Home Office

The first duty of the government is to keep citizens safe and the country secure. The Home Office has been at the front line of this endeavour since 1782. As such, the Home Office plays a fundamental role in the security and economic prosperity of the United Kingdom.



Secretary of State

 Portrait

James Cleverly
Home Secretary

Junior Shadow Ministers / Deputy Spokesperson
Labour
Stephen Kinnock (Lab - Aberavon)
Shadow Minister (Home Office) (Immigration)
Dan Jarvis (Lab - Barnsley Central)
Shadow Minister (Home Office) (Security)
Alex Norris (Lab - Nottingham North)
Shadow Minister (Home Office) (Policing)
Ministers of State
Tom Tugendhat (Con - Tonbridge and Malling)
Minister of State (Home Office) (Security)
Chris Philp (Con - Croydon South)
Minister of State (Home Office)
Parliamentary Under-Secretaries of State
Lord Sharpe of Epsom (Con - Life peer)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
Lord Sharpe of Epsom (Con - Life peer)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
Laura Farris (Con - Newbury)
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
Scheduled Event
Monday 26th February 2024
14:30
Home Office
Oral questions - Main Chamber
26 Feb 2024, 2:30 p.m.
Home Office (including Topical Questions)
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Scheduled Event
Monday 26th February 2024
16:30
Home Office
First Delegated Legislation Committee - Debate - General Committee
26 Feb 2024, 4:30 p.m.
The draft West Midlands Combined Authority (Transfer of Police and Crime Commissioner Functions) Order 2024
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Scheduled Event
Monday 26th February 2024
16:30
Home Office
First Delegated Legislation Committee - Debate - Select & Joint Committees
26 Feb 2024, 4:30 p.m.
The draft West Midlands Combined Authority (Transfer of Police and Crime Commissioner Functions) Order 2024
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Scheduled Event
Wednesday 28th February 2024
14:30
Home Office
Sixth Delegated Legislation Committee - Debate - General Committee
28 Feb 2024, 2:30 p.m.
The draft Data Protection Act 2018 (Amendment of Schedule 2 Exemptions) Regulations 2024
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Scheduled Event
Wednesday 28th February 2024
14:30
Home Office
Sixth Delegated Legislation Committee - Debate - Select & Joint Committees
28 Feb 2024, 2:30 p.m.
The draft Data Protection Act 2018 (Amendment of Schedule 2 Exemptions) Regulations 2024
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Scheduled Event
Monday 4th March 2024
Home Office
Legislation - Main Chamber
Safety of Rwanda (Asylum and Immigration) Bill - report stage (day 1)
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Scheduled Event
Tuesday 5th March 2024
Home Office
Orders and regulations - Grand Committee
Data Protection Act 2018 (Amendment of Schedule 2 Exemptions) Regulations 2024
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Scheduled Event
Tuesday 5th March 2024
Home Office
Orders and regulations - Grand Committee
Investigatory Powers Act 2016 (Remedial) Order 2023
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Scheduled Event
Tuesday 12th March 2024
Home Office
Legislation - Main Chamber
Safety of Rwanda (Asylum and Immigration) Bill - third reading
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Scheduled Event
Monday 15th April 2024
14:30
Home Office
Oral questions - Main Chamber
15 Apr 2024, 2:30 p.m.
Home Office (including Topical Questions)
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Debates
Friday 23rd February 2024
Select Committee Docs
Thursday 22nd February 2024
11:00
Select Committee Inquiry
Wednesday 21st February 2024
Written Answers
Thursday 22nd February 2024
No title given
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether his Department plans to classify police officer suicide as …
Secondary Legislation
Wednesday 21st February 2024
Extradition Appeals (Scotland) Order 2024
This Order makes consequential provision to modify the application of subsections (2) to (4) of section 109 of the Extradition …
Bills
Thursday 7th December 2023
Safety of Rwanda (Asylum and Immigration) Bill 2023-24
Make provision about the removal of certain migrants to the Republic of Rwanda.
Dept. Publications
Friday 23rd February 2024
13:00

Home Office Commons Appearances

Oral Answers to Questions is a regularly scheduled appearance where the Secretary of State and junior minister will answer at the Dispatch Box questions from backbench MPs

Other Commons Chamber appearances can be:
  • Urgent Questions where the Speaker has selected a question to which a Minister must reply that day
  • Adjornment Debates a 30 minute debate attended by a Minister that concludes the day in Parliament.
  • Oral Statements informing the Commons of a significant development, where backbench MP's can then question the Minister making the statement.

Westminster Hall debates are performed in response to backbench MPs or e-petitions asking for a Minister to address a detailed issue

Written Statements are made when a current event is not sufficiently significant to require an Oral Statement, but the House is required to be informed.

Most Recent Commons Appearances by Category
Jan. 15
Oral Questions
Nov. 28
Urgent Questions
View All Home Office Commons Contibutions

Bills currently before Parliament

Introduced: 7th December 2023

Make provision about the removal of certain migrants to the Republic of Rwanda.

Commons Completed
Lords - 60%

Last Event - Committee Stage
Monday 19th February 2024
(Read Debate)
Next Event - Report Stage
Monday 4th March 2024
Introduced: 8th November 2023

A Bill to amend the Investigatory Powers Act 2016; to make provision about information supplied by, or relating to, the Judicial Commissioners; and for connected purposes.

Lords Completed
Commons - 40%

Last Event - 2nd Reading
Monday 19th February 2024
(Read Debate)
Introduced: 14th November 2023

A Bill To amend the criminal law; to make provision about criminal justice (including the powers and duties of the police) and about dealing with offenders; to make provision about confiscation and the use of monies in suspended accounts; to make other provision about the prevention and detection of crime and disorder; to make provision about begging, rough sleeping and anti-social behaviour; to make provision about the police; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 60%

Last Event - Committee Stage
Tuesday 30th January 2024

Acts of Parliament created in the 2019 Parliament

Introduced: 22nd September 2022

A Bill to make provision about economic crime and corporate transparency; to make further provision about companies, limited partnerships and other kinds of corporate entity; and to make provision about the registration of overseas entities.

