Jim McMahon Portrait

Jim McMahon

Labour (Co-op) - Oldham West and Royton

First elected: 3rd December 2015

Shadow Minister (Levelling Up, Housing, Communities and Local Government)

(since November 2023)

Shadow Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
29th Nov 2021 - 4th Sep 2023
Shadow Secretary of State for Transport
6th Apr 2020 - 29th Nov 2021
Shadow Minister (Housing, Communities and Local Government) (Devolution)
9th Jan 2018 - 6th Apr 2020
Shadow Minister (Communities and Local Government) (Devolution)
9th Oct 2016 - 9th Jan 2018
Housing, Communities and Local Government Committee
7th Mar 2016 - 31st Oct 2016
Levelling Up, Housing and Communities Committee
7th Mar 2016 - 31st Oct 2016


Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Jim McMahon has voted in 632 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Jim McMahon Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Grant Shapps (Conservative)
Secretary of State for Defence
(39 debate interactions)
Lindsay Hoyle (Speaker)
(33 debate interactions)
George Eustice (Conservative)
(16 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Department for Transport
(38 debate contributions)
Home Office
(19 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Jim McMahon's debates

Oldham West and Royton Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Jim McMahon has not participated in any petition debates

Latest EDMs signed by Jim McMahon

24th February 2020
Jim McMahon signed this EDM on Monday 24th February 2020

Assaults on shopworkers

Tabled by: Gareth Thomas (Labour (Co-op) - Harrow West)
That this House deplores the rise in verbal and physical abuse of shopworkers, notes that according to research conducted by USDAW, over 400 retail workers were assaulted each day last year and that 62 per cent of retail staff have been the victim of either verbal or physical abuse; further …
69 signatures
(Most recent: 15 Sep 2020)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 55
Scottish National Party: 4
Democratic Unionist Party: 3
Conservative: 3
Independent: 2
Social Democratic & Labour Party: 1
Liberal Democrat: 1
Green Party: 1
4th September 2019
Jim McMahon signed this EDM as a sponsor on Wednesday 4th September 2019

CONFLICT IN KASHMIR

Tabled by: Naz Shah (Labour - Bradford West)
That this House expresses huge concern about the revocation of Articles 370 and 35A in Kashmir by the Indian Government, stripping away the right to special status for the people of Kashmir; is extremely alarmed by the road to ethnic cleansing opened up by the ongoing communications blackout and the …
27 signatures
(Most recent: 30 Sep 2019)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 23
Conservative: 1
Independent: 1
Scottish National Party: 1
Green Party: 1
View All Jim McMahon's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Jim McMahon, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


6 Urgent Questions tabled by Jim McMahon

Wednesday 28th June 2023
Thursday 23rd March 2023
Thursday 23rd February 2023
Thursday 19th May 2022
Monday 13th September 2021
Tuesday 29th June 2021

1 Adjournment Debate led by Jim McMahon

2 Bills introduced by Jim McMahon


A Bill to make provision about the monitoring of water quality; to set a target for the reduction of sewage discharges; to provide for financial penalties in relation to sewage discharges and breaches of monitoring requirements; to require the Secretary of State to publish a strategy for the reduction of sewage discharges from storm overflows, including an economic impact assessment; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 40%

Last Event - 2nd Reading
Friday 21st April 2023

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to reduce the voting age to 16 in parliamentary and other elections; to make provision about young people's education in citizenship and the constitution; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 19th July 2017
(Read Debate)

Latest 50 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
7th Nov 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many deaths in care homes relating to covid-19 were registered in the Metropolitan Borough of Oldham in each month since January 2020.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority.

A response to the Hon gentleman’s Parliamentary Question of 7 November is attached.

28th Jun 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to his Department's guidance entitled The Border Target Operating Model: Draft for Feedback, published on 5 April 2023, what steps his Department plans to take to implement the proposed changes without disrupting supply chains.

Following publication of the draft Border Target Operating Model, we have worked closely with businesses to develop our plans.

The new Border Target Operating Model sets out a new global regime of border controls that makes better use of technology and data to reduce friction and costs for businesses and consumers, while also protecting public, plant and animal health. It will create a radically simpler yet secure experience for businesses moving goods across the UK border. Businesses have indicated that they will need time to prepare for these changes, and the phased approach outlined in the draft Border Target Operating Model was designed with this in mind.

We are working to ensure that businesses throughout the supply chain are aware of and understand the new requirements. As we have done with all major border changes, we will take a pragmatic approach as controls are introduced, working with businesses to monitor trade flows and support them to be compliant.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
20th Apr 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many (a) agriculture, (b) forestry and (c) fishing businesses were registered in (a) 2010, (b) 2015 and (c) 2020.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority.

A response to the Hon gentleman Parliamentary Question of 20th April is attached.

28th Jan 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether he has made an assessment of the value for money of the work conducted by Sir Dave Lewis as the Prime Minister's Supply Chains Advisor

During his time as the Prime Minister's Supply Chains Advisor, Sir Dave Lewis worked across Government and with industry to help resolve a number of acute, short term issues. Sir Dave Lewis advised the Prime Minister and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster on immediate improvements and potential long term changes to UK supply chains. Work on supply chains continues to be a focus for the Government.

Sir Dave Lewis’ role was unpaid.

28th Jan 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the outcomes have been of the work undertaken by Sir Dave Lewis as the Prime Minister's Supply Chains Advisor; what the cost was to the public purse of that work.

During his time as the Prime Minister's Supply Chains Advisor, Sir Dave Lewis worked across Government and with industry to help resolve a number of acute, short term issues. Sir Dave Lewis advised the Prime Minister and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster on immediate improvements and potential long term changes to UK supply chains. Work on supply chains continues to be a focus for the Government.

Sir Dave Lewis’ role was unpaid.

14th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the impact of supply shortages in the used light goods vehicle market on inflation; and if he will publish projections of that impact for the next two years.

The independent Office for Budget Responsibility set out its forecasts for inflation in the October 2021 Economic and Fiscal Outlook.

