do not routinely record the role or function of visiting officials and so this information is not available. However, at least two Special Advisers have visited Dstl Porton Down in the past five years, one in 2018 and the other in 2020.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
29th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what assessment he has made of the threat to the UK's cyber-security of NSO Group's Pegasus software; and if he will make a statement.

The issue of cyber security is one the UK takes very seriously; the cyber threat is continually changing in scope and complexity. For reasons of safeguarding national security, we do not routinely disclose detailed information about the threats to UK networks.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
29th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 17 June 2020 to Question 58612 on Islamic State: Military Intervention, whether that matter would fall under the remit of the Intelligence and Security Committee; and if he will make a statement.

The remit of the Intelligence and Security Committee (ISC) of Parliament is set out within the Justice and Security Act 2013, and the accompanying Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) which is published and available at:

http://isc.independent.gov.uk/

Except for the circumstances specified in Paragraphs 11-17 of the MOU, operational intelligence activity falls outside the scope of the ISC.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
29th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 23 June 2020 to Question 61411 on Voyager Aircraft; what effect the new livery will have on the number of refuelling missions the aircraft will be able to undertake.

The new livery will have no effect on the number of refuelling missions the Voyager aircraft can take. Air-to-Air refuelling (AAR) remains the primary role of the aircraft when it is not being used for VIP travel. The aircraft has demonstrated this already and has undertaken routine AAR missions since returning from repaint.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
29th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, if he will publish the graphic designs of the refurbished RAF Voyager; and if he will place a copy of those designs in the Library.

Yes, I have arranged for the graphic designs for the RAF Voyager to be placed in the Library of the House.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
18th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, if he will publish the evidential basis that the re-painting of RAF Voyager in the colours of the Union Jack will (a) boost international trade and (b) improve diplomatic relations; and if he will make a statement.

The VIP Voyager aircraft is already used to fly senior Government Ministers and members of the Royal Family on official business. The new livery better reflects this prestigious task and supports the UK's prosperity agenda, promoting Global Britain the world over when used for international trade and diplomatic missions.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
18th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether the RAF has raised any security implications with regard to re-painting RAF Voyager in the colours of the Union Jack when that aircraft is used to carry (a) Ministers and (b) members of the Royal Family; and if he will make a statement.

The RAF has not raised any security implications regarding the re-painting of the VIP Voyager aircraft.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
18th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether he has plans to refurbish a RAF Voyager in Union Jack colours for ministerial travel; what the cost of that refurbishment is; and if he will make a statement.

I refer the hon Member to the answer I gave on 22 June to questions 60776, 60814, 60842, 60852, 60853 and 60864 to the hon Members for Cambridge (Daniel Zeichner), Newport West (Ruth Jones), Glasgow South (Stewart Malcolm McDonald), Caithness, Sutherland and Easter Ross (Jamie Stone) and Portsmouth South (Stephen Morgan).

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
18th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what cost benefit analysis has been carried out on the plans to refurbish an RAF Voyager for ministerial travel in the colours of the Union Jack; and if he will make a statement.

The VIP Voyager aircraft is already used to fly senior Government Ministers and members of the Royal Family on official business. The decision to re-paint the VIP Voyager aircraft was taken to ensure that the aircraft could better represent and promote the UK around the world with national branding. The new livery will benefit the UK by more clearly promoting Global Britain the world over.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
18th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how might flights RAF Voyager was used for ministerial travel in each of the last five years.

The number of occasions Voyager ZZ336 has been used on Prime Ministerial or Ministerial business since it was converted for its VIP role is given in the table below.

Voyager ZZ336 use in VIP role

FY 2016-17

FY2017-18

FY2018-19

FY2019-20

FY2020-21*

7

8

6

4

0

* 1 April to 22 June 2020

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
18th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether the (a) Prime Minister or (b) Prime Minister's office requested that RAF Voyager be painted in the colours of the Union Jack.