This Bill received Royal Assent on 26th October 2023 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 7th March 2023

A Bill to Make provision for and in connection with the removal from the United Kingdom of persons who have entered or arrived in breach of immigration control; to make provision about detention for immigration purposes; to make provision about unaccompanied children; to make provision about victims of slavery or human trafficking; to make provision about leave to enter or remain in the United Kingdom; to make provision about citizenship; to make provision about the inadmissibility of certain protection and certain human rights claims relating to immigration; to make provision about the maximum number of persons entering the United Kingdom annually using safe and legal routes; and for connected purposes.

This Bill received Royal Assent on 20th July 2023 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 11th May 2022

Make provision about threats to national security from espionage, sabotage and persons acting for foreign powers; about the extra-territorial application of Part 2 of the Serious Crime Act 2007; about the award of damages in proceedings relating to national security and the payment of damages at risk of being used for the purposes of terrorism; about the availability of legal aid to persons connected with terrorism; and for connected purposes.

This Bill received Royal Assent on 11th July 2023 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 24th May 2023

A Bill to make provision for immigration restrictions to be disregarded for the purposes of the British Nationality Act 1981 in historical cases in which such restrictions were in practice disregarded.

This Bill received Royal Assent on 29th June 2023 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 11th May 2022

A Bill to make provision for new offences relating to public order; to make provision about stop and search powers; to make provision about the exercise of police functions relating to public order; to make provision about proceedings by the Secretary of State relating to protest-related activities; to make provision about serious disruption prevention orders; and for connected purposes.

This Bill received Royal Assent on 2nd May 2023 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 6th July 2021

Make provision about nationality, asylum and immigration; to make provision about victims of slavery or human trafficking; to provide a power for Tribunals to charge participants where their behaviour has wasted the Tribunal’s resources; and for connected purposes.

This Bill received Royal Assent on 28th April 2022 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 1st March 2022

A Bill to Set up a register of overseas entities and their beneficial owners and require overseas entities who own land to register in certain circumstances; to make provision about unexplained wealth orders; and to make provision about sanctions.

This Bill received Royal Assent on 14th March 2022 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 3rd March 2020

To make provision in relation to domestic abuse; to make provision for and in connection with the establishment of a Domestic Abuse Commissioner; to prohibit cross-examination in person in family proceedings in certain circumstances; to make provision about certain violent or sexual offences, and offences involving other abusive behaviour, committed outside the United Kingdom; and for connected purposes.

This Bill received Royal Assent on 29th April 2021 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 19th March 2020

A Bill to make provision about the application of the Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005 where a building contains two or more sets of domestic premises; and to confer power to amend that order in future for the purposes of changing the premises to which it applies.

This Bill received Royal Assent on 29th April 2021 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 24th September 2020

A Bill to make provision for, and in connection with, the authorisation of criminal conduct in the course of, or otherwise in connection with, the conduct of covert human intelligence sources.

This Bill received Royal Assent on 1st March 2021 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 5th March 2020

A Bill to make provision to end rights to free movement of persons under retained EU law and to repeal other retained EU law relating to immigration; to confer power to modify retained direct EU legislation relating to social security co-ordination; and for connected purposes.

This Bill received Royal Assent on 11th November 2020 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 7th January 2020

A bill to create a power of arrest, without warrant, for the purpose of extraditing people for serious offences

This Bill received Royal Assent on 22nd October 2020 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 8th January 2020

To provide for the payment out of money provided by Parliament of expenditure incurred by the Secretary of State or a government department under, or in connection with, the Windrush Compensation Scheme.

This Bill received Royal Assent on 8th June 2020 and was enacted into law.

Home Office - Secondary Legislation

Under sections 9(2)(a) and 10(1)(a) of the Crime and Courts Act 2013 (c. 22) the Director General of the National Crime Agency (“NCA”) and other NCA officers, respectively, can be designated as persons having the powers and privileges of a constable. This Order modifies the application of certain provisions in Part 4 of the Extradition Act 2003 (c. 41) which provide that certain powers may be exercised only with the authorisation of a police officer of at least the rank of inspector. It enables a designated NCA officer of at least grade 3 to authorise designated NCA officers when they are exercising their powers under these provisions.
This Order makes consequential provision to modify the application of subsections (2) to (4) of section 109 of the Extradition Act 2003 (c. 41) (“the 2003 Act”). Those subsections (when read with sections 141 and 216(9) of the 2003 Act) provide that, in Scotland, on an appeal under section 108 of the 2003 Act against a decision of the Scottish Ministers to order a person’s extradition, the High Court of Justiciary is to consider the questions which were, or should have been, before the Scottish Ministers.
View All Home Office Secondary Legislation

Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Trending Petitions
Petitions with most signatures
Petition Debates Contributed
256,618
Petition Closed
16 Sep 2021
closed 2 years, 5 months ago

The right to peaceful assembly and protest are fundamental principles of any democracy and the proposed part of this bill that gives the police new powers to tackle disruptive peaceful protests should be removed from The Policing, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill.

188,650
Petition Closed
28 Aug 2022
closed 1 year, 6 months ago

Join other nations in providing a route to safety for refugees. Waive all visa requirements for Ukrainian passport holders arriving in the UK.

The Government is refusing to release official research on the characteristics of grooming gangs, claiming it is not in the “public interest”.

We, the British public, demand the release of the official research on grooming gangs undertaken by the Government in full.

View All Home Office Petitions

Departmental Select Committee

Home Affairs Committee

Commons Select Committees are a formally established cross-party group of backbench MPs tasked with holding a Government department to account.

At any time there will be number of ongoing investigations into the work of the Department, or issues which fall within the oversight of the Department. Witnesses can be summoned from within the Government and outside to assist in these inquiries.

Select Committee findings are reported to the Commons, printed, and published on the Parliament website. The government then usually has 60 days to reply to the committee's recommendations.