Lee Rowley
Minister of State (Minister for Housing)
13th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the correlation between supply and demand in the (a) secondhand van and (b) greener vehicles market.

The latest industry statistics show that demand for electric vehicles is stronger than ever, with about as many fully electric car registrations in 2021 as in the five years of 2016 to 2020 combined. In 2021 as a whole, 11.6% of all new cars registered were fully electric, trending upwards throughout the year, with over 1 in 4 new cars sold being fully electric in the month of December.

Lee Rowley
Minister of State (Minister for Housing)
11th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans he has to extend the provisions made under the Corporate Insolvency and Governance Act 2020 to cover (a) the holding of AGMs and (b) other aspects co-operative society governance.

The Corporate Insolvency and Governance Act 2020 introduced temporary measures to provide companies and other qualifying bodies - including co-operative societies - with flexibilities in the manner in which they conducted general meetings (including annual general meetings) in the light of coronavirus restrictions. Originally due to expire on 30 September 2020, these flexibilities were extended first to 30 December and then again, by regulations laid before Parliament on 25 November, to 30 March 2021.

18th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what recent assessment her Department has made of the viability of independent (a) local newspapers and (b) other media.

The Government is committed to supporting local and regional newspapers and other news outlets as vital pillars of communities and local democracy. They play an essential role in holding power to account, keeping the public informed of local issues and providing reliable, high-quality information.

Amid an evolving media landscape and changes in consumer behaviour, we are working to support journalism and local newsrooms to ensure the sustainability of this vital industry. We are introducing a new, pro-competition regime for digital markets. The regime, which aims to address the far-reaching power of the biggest tech firms, will help rebalance the relationship between publishers and the online platforms on which they increasingly rely. This will make an important contribution to the sustainability of the press.

Additionally, our support for the sector has included the delivery of a £2 million Future News Fund, the extension of a 2017 business rates relief on local newspaper office space until 2025; the publication of the Online Media Literacy Strategy; and our work through the Mid-Term Review of the BBC Charter to encourage greater collaboration and transparency from the BBC in the local news market and other markets in which it operates. The BBC also supports the sector directly, through the £8m it spends each year on the Local News Partnership, including the Local Democracy Reporting Scheme. We continue to consider all possible options in the interests of promoting and sustaining news journalism.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
18th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, if she will publish a list of the number of (a) theatres operating and (b) theatre closures in each year since 2010.

The Department does not systematically collect or publish data on the number of theatres operating across the country, but its advisory arm's-length body, The Theatres Trust, maintains a database of over 1,000 theatres in operation, which can be found online at https://database.theatrestrust.org.uk.

27th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment his Department has made of potential effect of the switch off of the Vodafone 3G network in 2023 on rural communities; and what steps the Government plans to take to rural communities as 3G networks are phased out.

We are committed to extending good quality mobile coverage across the UK. In March 2020, the government announced a deal with the mobile network operators, including Vodafone, to increase 4G coverage to 95% of the UK landmass. The Government’s ambition is for the majority of the population to have access to a 5G signal by 2027 and we want to ensure that UK businesses reap the full benefits of 5G.

There is no explicit regulatory requirement for mobile network operators to maintain a 2G or 3G network and the government has limited powers to compel operators to maintain, switch off or streamline specific networks. It is for operators to take final decisions on the provision of network services.

The Government welcomes 3G networks being switched off in a responsible way, and will continue to work with mobile network operators to ensure a smooth transition that meets the needs of business users and consumers, including rural communities.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
23rd Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what financial support he plans to provide to lower league football clubs to compensate for lost gate receipts as a result of the postponement of enabling spectators to attend football matches during the covid-19 outbreak.

Football clubs, at all levels, form the bedrock of our local communities. There have been countless examples during the pandemic of football clubs across the country demonstrating their importance to their local area, volunteering both time and money during these difficult times.

The Government has provided unprecedented support to businesses throughout the pandemic, including a comprehensive and sizable package of direct fiscal support for business through tax reliefs, cash grants and employee wage support. Many football clubs have benefited from these measures.

Where it can, we will expect the top tiers of professional sport to look at ways in which it can support itself, with government focusing on those most in need. I also welcomed the Premier League announcement to advance funds of £125 million to the EFL and National League to help clubs throughout the football pyramid.

As the Prime Minister said on 22 September, the government recognises the implications of being able to admit spectators on sports clubs and is working urgently on what the government can do to support them.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
6th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what support is available to enable fans to have a greater say on the running of the football club they support.

Football clubs and grounds are the heart of local communities, they have unique social value and many with a great history. it is vital they are protected and fans should have their voices heard.

The Fans Fund, funded by the Premier League and administered by the Football Supporters’ Association (FSA), includes funds to assist Supporters’ Trusts of clubs in the National League, English Football League and Premier League with the professional fees needed to build a credible bid when an ownership opportunity arises.

The FSA can provide support and advice to fans considering supporter ownership as part of their important work representing and connecting football fans across the country.

The Premier League and English Football League now also require clubs meet with supporters at least twice a year to discuss strategic issues, giving fans the opportunity to shape the direction of the club.

We have committed to a fan led review of football governance, which will include consideration of the Owners’ and Directors’ test.

6th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent discussions she has had with Facebook on moderating hate speech, harassment and bullying online.

Ministers and officials have regular meetings and discussions with social media platforms such as Twitter and Facebook on a range of issues, including moderating hate speech, harassment and bullying online. Details of Ministerial meetings are published quarterly on the gov.uk website.

2nd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, for what reason the Regional Schools Commissioner did not engage in the Q1 Serious Case Review conducted by the Manchester Safeguarding Partnership; and whether that decision was based on the policy of his Department.

Regional School Commissioners do not have a direct role in handling safeguarding cases and are not expected to act themselves.

8th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of trends in the level of attainment of (a) early years, (a) primary and (c) secondary pupils in Oldham as a result of its status as an Opportunity Area compared with those levels in other areas.

