Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport

The Department for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport (DCMS) helps to drive growth, enrich lives and promote Britain abroad. We protect and promote our cultural and artistic heritage and help businesses and communities to grow by investing in innovation and highlighting Britain as a fantastic place to visit. We help to give the UK a unique advantage on the global stage, striving for economic success.



Secretary of State

 Portrait

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport

Shadow Ministers / Spokeperson
Labour
Baroness Merron (LAB - Life peer)
Shadow Spokesperson (Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
Lucy Powell (LAB - Manchester Central)
Shadow Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport

Scottish National Party
John Nicolson (SNP - Ochil and South Perthshire)
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)

Liberal Democrat
Jamie Stone (LDEM - Caithness, Sutherland and Easter Ross)
Liberal Democrat Spokesperson (Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)

Labour
Lord Bassam of Brighton (LAB - Life peer)
Shadow Spokesperson (Digital, Culture, Media and Sport) (Sport)
Junior Shadow Ministers / Deputy Spokesperson
Labour
Rachael Maskell (LAB - York Central)
Shadow Minister (Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
Alex Davies-Jones (LAB - Pontypridd)
Shadow Minister (Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
Chris Elmore (LAB - Ogmore)
Shadow Minister (Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
Chi Onwurah (LAB - Newcastle upon Tyne Central)
Shadow Minister (Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
Jeff Smith (LAB - Manchester, Withington)
Shadow Minister (Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
Ministers of State
Julia Lopez (CON - Hornchurch and Upminster)
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
Parliamentary Under-Secretaries of State
Nigel Huddleston (CON - Mid Worcestershire)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
Chris Philp (CON - Croydon South)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay (CON - Life peer)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
Scheduled Event
Tuesday 5th July 2022
09:30
Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee - Oral evidence - Select & Joint Committees
5 Jul 2022, 9:30 a.m.
Promoting Britain abroad
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Scheduled Event
Thursday 7th July 2022
09:30
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Oral questions - Main Chamber
7 Jul 2022, 9:30 a.m.
Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (including Topical Questions)
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Scheduled Event
Thursday 7th July 2022
10:15
Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee - Oral evidence - Select & Joint Committees
7 Jul 2022, 10:15 a.m.
Sustainability of local journalism
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Scheduled Event
Thursday 22nd September 2022
09:30
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Oral questions - Main Chamber
22 Sep 2022, 9:30 a.m.
Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (including Topical Questions)
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Debates
Wednesday 29th June 2022
Select Committee Docs
Tuesday 28th June 2022
11:30
BBC, Google, and Meta
Oral Evidence
Select Committee Inquiry
Thursday 12th May 2022
Connected tech: smart or sinister?

The DCMS Committee will examine the impacts of the increasing prevalence of smart and connected technology and what needs to …

Written Answers
Thursday 30th June 2022
Gambling: Innovation
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how much money the Gambling Commission has spent …
Secondary Legislation
Thursday 23rd June 2022
Television Licences (Disclosure of Information) Act 2000 (Prescription of Information) Order 2022
This Order prescribes the descriptions of information that the Secretary of State (in practice, the Secretary of State for Work …
Bills
Thursday 17th March 2022
Online Safety Bill 2022-23
A Bill to make provision for and in connection with the regulation by OFCOM of certain internet services; for and …
Dept. Publications
Friday 1st July 2022
10:44
Digital Strategy 2020
Policy and Engagement

Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Commons Appearances

Oral Answers to Questions is a regularly scheduled appearance where the Secretary of State and junior minister will answer at the Dispatch Box questions from backbench MPs

Other Commons Chamber appearances can be:
  • Urgent Questions where the Speaker has selected a question to which a Minister must reply that day
  • Adjornment Debates a 30 minute debate attended by a Minister that concludes the day in Parliament.
  • Oral Statements informing the Commons of a significant development, where backbench MP's can then question the Minister making the statement.

Westminster Hall debates are performed in response to backbench MPs or e-petitions asking for a Minister to address a detailed issue

Written Statements are made when a current event is not sufficiently significant to require an Oral Statement, but the House is required to be informed.

Most Recent Commons Appearances by Category
May. 26
Oral Questions
Jun. 29
Written Statements
Jun. 28
Westminster Hall
May. 18
Adjournment Debate
View All Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Commons Contibutions

Bills currently before Parliament


A Bill to make provision about the security of internet-connectable products and products capable of connecting to such products; to make provision about electronic communications infrastructure; and for connected purposes.

Commons Completed
Lords - 40%

Last Event - Lords
Wednesday 29th June 2022
(Read Debate)

A Bill to make provision for and in connection with the regulation by OFCOM of certain internet services; for and in connection with communications offences; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 60%

Last Event - Committee Debate: 16th Sitting (Commons)
Tuesday 28th June 2022
(Read Debate)
Next Event - Report Stage (Commons)
Tuesday 12th July 2022

Acts of Parliament created in the 2019 Parliament


A Bill to make provision for and in connection with an expanded dormant assets scheme; to confer power to further expand the scope of that scheme; to amend the Dormant Bank and Building Society Accounts Act 2008; to enable an authorised reclaim fund to accept transfers of certain unwanted assets; and for connected purposes

This Bill received Royal Assent on Thursday 24th February 2022 and was enacted into law.


A Bill to amend the Charities Act 2011 and the Universities and College Estates Act 1925; and for connected purposes

This Bill received Royal Assent on Thursday 24th February 2022 and was enacted into law.


A Bill to make provision about the security of public electronic communications networks and public electronic communications services.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Wednesday 17th November 2021 and was enacted into law.


A Bill to amend the electronic communications code set out in Schedule 3A to the Communications Act 2003; and for connected purposes.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Monday 15th March 2021 and was enacted into law.


A bill to make provision about the Commonwealth Games that are to be held principally in Birmingham in 2022; and for connected purposes

This Bill received Royal Assent on Thursday 25th June 2020 and was enacted into law.

Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport - Secondary Legislation

This Order prescribes the descriptions of information that the Secretary of State (in practice, the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions) and, in Northern Ireland, the Department for Communities, can supply to the British Broadcasting Corporation (“BBC”). The Department for Communities was previously called the Department for Social Development, but was renamed by section 1(7) Departments Act (Northern Ireland) 2016 (c. 5).
This Order designates as restricted areas for the purposes of the Protection of Wrecks Act 1973 (“the Act”): the area within 75 metres of one wreck and 50 metres of another wreck in the Needles Channel, Isle of Wight; and the area within 50 metres of a wreck in the Swash Channel on the approach to Poole Harbour, Dorset.
View All Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Secondary Legislation

Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Trending Petitions
Petition Open
10,967 Signatures
(3,377 in the last 7 days)
Petition Open
1,888 Signatures
(268 in the last 7 days)
Petition Open
10,452 Signatures
(202 in the last 7 days)
Petition Open
7,044 Signatures
(74 in the last 7 days)
Petition Open
5,561 Signatures
(73 in the last 7 days)
Petitions with most signatures
Petition Open
10,967 Signatures
(3,377 in the last 7 days)
Petition Open
10,452 Signatures
(202 in the last 7 days)
Petition Open
7,044 Signatures
(74 in the last 7 days)
Petition Open
5,561 Signatures
(73 in the last 7 days)
Petition Open
2,003 Signatures
(15 in the last 7 days)
Petition Debates Contributed

Make it a legal requirement when opening a new social media account, to provide a verified form of ID. Where the account belongs to a person under the age of 18 verify the account with the ID of a parent/guardian, to prevent anonymised harmful activity, providing traceability if an offence occurs.

In the event of a spike we would like you not to close gyms as a measure to stop any spread of Covid. Also for gyms to not be put in the same group as pubs in terms of risk or importance. Gyms are following strict guidelines and most members are following rules in a sober manner.

We want the government to recognise the importance of gyms, health clubs, leisure centres and swimming pools in empowering people to look after their health and stay fit and for them to open first as we come out of lockdown.

We're also calling for government to fund a Work Out to Help Out scheme.

View All Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Petitions

Departmental Select Committee

Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee

Commons Select Committees are a formally established cross-party group of backbench MPs tasked with holding a Government department to account.

At any time there will be number of ongoing investigations into the work of the Department, or issues which fall within the oversight of the Department. Witnesses can be summoned from within the Government and outside to assist in these inquiries.

Select Committee findings are reported to the Commons, printed, and published on the Parliament website. The government then usually has 60 days to reply to the committee's recommendations.


11 Members of the Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee
Julian Knight Portrait
Julian Knight (Conservative - Solihull)
Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee Chair since 29th January 2020
Giles Watling Portrait
Giles Watling (Conservative - Clacton)
Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
John Nicolson Portrait
John Nicolson (Scottish National Party - Ochil and South Perthshire)
Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
Damian Green Portrait
Damian Green (Conservative - Ashford)
Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
Julie Elliott Portrait
Julie Elliott (Labour - Sunderland Central)
Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
Clive Efford Portrait
Clive Efford (Labour - Eltham)
Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
Steve Brine Portrait
Steve Brine (Conservative - Winchester)
Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
Kevin Brennan Portrait
Kevin Brennan (Labour - Cardiff West)
Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
Jane Stevenson Portrait
Jane Stevenson (Conservative - Wolverhampton North East)
Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee Member since 19th October 2021
Simon Jupp Portrait
Simon Jupp (Conservative - East Devon)
Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee Member since 19th October 2021
Rupa Huq Portrait
Rupa Huq (Labour - Ealing Central and Acton)
Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee Member since 7th March 2022
Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee: Upcoming Events
Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee - Oral evidence
Promoting Britain abroad
5 Jul 2022, 9:30 a.m.
At 10.00am: Oral evidence
Chris Philp MP - Minister for Tech and the Digital Economy at Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Ben Dean - Director of Sport, Gambling and Platinum Jubilee at Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
At 11.15am: Oral evidence
Nigel Huddleston MP - Minister for Sport, Tourism, Heritage and Civil Society at Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport

View calendar
Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee - Oral evidence
Sustainability of local journalism
7 Jul 2022, 10:15 a.m.
At 10.30am: Oral evidence
Maria Breslin - Editor at Liverpool Echo
David Floyd - Director at Social Spider CIC
Karl Hancock - Chief Executive at Nub News
At 11.30am: Oral evidence
Matt Abbott - Deputy Director at Independent Community News Network
George Brock - Chair at Charitable Journalism Project
Polly Perkins - Editor at Burngreave Messenger

View calendar

50 most recent Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department

22nd Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how much money the Gambling Commission has spent on investigating novel products in each of the last 5 years.

The Gambling Commission has both regulatory and criminal powers, and its investigation remit covers either regulatory failing by licensees (under LCCP) or criminal offences (under the Gambling Act 2005). The Commission does not record whether an investigation is related to a novel product, but in response to the collapse of BetIndex Limited, the Commission updated how it assesses risk so that novel products are properly considered.

The Commission often refuses a licence to operators if they are shown to be novel at the licence application stage (e.g. if they use cryptocurrency as a source of funds or intend to offer consumers cryptocurrency as a route to play). It cannot bring a prosecution under the Gambling Act 2005 regarding an aspect of a product which is outside of its remit.

The Gambling Commission at all times strives to recruit people with the skills, knowledge and diversity required to regulate the fast moving and innovative gambling sector but it does not retain information on where its staff join from and on the scope of their earlier careers. As well as staff with specialisms in areas of gambling such as cryptocurrency and NFTs, the Commission’s market insights specialists help anticipate industry developments.

All staff in the Commission’s Operations team (around 30% of its workforce) have the technical experience to investigate novel products and new technologies and where content is challenging, call on subject matter experts as appropriate (internal or external). The most recent estimate for the Commission’s overall headcount was around 320.

In order to help equip the Commission to tackle the rate of technological change, four years ago the Commission established a Digital Advisory Panel to advise on the digital landscape and emerging trends which may impact on how the gambling market operates, how the Commission interacts with operators and how they interact with consumers. The Digital Advisory Panel works with staff to explore the impact of emerging technologies on the Commission’s regulatory and policy work to ensure that they are a future-fit and effective regulator.

The Commission does not comment on ongoing cases. Each case has its own circumstances, and the length of prosecution depends on the case complexity and the court process.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
22nd Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what estimate she has made of the number of (a) employees and (b) consultants that are employed by the Gambling Commission with the relevant technical experience to investigate new technologies.

The Gambling Commission has both regulatory and criminal powers, and its investigation remit covers either regulatory failing by licensees (under LCCP) or criminal offences (under the Gambling Act 2005). The Commission does not record whether an investigation is related to a novel product, but in response to the collapse of BetIndex Limited, the Commission updated how it assesses risk so that novel products are properly considered.

The Commission often refuses a licence to operators if they are shown to be novel at the licence application stage (e.g. if they use cryptocurrency as a source of funds or intend to offer consumers cryptocurrency as a route to play). It cannot bring a prosecution under the Gambling Act 2005 regarding an aspect of a product which is outside of its remit.

The Gambling Commission at all times strives to recruit people with the skills, knowledge and diversity required to regulate the fast moving and innovative gambling sector but it does not retain information on where its staff join from and on the scope of their earlier careers. As well as staff with specialisms in areas of gambling such as cryptocurrency and NFTs, the Commission’s market insights specialists help anticipate industry developments.