11 Members of the Home Affairs Committee
Diana Johnson Portrait
Diana Johnson (Labour - Kingston upon Hull North)
Home Affairs Committee Chair since 15th December 2021
Tim Loughton Portrait
Tim Loughton (Conservative - East Worthing and Shoreham)
Home Affairs Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
Adam Holloway Portrait
Adam Holloway (Conservative - Gravesham)
Home Affairs Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
Simon Fell Portrait
Simon Fell (Conservative - Barrow and Furness)
Home Affairs Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
Diane Abbott Portrait
Diane Abbott (Independent - Hackney North and Stoke Newington)
Home Affairs Committee Member since 11th May 2020
Carolyn Harris Portrait
Carolyn Harris (Labour - Swansea East)
Home Affairs Committee Member since 7th March 2022
Lee Anderson Portrait
Lee Anderson (Conservative - Ashfield)
Home Affairs Committee Member since 15th March 2022
James Daly Portrait
James Daly (Conservative - Bury North)
Home Affairs Committee Member since 27th June 2022
Marco Longhi Portrait
Marco Longhi (Conservative - Dudley North)
Home Affairs Committee Member since 9th January 2023
Alison Thewliss Portrait
Alison Thewliss (Scottish National Party - Glasgow Central)
Home Affairs Committee Member since 28th March 2023
Kim Johnson Portrait
Kim Johnson (Labour - Liverpool, Riverside)
Home Affairs Committee Member since 27th November 2023
Home Affairs Committee: Previous Inquiries
Home Office preparedness for Covid-19 (Coronavirus) Online Harms Gangs and youth crime The work of the Metropolitan Police Child sexual exploitation and the response to localised grooming: follow-up The work of HM Passport Office The work of the Immigration Directorates (2014 Q1) The work of the Border Force Home Affairs Committee - The work of the Home Secretary Radicalisation in schools Police, the media, and high-profile criminal investigations The work of the National Crime Agency 2014 Undercover policing: follow-up The work of the Immigration Directorates (2013 Q2-3) Leadership and standards in the police: follow-up The work of Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector Of Constabulary Drugs Female Genital Mutilation The work of the Immigration Directorates (2013 Q4) Reform of the Police Federation The work of the National Crime Agency The work of the Independent Anti-Slavery Commissioner Police investigations and the role of the CPS The work of the Immigration Directorates (Q2 2015) Countering extremism inquiry Reform of the Police Funding Formula inquiry The work of the Independent Chief Inspector of Borders and Immigration Migration crisis inquiry Psychoactive substances inquiry Counter-radicalisation one-off session Immigration: the situation in Calais one-off session The work of the Home Office The work of the Home Secretary The work of the Metropolitan Police inquiry Immigration: skill shortages inquiry International exchange of criminal records Police National Database inquiry Police bail Policing in London Police Information Notices ("Harassment warnings") The work of the Immigration Directorates (2014 Q3) Counter-terrorism (2015) Female genital mutilation: follow-up The work of HM Inspectorate of Constabulary European Arrest Warrant The work of the Immigration Directorates (2014 Q2) Serious and organised crime The work of the Permanent Secretary Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000 College of Policing Out-of-Court Disposals Statutory Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill Police and Crime Commissioners Tobacco smuggling EU Justice and Home Affairs opt-out Policing and mental health Police and Crime Commissioners The work of the Home Office Immigration Cap Firearms Control Policing Immigration Cap - Terms Of Reference Second evidence session on Immigration Caps Specialist Operations Firearms submissions received Unauthorised tapping into or hacking of mobile communications Work of the Child Exploitation and Online Protection (CEOP) Centre Rules governing enforced removals from the UK Extradition Lessons from the American experience of policing Impact of proposed restrictions on Tier 4 migration Government's review of Counter-Terrorism The work of the Home Secretary (2012) New Landscape of Policing Roots of Violent Radicalisation Policing Large Scale Disorder The work of the Metropolitan Police Commissioner (2012) The work of the Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police The work of the UK Visas & Immigration Section E-crime Private Investigators Independent Police Complaints Commission Localised child grooming Leadership and standards in the police service Policing in London Olympics security Asylum The work of the UK Border Agency Human trafficking Counter-terrorism (2014) Hate crime and its violent consequences inquiry Counter-terrorism inquiry Domestic abuse inquiry Serious violence inquiry Windrush Children inquiry Immigration detention inquiry Post-Brexit migration policy inquiry EU policing and security cooperation inquiry Modern slavery inquiry Post Brexit migration inquiry Government preparations for Brexit inquiry Asylum accommodation inquiry Work of the Home Office inquiry Islamophobia inquiry The Macpherson Report: Twenty Years On inquiry English Channel crossings inquiry EU Settlement Scheme inquiry Home Office preparations for Brexit inquiry Police conduct and complaints inquiry Child migrants inquiry EU policing and security issues inquiry Immigration inquiry Brook House Immigration Removal Centre inquiry The work of the Home Secretary inquiry Policing for the future inquiry Home Office delivery of Brexit: immigration inquiry Home Office delivery of Brexit: policing and security cooperation inquiry Harassment and intimidation near abortion clinics Home Office delivery of Brexit: customs operations inquiry Immigration policy: principles for building consensus inquiry Antisemitism inquiry English-language testing inquiry Police diversity inquiry Prostitution inquiry The work of the Immigration Directorates (Q3 2015) inquiry College of Policing inquiry Police and Crime Commissioners inquiry Proceeds of crime inquiry Asylum accommodation The work of the Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse Policing for the future: changing demands and new challenges The work of the Immigration Directorates (Q2 2016) inquiry Female Genital Mutilation inquiry Sharia councils inquiry The work of the Immigration Directorates (Q4 2015) inquiry The work of the Immigration Directorates (Q1 2016) inquiry Implications of the UK's exit from the European Union inquiry Hate crime and its violent consequences inquiry Migration and asylum Policing priorities Channel crossings Human Trafficking Pre-legislative scrutiny of the Terrorism (Protection of Premises) Draft Bill Fraud Police and Crime Commissioners: 10 years on Policing of protests Non-contact sexual offences Violence and abuse towards retail workers Post-Transition management of the border The UK’s offer of visa and settlement routes for residents of Hong Kong Asylum accommodation Counter-terrorism Domestic abuse English Channel crossings EU policing and security cooperation EU Settlement Scheme Government preparations for Brexit Home Office delivery of Brexit: policing and security cooperation Home Office delivery of Brexit: immigration Home Office preparations for Brexit Immigration detention Immigration policy: principles for building consensus Brook House Immigration Removal Centre The work of the Home Secretary Post Brexit migration Hate crime and its violent consequences Post-Brexit migration policy Islamophobia The Macpherson Report: Twenty Years On Modern slavery Police conduct and complaints Policing for the future Serious violence Windrush Children Work of the Home Office

50 most recent Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department

8th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether his Department plans to classify police officer suicide as a work-related accident.

This Government takes the mental health of the police workforce very seriously and we are committed to making improvements in wellbeing support for officers and staff.