Evidence is at the heart of the Opportunity Areas programme. We are working closely with the ‘What Works Centres’ (including the Education Endowment Foundation) to identify and implement evidence-based interventions in Opportunity Areas that offer the best value for money and the potential to drive real change.

We continue to track progress in all of the Opportunity Areas to determine whether improvements have been realised against the priorities identified at the outset of the programme. The priorities identified in the Oldham Opportunity Area can be found in the delivery plan published here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/social-mobility-and-opportunity-areas. An evaluation of the programme is underway and will be published in due course.

In 2017, the percentage of children in early years education achieving a good level of development by age 5 in Oldham was 63.6%. In 2019, this percentage had increased to 68.1%, which is an increase of 4.5 percentage points.

The increase in all children in England achieving a good level of development by age 5 between 2017 and 2019 was 1.1 percentage point. In comparison, Oldham’s attainment in early years has increased faster than the England increase. With 68.1% of children achieving a good level of development by age 5, Oldham remains below 2019’s England average of 71.8%.

In Oldham, the percentage of pupils in primary school reaching the expected standard in reading, writing and maths at the end of key stage 2 increased from 57.2% in 2017 to 62.7% in 2019. This is a 5.5 percentage point increase. This is higher than the increase in England of 3.7 percentage points. At 62.7% of pupils reaching the expected standard in reading, writing and maths at the end of KS2 in 2019, Oldham remains below the 2019 England average of 65.3%.

In Oldham, the average Attainment 8 scores of pupils in secondary school at the end of key stage 4 had decreased by 1.5 percentage points between 2017 and 2019: it decreased from 43.6% in 2017 to 42.1% in 2019. This decrease was larger than the decrease in England of 0.4 percentage points, from 46.4% in 2017 to 46.8% on 2019. In 2019, Oldham’s Attainment 8 scores of pupils at the end of key stage 4 were 4.7 points lower than the England average.

For comparison to other areas, the department’s published data for early years can be found at this link: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/statistics-early-years-foundation-stage-profile, data on primary school pupils can be found at this link: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/statistics-key-stage-2, and data on secondary school pupils can be found at this link: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/statistics-gcses-key-stage-4.

Michelle Donelan
Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology
1st Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will publish the advice which informed the decision not to make the wearing of face coverings by pupils aged 12 and over a requirement in schools in England.

The Department’s priority is for pupils to safely return to schools and colleges and we have taken the latest medical and scientific advice into account at each stage of responding to the COVID-19 outbreak.

On 21 August 2020, the World Health Organisation published a new statement (https://www.who.int/news-room/q-a-detail/q-a-children-and-masks-related-to-covid-19) advising that children aged 12 and over should wear face coverings under the same condition as adults, in particular when they cannot guarantee at least a 1 metre distance from others and there is widespread transmission in the area. As a result, the Department has revised its guidance on face coverings in schools and colleges. The guidance for schools can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/actions-for-schools-during-the-coronavirus-outbreak/guidance-for-full-opening-schools.

It is reasonable to assume that staff and young people will now have access to face coverings due to their increasing use in wider society, and Public Health England has made available resources on how to make a simple face covering.

28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many and what proportion of the 200,000 devices and 4G wireless routers distributed from May to July 2020 to disadvantaged school children were (a) allocated and (b) distributed to children in each local authority in Greater Manchester.

The Department has delivered over 220,000 laptops and tablets and over 50,000 4G wireless routers to local authorities and academy trusts for children who would not otherwise have access, as part of over £100 million invested to support remote education and access to online social care.

The devices were an injection of support to help local authorities and academy trusts to provide access to education and social care during the COVID-19 outbreak. Local authorities and academy trusts are responsible for distributing the devices and are best placed to know which children and young people need access to a device.

On 27 August, the Department published information on which local authorities and academy trusts had received devices through the programme, including each local authority in Greater Manchester. This information can be viewed at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/laptops-tablets-and-4g-wireless-routers-progress-data.

The Department is now supplementing this support by making an initial 150,000 additional devices available this academic year in the event face-to-face schooling is disrupted as a result of local COVID-19 restrictions and children become reliant on remote education.

This scheme will enable schools to support disadvantaged children in years 3 to 11 who do not have access to a device. Devices will also be able to be ordered for disadvantaged children across all year groups who are shielding as a result of official advice, all year groups who attend hospital schools and those completing their Key Stage 4 at a further education college.

8th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether the licensing fees paid by XL Bully dog owners will cover the cost of preparing the certificate of exemption.

The application fee paid by XL bully owners on registering an XL Bully covers the cost of processing the application and preparing the certificate of exemption.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
19th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent assessment her Department has made of the economic benefits of the Countryside and Rights of Way Act 2000.

A general economic assessment of the Countryside and Rights of Way Act 2000 is not available.

However, assessments of current policies for increasing access to nature indicate there will be economic benefits. For example, the Coast to Coast National Trail currently generates significant economic benefits as England's most popular long-distance route, attracting approximately 6,000 annual end-to-end walkers who contribute £7 million to the local economy. A baseline study for the King Charles III England Coast Path showed that over 29 million leisure walking trips took place on English coastal paths in 2017. Over £379 million is spent in the national economy as a result of trips to use English coastal paths, of which £350 million is spent within local coastal economies.

19th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent assessment her Department has made of the economic impact of the use of combined sewer overflows on coastal businesses in England and Wales.

The Storm Overflows Discharge Reduction Plan was published in August 2022, alongside an Impact Assessment which considers costs and benefits of the final targets to businesses, the public, wider society and government spending where applicable.

Water is a devolved area. The Storm Overflows Discharge Reduction Plan applies to companies wholly or mainly in England.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
18th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent assessment she has made of the effectiveness of the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991.