All staff in the Commission’s Operations team (around 30% of its workforce) have the technical experience to investigate novel products and new technologies and where content is challenging, call on subject matter experts as appropriate (internal or external). The most recent estimate for the Commission’s overall headcount was around 320.

In order to help equip the Commission to tackle the rate of technological change, four years ago the Commission established a Digital Advisory Panel to advise on the digital landscape and emerging trends which may impact on how the gambling market operates, how the Commission interacts with operators and how they interact with consumers. The Digital Advisory Panel works with staff to explore the impact of emerging technologies on the Commission’s regulatory and policy work to ensure that they are a future-fit and effective regulator.

The Commission does not comment on ongoing cases. Each case has its own circumstances, and the length of prosecution depends on the case complexity and the court process.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
22nd Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many staff who are employed by the Gambling Commission who have previously worked in the (a) technology, (b) digital assets, (c) cryptoassets or (d) NFT sectors.

The Gambling Commission has both regulatory and criminal powers, and its investigation remit covers either regulatory failing by licensees (under LCCP) or criminal offences (under the Gambling Act 2005). The Commission does not record whether an investigation is related to a novel product, but in response to the collapse of BetIndex Limited, the Commission updated how it assesses risk so that novel products are properly considered.

The Commission often refuses a licence to operators if they are shown to be novel at the licence application stage (e.g. if they use cryptocurrency as a source of funds or intend to offer consumers cryptocurrency as a route to play). It cannot bring a prosecution under the Gambling Act 2005 regarding an aspect of a product which is outside of its remit.

The Gambling Commission at all times strives to recruit people with the skills, knowledge and diversity required to regulate the fast moving and innovative gambling sector but it does not retain information on where its staff join from and on the scope of their earlier careers. As well as staff with specialisms in areas of gambling such as cryptocurrency and NFTs, the Commission’s market insights specialists help anticipate industry developments.

All staff in the Commission’s Operations team (around 30% of its workforce) have the technical experience to investigate novel products and new technologies and where content is challenging, call on subject matter experts as appropriate (internal or external). The most recent estimate for the Commission’s overall headcount was around 320.

In order to help equip the Commission to tackle the rate of technological change, four years ago the Commission established a Digital Advisory Panel to advise on the digital landscape and emerging trends which may impact on how the gambling market operates, how the Commission interacts with operators and how they interact with consumers. The Digital Advisory Panel works with staff to explore the impact of emerging technologies on the Commission’s regulatory and policy work to ensure that they are a future-fit and effective regulator.

The Commission does not comment on ongoing cases. Each case has its own circumstances, and the length of prosecution depends on the case complexity and the court process.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
22nd Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what proportion of Gambling Commission investigations into novel products have been brought to prosecution; what proportion of those prosecutions have been successful, and on average how long investigations take prior to prosecution.

The Gambling Commission has both regulatory and criminal powers, and its investigation remit covers either regulatory failing by licensees (under LCCP) or criminal offences (under the Gambling Act 2005). The Commission does not record whether an investigation is related to a novel product, but in response to the collapse of BetIndex Limited, the Commission updated how it assesses risk so that novel products are properly considered.

The Commission often refuses a licence to operators if they are shown to be novel at the licence application stage (e.g. if they use cryptocurrency as a source of funds or intend to offer consumers cryptocurrency as a route to play). It cannot bring a prosecution under the Gambling Act 2005 regarding an aspect of a product which is outside of its remit.

The Gambling Commission at all times strives to recruit people with the skills, knowledge and diversity required to regulate the fast moving and innovative gambling sector but it does not retain information on where its staff join from and on the scope of their earlier careers. As well as staff with specialisms in areas of gambling such as cryptocurrency and NFTs, the Commission’s market insights specialists help anticipate industry developments.

All staff in the Commission’s Operations team (around 30% of its workforce) have the technical experience to investigate novel products and new technologies and where content is challenging, call on subject matter experts as appropriate (internal or external). The most recent estimate for the Commission’s overall headcount was around 320.

In order to help equip the Commission to tackle the rate of technological change, four years ago the Commission established a Digital Advisory Panel to advise on the digital landscape and emerging trends which may impact on how the gambling market operates, how the Commission interacts with operators and how they interact with consumers. The Digital Advisory Panel works with staff to explore the impact of emerging technologies on the Commission’s regulatory and policy work to ensure that they are a future-fit and effective regulator.

The Commission does not comment on ongoing cases. Each case has its own circumstances, and the length of prosecution depends on the case complexity and the court process.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
22nd Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps she is taking to increase tourism in Solihull constituency.

The Government is committed to supporting tourism recovery in the UK, which is why we published the Tourism Recovery Plan in June 2021.

In March 2022, the national tourist board and DCMS’ arms-length body, VisitBritain, welcomed 9 international trade buyers from Canada to the West Midlands for an educational visit. In May 2022, VisitBritain took part in a global multinational press trip to Birmingham to promote the Commonwealth Games and the wider region. Ahead of the Birmingham 2022 Commonwealth Games, VisitBritain is promoting the West Midlands as a premier UK holiday destination, focusing on key markets in Australia, India, and Canada.

VisitBritain has done extensive work with the West Midlands Growth Company on the business events front including marketing support, North American trade mission support, and opportunities to participate in trade shows at heavily discounted rates.

Birmingham was also a featured city in VisitBritain’s GREAT funded £10 million ‘Welcome to Another Side of Britain’ international campaign. Birmingham was also a featured city in VisitEngland’s recent ‘Escape the Everyday’ domestic marketing campaign, which encouraged people to book a city break in spring.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
27th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether her Department issued guidance on the optimal distribution of funds between different levels of employees in the event that the Culture Recovery Fund was used to provide pay uplifts by organisations.

Culture Recovery Fund resource grants were awarded subject to terms and conditions.

There was some variation in the language of the terms and conditions between Arm’s Length Bodies. However, it was standard that grantees were required to exercise pay restraint for at least 18 months from the date of their Grant Agreement, where legally possible for them to do so. This included – but was not limited to – imposing a pay freeze for all senior employees (defined as staff earning over £100,000) and a 10% pay reduction in remuneration to the pre-Covid-19 remuneration packages for employees contracted to receive above £150,000 per year.

DCMS did not issue any guidance on the optimal distribution of funds between different levels of employees within organisations.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
27th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether it was possible for the Culture Recovery Fund to be used to top up furloughed staff in order that they received full remuneration.

The Government’s Job Retention Scheme rules evolved throughout the pandemic, as did the Culture Recovery Fund's interaction with them. Details on the eligible and ineligible costs can be found in the relevant fund guidance documents for the different rounds.