Through the Police Covenant, we continue to work with policing partners to ensure those who work in policing and their families get the support and protection they need. We have already delivered pre-deployment mental health support for all new starters and established a Chief Medical Officer for policing.

Suicide is a particularly sensitive and difficult issue and usually involves a combination of many factors, which means that it is not straightforward to classify by default as a work-related incident. There is an existing system in which deaths are examined by a Coroner and a Coroner can already refer cases to the Health and Safety Executive, or other public body, if they consider there is an ongoing risk to others.

Any suicide is devastating and that is why, through the Police Covenant, we have developed a priority work stream on suicide prevention. The Home Office is also providing funding to establish and run the first year of a 24/7 Mental Health Crisis Support line for current and former members of the police workforce.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
16th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if his Department will take steps to halt evictions from temporary asylum accommodation for the full duration that a severe weather emergency protocol is active.

It has been agreed that the eviction or move on from asylum accommodation will pause for up to, but no more than three days, when Severe Weather Emergency Protocol (SWEP) is activated by a local authority and an individual does not have a housing offer from elsewhere.

The Home Office is working to ensure that individuals are offered support from Migrant Help or their partner organisation when they receive a decision on their asylum claim. This support includes providing advice on accessing the labour market, on applying for Universal Credit and signposting to local authorities for assistance with housing.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
16th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many and what proportion of people from Sudan applying for entry clearance to the UK have requested that (a) the biometric enrolment process be excused and (b) the application be predetermined since April 2023.

The Home Office does not routinely publish data on the number of applications that are excused from the biometric enrolment process and those that are pre-determined due to applicants undertaking unsafe journeys.

Biometrics, in the form of fingerprints and facial images, underpin the current UK immigration system to support identity assurance and suitability checks on foreign nationals who are subject to immigration control. They enable comprehensive checks to be made against immigration and criminality records to identify those who pose a threat to our national security, public safety, immigration controls, or are likely to breach our laws if they are allowed to come to the UK.

The threshold in the unsafe journeys guidance for excusing the requirement to attend a visa application centre is deliberately set at a high-level because of the need to protect the integrity of the UK border. If we do not know about a person's identity we are less able to assess the risks they may pose to the public. This is why we would only excuse applicants from being required to attend a visa application centre to enrol their biometrics in circumstances that are so compelling as to be exceptional.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
16th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many and in what proportion of cases he has (a) excused the biometric enrolment process and (b) predetermined the application for people applying for entry clearance to the UK from Sudan since April 2003.

The Home Office does not routinely publish data on the number of applications that are excused from the biometric enrolment process and those that are pre-determined due to applicants undertaking unsafe journeys.

Biometrics, in the form of fingerprints and facial images, underpin the current UK immigration system to support identity assurance and suitability checks on foreign nationals who are subject to immigration control. They enable comprehensive checks to be made against immigration and criminality records to identify those who pose a threat to our national security, public safety, immigration controls, or are likely to breach our laws if they are allowed to come to the UK.

The threshold in the unsafe journeys guidance for excusing the requirement to attend a visa application centre is deliberately set at a high-level because of the need to protect the integrity of the UK border. If we do not know about a person's identity we are less able to assess the risks they may pose to the public. This is why we would only excuse applicants from being required to attend a visa application centre to enrol their biometrics in circumstances that are so compelling as to be exceptional.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
7th Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government for what reasons the Islamic Army of Aden is a proscribed organisation; and whether they have any plans to proscribe the Houthi group as a proscribed organisation.

The Islamic Army of Aden was proscribed in March 2001. It has a history of involvement in attempts to overthrow the Government of Yemen, including through use of terrorism to establish an Islamic State following Sharia Law.

The UK Government has been unequivocal: the illegal attacks by the Iran-backed Houthis on commercial shipping in the Red Sea, as well as attacks against British and allied warships, are unacceptable and will not be tolerated. Together with the US, the UK Government has imposed coordinated sanctions on the Houthis. This is in addition to the US-UK led strikes, conducted with support from the Netherlands, Canada, Bahrain and Australia.

The Government does not routinely comment whether an organisation is under consideration for proscription. The Government keeps the list of proscribed organisations under review.

Lord Sharpe of Epsom
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
16th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether the exemption from immigration rules for seasonal workers in the perishable food industry extends to those in the fish processing sector.

The Government operates no exemption from Immigration Rules for seasonal workers in the perishable food industry. Within the Immigration Rules, the Government operates the Seasonal Worker route which allows up to 45,000 workers to come to the UK for up to six months to pick both edible and ornamental crops (e.g. fruit and flower picking). The route also enables up to 2,000 poultry to come to the UK in the run up to Christmas. The Seasonal Worker route is specifically designed to support the UK horticulture and poultry sectors – both sectors which typically require higher volumes of labour, for relatively short-term periods of time, in line with seasonal production peaks. The route is not designed to support non-seasonal roles, operating on a year-round basis, such as fish processing.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
16th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people accused by Educational Testing Service of cheating in its Test of English for International Communication have received compensation from the Government; and how much has been paid out in that compensation.

The information requested is not held in a reportable format and could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
16th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether (a) changes to minimum income thresholds and (b) other changes to legal migration rules for (i) family and (ii) work visas apply to members of the armed forces.

We will set out full details of changes to the Immigration Rules for members of the Armed Forces when we intend to lay the Immigration Rules on 14 March.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
16th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether initial asylum decisions have been made for claims made before 28 June 2022.

In December 2022, the Prime Minister pledged to clear 92,601 legacy asylum claims (those lodged before the 28 June 2022) by the end of 2023. The Home Office not only cleared the equivalent 92,000 legacy asylum backlog, but exceeded it, processing over 112,000 cases in total.

Of the 112,138 initial asylum decisions, 86,800 of these decisions were made on legacy claims, with a further 25,338 decisions on flow claims. Please see Statistics relating to Illegal Migration - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk).

Around 4,500 legacy claims require further investigation. We will never compromise the integrity of the UK immigration system and will ensure that rigorous checks are made on these claims before decisions are made.

Indeed, since the end of December 2023, we have continued to make decisions on cases in the legacy backlog and will continue to do so. We will publish data on the number of outstanding decisions in the legacy cohort in the usual way.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
7th Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government when all Independent Chief Inspector of Borders and Immigration reports submitted to the Home Office will be published.