The Government believes that the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991 plays a very important part in our overall approach towards tackling dangerous dogs. This is why we are taking urgent action to bring forward a ban on XL Bully dog types under the Act following a concerning rise in attacks and fatalities, which appear to be driven by this type of dog. In the meantime, we have been working hard with the police, local authorities and animal welfare groups to help prevent attacks by encouraging responsible dog ownership, to ensure dog control issues are addressed before they escalate and to make sure the full force of the law is applied across all breeds of dog.

10th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the oral contribution of the Minister for Food, Farming and Fisheries of 6 July 2023, Official Report, column 921, if she will publish all water company storm overflow plans that she has received in full.

In February 2023, the Secretary of State asked water and sewerage companies to produce an action plan for every storm overflow in England. As a result, I have received all the draft water company plans.

Action Plans will be published following a review to ensure there is a standardised level of accuracy and consistency across the plans.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
25th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment her Department has made of the impact of avian influenza on food (a) prices and (b) availability.

The UK has a highly resilient food supply chain which has coped well in responding to the unprecedented challenges the industry has faced in the past few years.

The UK egg and poultry industries operate in an open market. The value of poultry products and egg commodities is established by those in the supply chain. The impact of avian influenza on the price of food products has been limited with the increases experienced recently by these sectors related to a range of other factors, primarily due to Russia's invasion of Ukraine.

In the UK, there have been 186 cases of Avian Influenza (AI) since 1 October 2022. 155 of these have been in England and all have been of the HPAI H5N1 strain. Since 1 October 2022, 5.3 million birds have died or been culled and disposed of for disease control purposes. With approximately, 20 million birds slaughtered every week for human consumption, the impact on the availability of poultry and eggs due to AI has therefore been limited.

We continue to keep the market situation under close review, including through the UK Agriculture Market Monitoring Group and our on-going and regular engagement with sector stakeholders.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
25th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what progress the Government has made on delivering an avian influenza vaccine.

Vaccination of poultry and captive birds against avian influenza, excluding those in licensed zoos in England, is not currently permitted. However preventative vaccination for avian influenza may be an option for the future but is unlikely to be a viable option for the 2023/24 high risk season. Defra established in February 2023 a cross government and industry task force to explore potential for use of vaccination as a preventive measure for avian influenza.

In parallel to the work of the avian influenza vaccination task force Defra in conjunction with the Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD) will continue to monitor the development and availability of vaccines for their utility in preventing and responding to avian influenza outbreaks as they are put forward for market authorisation by vaccine manufacturers.

Any future decisions on disease control measures, including the use of vaccination, will be based upon the latest scientific and ornithological evidence, and veterinary advice.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
25th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment her Department has made of the economic impact of avian influenza on the poultry sector and what support her Department provides to (a) poultry farmers and (b) others affected.

We are aware that the ongoing outbreak of highly pathogenic avian influenza has created challenges for poultry and egg producers. To support poultry producers and others affected by this unprecedented outbreak, on the 28 October 2022 Defra announced new support for the poultry industry to assist farmers and producers with the impacts of avian influenza. This includes a change to the existing avian influenza compensation scheme allowing us to provide swifter payments to help stem any cash flow pressures and give earlier certainty about entitlement to compensation.

We also introduced market support measures to assist businesses impacted by avian influenza. These included allowing seasonal poultry producers to slaughter birds, freeze them and then sell them as defrosted products during the period 28 November to 31 December 2022 and concessions to the labelling of free-range eggs from poultry housed under avian influenza mandatory housing measures for longer than the 16-week period for which an automatic derogation applies.

We continue to monitor the impacts of avian influenza on the poultry and allied sectors.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
25th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether her Department has plans to support egg producers (a) affected by avian influenza and (b) generally.

The UK has a highly resilient food supply chain which has coped well in responding to the unprecedented challenges the industry, including the egg sector, has faced in the past few years.

Defra has been working closely with the egg sector and has acted where appropriate in response to the recent unprecedented avian Influenza (AI) outbreak. We announced changes to the AI compensation scheme on 28 October 2022 by allowing compensation to be paid for farmers from the outset of planned culling rather than at the end. This allowed Defra to provide swifter payments to help stem any cash flow pressures and give farmers earlier certainty about entitlements to compensation. We also granted a concession to the marketing standards rules for the labelling of free-range eggs from poultry that have been housed under an AI Prevention Zone with mandatory housing measures for longer than the 16-week period for which an automatic derogation applies.   More widely, the Government has put in place a number of measures which the egg industry has been able to access, including cuts to VAT and fuel duty and support through the Energy Bill Relief Scheme.

In December 2022 I hosted an egg industry roundtable which brought together representatives of the egg supply chain from across the UK. The Roundtable focused on addressing the challenges that the sector had been facing due to the increase in input costs caused by the war in Ukraine. The meeting was productive with a clear willingness from all parties to address issues affecting the supply chain.

At the recent No 10 Food Summit, I announced that we would be undertaking a supply chain fairness review of the egg sector.

We continue to keep the egg sector under constant review including through the UK Agriculture Market Monitoring Group and our ongoing regular engagement with sector stakeholders.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
25th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps her Department is taking to curb the spread of avian influenza to minimise impact on businesses.

Defra’s approach to avian influenza prevention and control is set out in the Notifiable Avian Disease Control Strategy for Great Britain supported by the Mitigation Strategy for Avian Influenza in Wild Birds in England and Wales. To help stop the spread of avian influenza, Avian Influenza Prevention Zones (AIPZs) are in force across the UK. This means it is a legal requirement for all bird keepers (whether they have pet birds, commercial flocks or just a few birds in a backyard flock) to follow strict biosecurity measures to limit the spread of and eradicate the disease. The mandatory housing measures that were lifted on 17 April 2023 together with the enhanced biosecurity measures required by the AIPZ have been vital in protecting flocks across the country from avian influenza.

In addition, where infection in poultry or other captive birds does occur, swift and humane culling of birds on infected premises coupled with good biosecurity are used to prevent the amplification of avian influenza and subsequent environmental contamination and to reduce the risk of disease spread from infected premises.