The most recent set of fund guidance documents (from November 2021) states that "The optional salary costs not covered by the Government’s Job Retention Scheme for hours not worked by staff on furlough, or any additional optional salary costs for hours not worked about the furloughing cap" were not an eligible cost. However organisations should consult the relevant guidance for the appropriate round of the scheme that their grant pertains to.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
22nd Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps she is taking to help improve the level of physical activity in Ipswich through (a) grassroots sport and (b) other means.

Sport and physical activity are incredibly important for our physical and mental health and this government is committed to ensuring that everyone, regardless of background, should have access to and benefit from quality sport and physical activity opportunities.

Since 2018, the government has invested £528,357 into a range of grassroots sport projects within Ipswich through Sport England, for example the Ipswich BMX club, the School Games Organisers and through National Leisure Recovery Fund.

The Government also invests £18 million each year in community sport facilities via the Football Foundation. In partnership with the Football Association and Premier League, this results in £70 million being invested into community sport facilities every year.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
22nd Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment she has made of the revenue opportunities on offer from the growing NFT industry for English football.

The Government has not made a specific assessment of whether Non-Fungible Tokens (NFTs) can benefit football in England.

The Cryptoassets Taskforce, consisting of Her Majesty’s Treasury (HMT), the Bank of England and the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA), was established in 2018 to explore the impact of crypto assets and the potential benefits and challenges of Distributed Ledger Technology (DLT) in financial services, as well as assessing what, if any, regulation is required in response. HMT is not currently proposing to bring NFTs into regulation.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
23rd Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether she plans to put in place provisions for community activities for children and young people during the 2022 summer holidays.

Local Authorities have a statutory duty to allocate funding to youth services in line with local need, this includes provision during the summer holidays. This is funded from the Local Government settlement, which was over £12 billion last year.

DCMS has been working closely with the Department for Education on the Holiday Activity and Food (HAF) programme, which will provide disadvantaged children and families with access to healthy food and enriching activities during the longer school holidays. The Department for Education is making over £600 million available to Local Authorities in England over the next 3 years to deliver this programme with the funding being distributed through all 152 local authorities in England.

In addition, the DCMS funded National Citizen Service (NCS) is running a range of activities during the 2022 summer holidays, providing access to adventures away from home, skills development, engaging in local community projects and volunteering opportunities for thousands of young people across the country.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
23rd Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what discussions she had with leaders of local authorities on the provision of activities for children and young people during the 2022 summer holidays.

Local Authorities have a statutory duty to allocate funding to youth services in line with local need, this includes provision during the summer holidays. This is funded from the Local Government settlement, which was over £12 billion last year.

DCMS has been working closely with the Department for Education on the Holiday Activity and Food (HAF) programme, which will provide disadvantaged children and families with access to healthy food and enriching activities during the longer school holidays. The Department for Education is making over £600 million available to Local Authorities in England over the next 3 years to deliver this programme with the funding being distributed through all 152 local authorities in England.

In addition, the DCMS funded National Citizen Service (NCS) is running a range of activities during the 2022 summer holidays, providing access to adventures away from home, skills development, engaging in local community projects and volunteering opportunities for thousands of young people across the country.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
23rd Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps she is taking to ensure the sufficiency of youth work services to support and keep young people safe during the 2022 summer holidays.

Local Authorities have a statutory duty to allocate funding to youth services in line with local need, this includes provision during the summer holidays. This is funded from the Local Government settlement, which was over £12 billion last year.

DCMS has been working closely with the Department for Education on the Holiday Activity and Food (HAF) programme, which will provide disadvantaged children and families with access to healthy food and enriching activities during the longer school holidays. The Department for Education is making over £600 million available to Local Authorities in England over the next 3 years to deliver this programme with the funding being distributed through all 152 local authorities in England.

In addition, the DCMS funded National Citizen Service (NCS) is running a range of activities during the 2022 summer holidays, providing access to adventures away from home, skills development, engaging in local community projects and volunteering opportunities for thousands of young people across the country.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
23rd Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if she will make additional funding available for youth services to work with young people during the 2022 summer holidays.

Local Authorities have a statutory duty to allocate funding to youth services in line with local need, this includes provision during the summer holidays. This is funded from the Local Government settlement, which was over £12 billion last year.

DCMS has been working closely with the Department for Education on the Holiday Activity and Food (HAF) programme, which will provide disadvantaged children and families with access to healthy food and enriching activities during the longer school holidays. The Department for Education is making over £600 million available to Local Authorities in England over the next 3 years to deliver this programme with the funding being distributed through all 152 local authorities in England.

In addition, the DCMS funded National Citizen Service (NCS) is running a range of activities during the 2022 summer holidays, providing access to adventures away from home, skills development, engaging in local community projects and volunteering opportunities for thousands of young people across the country.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
23rd Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if she will make it her policy to introduce cheaper entry for young people to (a) heritage, (b) sport and (c) arts venues and activities during the 2022 summer holidays.

DCMS is committed to increasing access to its sectors for young people, particularly those from disadvantaged backgrounds. This includes a range of ongoing policies, for example, supporting free-entry to Museums and Galleries and numerous English Heritage historic monuments, buildings and sites. We are also encouraging sporting bodies to enable access to major sporting events for people, particularly children, from more deprived backgrounds. This year, we have worked closely with the Football Association on the ‘Invitations’ programme for the UEFA Women’s European Championships, ensuring tickets are available through the government’s Holiday Activities and Food programme.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
16th Jun 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the findings of the interim report by CFE research on behalf of the Sports Grounds Safety Authority, when they expect to publish the Safe Standing Trial.

Following the conclusion of the Early Adopter Programme for Licensed Standing in Seated Areas, Her Majesty’s Government has been provided with the Final Evaluation Report by CFE Research. We will continue to work closely with the Sports Grounds Safety Authority to review the findings of this report and expect to publish it in due course.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
24th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how much funding her Department has provided to the British Boxing Board of Control in each year since 2017.

My Department has not provided funding to the British Boxing Board of Control, which has been overseeing British professional boxing independently of the government since 1929.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
21st Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps his Department is taking to help support grassroot sports initiatives in (a) Wolverhampton and (b) the West Midlands.

Sport and physical activity are incredibly important for our physical and mental health and this government is committed to ensuring that everyone, regardless of background, should have access to and benefit from quality sport and physical activity opportunities.

The significant core public investment of £778 million for the Birmingham 2022 Commonwealth Games has accelerated investment and regeneration in Birmingham and the West Midlands. This includes infrastructure developments like the Alexander Stadium renovations and the new Sandwell Aquatics Centre that will be a legacy for the community to use long after the Games is over. Sport England is also investing £35 million for physical activity legacy, which will cover both targeted interventions in the West Midlands region as well as national investments to open up sporting opportunities to all.