The department takes every inspection report seriously and considers the findings and recommendations carefully. This can sometimes mean the publication process is longer than expected. We will publish the reports in due course.

Lord Sharpe of Epsom
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
7th Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what guidance is currently issued to health and care workers recruited from overseas with regard to the right of entry of dependent children.

The Home Office publishes guidance on the Health and Care visa to assist in making a visa application, including for dependents. This can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/health-care-worker-visa.

The guidance will be updated once the net migration changes announced in December come into force. Further details on the measures, and how carers and dependents will be affected, is available here: https://homeofficemedia.blog.gov.uk/2024/02/01/reducing-net-migration-factsheet-december-2023/.

Lord Sharpe of Epsom
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
7th Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government whether support is provided to health and care workers recruited overseas in the visa application process for dependent children.

The Home Office publishes guidance on the Health and Care visa to assist in making a visa application, including for dependents. This can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/health-care-worker-visa.

The guidance will be updated once the net migration changes announced in December come into force. Further details on the measures, and how carers and dependents will be affected, is available here: https://homeofficemedia.blog.gov.uk/2024/02/01/reducing-net-migration-factsheet-december-2023/.

Lord Sharpe of Epsom
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
7th Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government on how many occasions enforcement action has been taken against care providers who fail to provide sufficient work for health and care workers recruited from overseas under the Certificate of Sponsorship scheme.

The Home Office does not publish data that would cover this request.

Lord Sharpe of Epsom
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
7th Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government how many complaints they have received about Teleperformance overseas helplines, and what compensation has been awarded to customers, in each month since 2022.

The number of complaints made to the UKVI international helpline, managed by Teleperformance, are found in the table below.

We do not hold the data relating to how much compensation has been issued in relation to contact made to the UKVI Contact Centre, as this is held by Teleperformance.

Teleperformance collect call and email charges on behalf of UKVI. Where any refunds are to be issued in relation to complaints made against the services, it is appropriate for Teleperformance to manage these refund transactions.

Lord Sharpe of Epsom
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
8th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what support is provided to serving police officers with mental health problems.

This Government takes the mental health of the police workforce very seriously and we are committed to making improvements in wellbeing support for officers and staff.

Through the Police Covenant, we continue to work with policing partners to ensure those who work in policing and their families get the support and protection they need. We have already delivered pre-deployment mental health support for all new starters and established a Chief Medical Officer for policing.

Suicide is a particularly sensitive and difficult issue and usually involves a combination of many factors, which means that it is not straightforward to classify by default as a work-related incident. There is an existing system in which deaths are examined by a Coroner and a Coroner can already refer cases to the Health and Safety Executive, or other public body, if they consider there is an ongoing risk to others.

Any suicide is devastating and that is why, through the Police Covenant, we have developed a priority work stream on suicide prevention. The Home Office is also providing funding to establish and run the first year of a 24/7 Mental Health Crisis Support line for current and former members of the police workforce.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
16th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether he has taken steps with Cabinet colleagues to issue guidance to people with horticultural seasonal worker visas on how to register with a GP; and what information his Department holds on the number and proportion of people with horticultural seasonal worker visas who registered with a GP in 2022.

The Home Office has no plans to issue guidance to people with Seasonal Worker visas as to how to register with a GP. Orientation information is a matter for their licenced scheme operator.

The Home Office holds no records on the numbers of Seasonal Workers who have registered with a GP, as this is not an immigration related metric.

In the event that a scheme operator for the Seasonal Worker route became unlicensed for any reason, the Home Office will consider each case on its own merits and tailor our response accordingly.

The Home Office does not hold data on the average number of weeks of work provided to workers on the horticultural seasonal worker visa scheme during (a) 2022 and (b) 2023. Since 12 April 2023, Seasonal Workers must receive a minimum of 32 hour’s pay for each week of their stay in the UK, regardless of whether work is available.

The Home Office does not hold data on how many workers on the horticultural seasonal worker visa scheme were injured at work during (a) 2022 and (b) 2023. Seasonal Workers enjoy the same workplace protections as resident workers, and as such workplace safety is a matter for the Health and Safety Executive.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
16th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment his Department has made of the economic benefits of allowing asylum seekers to work if they have been waiting six months or more for an initial decision.

Asylum seekers who have had their claim outstanding for 12 months or more, through no fault of their own, are allowed to work. Those permitted to work are restricted to jobs on the Shortage Occupation List. This is based on expert advice from the independent Migration Advisory Committee. It is the Home Office’s assessment that any analysis in this area is dependent on making assumptions from limited evidence and will therefore produce uncertain results.

Whilst we keep all policies under review, there are no immediate plans to change the existing policy, other than aligning it with the upcoming Immigration Salary List, which replaces the SOL. It is important that we distinguish between individuals who need protection and those seeking to work here who can apply for a work visa under the Immigration Rules. The Government has always been clear that asylum seekers do not need to make perilous journeys in order to seek employment in the UK. Those in need of protection should claim asylum in the first safe country they reach – that is the fastest route to safety.

Whilst there is mixed evidence that access to work in itself is a pull factor, it is reasonable to assume that this is one element in a range of factors that may drive illegal migration rather than use of legal routes to work in the UK. These routes include Skilled Worker, Global Talent, and Health and Care routes, which are supporting UK businesses to recruit workers with the skills and talent they need from around the world.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
16th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if he will discuss attacks on employees in the retail sector at the next meeting of the National Retail Crime Steering Group.

The Government is clear that violent and abusive behaviour towards any worker, particularly those who provide a valuable service to the public, is never acceptable.

The National Retail Crime Steering Group (NRCSG), which I co-chair alongside the British Retail Consortium, ensures the response to retail crime is as robust as it can be. The NRCSG meets quarterly and comprises senior representatives from policing, the retail sector, retail trade associations, security providers and Government departments. Violence and abuse towards retail workers will be discussed at the next NRCSG.

In October, the National Police Chiefs’ Council’s Retail Crime Action Plan was launched, which includes a commitment to prioritise police attendance at the scene where violence has been used towards shop staff, where an offender has been detained by store security, and where evidence needs to be secured and can only be done by police personnel. These are substantial commitments, and I will use the NRCSG to hold police to account, whilst also ensuring retailers are playing their part by providing evidence of shoplifting and violence and abuse to police.

