Tuesday 25th January 2022

(4 months ago)

Ministerial Corrections
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Education (Careers Guidance in Schools) Bill
The following is an extract from debate on the Education (Careers Guidance in Schools) Bill on Friday 14 January 2022.
Alex Burghart Portrait Alex Burghart
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Turning to amendment 2, the Bill seeks to exempt 16 to 18-year-olds from the provision of guidance on options available for 16 to 18 education or training, including apprenticeships. That guidance is thought to be unnecessary, as 16 to 18-year-olds who are not in compulsory schooling will have already chosen their post-16 options. If we adopted this amendment, schools would be obliged to provide 16 to 18-year-olds with guidance on post-16 education or training options, which might simply waste their time and schools’ resources. In fact, that exemption—it must be noted—is already in force through the Careers Guidance in Schools Regulations 2013, so the Bill simply seeks to move what we have previously had in guidance into primary legislation: it is more of a tidying-up exercise.

[Official Report, 14 January 2022, Vol. 706, c. 777.]

Letter of correction from the Under-Secretary of State for Education, the hon. Member for Brentwood and Ongar (Alex Burghart).

An error has been identified in my response to my hon. Friend the Member for Christchurch (Sir Christopher Chope).

The correct response should have been:

Alex Burghart Portrait Alex Burghart
- Hansard - - - Excerpts

Turning to amendment 2, the Bill seeks to exempt 16 to 18-year-olds from the provision of guidance on options available for 16 to 18 education or training, including apprenticeships. That guidance is thought to be unnecessary, as 16 to 18-year-olds who are not in compulsory schooling will have already chosen their post-16 options. If we adopted this amendment, schools would be obliged to provide 16 to 18-year-olds with guidance on post-16 education or training options, which might simply waste their time and schools’ resources. In fact, that exemption—it must be noted—is already in force through the Careers Guidance in Schools Regulations 2013, so the Bill simply seeks to move what we have previously had into primary legislation: it is more of a tidying-up exercise.