Since 2018, the department has also invested £333,674 into a wide range of grassroots sport projects across Wolverhampton through Sport England, such as to the Finchfield Hockey Club and Ormiston New Academy. This is part of the £23.2 million invested in the West Midlands during the same period.

The Government also invests £18 million each year in community sport facilities via the Football Foundation. In partnership with the Football Association and Premier League, this results in £70 million being invested into community sport facilities every year. The Football Foundation has granted over £4.7 million to the West Midlands to develop football and multi-use grassroots sports facilities in 2021/22.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
21st Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether her Department has plans to increase the funding allocated to youth services in areas of high deprivation.

Local Authorities have a statutory duty to allocate funding to youth services in line with local need. This is funded from the Local Government settlement, which was over £12 billion last year. DCMS is currently reviewing the guidance associated with the statutory duty.

The Government recognises the vital role that youth services and activities play in improving the life chances and wellbeing of young people. The Government has committed to a National Youth Guarantee: that by 2025, every young person will have access to regular clubs and activities, adventures away from home and opportunities to volunteer. This will be supported by a three year £560 million investment in youth services, reflecting young people's priorities and addressing the inconsistencies in national youth spending, with a firm focus on levelling up.

The £368 million Youth Investment Fund will fund the construction or redevelopment of up to 300 youth facilities - such as small youth facilities, youth centres and activity centres - targeting investment in left-behind areas, where young people have the greatest need and lowest provision. Phase One of the Youth Investment Fund, administered by BBC Children in Need, has delivered £12 million of funding this year to over 400 local youth organisations in levelling up priority areas in England.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
15th Jun 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to establish an independent racism reporting body for the broadcasting industry.

Her Majesty’s Government believes that there is no place for prejudice or discrimination in the media or anywhere else and is committed to supporting the broadcasting sector to ensure it is a place which offers opportunities for people from all backgrounds to contribute and succeed. This can only be achieved through a diverse workforce which reflects modern Britain.

Ofcom, as the independent communications regulator, has a duty to promote equality of opportunity in relation to employment in the broadcasting sector and has powers to ask broadcasters to provide information about their diversity policies and the make-up of their workforce. Her Majesty’s Government is committed to working together with the industry and with Ofcom to support greater diversity and inclusion. Her Majesty’s Government has no plans to establish an independent racism reporting body for the broadcasting industry.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
16th Jun 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the White Paper on the future of football governance will include detailed protections for key items of a club’s heritage.

Her Majesty’s Government has published its response to the recommendations made by the Independent Fan-Led Review of Football Governance. Her Majesty’s Government has accepted the recommendation that there should be additional protection for key items of club heritage and more detail will be published in the forthcoming White Paper.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
24th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what sanctions the Ofcom can impose on advertisers referred to them by the Advertising Standards Agency for consistently breaking advertising standards.

The Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) is responsible for writing and enforcing standards for advertisers through the UK Code of Broadcast Advertising (BCAP Code) and the UK Code of Non-broadcast Advertising and Direct & Promotional Marketing (CAP Code). In certain areas of these codes the ASA can refer cases to a number of different backstop regulators who have additional enforcement powers. The regulators that can be involved depend on the media in which advertising is published or the type of breach in question.

The ASA’s responsibility for the day-to-day regulation of broadcast advertising content is established under a co-regulatory arrangement with Ofcom. Ofcom can take enforcement action, such as sanctions, against broadcasters who do not comply with ASA decisions and/or where breaches are sufficiently serious.

For non-broadcast advertising, including newspapers, magazines, out of home and the majority of online advertising, the self-regulatory framework primarily applies to advertisers. Where further powers of enforcement have been deemed necessary, the ASA is able to refer certain cases to relevant statutory backstop regulators, such as to the Gambling Commission in the case of gambling advertising, the Competition and Markets Authority in relation to competition in digital markets, and to Trading Standards Services for misleading advertising. Those organisations are able to apply sanctions in line with their respective legislative powers.

Separately, as a result of the Health and Care Act, from 1 January 2024, Ofcom will have the power to sanction broadcasters and online advertisers that breach restrictions surrounding the advertising of products high in fat, sugar or salt on TV or via paid-for advertising online. Ofcom will have statutory responsibility for enforcing restrictions including powers to designate functions to a frontline regulator who will be responsible for the day to day enforcement of the policy. Ofcom will be able to take enforcement action, including the imposition of financial penalties on broadcasters and online advertisers.

The Government consultation on the Online Advertising Programme launched earlier this year and closed on 8 June. The Online Advertising Programme is examining the regulatory model for online advertising to ensure it protects consumers and minimises harm. This work includes looking at the role of platforms and intermediaries, as well as advertisers, to ensure the overarching system is coherent, supporting a sustainable, transparent and accountable online advertising market. We will be publishing a Government response to the consultation in due course.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
20th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent estimate his Department has made of the number of people over the age of 60 who are unable to access online services.

Earlier this year, it was reported that Ofcom's Media Literacy Tracker Computer-assisted telephone Interviewing survey found that of the 3,143 respondents, 26% of the 75+ did not have internet access at home and 8% of those 65-74 also did not have access.

It is research like this that is behind the government's focus on building a world-leading digital economy that works for everyone. DCMS is responsible for coordinating HMG digital inclusion policy, and aims to ensure that as many people as possible, no matter their age, have internet access and a base level of digital skills.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
23rd Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if she will make an assessment of the potential merits of adopting the UNICTRAL Model Law 2017 for UK-Australia trade; and if she will make a statement.

In the UK Australia Free Trade Agreement both parties agreed to “…maintain a legal framework governing electronic transactions consistent with the principles of the UNCITRAL Model Law on Electronic Commerce…” and to “...recognise the importance of developing mechanisms to facilitate the use of electronic transferable records.”

In the Queen’s Speech, the Government committed to implementing the recommendations made by the Law Commission for England and Wales by legislating to put electronic documents on the same legal footing as paper documents, thereby delivering the principles of the UN Commission On International Trade Law (UNCITRAL) Model Law.

Reform in this area is a G7 commitment made under DCMS Secretary of State’s Digital Track of the UK G7 Presidency and confirmed by the Carbis Bay G7 Leaders’ Summit Communique.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
21st Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment her Department has made of the role of technology companies in preventing the harmful use of deepfake technology.

The Government recognises the challenges digitally manipulated content such as deepfakes pose.