In 2022, the Government took the significant step to introduce a statutory aggravating factor for assault against those who are serving the public. Section 156 of the Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Act 2022 means the public facing nature of a victim’s role will be considered an aggravating factor when it comes to sentencing for assault offences, allowing the court to give a longer sentence within the statutory maximum for the offence.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
6th Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what UK expenditure within Rwanda has been authorised in respect of (1)  building the capacity of their asylum system, and (2) amending the UK–Rwanda agreement to mitigate against the risk of refoulement.

As I said to the House at Committee Stage for the Safety of Rwanda (Asylum and Immigration) Bill on 19 February, Noble Lords will be aware that we have provided Rwanda with £220 million as part of the economic transformation fund and £20 million as an advance credit to pay for operational costs in advance of flights commencing. The spend on the MEDP with Rwanda so far is £240 million.

We anticipate providing another £50 million in the next financial year. This is not new but follows the same arrangement from 2022.

Rwanda did not ask for money to sign the treaty, nor did we offer it. However, it is right and proper that there is funding to reflect the additional costs in the future. The Government are already committed to disclosing further payments made as part of the economic transformation fund and the per-person relocation costs as part of the department’s annual accounts in the normal way.

During the debate, I committed to write to the Noble Lord Purvis on this matter, and the letter will be published in the House library in due course.

Lord Sharpe of Epsom
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
6th Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government when the Digital Services at the Border programme will be completed, and what estimate they have made of its total cost.

DSAB will complete in spring this year. The cost of bringing all the world leading, security features that it delivers will have been £177m since the programme reset in 2020.

Lord Sharpe of Epsom
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
6th Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government how many community events have Immigration Enforcement's National Community Engagement Team annually (1) held, and (2) hosted; and what were the annual costs of these events.

The National Community Engagement Team have held and hosted two community events, both in this financial year. The annual costs for these are £20,707, which includes £3,451 VAT.

Lord Sharpe of Epsom
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
6th Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government how many data breaches have been reported by HM Passport Office's security team since 2020.

Between 1 January 2020 and 6 February 2024, His Majesty’s Passport Office reported 15,218 data breaches across passport and certificate services, which includes those resulting from a partner delivery error.

This figure is approximately 0.05% of the applications and orders handled by HM Passport Office and the General Register Office within the same period.

Lord Sharpe of Epsom
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
5th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many private investigators have been questioned by police over allegations of assisting Russia in the last 12 months; and what steps his Department is taking to tackle companies that assist (a) Russia and (b) other sanctioned countries.

The Home Office does not hold information on how many private investigators have been questioned by police over allegations of assisting Russia.

Departments across HMG including FCDO, HMT (through OFSI), DBT, DFT, HMRC, Home Office, and NCA, work together to ensure that UK companies are compliant with UK sanctions, including through guidance, engagement, civil enforcement and criminal prosecution.

The launch of the Office of Trade Sanctions Implementation (OTSI) by DBT will further enhance guidance and engagement with industry, as well as civil enforcement of trade sanctions.

Legislation is being enhanced to expand the powers to impose civil monetary penalties for breaches of both trade and transport sanctions measures.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
6th Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government how many legacy asylum applications are awaiting an initial decision.

The Home Office publishes data on asylum in the ‘Statistics relating to Illegal Migration’. Provisional data on the legacy applications awaiting an initial decision is published in table IMB_02 of the Statistics relating to the Illegal Migration Act: data tables to December 2023. The latest data relates to 28 December 2023.

Finalised data for 31 December 2023 is due to be published on 29 February 2024 in table Asy_10a of the Asylum and resettlement summary tables, as part of the ‘Immigration System Statistics Quarterly Release’.

Information on future Home Office statistical release dates can be found in the ‘Research and statistics calendar’.

Lord Sharpe of Epsom
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
6th Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what percentage of serving Metropolitan Police Service officers have served for more than five years, and what assessment they have made of the strength of institutional memory within the Metropolitan Police Service.

The Home Office collects and publishes data annually on the length of service of police officers employed within the police service in the ‘Police Workforce, England and Wales’ statistical bulletin which can be accessed here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/police-workforce-england-and-wales.

Information on the length of service of police officers employed in each of the 43 territorial police forces in England and Wales can be found in Table JL5 in the data tables accompanying each publication.

As at 31 March 2023, 67% of police officers employed within the Metropolitan Police Service had 5 years or more service.

The retention of experienced police officers is a priority for the Home Office and the National Police Chiefs’ Council (NPCC). Voluntary resignation rates, at around 3%, are low compared to other sectors.

Lord Sharpe of Epsom
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
6th Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government how many unannounced inspections of Life in the UK test centres have taken place each month since November 2022; whether any test centres have been closed since November 2022; and, if so, for what reason.

The information requested is not held in a reportable format.

Lord Sharpe of Epsom
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
6th Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what representations they have made to Interpol regarding (1) arrest warrants being issued by the Chinese and Hong Kong authorities for Hong Kong dissidents and (2) their targeting through Interpol, including through its Stolen and Lost Travel Documents database.

The Government strongly supports INTERPOL’s efforts to ensure systems are in place that protect individuals’ human rights in line with Article 3 of INTERPOL's Constitution which strictly forbids any intervention or activities of a political, military, religious or racial character.

The Home Office continues to work with INTERPOL and the National Crime Agency (NCA), which acts as the UK’s National Central Bureau (NCB) for INTERPOL, to monitor the effectiveness of existing safeguards. We encourage INTERPOL to uphold international human rights obligations and we won’t hesitate to recommend further reforms to INTERPOL as necessary.

We are continuing to strengthen our collective efforts to deter the misuse of INTERPOL systems and support organisational reform and governance at INTERPOL.

Lord Sharpe of Epsom
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
6th Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government, following reports of the Turkish government's use of the Interpol Stolen and Lost Travel Documents (SLTD) database to target dissidents abroad, what representations they have made to Interpol regarding misuse of the SLTD database.

The Government strongly supports INTERPOL’s efforts to ensure systems are in place that protect individuals’ human rights in line with Article 3 of INTERPOL's Constitution which strictly forbids any intervention or activities of a political, military, religious or racial character.

The Home Office continues to work with INTERPOL and the National Crime Agency (NCA), which acts as the UK’s National Central Bureau (NCB) for INTERPOL, to monitor the effectiveness of existing safeguards. We encourage INTERPOL to uphold international human rights obligations and we won’t hesitate to recommend further reforms to INTERPOL as necessary.