I refer the hon Member to the answer I gave on 22 June to questions 60776, 60814, 60842, 60852, 60853 and 60864 to the hon Members for Cambridge (Daniel Zeichner), Newport West (Ruth Jones), Glasgow South (Stewart Malcolm McDonald), Caithness, Sutherland and Easter Ross (Jamie Stone) and Portsmouth South (Stephen Morgan).

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
18th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what direction he gave the Ministry of Defence to paint the RAF Voyager used for ministerial travel in the colours of the Union Jack; and if he will make a statement.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 22 June to Question 60814.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
18th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what assessment he has made of the potential for RAF Voyager becoming more identifiable to enemy combatants after it is painted in the colours of the Union Jack; and if he will make a statement.

The new livery, incorporating the Union Flag, represents Global Britain and will support the MOD’s Defence Task to promote UK prosperity. While the distinctive new livery will allow the aircraft to better represent the UK at high-profile events around the world, military Air to Air refuelling remains its primary mission. Decisions on whether to deploy the VIP Voyager aircraft, or other members of the Voyager fleet, on military operations will be taken on a case-by-case basis depending on the specific circumstances.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
17th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many (a) solar panels and (b) wind turbines his Department's buildings (a) have in 2020 and (b) had in each of the last five years.

There are approximately 115,000 buildings in the total Ministry of Defence Estate, and information on the number of solar panels and wind turbines on these buildings in 2020, and in each of the last 5 years, is not held in the format requested.

However, there are examples of such installations including 2,653 solar PV panels installed by the Allenby Connaught Private Finance Initiative (PFI) and solar panels have been included on 286 new Service Family Accommodation houses recently built near the Salisbury Plain Training Area.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
15th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how much energy his departmental buildings have used in (a) each of the last five years and (b) 2020 to date.

The Department does not hold information on the entirety of energy use by the buildings on its estate as a (relatively small) proportion are provided ‘off contract’, falling outside the frameworks and local contracts.

However, the Department’s recorded energy consumption across its estate, falling under the frameworks and local contracts, for the previous 5 years and current year to date is shown in the table below:

2015-16

5,229,447,046 kWh

2016-17

5,213,898,631 kWh

2017-18

5,090,803,519 kWh

2018-19

4,974,891,458 kWh

2019-20

4,967,433,252 kWh

2020-21 (up to April 30)

384,641,178 kWh

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
11th Jun 2020
To ask the hon. Member for Perth and North Perthshire, representing the House of Commons Commission, the amount spent on art on display on the Parliamentary Estate in the last five years broken down by (a) gender and (b) ethnicity.

This answer applies to the House of Commons expenditure only.

The Speaker’s Advisory Committee on Works of Art has spent £400,500 on acquiring art over the last five financial years. Of that figure 47% was spent on acquiring art which documented women’s history and 6.8% on art documenting BAME history.

Pete Wishart
Shadow SNP Leader of the House of Commons
11th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, if he will list the countries that RAF Reaper drones are being deployed in outside of those of Operation Shader; and if he will make a statement.

REAPER is an intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance platform. We do not comment on intelligence matters and I am therefore withholding the information as its disclosure would, or would be likely to, prejudice the capability, effectiveness or security of the Armed Forces.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
11th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how much revenue the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst has received from the training of foreign nationals since 2010, by country.

The attached table provides the total income received by the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst for foreign nationals completing courses since 2010. Country specific breakdowns have been withheld from publication to protect international relations.

Governments are charged equally for all courses, but some are paid for by a combination of those governments and UK funding.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
9th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many staff in his Department had caring responsibilities in each of the last five years.

The information is not held in the format requested.

The Ministry of Defence recognises the unique challenges faced by people with caring responsibilities. In addition to flexible working arrangements, in 2018 the Department adopted the Civil Service Carer's Passport. This provides staff with the right to discuss and formally agree with their Line Manager a working pattern that considers both working and caring responsibilities. Serving military personnel have the option, where appropriate, to adopt flexible working arrangements, including for caring responsibilities, under the 'Flexible Service' arrangements introduced in January 2019.