The Online Safety Bill requires service providers to tackle serious and illegal forms of manipulated media. All services in scope of the Bill will need to proactively remove and prevent users from being exposed to priority illegal content. This could include deepfake material where it is linked to existing priority offences, such as extreme or revenge pornography. Service providers will also need to prevent children from accessing content, including deepfakes, which is harmful or inappropriate. Major platforms will also need to set out clearly their terms of service in relation to priority content that is legal but harmful to adults, which may include deepfake content. They will need to enforce these terms of service consistently.

The Government has also asked the Law Commission to review the criminal law related to intimate images. This review is sponsored by the Ministry of Justice and includes ‘deepfake’ pornography. The Law Commission will publish its final report and recommendations later this year.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
20th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent discussions officials in her Department have had with their counterparts in the Department for Education on the adequacy of youth work training places.

DCMS is the department responsible for the youth sector workforce and is committed to supporting its development. DCMS funds the National Youth Agency to set professional standards, qualifications and a curriculum for youth work, including a new youth work apprenticeship and free-to-access training. DCMS bursaries have fully-funded hundreds of individuals to gain youth work qualifications who otherwise may have been excluded due to cost.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
17th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether her Department has plans to increase tourism in Bournemouth East constituency.

As set out in the government’s Tourism Recovery Plan, we are committed to supporting the tourism industry’s return to pre-pandemic levels across England including Bournemouth East and other coastal destinations.

DCMS’s arms-length body and the national tourist board, VisitBritain, promotes Bournemouth and other coastal destinations on their websites and social media.

VisitBritain works with Bournemouth’s Destination Management Organisation who attend their best practice calls and have engaged in discussions related to marketing activity. Bournemouth engaged with VisitBritain’s Escape the Everyday campaign to create dedicated content and itineraries. VisitBritain has also supported specific initiatives, such as the Beach Check App, which was aligned to responsible travel.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
17th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether her Department is providing funding to Bournemouth Tourism Centre.

The Bournemouth Tourist Information Centre forms part of the Destination Management Organisation (DMO) for Bournemouth. Bournemouth engages with the DCMS’s arms-length body and the national tourist board, VisitEngland.

DMO funding varies greatly but generally they receive their funding from or a combination of local authority and private sector funding and membership fees.

During the pandemic, VisitEngland ran the Destination Management Resilience Fund. Funding from this was awarded to Bournemouth through their Coastal Business Improvement District, with the aim of alleviating the financial pressure many DMOs in all regions of England were facing.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
20th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what representations she has received on widening the scope of the Communications Act 2003 to include alcohol marketing and alcohol advertising.

The Secretary of State has received no recent representations, including from the Scottish Government, about widening the scope of the Communications Act 2003 to include alcohol advertising, its statutory regulation or making it a devolved matter. The Secretary of State has also had no recent discussions with Ofcom regarding alcohol advertising.

There are already very stringent regulations in place for the marketing of alcohol in traditional forms of media, including radio, TV, and cinema, and online, as well as in relation to sports promotion, through the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) codes of practice for advertising. If new evidence emerges that clearly highlights major problems with the existing codes of practice, then the ASA has a duty to revisit the codes and take appropriate action.

As part of the Online Advertising Programme the government is currently reviewing how online advertising is regulated in the UK, including legal but harmful content, such as alcohol advertising. The consultation closed on 8 June and will help us determine how to tackle such harms. We hope to publish a Government response in due course.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
20th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what representations she has received in support of providing a statutory basis for the regulation of alcohol marketing and alcohol advertising in Great Britain.

The Secretary of State has received no recent representations, including from the Scottish Government, about widening the scope of the Communications Act 2003 to include alcohol advertising, its statutory regulation or making it a devolved matter. The Secretary of State has also had no recent discussions with Ofcom regarding alcohol advertising.

There are already very stringent regulations in place for the marketing of alcohol in traditional forms of media, including radio, TV, and cinema, and online, as well as in relation to sports promotion, through the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) codes of practice for advertising. If new evidence emerges that clearly highlights major problems with the existing codes of practice, then the ASA has a duty to revisit the codes and take appropriate action.

As part of the Online Advertising Programme the government is currently reviewing how online advertising is regulated in the UK, including legal but harmful content, such as alcohol advertising. The consultation closed on 8 June and will help us determine how to tackle such harms. We hope to publish a Government response in due course.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
20th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what further steps she plans to take to strengthen the regulation of alcohol marketing and alcohol advertising in Great Britain.

The Secretary of State has received no recent representations, including from the Scottish Government, about widening the scope of the Communications Act 2003 to include alcohol advertising, its statutory regulation or making it a devolved matter. The Secretary of State has also had no recent discussions with Ofcom regarding alcohol advertising.

There are already very stringent regulations in place for the marketing of alcohol in traditional forms of media, including radio, TV, and cinema, and online, as well as in relation to sports promotion, through the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) codes of practice for advertising. If new evidence emerges that clearly highlights major problems with the existing codes of practice, then the ASA has a duty to revisit the codes and take appropriate action.

As part of the Online Advertising Programme the government is currently reviewing how online advertising is regulated in the UK, including legal but harmful content, such as alcohol advertising. The consultation closed on 8 June and will help us determine how to tackle such harms. We hope to publish a Government response in due course.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
20th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent discussions she has had with Ofcom to ensure that alcohol advertising is regulated across the range of relevant media including (a) television, (b) radio, (c) cinema and (d) internet-based and other digital media.

The Secretary of State has received no recent representations, including from the Scottish Government, about widening the scope of the Communications Act 2003 to include alcohol advertising, its statutory regulation or making it a devolved matter. The Secretary of State has also had no recent discussions with Ofcom regarding alcohol advertising.

There are already very stringent regulations in place for the marketing of alcohol in traditional forms of media, including radio, TV, and cinema, and online, as well as in relation to sports promotion, through the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) codes of practice for advertising. If new evidence emerges that clearly highlights major problems with the existing codes of practice, then the ASA has a duty to revisit the codes and take appropriate action.

As part of the Online Advertising Programme the government is currently reviewing how online advertising is regulated in the UK, including legal but harmful content, such as alcohol advertising. The consultation closed on 8 June and will help us determine how to tackle such harms. We hope to publish a Government response in due course.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
20th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether she has received any representations from the Scottish Government requesting that powers over the regulation of alcohol marketing and alcohol advertising be devolved.

The Secretary of State has received no recent representations, including from the Scottish Government, about widening the scope of the Communications Act 2003 to include alcohol advertising, its statutory regulation or making it a devolved matter. The Secretary of State has also had no recent discussions with Ofcom regarding alcohol advertising.

There are already very stringent regulations in place for the marketing of alcohol in traditional forms of media, including radio, TV, and cinema, and online, as well as in relation to sports promotion, through the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) codes of practice for advertising. If new evidence emerges that clearly highlights major problems with the existing codes of practice, then the ASA has a duty to revisit the codes and take appropriate action.