Together, the Government and bird keepers must do everything we can to keep disease out of kept bird flocks. We all have a shared responsibility to ensure that if disease occurs it is diagnosed early, that good management practices ensure that the risk of further spread is minimised, the outbreak is controlled, and disease is eradicated. Scrupulous biosecurity is the most effective method of disease control available and all bird keepers should apply enhanced measures at all times to prevent the risk of future outbreaks.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
25th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what discussions her Department has had with food producers on the impact of avian influenza on (a) poultry producers and (b) egg producers.

The Government continues to work closely with the poultry industry to tackle the unprecedented outbreak of avian influenza which has been affecting the UK. Defra Officials and Ministers in conjunction with the Animal and Plant Health Agency, the Food Standards Agency and devolved administration representatives have met regularly throughout the outbreak with industry bodies including the British Egg Industry Council, British Poultry Council, British Free Range Egg Producers Association and the Game Farmers Association in addition to individual producers representing the breadth of the poultry sector.

We are continuing to keep the market situation under close review, including through the UK Agriculture Market Monitoring Group, which monitors UK agricultural markets including price, supply, inputs, trade and recent developments, and our ongoing engagement with industry stakeholders.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
25th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether her Department has made an assessment of potential risks of pets and domestic animals encountering dead birds that have contracted avian influenza.

While avian influenza viruses are predominantly considered a pathogen of birds, the virus can infect mammals. Findings of influenza of avian origin in mammals are uncommon and there is no evidence to suggest an increased risk to non-avian wildlife. The main risk to non-avian pets is from eating or chewing on dead wild birds or from feeding them raw poultry, gamebird, wildfowl or other wild bird meat with an unknown provenance. Pets should not be allowed to feed on or play with infected or potentially infected sick or dead birds. While there is a small risk to cats if they catch wild birds which are infected, common garden birds are considered a lower risk of being infected with avian influenza than ducks, geese, swans and gulls.

Infection of mammals including pets with influenza of avian origin is notifiable; failure to report suspicion of infection or detection of influenza of avian origin in mammals is an offence. Further information on the case definition for influenza of avian origin and reporting requirements in mammals including pets can be found in our Influenza A (H5N1) infection in mammals: suspect case definition and diagnostic testing criteria guidance.

The Animal and Plant Health Agency carries out year-round avian influenza surveillance of dead wild birds submitted via public reports and warden patrols. Members of the public are encouraged to report findings of dead wild birds using the new online reporting system or by calling the Defra helpline (03459 33 55 77).

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
16th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 15 May to Question 183788 on Water: Sewage, which overflows cause the most harm to businesses.

The Storm Overflows Discharge Reduction Plan was published in August 2022, alongside an Impact Assessment which considers costs and benefits of the final targets to businesses, the public, wider society and government spending where applicable.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
16th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 15 May to Question 183788 on Water: Sewage, which overflows cause the most harm to public health.

In August 2022 the Government launched the most ambitious plan in water company history. In our £56 billion Plan, protecting public health at bathing waters was one of our main priorities.

Storm overflows near bathing waters have the potential to impact public health. Our plan to reduce sewage discharges from storm overflows includes a specific target for bathing water. This ensures we are prioritising improvements that secure the greatest benefit for public health.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
16th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 15 May to Question 183788 on Water: Sewage, which overflows cause the most harm to the environment.

In August 2022 the Government launched the most ambitious plan to reduce sewage discharges from storm overflows in water company history. In our £56 billion Plan, protecting public health at bathing waters is one of our main priorities. The Plan frontloads action in particularly important and sensitive areas including designated bathing waters and high priority ecological sites.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
16th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 15 May to Question 183788 on Water: Sewage, if she will publish the dates of meetings she has had on the impact of sewage pollution on public health.

The department regularly publishes transparency data, including on ministerial meetings.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
16th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what contingency plans her Department has in place for water shortages in the South West; what medium term spending plans her Department has if that shortage takes place; and what the water leakage rate is in that region.

Defra recently published its Plan for Water which set out the importance of ensuring a clean and plentiful water supply. Water companies have a statutory duty to provide clean and reliable water to customers. To fulfil this duty there are statutory requirements to consult, publish and maintain water resources management plans, to balance water supply and demand at least twenty-five years into the future, and to develop drought plans setting out the actions taken to maintain secure supplies during drought events.

Water companies have been consulting on their draft water resources management plans and consulted on their drought plans in 2021. These plans are available on water company websites.

The Government expects water companies to take action to reduce levels of leakage and has consistently challenged them on their performance. Water companies have committed to a government endorsed target to reduce leakage by 50% sector-wide by 2050. As a first step, Ofwat has set requirements for water companies to cut leaks by 16% and reduce mains bursts by 12% by 2025. In July, Ofwat reported that industry wide leakage has reduced by 11% since 2017-18. In addition, water companies will need to contribute to delivery of Defra’s Water Demand Target under the Environment Act 2021 to reduce the use of public water supply per person in England by 20% by 2038. This includes a 37% reduction in leakage by 2038 on the pathway to meet their 50% reduction in leakage commitment by 2050.

The Environment Agency collects leakage data reported by water companies annually. It is provided by water company area. This means we cannot break down these data into specific regions such as the East and West Midlands. We have collated the data provided by the companies into regions based on their locations and information provided by regional water resources groups for the year 2021 – 2022.

Region

Megalitres per day (MLd)

London

554.7

North East

135.1

North West

413.8

Yorkshire

283.1

East Midlands

509.3 covers the whole midlands area i.e. East and West

West Midlands

South East

549.1 (excl London)

East of England

248.4

South West

190.3

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
16th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what contingency plans her Department has in place for water shortages in the East of England; what medium term spending plans her Department has if that shortage takes place; and what the water leakage rate is in that region.

Defra recently published its Plan for Water which set out the importance of ensuring a clean and plentiful water supply. Water companies have a statutory duty to provide clean and reliable water to customers. To fulfil this duty there are statutory requirements to consult, publish and maintain water resources management plans, to balance water supply and demand at least twenty-five years into the future, and to develop drought plans setting out the actions taken to maintain secure supplies during drought events.