10th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, whether his Department holds data on the number of blocks that are only able to obtain first loss buildings insurance policies that do not cover the full cost of major losses.

The Department does not hold this information for all medium and high rise blocks in England.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
10th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what information his Department holds on the number of blocks which are (a) unable to obtain building cover via a single insurer or (b) are subject to insurance exclusions or excesses which would not have applied prior to the Grenfell tower fire.

The Department does not hold this information for all medium and high rise blocks in England.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
10th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what data his department holds on (a) the costs of buildings insurance in both medium and high rise blocks and (b) the extent to which those costs have increased since the Grenfell fire.

The Department does not hold this information for all medium and high rise blocks in England.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
18th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what plans he has to include provisions to protect woodland in his proposals for planning reform.

In Planning for the Future we proposed a quicker and simpler framework for assessing environmental effects: one which does not compromise on environmental standards, and indeed encourages opportunities for environmental enhancements to be identified and pursued early in the development process. Proposals will leave an inheritance of environmental improvements with environmental assets protected, more green spaces provided, more sustainable development supported and new homes that are more energy efficient


Though we are still considering the responses to the White Paper consultation, I can confirm that the protections for landscape, habitat and wildlife will remain in force, including ancient woodland, and ancient and veteran trees, and reforms will support the implementation of the proposals in the Environment Bill. Consultation on the White Paper closed on 29 October 2020. The Government will publish its response following consideration of all the feedback received.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
20th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, if he will bring forward legislative proposals to prevent landlords from refusing to accept tenants in receipt of benefit payments.

We are clear that ‘No DSS’ -- or any blanket ban on tenants on the basis that they are in receipt of benefits -- has no place in a modern housing market.

We strongly encourage landlords and agents to look at all potential and existing tenants claiming housing benefit on an individual basis, and have worked with the sector to find ways to prevent the practice of 'No DSS'. Last year major lettings portals Zoopla and Rightmove agreed to stop use of 'No DSS' adverts on their websites, and several major lenders agreed to remove restrictions on mortgages which prevented landlords from letting to tenants on benefits.

We have no plans at present to introduce legislation on this issue but are committed to bringing forward a Renters Reform Bill in due course, to deliver a better deal for renters and a fairer and more effective rental market.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
29th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how many section 21 eviction notices have been issued in each month of 2020, by local authority.

The Government does not collect information on the number of section 21 notices that landlords have served on their tenants indicating a desire to regain possession of their property.

Where a landlord serves a valid notice on an Assured Shorthold Tenancy, the landlord can only lawfully regain possession by making a claim for possession in the county court unless the tenant chooses to vacate the property.

The Mortgage and Landlord Repossession Statistics record the number of claims for possession brought by landlords in the county court in each quarter. In addition, the latest statistics for the first quarter of 2020 indicate the number of claims for possession issued on a weekly basis from the week commencing 3 February until the end of the quarter. The quarterly data can be accessed to local authority level in the published data files. The statistics are available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/mortgage-and-landlord-possession-statistics-january-to-march-2020

All housing possession proceedings are suspended until 23 August 2020. In addition, the emergency measures in the Coronavirus Act 2020, which require landlords to give tenants at least 3 months' notice of their intention to regain possession of their property are in place until 30 September 2020.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
25th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what recent assessment he has made of the potential effect on the social care sector of local authority insolvency; and if he will make a statement.

We have made £3.7 billion available to local authorities through an un-ringfenced grant so they can address pressures they are facing in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, including expenditure pressures from adult social care. This includes £500 million of additional funding announced by the Secretary of State on 2 July.

Over 90 per cent of the funding announced in March and April has been allocated to councils with responsibility for social care services; allocations of the latest tranche of £500 million will be shared in due course. Local authorities have also received £600 million through the Infection Control Fund to pass on to social care providers.

The Department recognises the additional costs and pressures on finances councils are facing as a result of the current Covid-19 crisis. We continue to engage regularly with the local government sector, which includes our ongoing financial monitoring survey and direct contact with councils and their representatives, local Leaders and Chief Executives. We have also worked closely with CIPFA who have temporarily amended their guidance on the use of section 114 notices to further encourage local authorities to make contact with the Department in the first instance to advise of any immediate financial concerns.

