Department for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport

The Department for Culture, Media and Sport will focus on supporting culture, arts, media, sport, tourism and civil society across every part of England — recognising the UK’s world-leading position in these areas and the importance of these sectors in contributing so much to our economy, way of life and our reputation around the world.



Secretary of State

 Portrait

Lucy Frazer
Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport

Shadow Ministers / Spokeperson
Democratic Unionist Party
Ian Paisley (DUP - North Antrim)
Shadow DUP Spokesperson (Culture, Media and Sport)

Scottish National Party
John Nicolson (SNP - Ochil and South Perthshire)
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)

Liberal Democrat
Baroness Bonham-Carter of Yarnbury (LD - Life peer)
Liberal Democrat Lords Spokesperson (Culture, Media and Sport)
Jamie Stone (LD - Caithness, Sutherland and Easter Ross)
Liberal Democrat Spokesperson (Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)

Labour
Lord Bassam of Brighton (Lab - Life peer)
Shadow Spokesperson (Culture, Media and Sport)
Thangam Debbonaire (Lab - Bristol West)
Shadow Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Baroness Thornton (Lab - Life peer)
Shadow Spokesperson (Culture, Media and Sport)
Junior Shadow Ministers / Deputy Spokesperson
Labour
Stephanie Peacock (Lab - Barnsley East)
Shadow Minister (Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
Barbara Keeley (Lab - Worsley and Eccles South)
Shadow Minister (Culture, Media and Sport)
Lilian Greenwood (Lab - Nottingham South)
Shadow Minister (Culture, Media and Sport)
Ministers of State
Julia Lopez (Con - Hornchurch and Upminster)
Minister of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
Parliamentary Under-Secretaries of State
Stuart Andrew (Con - Pudsey)
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay (Con - Life peer)
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
Scheduled Event
Wednesday 28th February 2024
Department for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport
Legislation - Main Chamber
Media Bill - second reading
View calendar
Scheduled Event
Thursday 18th April 2024
09:30
Department for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport
Oral questions - Main Chamber
18 Apr 2024, 9:30 a.m.
Culture, Media and Sport (including Topical Questions)
Save to Calendar
View calendar
Debates
Thursday 22nd February 2024
Oral Answers to Questions
Oral Questions
Select Committee Inquiry
Monday 5th February 2024
Grassroots music venues

Last year, the UK experienced a net loss of 125 grassroots music venues (GMVs) across the UK, equivalent to over …

Written Answers
Wednesday 21st February 2024
Sports Competitors: Hearing Impairment
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, whether his Department has undertaken an equality impact assessment …
Secondary Legislation
Monday 16th January 2023
Public Lending Right Scheme 1982 (Commencement of Variation) Order 2023
This Order brings into force on 13th February 2023 a variation of the Public Lending Right Scheme 1982 (“the Scheme”) …
Bills
Monday 18th July 2022
Data Protection and Digital Information Bill 2022-23
A Bill to make provision for the regulation of the processing of information relating to identified or identifiable living individuals; …
Dept. Publications
Friday 23rd February 2024
12:01

Department for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport Commons Appearances

Oral Answers to Questions is a regularly scheduled appearance where the Secretary of State and junior minister will answer at the Dispatch Box questions from backbench MPs

Other Commons Chamber appearances can be:
  • Urgent Questions where the Speaker has selected a question to which a Minister must reply that day
  • Adjornment Debates a 30 minute debate attended by a Minister that concludes the day in Parliament.
  • Oral Statements informing the Commons of a significant development, where backbench MP's can then question the Minister making the statement.

Westminster Hall debates are performed in response to backbench MPs or e-petitions asking for a Minister to address a detailed issue

Written Statements are made when a current event is not sufficiently significant to require an Oral Statement, but the House is required to be informed.

Most Recent Commons Appearances by Category
Feb. 22
Oral Questions
Feb. 19
Written Statements
Jan. 24
Westminster Hall
Nov. 08
Adjournment Debate
View All Department for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport Commons Contibutions

Bills currently before Parliament

Department for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport does not have Bills currently before Parliament


Acts of Parliament created in the 2019 Parliament


A Bill to make provision for and in connection with the regulation by OFCOM of certain internet services; for and in connection with communications offences; and for connected purposes

This Bill received Royal Assent on 26th October 2023 and was enacted into law.


A Bill to make provision about the security of internet-connectable products and products capable of connecting to such products; to make provision about electronic communications infrastructure; and for connected purposes.