Water companies have been consulting on their draft water resources management plans and consulted on their drought plans in 2021. These plans are available on water company websites.

The Government expects water companies to take action to reduce levels of leakage and has consistently challenged them on their performance. Water companies have committed to a government endorsed target to reduce leakage by 50% sector-wide by 2050. As a first step, Ofwat has set requirements for water companies to cut leaks by 16% and reduce mains bursts by 12% by 2025. In July, Ofwat reported that industry wide leakage has reduced by 11% since 2017-18. In addition, water companies will need to contribute to delivery of Defra’s Water Demand Target under the Environment Act 2021 to reduce the use of public water supply per person in England by 20% by 2038. This includes a 37% reduction in leakage by 2038 on the pathway to meet their 50% reduction in leakage commitment by 2050.

The Environment Agency collects leakage data reported by water companies annually. It is provided by water company area. This means we cannot break down these data into specific regions such as the East and West Midlands. We have collated the data provided by the companies into regions based on their locations and information provided by regional water resources groups for the year 2021 – 2022.

Region

Megalitres per day (MLd)

London

554.7

North East

135.1

North West

413.8

Yorkshire

283.1

East Midlands

509.3 covers the whole midlands area i.e. East and West

West Midlands

South East

549.1 (excl London)

East of England

248.4

South West

190.3

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
16th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what contingency plans her Department has in place for water shortages in the South East; what medium term spending plans her Department has if that shortage takes place; and what the water leakage rate is in that region.

Defra recently published its Plan for Water which set out the importance of ensuring a clean and plentiful water supply. Water companies have a statutory duty to provide clean and reliable water to customers. To fulfil this duty there are statutory requirements to consult, publish and maintain water resources management plans, to balance water supply and demand at least twenty-five years into the future, and to develop drought plans setting out the actions taken to maintain secure supplies during drought events.

Water companies have been consulting on their draft water resources management plans and consulted on their drought plans in 2021. These plans are available on water company websites.

The Government expects water companies to take action to reduce levels of leakage and has consistently challenged them on their performance. Water companies have committed to a government endorsed target to reduce leakage by 50% sector-wide by 2050. As a first step, Ofwat has set requirements for water companies to cut leaks by 16% and reduce mains bursts by 12% by 2025. In July, Ofwat reported that industry wide leakage has reduced by 11% since 2017-18. In addition, water companies will need to contribute to delivery of Defra’s Water Demand Target under the Environment Act 2021 to reduce the use of public water supply per person in England by 20% by 2038. This includes a 37% reduction in leakage by 2038 on the pathway to meet their 50% reduction in leakage commitment by 2050.

The Environment Agency collects leakage data reported by water companies annually. It is provided by water company area. This means we cannot break down these data into specific regions such as the East and West Midlands. We have collated the data provided by the companies into regions based on their locations and information provided by regional water resources groups for the year 2021 – 2022.

Region

Megalitres per day (MLd)

London

554.7

North East

135.1

North West

413.8

Yorkshire

283.1

East Midlands

509.3 covers the whole midlands area i.e. East and West

West Midlands

South East

549.1 (excl London)

East of England

248.4

South West

190.3

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
16th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what contingency plans her Department has in place for water shortages in the West Midlands; what medium term spending plans her Department has if that shortage takes place; and what the water leakage rate is in that region.

Defra recently published its Plan for Water which set out the importance of ensuring a clean and plentiful water supply. Water companies have a statutory duty to provide clean and reliable water to customers. To fulfil this duty there are statutory requirements to consult, publish and maintain water resources management plans, to balance water supply and demand at least twenty-five years into the future, and to develop drought plans setting out the actions taken to maintain secure supplies during drought events.

Water companies have been consulting on their draft water resources management plans and consulted on their drought plans in 2021. These plans are available on water company websites.

The Government expects water companies to take action to reduce levels of leakage and has consistently challenged them on their performance. Water companies have committed to a government endorsed target to reduce leakage by 50% sector-wide by 2050. As a first step, Ofwat has set requirements for water companies to cut leaks by 16% and reduce mains bursts by 12% by 2025. In July, Ofwat reported that industry wide leakage has reduced by 11% since 2017-18. In addition, water companies will need to contribute to delivery of Defra’s Water Demand Target under the Environment Act 2021 to reduce the use of public water supply per person in England by 20% by 2038. This includes a 37% reduction in leakage by 2038 on the pathway to meet their 50% reduction in leakage commitment by 2050.

The Environment Agency collects leakage data reported by water companies annually. It is provided by water company area. This means we cannot break down these data into specific regions such as the East and West Midlands. We have collated the data provided by the companies into regions based on their locations and information provided by regional water resources groups for the year 2021 – 2022.

Region

Megalitres per day (MLd)

London

554.7

North East

135.1

North West

413.8

Yorkshire

283.1

East Midlands

509.3 covers the whole midlands area i.e. East and West

West Midlands

South East

549.1 (excl London)

East of England

248.4

South West

190.3

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
16th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what contingency plans her Department has in place for water shortages in the East Midlands; what medium term spending plans her Department has if that shortage takes place; and what the water leakage rate is in that region.

Defra recently published its Plan for Water which set out the importance of ensuring a clean and plentiful water supply. Water companies have a statutory duty to provide clean and reliable water to customers. To fulfil this duty there are statutory requirements to consult, publish and maintain water resources management plans, to balance water supply and demand at least twenty-five years into the future, and to develop drought plans setting out the actions taken to maintain secure supplies during drought events.

Water companies have been consulting on their draft water resources management plans and consulted on their drought plans in 2021. These plans are available on water company websites.