Simon Clarke
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
18th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what assessment has he made of the economic effect of covid-19 on places of worship; and if he will make a statement.

Faith communities have a long history of service supporting many of the most vulnerable members of our society. The rapid response during the current pandemic has been no different and I would like to reiterate how much the government values the work being done to support those in need. Responsibility for faith engagement is led by the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government, who?continue to play a facilitative?role?in ensuring?Government?understands?the needs of faith communities and the challenges they?may be currently?facing?due to the pandemic.

We are working closely with a range of faith and community groups, including the Places of Worship Taskforce to better understand how Government can support them to respond to the pressures they face on sustaining their?organisations during this period of time.

The Government has announced a range of funds available to charities. Further information about what funding is available and how to apply can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/financial-support-for-voluntary-community-and-social-enterprise-vcse-organisations-to-respond-to-coronavirus-covid-19

17th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how many (a) solar panels and (b) wind turbines his Department's buildings (a) have in 2020 and (b) had in each of the last five years.

MHCLG offices are managed by the Government Property Agency with certain services, such as energy, managed by other government departments across all sites. MHCLG therefore does not hold this data.

15th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how much energy his departmental buildings have used in (a) each of the last five years and (b) 2020 to date.

The information for the years 2015-16 to 2018-19 is available in our Annual Report and Accounts.

Data for 2019-20 and for 2020 to date is not held centrally.

12th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what guidance his Department has provided to local authorities on the opening of public toilets during the covid-19 outbreak; and if he will make a statement.

We strongly encourage public toilets to be open wherever possible. We have published guidance to help operators ensure facilities are safe where they are open including increasing cleaning of touch points.

The Government has published guidance on safer public spaces. It includes advice, information and examples of the potential interventions that can be used in public places to facilitate social distancing in areas of higher footfall such as in parks ( https://www.gov.uk/guidance/safer-public-places-urban-centres-and-green-spacescovid-19). Owners and operators are advised to implement cleaning protocols to limit coronavirus transmission in public places. It is advised that touch points (e.g. handrails and gates) should be particular areas of focus for increased cleaning.

We have now made £3.2 billion available to local authorities through an unringfenced grant so they can address pressures they are facing in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. The package recognises the additional costs and pressures on finances councils are facing as a result of the current crisis. It demonstrates the Government’s commitment to making sure councils, including upper and lower tier authorities, have the resources they need to support their communities through this challenging time. Local authorities are best placed to understand how to meet the major COVID-19 service pressures and spending needs in their local area, this funding will not be ringfenced. The funding can be used across all local services facing pressures.

Simon Clarke
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
12th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how many and what proportion of public toilets were closed during the covid-19 lockdown.

Central Government does not hold monitoring data on the number of public toilets which were in operation during the COVID-19 lockdown as it is a local decision whether to keep these facilities open or closed.

While decisions to reopen public toilets are for councils - and others responsible for them - we strongly encourage them to open wherever possible.

We have published guidance to help them ensure facilities are safe where they are open including increasing cleaning of touch points: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/safer-public-places-urban-centres-and-green-spaces-covid-19.

Simon Clarke
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
9th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how many staff in his Department had caring responsibilities in each of the last five years.

The Department’s annual People Survey includes two questions on caring responsibilities and responses to these questions can be used to help determine the number of officials with caring responsibilities. This information is offered on an entirely voluntary basis and as such only accounts for those officials that elected to complete the survey questions concerned. The number of staff who identified themselves as having caring and/or childcare responsibilities in each of the last five years is included in the table below:

Survey Year

People Survey Response Rate

Number with caring responsibilities

Total number who answered the caring question

Proportion with caring responsibilities

Number with childcare responsibilities

Total number who answered the childcare question

Proportion with childcare responsibilities

2015

82%

280

1273

22%

483

1277

38%

2016

82%

215

1071

20%

387

1077

36%

2017

90%

241

1270

19%

427

1269

34%

2018

94%

278

1683

17%

492

1698

29%

2019

97%

435

1973

22%

610

2017

30%

It is worth pointing out that this information is not considered to be an official workforce statistic, and this is also only representative of those who completed the people survey in each year.