This Bill received Royal Assent on 6th December 2022 and was enacted into law.


A Bill to amend the Charities Act 2011 and the Universities and College Estates Act 1925; and for connected purposes

This Bill received Royal Assent on 24th February 2022 and was enacted into law.


A Bill to make provision for and in connection with an expanded dormant assets scheme; to confer power to further expand the scope of that scheme; to amend the Dormant Bank and Building Society Accounts Act 2008; to enable an authorised reclaim fund to accept transfers of certain unwanted assets; and for connected purposes

This Bill received Royal Assent on 24th February 2022 and was enacted into law.


A Bill to make provision about the security of public electronic communications networks and public electronic communications services.

This Bill received Royal Assent on 17th November 2021 and was enacted into law.


A Bill to amend the electronic communications code set out in Schedule 3A to the Communications Act 2003; and for connected purposes.

This Bill received Royal Assent on 15th March 2021 and was enacted into law.


A bill to make provision about the Commonwealth Games that are to be held principally in Birmingham in 2022; and for connected purposes

This Bill received Royal Assent on 25th June 2020 and was enacted into law.

Department for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport - Secondary Legislation

This Order brings into force on 13th February 2023 a variation of the Public Lending Right Scheme 1982 (“the Scheme”) made by the Secretary of State.
These Regulations limit the wholesale roaming rates chargeable to mobile phone service providers in certain countries or territories with which the United Kingdom has an international agreement.
View All Department for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport Secondary Legislation

Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Trending Petitions
Petitions with most signatures
Petition Debates Contributed

Make it a legal requirement when opening a new social media account, to provide a verified form of ID. Where the account belongs to a person under the age of 18 verify the account with the ID of a parent/guardian, to prevent anonymised harmful activity, providing traceability if an offence occurs.

In the event of a spike we would like you not to close gyms as a measure to stop any spread of Covid. Also for gyms to not be put in the same group as pubs in terms of risk or importance. Gyms are following strict guidelines and most members are following rules in a sober manner.

We want the government to recognise the importance of gyms, health clubs, leisure centres and swimming pools in empowering people to look after their health and stay fit and for them to open first as we come out of lockdown.

We're also calling for government to fund a Work Out to Help Out scheme.

View All Department for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport Petitions

Departmental Select Committee

Culture, Media and Sport Committee

Commons Select Committees are a formally established cross-party group of backbench MPs tasked with holding a Government department to account.

At any time there will be number of ongoing investigations into the work of the Department, or issues which fall within the oversight of the Department. Witnesses can be summoned from within the Government and outside to assist in these inquiries.

Select Committee findings are reported to the Commons, printed, and published on the Parliament website. The government then usually has 60 days to reply to the committee's recommendations.