The Government expects water companies to take action to reduce levels of leakage and has consistently challenged them on their performance. Water companies have committed to a government endorsed target to reduce leakage by 50% sector-wide by 2050. As a first step, Ofwat has set requirements for water companies to cut leaks by 16% and reduce mains bursts by 12% by 2025. In July, Ofwat reported that industry wide leakage has reduced by 11% since 2017-18. In addition, water companies will need to contribute to delivery of Defra’s Water Demand Target under the Environment Act 2021 to reduce the use of public water supply per person in England by 20% by 2038. This includes a 37% reduction in leakage by 2038 on the pathway to meet their 50% reduction in leakage commitment by 2050.

The Environment Agency collects leakage data reported by water companies annually. It is provided by water company area. This means we cannot break down these data into specific regions such as the East and West Midlands. We have collated the data provided by the companies into regions based on their locations and information provided by regional water resources groups for the year 2021 – 2022.

Region

Megalitres per day (MLd)

London

554.7

North East

135.1

North West

413.8

Yorkshire

283.1

East Midlands

509.3 covers the whole midlands area i.e. East and West

West Midlands

South East

549.1 (excl London)

East of England

248.4

South West

190.3

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
16th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what contingency plans her Department has in place for water shortages in Yorkshire; what medium term spending plans her Department has if that shortage takes place; and what the water leakage rate is in that region.

Defra recently published its Plan for Water which set out the importance of ensuring a clean and plentiful water supply. Water companies have a statutory duty to provide clean and reliable water to customers. To fulfil this duty there are statutory requirements to consult, publish and maintain water resources management plans, to balance water supply and demand at least twenty-five years into the future, and to develop drought plans setting out the actions taken to maintain secure supplies during drought events.

Water companies have been consulting on their draft water resources management plans and consulted on their drought plans in 2021. These plans are available on water company websites.

The Government expects water companies to take action to reduce levels of leakage and has consistently challenged them on their performance. Water companies have committed to a government endorsed target to reduce leakage by 50% sector-wide by 2050. As a first step, Ofwat has set requirements for water companies to cut leaks by 16% and reduce mains bursts by 12% by 2025. In July, Ofwat reported that industry wide leakage has reduced by 11% since 2017-18. In addition, water companies will need to contribute to delivery of Defra’s Water Demand Target under the Environment Act 2021 to reduce the use of public water supply per person in England by 20% by 2038. This includes a 37% reduction in leakage by 2038 on the pathway to meet their 50% reduction in leakage commitment by 2050.

The Environment Agency collects leakage data reported by water companies annually. It is provided by water company area. This means we cannot break down these data into specific regions such as the East and West Midlands. We have collated the data provided by the companies into regions based on their locations and information provided by regional water resources groups for the year 2021 – 2022.

Region

Megalitres per day (MLd)

London

554.7

North East

135.1

North West

413.8

Yorkshire

283.1

East Midlands

509.3 covers the whole midlands area i.e. East and West

West Midlands

South East

549.1 (excl London)

East of England

248.4

South West

190.3

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
16th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what contingency plans her Department has in place for water shortages in the North West; what medium term spending plans her Department has if that shortage takes place; and what the water leakage rate is in that region.

Defra recently published its Plan for Water which set out the importance of ensuring a clean and plentiful water supply. Water companies have a statutory duty to provide clean and reliable water to customers. To fulfil this duty there are statutory requirements to consult, publish and maintain water resources management plans, to balance water supply and demand at least twenty-five years into the future, and to develop drought plans setting out the actions taken to maintain secure supplies during drought events.

Water companies have been consulting on their draft water resources management plans and consulted on their drought plans in 2021. These plans are available on water company websites.

The Government expects water companies to take action to reduce levels of leakage and has consistently challenged them on their performance. Water companies have committed to a government endorsed target to reduce leakage by 50% sector-wide by 2050. As a first step, Ofwat has set requirements for water companies to cut leaks by 16% and reduce mains bursts by 12% by 2025. In July, Ofwat reported that industry wide leakage has reduced by 11% since 2017-18. In addition, water companies will need to contribute to delivery of Defra’s Water Demand Target under the Environment Act 2021 to reduce the use of public water supply per person in England by 20% by 2038. This includes a 37% reduction in leakage by 2038 on the pathway to meet their 50% reduction in leakage commitment by 2050.

The Environment Agency collects leakage data reported by water companies annually. It is provided by water company area. This means we cannot break down these data into specific regions such as the East and West Midlands. We have collated the data provided by the companies into regions based on their locations and information provided by regional water resources groups for the year 2021 – 2022.

Region

Megalitres per day (MLd)

London

554.7

North East

135.1

North West

413.8

Yorkshire

283.1

East Midlands

509.3 covers the whole midlands area i.e. East and West

West Midlands

South East

549.1 (excl London)

East of England

248.4

South West

190.3

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
16th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what contingency plans her Department has in place for water shortages in the North East; what medium term spending plans her Department has if that shortage takes place; and what the water leakage rate is in that region.

Defra recently published its Plan for Water which set out the importance of ensuring a clean and plentiful water supply. Water companies have a statutory duty to provide clean and reliable water to customers. To fulfil this duty there are statutory requirements to consult, publish and maintain water resources management plans, to balance water supply and demand at least twenty-five years into the future, and to develop drought plans setting out the actions taken to maintain secure supplies during drought events.

Water companies have been consulting on their draft water resources management plans and consulted on their drought plans in 2021. These plans are available on water company websites.

The Government expects water companies to take action to reduce levels of leakage and has consistently challenged them on their performance. Water companies have committed to a government endorsed target to reduce leakage by 50% sector-wide by 2050. As a first step, Ofwat has set requirements for water companies to cut leaks by 16% and reduce mains bursts by 12% by 2025. In July, Ofwat reported that industry wide leakage has reduced by 11% since 2017-18. In addition, water companies will need to contribute to delivery of Defra’s Water Demand Target under the Environment Act 2021 to reduce the use of public water supply per person in England by 20% by 2038. This includes a 37% reduction in leakage by 2038 on the pathway to meet their 50% reduction in leakage commitment by 2050.

The Environment Agency collects leakage data reported by water companies annually. It is provided by water company area. This means we cannot break down these data into specific regions such as the East and West Midlands. We have collated the data provided by the companies into regions based on their locations and information provided by regional water resources groups for the year 2021 – 2022.