We are continuing to strengthen our collective efforts to deter the misuse of INTERPOL systems and support organisational reform and governance at INTERPOL.

Lord Sharpe of Epsom
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
6th Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government, following reports of the Turkish government's misuse of the Interpol Stolen and Lost Travel Documents (SLTD) database, what assessment they have made of the Chinese government's ability to use the SLTD database to target Chinese and Hong Kong dissidents abroad.

The Government strongly supports INTERPOL’s efforts to ensure systems are in place that protect individuals’ human rights in line with Article 3 of INTERPOL's Constitution which strictly forbids any intervention or activities of a political, military, religious or racial character.

The Home Office continues to work with INTERPOL and the National Crime Agency (NCA), which acts as the UK’s National Central Bureau (NCB) for INTERPOL, to monitor the effectiveness of existing safeguards. We encourage INTERPOL to uphold international human rights obligations and we won’t hesitate to recommend further reforms to INTERPOL as necessary.

We are continuing to strengthen our collective efforts to deter the misuse of INTERPOL systems and support organisational reform and governance at INTERPOL.

Lord Sharpe of Epsom
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
6th Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the Home Office's Independent Examiner of Complaints service, and whether the Office of the Independent Examiner of Complaints will publish annual reports.

The Independent Examiner of Complaints (IEC) is operating within its terms of reference. The Memorandum of Understanding between the Home Office and the IEC states that the IEC will publish an annual report.

Lord Sharpe of Epsom
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
6th Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what decision, if any, was made by the Migration Advisory Committee on item 7 of their agenda as referenced in the minutes of their meeting of 14 July 2023; and, if so, when.

In response to the request from the Home Secretary for all agencies and public bodies that are sponsored by the Home Office, including the Migration Advisory Committee (MAC), to adopt and publish a statement adopting the IHRA’s definition of antisemitism, the MAC included a wider policy statement on discrimination in its 2023 Annual Governance Report: Migration Advisory Committee: annual report, 2023 - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk).

Lord Sharpe of Epsom
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
6th Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what steps they intend to take to tackle modern slavery.

The Government is committed to tackling modern slavery to ensure that victims are provided with the support they need to begin rebuilding their lives and that those responsible are prosecuted.

The Home Office continues to fund specialist support for adult victims of modern slavery in England and Wales through the £379 million Modern Slavery Victim Care Contract and for children, who receive support through local authority safeguarding structures, we are also continuing to work with Barnardo’s to provide additional and tailored support through the Independent Child Trafficking Guardian service.

Since 2016, in addition to core police funding, we have invested £17.8 million in the Modern Slavery and Organised Immigration Crime Unit, a specialist police unit which supports all police forces in England and Wales to improve their response to modern slavery.

In addition, between 2016 and March 2023, the Home Office spent over £40.4 million through the Modern Slavery Fund to combat modern slavery overseas and reduce the threat of human trafficking to the UK. We continue to work across operational partners and the sector to deliver on modern slavery.

Lord Sharpe of Epsom
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
5th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people had their British citizenship revoked under the British Nationality Act 1981 between 1997 and 2010.

The Home Office publishes data relating to those deprived of British Citizenship. Statistics are available from May 2010.

The British Nationality Act 1981 provides the Secretary of State with powers to deprive a person of citizenship status only under the circumstances set out at sections 40(2) (if deemed to be conducive to the public good) and 40(3) (citizenship was obtained by means of fraud, false representation, or concealment of material fact) of the Act.

Details on the numbers of conducive deprivation orders made under Section 40(2) of the Act, are published in the Government Transparency Report: Disruptive and Investigatory Powers. Seven reports have been published to date providing the number of deprivations of citizenship orders made up until the end of 2022 and are all published online. The latest can be found at this link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/counter-terrorism-disruptive-powers-report-2022

We intend to publish more recent data in future publications.

Numbers of Section 40(3) deprivation orders can be found in quarterly published transparency data at the link below:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/migration-transparency-data#uk-visas-and-immigration

Tom Tugendhat
Minister of State (Home Office) (Security)
6th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, on what dates he plans to publish the inspections completed by the Independent Chief Inspector of Borders and Immigration on (a) Country of Origin Information – Thematic review of statelessness, (b) Afghan resettlement schemes, (c) ePassport gates, (d) the use of powers to deprive British nationals of citizenship, (e) contingency asylum accommodation for families with children in Northern Ireland, (f) Border Force operations at Portsmouth International Port, (g) Border Force’s fast parcel operations, (h) Border Force practices and procedures in relation to firearms, (i) the use of hotels for housing unaccompanied asylum-seeking children, (j) illegal working enforcement activity, (k) country of origin information, Albania and Pakistan, (l) asylum casework and (m) the immigration system as it relates to the social care sector.

The department takes every inspection report seriously and considers the findings and recommendations carefully. This can sometimes mean the publication process is longer than expected. We will publish the reports in due course.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
7th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps he is taking to ensure that non-statutory guidance on abortion clinic safe access zones around abortion clinics issued by his Department supports the human rights of people with pro-life views.

The Government respects people’s fundamental rights provided under Article 9 (freedom of thought, religion and belief), Article 10 (freedom of expression) and Article 11 (freedom of association and assembly) of the European Convention on Human Rights. The enforcement of abortion safe access zones must be compliant with the ECHR.

The Government has recently consulted publicly on the guidance. We are currently analysing all responses to the consultation, which closed on 22 January, and we will publish the final guidance in due course.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
6th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many staff in his Department are working on countering deepfake material.

The Home Office is working closely with law enforcement, international partners, industry and across Government – including with the Department for Science, Innovation and Technology (DSIT) as lead Department - to address the risks associated with deepfakes.

This includes Home Office teams working across crime and policing, national security, immigration and science and technology as well as the Defending Democracy Taskforce. Work on deepfakes forms part of a wider Home Office programme to manage the risks and opportunities from artificial intelligence.

We are unable to provide figures for departmental staff working on deepfakes as headcount is captured according to crime type, or broader work on artificial intelligence, and not broken down into activities specific to deepfakes.

Tom Tugendhat
Minister of State (Home Office) (Security)
7th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people who applied for asylum who changed their religious adherence had their claim (a) granted and (b) refused in each of the last five years.

This information is not recorded in a reportable format.