12 Members of the Culture, Media and Sport Committee
Giles Watling Portrait
Giles Watling (Conservative - Clacton)
Culture, Media and Sport Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
John Nicolson Portrait
John Nicolson (Scottish National Party - Ochil and South Perthshire)
Culture, Media and Sport Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
Damian Green Portrait
Damian Green (Conservative - Ashford)
Culture, Media and Sport Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
Julie Elliott Portrait
Julie Elliott (Labour - Sunderland Central)
Culture, Media and Sport Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
Clive Efford Portrait
Clive Efford (Labour - Eltham)
Culture, Media and Sport Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
Steve Brine Portrait
Steve Brine (Conservative - Winchester)
Culture, Media and Sport Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
Kevin Brennan Portrait
Kevin Brennan (Labour - Cardiff West)
Culture, Media and Sport Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
Jane Stevenson Portrait
Jane Stevenson (Conservative - Wolverhampton North East)
Culture, Media and Sport Committee Member since 19th October 2021
Simon Jupp Portrait
Simon Jupp (Conservative - East Devon)
Culture, Media and Sport Committee Member since 19th October 2021
Rupa Huq Portrait
Rupa Huq (Labour - Ealing Central and Acton)
Culture, Media and Sport Committee Member since 7th March 2022
Caroline Dinenage Portrait
Caroline Dinenage (Conservative - Gosport)
Culture, Media and Sport Committee Member since 17th May 2023
Alex Sobel Portrait
Alex Sobel (Labour (Co-op) - Leeds North West)
Culture, Media and Sport Committee Member since 15th January 2024
Culture, Media and Sport Committee: Previous Inquiries
Impact of Covid-19 on the charity sector Impact of Covid-19 on DCMS sectors Combatting doping in sport inquiry Impact of Brexit on UK Creative industries, tourism and The Single Digital Market inquiry Channel 4 Annual Report 2016 inquiry Sport governance inquiry The work of the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport inquiry BBC Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17 Disinformation and ‘fake news’ The work of Ofcom inquiry Live music inquiry The social impact of participation in culture and sport inquiry Appointment of the Chair of the Charity Commission Appointment of the Chair of Ofcom Wembley Stadium and the future of English football inquiry Immersive and addictive technologies inquiry Channel 4 Annual Report 2017 inquiry BBC Annual Report and Accounts 2017-18 inquiry The work of the Charity Commission inquiry BBC pay inquiry Channel 4 Annual Report 2018 inquiry Reality tv inquiry The future of English cricket inquiry BBC Annual Report 2018-19 and TV licences for over 75s inquiry The future of the National Lottery inquiry Administration of Football Clubs inquiry Garden tourism inquiry Lessons from the First World War Centenary inquiry Economics of music streaming Sport in our communities Connected tech: smart or sinister? Safety at major sporting events Non-fungible tokens (NFTs) and the blockchain Women's sport Gambling regulation Current issues in rugby union Minority languages Appointment of Richard Sharp as Chair of the BBC The future of UK music festivals British Film and High-End Television Grassroots music venues The work of the Charity Commission Broadband and the road to 5G The future of public service broadcasting Concussion in sport Administration of Football Clubs The future of English cricket Disinformation and ‘fake news’ Garden tourism Immersive and addictive technologies Channel 4 Annual Report 2018 BBC Annual Report 2018-19 and TV licences for over 75s Live music The future of the National Lottery The work of Ofcom Reality tv The Social Impact of Participation in Culture and Sport The work of the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Lessons from the First World War Centenary

50 most recent Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department

16th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what steps her Department is taking to support the grime music scene in urban centres across England.

The Government is committed to supporting our world leading music sector, including at a grassroots level across the country. Grime music projects have been successful in applying for the Arts Council England’s (ACE’s) Supporting Grassroots Music Fund, to which the government last year committed an additional £5 million, taking our total investment through the Fund to almost £15 million. The Fund enables grassroots music organisations including venues, rehearsal and recording studios, festivals and promoters from all music genres to increase support for young, emerging and more diverse artists, improve equipment and physical infrastructure, and support them to be more financially resilient.

The Government also supports our world leading music industry through a range of export support programmes, including the Music Export Growth Scheme (MEGS) co-funded by DCMS and DBT. MEGS has supported over 300 musical acts from a range of genres and backgrounds, including grime artists, to grow their international profile and exports in global markets. As part of the Creative Industries Sector Vision we announced that funding for MEGS will be tripled to £3.2 million over the next two years, helping to support more artists than ever before.

DCMS works closely with ACE to develop and invest in artistic and cultural experiences to enrich people's lives. ACE offers a range of grants and support offers, such as Developing Your Creative Practice and Project Grants, which are open to applicants from any music genre or background. DCMS officials continue to engage with a diverse range of stakeholders from across the music industry to better understand issues and concerns and to identify opportunities to support.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
7th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what recent assessment her Department has made of the potential merits of piloting alcohol sales in sight of pitch in (a) women’s, (b) National League and (c) League Two football.

As set out in “A sustainable future - reforming club football governance”, the Government acknowledges the case for pilots of alcohol sales in sight of the pitch in the lower leagues as set out in the Fan Led Review of Football Governance, and will continue to engage with a range of stakeholders on this.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
7th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, when her Department plans to publish the results of the Listed Events: Digital Rights Review.

We will set out more detail in due course.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
8th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, how much funding has been allocated to support deaf athletes at the elite level in each of the last five years.

The Government is dedicated to making sport in this country accessible and inclusive for everyone, including d/Deaf people.

Sport England has committed £1.2 million between 2022 and 2027 to UK Deaf Sport to boost deaf sport at the grassroots level and build wider participation. They have also agreed to explore a series of small-scale talent pilots for d/Deaf athletes. These pilots will see Sport England, National Governing Bodies, and UK Deaf Sport working together to explore support around elite competitions and suggest potential improvements.