6th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, if he will take steps to support legal aid firms during the covid-19 outbreak.

We are aware that the COVID-19 pandemic has created a range of challenges for the legal profession. We have been working closely with legal aid providers across the justice system throughout the pandemic and will continue to do so, monitoring any impact and understanding their concerns.

A range of measures have been introduced to support providers during the pandemic while maintaining access to justice for the most vulnerable in society. These include:

  • Reducing the levels of contract administration to allow providers to focus on supporting their clients;
  • Expanding how domestic abuse requirements may be evidenced to make it easier for victims to access legal aid during this difficult period;
  • Expanding the scope and relaxing the evidence requirements for hardship payments in crown court cases – including reducing the threshold for work done to £450, rather than the previous £5,000;
  • Halting the pursuit of outstanding debts owed to the Legal Aid Agency (LAA);
  • Suspending sanctions in relation to missed deadlines for delegated function applications, substantive amendments and appeals against LAA decisions;
  • Publicising existing avenues of financial help for legal firms, such as the ability to apply for early payment for work already done on a case, and changing rules for payment on account for providers, benefitting cashflow in the short-term and ensuring that providers can claim the same amount of money for online hearings as they can for face-to-face hearings.

HM Treasury have introduced and recently extended a range of measures to support individuals and businesses impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic, including the furlough scheme, Self-Employed Income Support Scheme, Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan and Bounce Back Loan, to provide some financial stability. We encourage the professions to continue to take advantage of this support where appropriate.

We will continue to closely monitor the situation, working with providers to keep these measures under review.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many restraining orders have been broken in each (a) month of 2020 and (b) of the last five years.

The Ministry of Justice has published information on convictions for ‘Breach of a restraining order’ up to December 2019, which is available in the Outcomes by Offence data tool available here:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/888664/outcomes-by-offence-tool-2019.xlsx

The number of offenders convicted for ‘Breach of a restraining order’ in each year since 2009 can be found using the offence filter to search for ‘Breach of a restraining order’. Convictions can be found in row 24.

Court outcomes data for 2020 will be published in May 2021.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps he is taking to help improve access between solicitors and their clients during the covid-19 outbreak.

Despite the absence of physical visits, prisoners maintain the right to access legal advice, and we have looked to ensure that prisoners continue to have the tools to make contact with their legal representatives via telephone, video link or written correspondence.

Since the outbreak of the pandemic, we have enhanced the capability of prison video conferencing facilities, particularly to support priority court work such as sentencing hearings and prisoners approaching their parole hearing dates. We have made use of the additional 1,250 handsets issued to prisons without in-cell telephony in order to facilitate private conversations with legal advisers, alongside encouraging governors to ensure prisoners can have conversations with their representatives in confidence.

We have also been taking steps to increase the available capacity of video conferencing at some locations through increased operating hours to include longer hours during the weekdays, and in some cases on Saturdays. Alongside this work, we are increasing the physical number of video link outlets at a number of critical sites where capacity is limited, as well as to support specialist courts, including youth and women’s prisons.

As stated in our National Framework for recovery in prisons, we are adapting aspects of prison regime, in consultation with trade unions and health partners, to restart key services. We have consulted representatives of the legal profession on the resumption of legal visits so that they can resume in a safe manner over the next few weeks.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
23rd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many (a) prison wardens, (b) probation officers, (c) prison governors, (d) judges and (e) magistrates have been dismissed for sexual harassment in each of the last five years.

The number of dismissals for the roles requested in each of the last five years is as follows:

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

Band 3-5 Prison Officers

3

3

4

4

4

Probation Officers

0

0

0

0

0

Prison Governors

0

0

0

0

0

Judges

0

0

0

0

0

Magistrates

0

0

0

0

0


MoJ treats allegations of sexual harassment seriously and has policies in place to ensure that they are fully investigated and appropriate action is taken.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what training is provided to the judicary on supporting people in court with learning disabilities; and if he will make a statement.