As part of the Online Advertising Programme the government is currently reviewing how online advertising is regulated in the UK, including legal but harmful content, such as alcohol advertising. The consultation closed on 8 June and will help us determine how to tackle such harms. We hope to publish a Government response in due course.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
20th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what further steps she plans to take to strengthen the regulation of alcohol marketing and alcohol advertising in relation to sports promotion.

The Secretary of State has received no recent representations, including from the Scottish Government, about widening the scope of the Communications Act 2003 to include alcohol advertising, its statutory regulation or making it a devolved matter. The Secretary of State has also had no recent discussions with Ofcom regarding alcohol advertising.

There are already very stringent regulations in place for the marketing of alcohol in traditional forms of media, including radio, TV, and cinema, and online, as well as in relation to sports promotion, through the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) codes of practice for advertising. If new evidence emerges that clearly highlights major problems with the existing codes of practice, then the ASA has a duty to revisit the codes and take appropriate action.

As part of the Online Advertising Programme the government is currently reviewing how online advertising is regulated in the UK, including legal but harmful content, such as alcohol advertising. The consultation closed on 8 June and will help us determine how to tackle such harms. We hope to publish a Government response in due course.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
21st Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how much her Department spent on consultancy fees in the last five years.

The Department has spent the following amount on consultancy services in the past 5 financial years. Values include VAT that is non-recoverable, whilst VAT that is recoverable has been deducted accordingly. The values for FY21/22 are subject to change following audit and the final value will be published in the DCMS Annual Report and Accounts FY21/22.

FY17/18

FY18/19

FY19/20

FY20/21

FY21/22*

Consultancy

£2,700,000.00

£3,300,000.00

£3,900,000.00

£16,600,000.00

£17,512,000.00

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
21st Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps she is taking to ensure the rollout of gigabit broadband to (a) Croxden, (b) Marchington, (c) Denstone and (d) other rural areas of Burton constituency.

We are investing £5 billion through Project Gigabit so people in hard-to-reach areas can get gigabit broadband. As part of Project Gigabit, we will be launching a regional supplier procurement in Staffordshire, covering Croxden, Marchington, Denstone, and other rural areas in Burton. The procurement will target premises that would not otherwise get gigabit broadband through suppliers’ commercial plans.

In preparation, we have conducted an Open Market Review and a Public Review across Staffordshire to survey suppliers’ delivery plans and shape the areas that require intervention. The procurement is scheduled to begin between September and November 2022, with a contract expected to be awarded between July and September 2023.

Eligible premises that are not included in the chosen supplier’s plans will be able to apply for subsidy via the Gigabit Broadband Voucher Scheme, which provides a micro-grant of up to £1,500 for residents and up to £3,500 for businesses towards the cost of installing gigabit-capable broadband.

Constituents in Burton have made good use of the Gigabit Broadband Voucher Scheme; to date, approximately 80 premises in the constituency have claimed and received payment for a voucher through the scheme, with approximately 200 further premises awaiting completion, for a combined value of over £550,000.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
21st Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether her Department has made an assessment of the impact of free public Wi-Fi on footfall in town centres.

The Department has not made an assessment on the impact of free public Wi-Fi on footfall in town centres. However, we know that good quality digital infrastructure, including in public spaces, has substantial social and economic benefits, and this can play a role in supporting our broader policy objectives, including Levelling Up. We are developing a Wireless Infrastructure Strategy to set out a strategic framework for the development, deployment and adoption of 5G and future networks.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
20th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how much and what proportion of the funds allocated from the Youth Investment Fund have been to organisations working with Gypsy, Roma and/or Traveller communities.

Local Authorities have a statutory duty to secure sufficient youth services in line with local need. Before securing such services, local authorities are required to take steps to ascertain the views of young people in their area and must take those views into account when deciding on the services to be provided. Funding for these services come from the Local Government settlement, which was over £12 billion last year. DCMS are currently reviewing the guidance associated with the statutory duty.

DCMS funds Universal Youth Services that are open to all young people and is investing £560 million over the next 3 years in a new National Youth Guarantee, so that by 2025 every young person will have access to regular clubs and activities, adventures away from home and opportunities to volunteer.

Phase One of the Youth Investment Fund, administered by BBC Children in Need, has delivered £12 million of funding this year to over 400 local youth organisations in levelling up priority areas in England. Five organisations working with Gypsy, Roma and/or Traveller communities were awarded funding. The grants have a total value of £202,346 which represents 1.7% of the total amount awarded. Phase Two of the Youth Investment Fund is expected to open in summer 2022.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
20th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what her strategy is for ensuring that Gypsy, Roma and Traveller young people are reached by youth work in England.

Local Authorities have a statutory duty to secure sufficient youth services in line with local need. Before securing such services, local authorities are required to take steps to ascertain the views of young people in their area and must take those views into account when deciding on the services to be provided. Funding for these services come from the Local Government settlement, which was over £12 billion last year. DCMS are currently reviewing the guidance associated with the statutory duty.

DCMS funds Universal Youth Services that are open to all young people and is investing £560 million over the next 3 years in a new National Youth Guarantee, so that by 2025 every young person will have access to regular clubs and activities, adventures away from home and opportunities to volunteer.

Phase One of the Youth Investment Fund, administered by BBC Children in Need, has delivered £12 million of funding this year to over 400 local youth organisations in levelling up priority areas in England. Five organisations working with Gypsy, Roma and/or Traveller communities were awarded funding. The grants have a total value of £202,346 which represents 1.7% of the total amount awarded. Phase Two of the Youth Investment Fund is expected to open in summer 2022.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
20th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what plans she has for strengthening the duty on local authorities to provide youth work services.

DCMS officials are currently reviewing the statutory duty and its associated guidance to assess its effectiveness after a call for responses from key youth stakeholders. We will publish the outcomes of the review in due course.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
20th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent assessment she has made of the adequacy of long-term funding for youth services.

I refer the Hon. Member to the answer I gave on 28/04/22 to Question 159010.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
22nd Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment she has made of the effect of rises in the cost of energy and chemicals on the viability of public leisure centres with swimming pools; and if she will make a statement.

We recognise the importance of ensuring public access to leisure facilities and swimming pools, which are great spaces for people of all ages to stay fit and healthy, and play an important role within communities. The ongoing responsibility of providing access to public leisure facilities lies at Local Authority level, and the government continues to encourage Local Authorities to invest in leisure facilities.

We also recognise the impact rising energy prices will have on businesses of all sizes. Ofgem and the government are in regular contact with business groups and the leisure sector to understand the challenges they face and explore ways to protect consumers and businesses. The Government is also working with partners within the sector to monitor the availability and supply of pool chemicals.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
22nd Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if she will set out a long-term funding strategy for youth services in England.