UK Sport uses funding provided by the Government to support athletes with potential to achieve success in Olympic and Paralympic sports. As the Deaflympics falls outside of Olympic and Paralympic sport, UK Sport are therefore unable to fund athletes targeting this event. This is in line with the Government’s approach to other Paralympic sports where competition is not offered in an athlete's particular classification or discipline.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
8th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, whether his Department has undertaken an equality impact assessment on the effectiveness of access to elite sport funding pathways for deaf athletes.

The Government is dedicated to making sport in this country accessible and inclusive for everyone, including d/Deaf people.

Sport England has committed £1.2 million between 2022 and 2027 to UK Deaf Sport to boost deaf sport at the grassroots level and build wider participation. They have also agreed to explore a series of small-scale talent pilots for d/Deaf athletes. These pilots will see Sport England, National Governing Bodies, and UK Deaf Sport working together to explore support around elite competitions and suggest potential improvements.

UK Sport uses funding provided by the Government to support athletes with potential to achieve success in Olympic and Paralympic sports. As the Deaflympics falls outside of Olympic and Paralympic sport, UK Sport are therefore unable to fund athletes targeting this event. This is in line with the Government’s approach to other Paralympic sports where competition is not offered in an athlete's particular classification or discipline.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
6th Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay on 29 January (HL1664), when they expect to receive applications for the listing of gas lamps within Westminster, and what steps they will take to make public the outcome of those applications.

The Department for Culture Media and Sport has recently received the advice of Historic England on a number of these applications and protected four historic lamps by listing them at Grade II. These cases were assessed as part of a pilot group and Historic England, the Government's statutory advisor on heritage matters, is currently undertaking a series of wider listing assessments relating to gas lamps in Westminster. When this additional advice is received by the Department, each case will be carefully considered. Historic England is then responsible for notifying interested parties of the Minister's decision.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
7th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, how many times the National Physical Activity Taskforce has met since it was created; and what progress that taskforce has made towards achieving its targets set out in the Get Active strategy.

The National Physical Activity Taskforce (NPAT) was launched in September 2023 as part of the government sport strategy Get Active, to bring together government departments, the sport sector and independent experts to deliver coordinated and innovative policy that will help encourage people to get active.

The NPAT meets quarterly and has held two productive meetings since its launch, with the next meeting scheduled for March. To make the ambitions of the Sport Strategy a reality requires long term behavioural change and that is why we have set our targets to 2030.

To help reach our target to get 3.5 million more people active by 2030, the Government is investing over £400 million into a wide range of grassroots sports facilities, including park tennis courts and swimming pools between 2021 and 2025. This is on top of the £323m in Exchequer and Lottery Sport England funding provided to help get people active.

We map our trends, targets and trajectories using the Sport England Active Lives Survey, and the Active Lives Children and Young People Survey, which provides data and insight into activity levels and behaviours. The NPAT commissions short term-actions and milestones that can be measured to supplement our long term targets. The minutes and actions of each meeting are published on gov.uk.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
7th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what steps the Department is taking to support amateur boxing.

Supporting grassroots sport is a key Government priority and we are committed to ensuring everyone has the opportunity to be able to play sport and be active. Our new strategy ‘Get Active’ sets out our unapologetic ambition to build a more active nation, with a target to get 3.5 million more people classed as ‘active’ by 2030.

We provide the majority of support for grassroots sport through our Arm’s Length Body, Sport England, which receives £323m in Exchequer and Lottery funding each year. Since 2020, Sport England has provided over £11.9m of investment into projects which facilitate participation in boxing. This includes £6.3m of system partner funding which has been provided to England Boxing to grow and develop boxing across the country between 2022 and 2027. England boxing has a team of club support officers based around the country who provide guidance to grassroots clubs looking to secure funding for new projects.

In addition to this UKSport have invested just over £12m in Team GB amateur boxers during the Paris investment Cycle.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
7th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, whether her Department has had discussions with representatives from professional boxing organisations on investing in grassroots boxing.

Supporting grassroots sport is a key Government priority and we are committed to ensuring everyone has the opportunity to be able to play sport and be active. Our new strategy ‘Get Active’ sets out our unapologetic ambition to build a more active nation, with a target to get 3.5 million more people classed as ‘active’ by 2030.

We provide the majority of support for grassroots sport through our Arm’s Length Body, Sport England, which receives £323m in Exchequer and Lottery funding each year. Since 2020, Sport England has provided over £11.9m of investment into projects which facilitate participation in boxing. This includes £6.3m of system partner funding which has been provided to England Boxing to grow and develop boxing across the country between 2022 and 2027. England boxing has a team of club support officers based around the country who provide guidance to grassroots clubs looking to secure funding for new projects.