Information regarding initial decisions on asylum applications, by outcome, is contained within the ASY_D02 tab of the Asylum applications, decisions and resettlement dataset: Immigration system statistics data tables - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk).

This does not include information regarding whether the asylum applicant changed their religion.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
8th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether all (a) buildings and (b) workplaces staff from their Department occupy have a suitable and sufficient risk assessment under Section 3 of the Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999.

Yes, the Home Office has a Health and Safety and Fire Management system within which risk assessments are conducted and reviewed appropriately for our buildings and people.

The Home Office seeks to comply with all UK Health, Safety and Fire Safety statutory provisions proportionate and relevant to its undertaking.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
6th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many asylum applications were granted on the basis of the risk of persecution on religious grounds in each of the last five years.

This information is not recorded in a reportable format.

Information regarding initial decisions on asylum applications, by outcome, is contained within the ASY_D02 tab of the Asylum applications, decisions and resettlement dataset: Immigration system statistics data tables - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk).

This does not include the grounds for granting leave to remain in the UK.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
5th Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Sharpe of Epsom on 31 January (HL1679), whether they plan to review the algorithms used in the automatic verification of passport photographs to ensure that they account for ethnic diversity, notwithstanding any direct human intervention.

The initial check to determine if a photo meets the internationally agreed standards for passports utilises an algorithm provided by a leading technology provider and, through extensive testing, this has been optimised to help best meet the needs of His Majesty’s Passport Office and its customers. HM Passport Office is committed to making applying for a passport as simple as possible and will continue to evolve its photo checker as algorithmic technology improves.

Lord Sharpe of Epsom
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
7th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 8 January 2024 to Question 8419 on Protection from Sex-based Harassment in Public Act 2023, when he plans to publish the statutory guidance for the Protection from Sex-based Harassment in Public Act 2023.

We supported the Protection from Sex-Based Harassment in Public Act 2023 (sponsored by Rt Hon. Greg Clark MP and Lord Wolfson of Tredegar KC), which makes public sexual harassment a specific offence. As with any new criminal justice legislation, an implementation period is necessary to ensure all processes, systems and guidance are updated – including drawing up the statutory guidance. We are working to ensure the legislation comes into force as quickly as reasonably possible.

Laura Farris
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
8th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether he has had discussions with his Scottish counterpart on minimum unit pricing for alcohol.

The Government notes the recent outcome report from Public Health Scotland on minimum unit pricing for alcohol. The Government will continue to monitor emerging evidence relating to minimum unit pricing with interest.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
7th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when he expects pension adjustments for police officers affected by the McCloud judgement to be completed.

Neither the policy responsibility nor administrative responsibility for police pension scheme falls to the Department of Work and Pensions. There have, therefore, been no such discussions.

The relevant legislation provides that all eligible members will be given a choice to remedy the discrimination set out in the McCloud judgment and that information should be provided to eligible members by 31 March 2025. Adjustments to individual members’ benefits are an administrative matter, and the police pension scheme is locally administered by each of the separate police forces in England and Wales (policing is a devolved matter in Scotland and Northern Ireland).

The Home Office has policy responsibility for the police pension scheme but does not have any role in the administration of police pensions. Information on the progress of forces with the remedy process is therefore not held centrally.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
7th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether he has had discussions with the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions on pension adjustments for police officers affected by the McCloud judgement.

Neither the policy responsibility nor administrative responsibility for police pension scheme falls to the Department of Work and Pensions. There have, therefore, been no such discussions.

The relevant legislation provides that all eligible members will be given a choice to remedy the discrimination set out in the McCloud judgment and that information should be provided to eligible members by 31 March 2025. Adjustments to individual members’ benefits are an administrative matter, and the police pension scheme is locally administered by each of the separate police forces in England and Wales (policing is a devolved matter in Scotland and Northern Ireland).

The Home Office has policy responsibility for the police pension scheme but does not have any role in the administration of police pensions. Information on the progress of forces with the remedy process is therefore not held centrally.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
5th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment he has made of the impact of extreme weather on the risk of intimate partner violence.

The Home Office has not made any formal assessment on the impact of extreme weather on the risk of intimate partner violence.

The prevalence of domestic abuse has remained relatively stable over recent years, but there was a decline seen between the year ending March 2020, a year largely unaffected by the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, and the most recent figure for the year ending March 2023.

The government are taking important steps to tackle intimate partner violence, including implementation of the Tackling VAWG Strategy, Tackling Domestic Abuse Plan and the Domestic Abuse Act 2021.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
8th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that workers with the Health and Social Care visa are supported to find alternative work if their sponsor has had their licence revoked.

UKVI Compliance Command work with local authorities and the Association of Adult Social Care Directors.

Relevant authorities receive prior notification of suspended and revoked sponsors and the numbers of workers affected by a compliance action.

This allows time for authorities to relocate workers with other care providers in the area and ensure continuity of care provision.

UKVI work proactively with authorities in the timing of revocations and where appropriate delay revocation and cancellation to allow workers the opportunity to find new sponsors.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
6th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many and what proportion of newly warranted officers in the Metropolitan Police Force left within their first two years of service in each of the last five years.

The Home Office does not collect information on the length of service of police officers leaving the police service.

The Home Office collects and publishes data annually on the number of police officer leavers in the ‘Police Workforce, England and Wales’ statistical bulletin which can be accessed here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/police-workforce-england-and-wales

Information on the number of police officers leaving the Metropolitan Police Service, between the years ending 31 March 2007 and 2023, by reason for leaving, can be found in the ‘Leavers Open Data Table’ here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/media/64ba76662059dc000d5d27c0/open-data-table-police-workforce-leavers-260723.ods

Voluntary resignation rates in the Metropolitan Police Service, at around 3%, are low compared to other sectors.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
8th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many care workers on the Health and Social Care visa are employed by visa sponsors who are (a) registered with the Care Quality Commission and (b) not registered with the Care Quality Commission.

The Home Office does not publish data that would cover these requests.

However, care workers who are currently sponsored by non-CQC-registered providers will be able to continue working for those providers after the upcoming rules change.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
8th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many care providers lost their sponsorship license in each quarter since October 2023.

The Home Office does not publish data that would cover these requests.

However, care workers who are currently sponsored by non-CQC-registered providers will be able to continue working for those providers after the upcoming rules change.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)