Responsibility for judicial training rests with the Lord Chief Justice and with the Senior President of Tribunals and is exercised through the Judicial College.

To preserve judicial independence, the judiciary and professional staff in the Judicial College are responsible for the design, content, and delivery of judicial training.

The Judicial College provides training on vulnerable litigants including those with learning disabilities for judges and magistrates sitting in criminal, family and youth courts. In addition, the Equal Treatment Bench Book contains specific guidance for the judiciary on how to identify and accommodate court users with learning disabilities.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
17th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps he is taking in response to the publication of the Equality and Human Rights Commission's report entitled Inclusive Justice, published on 22 April 2020, and if he will make a statement.

The government welcomes the Equality and Human Rights Commission’s report, Inclusive Justice, the interim findings of which were published on 22 April, and the full report on 11 June 2020. The recommendations made in the report are being carefully considered.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
15th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how much energy his departmental buildings have used in (a) each of the last five years and (b) 2020 to date.

The amount of energy used by the Ministry of Justice in each of the last five years is as follows:

Financial Year

2015-16

2016-17

2017-18

2018-19

2019-20

Energy (MWh)

1,434,498

1,409,163

1,356,100

1,367,729

1,320,597

Data is not yet available for any part of 2020/21 as this is collated quarterly in arrears.

The department is committed to reducing its carbon emissions on a trajectory to Net Zero by 2050 or sooner; and has reduced its total emissions by 44% by 2019-20 compared to 2009-10.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
11th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what estimate he has made of the number of instances in prisons of (a) self-harm and (b) suicide by (i) region, (ii) ethnicity and (iii) gender for each of the last five years.

Please see the attached tables showing the number of instances of (a) self-harm and (b) self-inflicted deaths in prisons by (i) region, (ii) ethnicity and (iii) gender for each of the last five years. Our condolences are with the family and friends of the prisoners who have died.

The figures on self-harm have been drawn from the HMPPS Incident Reporting System. Care is taken when processing and analysing the returns but the detail collected is subject to the inaccuracies inherent in any large scale recording system. Although the figures are shown to the last individual the figures may not be accurate to that level. The figures on self-inflicted deaths are derived from the HMPPS Deaths in Prison Custody database. As classification of deaths may change following inquest or as new information emerges, numbers may change from time to time.

Far too many prisoners are self-harming or taking their own lives and it is one of the reasons we introduced the key worker scheme in 2018, supported by the recruitment of extra prison officers, so that every offender can get dedicated support and have someone to talk to.

We have also given over 25,000 staff better training to spot and prevent self-harm and are investing an extra £2.75 billion to modernise prisons, combat drug use and improve the environment in which offenders live.

As well as this, we have refreshed our partnership with the Samaritans, awarding a grant of £500k each year for the next three years. This supports the excellent Listeners scheme, through which selected prisoners are trained to provide emotional support to their fellow prisoners.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
11th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, when the review into means testing of legal aid for victims of domestic violence will conclude; and if he will make a statement.

Victims of domestic abuse must have access to the help they need - including legal aid, which is subject to a means and merits test. Our comprehensive review of the legal aid means test commenced in February 2019. The review is considering how the current arrangements adequately protect access to justice, and as part of this we have explicitly committed to look at means testing for victims of domestic abuse, including the existing capital thresholds.

Whilst the Government had previously committed to complete the review by Summer 2020, and to mark this with publication of a consultation paper, the impact of the Covid-19 crisis has meant this work has been temporarily paused and a revised timetable for delivery of the review will be announced shortly.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
11th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many applications have been (a) granted and (b) rejected for legal aid from victims of domestic violence in each of the last five years.

The information requested is not held centrally.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
11th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what recent assessment he has made of the adequacy of the capital threshold for means testing legal aid for domestic violence victims; and if he will make a stat