In addition to this UKSport have invested just over £12m in Team GB amateur boxers during the Paris investment Cycle.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
6th Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to ensure the long-term survival of Bevis Marks Synagogue at its current site, in the light of its listed status and historical importance to the Jewish community.

Listing recognises the special architectural or historic interest of a building, and ensures that the conservation of its significance is given particularly careful consideration by local planning authorities through the planning and listed building consent processes. The Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities has the power to call in applications for planning permission or listed building consent.

The Bevis Marks Synagogue in the City of London was listed at Grade I in 1950, reflecting its status as the oldest synagogue in Great Britain, and among the oldest in continuous use in Europe. It is one of the most splendid architecturally, as well as being a place of religious and cultural significance.

Historic England is a statutory consultee in relation to applications planning permission or listed building consent relating to Grade I-listed buildings. It is working closely with the Synagogue and the City of London Corporation to ensure that commercial growth in the City is achieved without harm to the Synagogue. As a result of its negotiations with Historic England the City Corporation recently designated a conservation area around the Synagogue and is now considering a specific policy for the protection of the Synagogue’s immediate setting.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
9th Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with the Gaelic Athletic Association with regard to increasing the £15 million intended to contribute towards the redevelopment of Casement Park in Belfast; and how much the overall project is currently estimated to cost.

The Department for Communities in Northern Ireland is responsible for the procurement process for the redevelopment of Casement Park, including direct engagement with local partners on their funding contributions.

We are working closely with partners in Northern Ireland to make sure that EURO 2028 leaves a lasting legacy across the whole United Kingdom.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
8th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what progress she has made in appointing an interim chair of S4C.

An interim appointment will be announced in due course, following consultation with the S4C board and the Welsh Government. He or she will fulfil the role from 1 April, when Mr Williams steps down, until a new permanent Chairman is appointed. This is consistent with the S4C Board’s standing orders.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
8th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, when she plans to advertise the role of S4C chair.

Preparations are being made to launch the process to appoint a new Chairman of S4C and the role will be advertised in due course. This will be a fair and open process, run in accordance with the Governance Code on Public Appointments.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
8th Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the success of commercial radio in the UK.

His Majesty’s Government strongly supports a vibrant radio sector, including national and local commercial stations as well as community stations and the BBC, which between them provide a rich variety of choice for listeners across the UK.

The UK’s commercial radio sector now accounts for approximately 55% of radio listening in the UK, according to figures published by RAJAR for Quarter 4 2023, with 39 million people tuning in to national or local commercial stations at least once a week. This compares to 42% of radio listening and 34 million listeners in Quarter 4 2013. The growth in commercial radio listening over the past 10 years is thanks to the investment the sector has made to develop and grow new services and its ability to adapt what it offers to listeners on digital radio or via internet-connected devices such as smart speakers.

The measures in the Media Bill to reduce regulatory burdens on commercial radio and to secure protections for the carriage of radio on smart speaker devices are intended to help support and secure commercial radio’s long-term future.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
8th Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what guidelines, policies, or codes of conduct exist that govern the remuneration provided to artists engaged by UK National Museums and Galleries; and what mechanisms are in place to monitor and enforce adherence to these standards.

Creative and cultural practitioners are vital to the work of our museums and galleries: they bring independent visions and ideas, and offer highly developed specialist skills to the work of these institutions.

As the national museums and galleries operate at arm’s length from His Majesty's Government, the Department does not monitor payments made to artists or any other people working as contractors or freelancers at them.

While the Government has no plans to introduce a code of conduct, Arts Council England — the publicly-funded development agency for the arts and museums — has produced guidance outlining best practice for working with freelancers, without whom so much of the creative and cultural sectors could not operate. This is complemented by guidance from sector organisations such as the Museums Association.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
8th Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government whether they plan to introduce a code of conduct to ensure that the remuneration provided to artists engaged by UK National Museums and Galleries meets or exceeds the national minimum living wage.

Creative and cultural practitioners are vital to the work of our museums and galleries: they bring independent visions and ideas, and offer highly developed specialist skills to the work of these institutions.

As the national museums and galleries operate at arm’s length from His Majesty's Government, the Department does not monitor payments made to artists or any other people working as contractors or freelancers at them.