Local Authorities have a statutory duty to allocate funding to youth services in line with local need. This is funded from the Local Government settlement, which was over £12 billion last year. DCMS are currently reviewing the guidance associated with the statutory duty.

Last year, DCMS conducted a Youth Review to ensure that our spending, policy and programmes meet the needs of young people. The review heard from over 6,000 young people and 120 youth organisations. Grounded in the findings from this review, the government has committed to a National Youth Guarantee: that by 2025 every young person will have access to regular clubs and activities, adventures away from home and volunteering opportunities. This will be supported by a three year £560 million investment in youth services, reflecting young people's priorities and addressing the inconsistencies in national youth spending, with a firm focus on levelling up.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
17th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, with reference to the report by Public Health England entitled Gambling-related harms evidence review: the economic and social cost of harms, published in September 2021, if she will make an assessment of the whether Public Health England conducted methodologically robust research when it estimated that there was a £1.27 billion annual economic burden of harmful gambling.

Public Health England (PHE)’s evidence review on gambling-related harms estimated the annual cost of harmful gambling to society to be between £841 million and £2.2 billion, or approximately £1.27 billion, however the lack of quantitative causal evidence for some of the harms described did not allow PHE to make a direct assessment of the cost of gambling harm specifically. While the review acknowledged that further research is needed to determine costs attributable directly to gambling-related harm rather than those associated with people who are problem or at-risk gamblers, it is the most comprehensive review of the evidence on gambling-related harm and its associated costs, and has been carefully considered as an important input to our Review of the Gambling Act 2005. We will publish our white paper in the coming weeks.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
22nd Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what the Government's policy is on the (a) ownership and (b) home of the Elgin Marbles; and if she will make a statement.

The Parthenon Sculptures in the British Museum were legally acquired under the laws pertaining at the time and are legally owned by the Trustees of the British Museum, which is operationally independent of the Government. Decisions relating to the care and management of the museum's collections are a matter for the Trustees of the British Museum. The Government fully supports the position taken by the Trustees of the British Museum.

DCMS ministers have not had any recent discussions on this matter with Greek counterparts. When the Greek Prime Minister called on the Prime Minister in November last year, Mr Mitsotakis raised the issue of the Parthenon Sculptures. The Prime Minister reiterated the UK’s longstanding position that this is a matter for the Trustees of the British Museum. There have been no subsequent ministerial discussions on the Parthenon Sculptures, although we continue to talk to colleagues in the Greek government on wider issues of cultural co-operation.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
22nd Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what discussions Ministers in (a) her Department or (b) other Government Departments have had with their Greek counterparts on the ownership and location of the Elgin Marbles; and if she will make a statement.

The Parthenon Sculptures in the British Museum were legally acquired under the laws pertaining at the time and are legally owned by the Trustees of the British Museum, which is operationally independent of the Government. Decisions relating to the care and management of the museum's collections are a matter for the Trustees of the British Museum. The Government fully supports the position taken by the Trustees of the British Museum.

DCMS ministers have not had any recent discussions on this matter with Greek counterparts. When the Greek Prime Minister called on the Prime Minister in November last year, Mr Mitsotakis raised the issue of the Parthenon Sculptures. The Prime Minister reiterated the UK’s longstanding position that this is a matter for the Trustees of the British Museum. There have been no subsequent ministerial discussions on the Parthenon Sculptures, although we continue to talk to colleagues in the Greek government on wider issues of cultural co-operation.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
21st Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether she has had discussions with representatives of the voluntary sector on the potential opportunities that exist for Ukrainian refugees to volunteer in a field that they are able to contribute to.

Volunteering can play a role in building social connectedness, and can support volunteers to learn new skills or develop existing ones, including learning English. DCMS is focusing its efforts on removing barriers to participation in volunteering and supporting a more inclusive volunteering experience, including for those arriving from Ukraine. Through the £7.4 million Volunteering Futures Fund volunteering opportunities are being created to remove barriers to participation in the arts, culture, sports, civil society, youth and heritage sectors.

The Government recognises that civil society has, and continues, to play a crucial role in the response to Ukraine. Since May 2020, DCMS has funded the Voluntary and Community Sector Emergencies Partnership (VCSEP) to help build capacity in the voluntary sector in responding to emergencies. The VCSEP and its partners have been active in assisting those arriving from Ukraine, including supporting the development of the Homes for Ukraine programme and targeted support.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
21st Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if she will facilitate volunteering support for Ukrainian refugees for the purposes of enabling people to contribute to civil society while learning English.

Volunteering can play a role in building social connectedness, and can support volunteers to learn new skills or develop existing ones, including learning English. DCMS is focusing its efforts on removing barriers to participation in volunteering and supporting a more inclusive volunteering experience, including for those arriving from Ukraine. Through the £7.4 million Volunteering Futures Fund volunteering opportunities are being created to remove barriers to participation in the arts, culture, sports, civil society, youth and heritage sectors.

The Government recognises that civil society has, and continues, to play a crucial role in the response to Ukraine. Since May 2020, DCMS has funded the Voluntary and Community Sector Emergencies Partnership (VCSEP) to help build capacity in the voluntary sector in responding to emergencies. The VCSEP and its partners have been active in assisting those arriving from Ukraine, including supporting the development of the Homes for Ukraine programme and targeted support.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
21st Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what progress has been made on the sale of Chelsea Football Club; and whether the Government will consult on that sale with (a) Ukrainian and (b) other international civil society groups.

On 24 May the Office of Financial Sanctions Implementation (OFSI) issued a licence to Chelsea Football Club to allow the sale of Chelsea FC PLC. We have worked in coordination with international partners to ensure that relevant licences from other jurisdictions have also been issued.

The Club has now transferred ownership to the Boehly-Clearlake consortium. This means that the Club is no longer subject to sanctions.The proceeds are being held in a frozen account and any onward transfer requires a further Government licence to enable that to happen. Abramovich cannot access those funds without a Government licence.

Abramovich has made a number of public statements regarding his intention to transfer the proceeds to the victims of the war in Ukraine. We have agreed a Deed of Undertaking in which he commits the proceeds to a charity in a jurisdiction agreed by the Government for the purposes of helping victims of the war in Ukraine. Any future movement of the sale revenue will be assessed in line with sanctions obligations and the position outlined in the Deed.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
21st Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of whether changes to gambling regulations are required in response to the Report of the Independent Review of the Regulation of BetIndex Limited.

The independent review led by Malcolm Sheeran QC has been an important input into our ongoing Review of the Gambling Act 2005. We will publish a White Paper setting out our conclusions and next steps in the coming weeks.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)