Region

Megalitres per day (MLd)

London

554.7

North East

135.1

North West

413.8

Yorkshire

283.1

East Midlands

509.3 covers the whole midlands area i.e. East and West

West Midlands

South East

549.1 (excl London)

East of England

248.4

South West

190.3

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
16th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what contingency plans her Department has in place for water shortages in London; what medium term spending plans her Department has if that shortage takes place; and what the water leakage rate is in that region.

Defra recently published its Plan for Water which set out the importance of ensuring a clean and plentiful water supply. Water companies have a statutory duty to provide clean and reliable water to customers. To fulfil this duty there are statutory requirements to consult, publish and maintain water resources management plans, to balance water supply and demand at least twenty-five years into the future, and to develop drought plans setting out the actions taken to maintain secure supplies during drought events.

Water companies have been consulting on their draft water resources management plans and consulted on their drought plans in 2021. These plans are available on water company websites.

The Government expects water companies to take action to reduce levels of leakage and has consistently challenged them on their performance. Water companies have committed to a government endorsed target to reduce leakage by 50% sector-wide by 2050. As a first step, Ofwat has set requirements for water companies to cut leaks by 16% and reduce mains bursts by 12% by 2025. In July, Ofwat reported that industry wide leakage has reduced by 11% since 2017-18. In addition, water companies will need to contribute to delivery of Defra’s Water Demand Target under the Environment Act 2021 to reduce the use of public water supply per person in England by 20% by 2038. This includes a 37% reduction in leakage by 2038 on the pathway to meet their 50% reduction in leakage commitment by 2050.

The Environment Agency collects leakage data reported by water companies annually. It is provided by water company area. This means we cannot break down these data into specific regions such as the East and West Midlands. We have collated the data provided by the companies into regions based on their locations and information provided by regional water resources groups for the year 2021 – 2022.

Region

Megalitres per day (MLd)

London

554.7

North East

135.1

North West

413.8

Yorkshire

283.1

East Midlands

509.3 covers the whole midlands area i.e. East and West

West Midlands

South East

549.1 (excl London)

East of England

248.4

South West

190.3

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
3rd May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent assessment her Department has made of the risk to human health from sewage pollution in (a) rivers, (b) lakes and (c) beaches.

In August 2022 the Government launched the most ambitious plan to reduce sewage discharges from storm overflows in water company history – Storm Overflow Discharge Reduction Plan. Our strict targets will see the toughest ever crackdown on sewage spills and will require water companies to deliver the largest infrastructure programme in water company history - £56 billion capital investment over 25 years.

In the Plan, we have prioritised protecting public health at bathing waters. Overflows that are causing the most harm to public health, or the environment, will be addressed first to make the biggest difference as quickly as possible.

In the Plan, we state that water companies must significantly reduce harmful pathogens from storm overflows discharging into and near designated bathing waters, by either: applying disinfection; or reducing the frequency of discharges to meet Environment Agency spill standards by 2035.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
3rd May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what discussions she has had with the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care on the potential risks of contracting (a) Hepatitis A and (b) E.coli as a result of sewage pollution into rivers and water courses.

The Secretary of State has many meetings with Cabinet Ministers and discussions between departments continue.

In August 2022 the Government launched the most ambitious plan to reduce sewage discharges from storm overflows in water company history - Storm Overflows Discharge Reduction Plan.

In the Plan, we have prioritised protecting public health at bathing waters. Overflows that are causing the most harm to public health, or the environment, will be addressed first to make the biggest difference as quickly as possible.

E. coli is one of the standard faecal indicator organisms prevalent in sewage discharges but can also be found in agricultural runoff and road drainage. Bathing waters at beaches, lakes and rivers are designated under the Bathing Water Regulations 2013 to protect bathers’ health against faecal pollution. E. coli is one of the standards bathing waters are monitored for.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
3rd May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what discussions her Department has had with the Chief Medical Officer on the impact of sewage pollution on levels of contraction of (a) Hepatitis A and (b) E.coli as a result of sewage pollution.

The Secretary of State has many meetings with senior members of government and officials, and discussions between departments continue.

In August 2022 the Government launched the most ambitious plan to reduce sewage discharges from storm overflows in water company history - Storm Overflows Discharge Reduction Plan.

In the Plan, we have prioritised protecting public health at bathing waters. Overflows that are causing the most harm to public health, or the environment, will be addressed first to make the biggest difference as quickly as possible.

E. coli is one of the standard faecal indicator organisms prevalent in sewage discharges but can also be found in agricultural runoff and road drainage. Bathing waters at beaches, lakes and rivers are designated under the Bathing Water Regulations 2013 to protect bathers’ health against faecal pollution. E. coli is one of the standards bathing waters are monitored for.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
3rd May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent assessment her Department has made of the impact of sewage pollution on the contraction of (a) Hepatitis A an (b) E.coli.

In August 2022 the Government launched the most ambitious plan to reduce sewage discharges from storm overflows in water company history – Storm Overflow Discharge Reduction Plan. Our strict targets will see the toughest ever crackdown on sewage spills and will require water companies to deliver the largest infrastructure programme in water company history - £56 billion capital investment over 25 years.

In the Plan, we have prioritised protecting public health at bathing waters. Overflows that are causing the most harm to public health, or the environment, will be addressed first to make the biggest difference as quickly as possible.

In the Plan, we state that water companies must significantly reduce harmful pathogens from storm overflows discharging into and near designated bathing waters, by either: applying disinfection; or reducing the frequency of discharges to meet Environment Agency spill standards by 2035.

E. coli is one of the standard faecal indicator organisms prevalent in sewage discharges but can also be found in agricultural runoff and road drainage. Bathing waters at beaches, lakes and rivers are designated under the Bathing Water Regulations 2013 to protect bathers’ health against faecal pollution. E. coli is one of the standards bathing waters are monitored for.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)