While the Government has no plans to introduce a code of conduct, Arts Council England — the publicly-funded development agency for the arts and museums — has produced guidance outlining best practice for working with freelancers, without whom so much of the creative and cultural sectors could not operate. This is complemented by guidance from sector organisations such as the Museums Association.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
8th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what events will be held in Northern Ireland to launch the Big Help Out in 2024.

My department is funding and supporting the launch of the 2024 Big Help Out, taking place 7 - 9 June this year, aiming to raise awareness of volunteering and to provide opportunities for people to support their communities.

The Government does not organise events itself, but we understand that plans are in development for the Big Help Out in Northern Ireland with Volunteer Now supporting Shaping the Future member organisations to host two events in Belfast and Enniskillen on 7 June 2024.

Millions of people took part in last year’s Big Help Out with a huge range of charities and voluntary organisations providing people with the opportunity to try out and experience volunteering. All 11 local government districts in Northern Ireland participated last year.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
6th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, if she will have discussions with representatives of Britannia Hotels on the impact of the closure of Pontins Holiday Parks on (a) staff, (b) local tourism and (c) community organisations using the parks for events.

Holiday parks are a key part of the UK’s tourism landscape and enjoyed by many visitors around the country, as well as being important local employers and bringing wider benefits to regional visitor economies.

As a department, we are therefore concerned about the closures of Pontins sites at Prestatyn Sands, Camber Sands and Southport, particularly with regards to supporting staff from those sites who no longer have roles, as well as tourism businesses who rely on the secondary spend of visitors to Pontins.

The Culture Secretary has set out her concerns around job losses and the impact on the local tourism sector in written correspondence with Britannia, and requested a meeting to discuss.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
6th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, whether her Department has had recent discussions with the BBC board on impartiality in its news coverage of the conflict in Gaza.

The Department for Culture, Media and Sport’s Ministerial team regularly meets with BBC leadership, including members of the Board, to discuss a range of issues.

The BBC has a duty to provide accurate and impartial news and information. In delivering that duty, the BBC is editorially and operationally independent and decisions around its editorial policies and guidelines are a matter for the BBC. Ofcom is the external independent regulator responsible for ensuring BBC coverage is duly impartial and accurate under the Broadcasting Code and BBC Charter.

The Secretary of State has repeatedly made clear that the BBC’s accuracy and impartiality is critical to viewer trust. It is particularly important when it comes to coverage of highly sensitive events, such as the terrorist acts committed in Israel on 7 October and the ongoing conflict in Gaza. The Secretary of State has regularly stated that point in meetings with the BBC.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
6th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment she has made of trends in the number of youth clubs available to young people since 2010.

The Department for Culture, Media and Sport does not hold the data requested. Local authorities have a statutory duty to secure, so far as is reasonably practicable, sufficient provision of educational and recreational leisure-time activities for young people in their area. This is funded from the Local Government settlement, which is due to rise to more than £64 billion in 2024-25. We have worked with local authorities and with the youth sector to update the statutory guidance that underpins local authorities’ duty to support them in adequately meeting the needs of young people.

The Government recognises the vital role that youth services and activities play in improving the life chances and wellbeing of young people, which is why we have committed to the National Youth Guarantee. This includes the delivery of up to 300 new and refurbished youth spaces and services in left behind areas through the Youth Investment Fund, totalling over £300 million.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
6th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, whether her Department’s research on charity lottery sales and prize limits will assess the case for removing sales limits.

As set out in the response to WPQ 203179, the annual sales limits for charity lotteries were reviewed 12 months after the reforms were implemented in 2020. The review concluded it was too soon to reach any firm view on the impact of the reforms, and that more data on the growth of the sector was needed before considering any further changes.

The department will continue to look closely at this, and work closely with the Gambling Commission to keep the sector and research regarding charity lottery sales and prize limits under review.

I have committed to commissioning independent research, and we are currently considering a range of options in discussion with the Gambling Commission.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
5th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, which listed places of worship in (a) Lincolnshire and (b) South Holland and the Deepings constituency have received funding since 2017; and how much each received.

The Listed Places of Worship Grant Scheme, jointly funded by HM Treasury and the Department for Culture, Media and Sport to provide up to £42 million per annum, was established to provide grants towards VAT paid on repairs and maintenance to the nation's listed places of worship. Through this scheme, 1,177 grants have been awarded to places of worship in Lincolnshire since 2017, amounting to a total of £3,882,071. In the South Holland and the Deepings constituency, 130 grants have been awarded since 2017, amounting to a total of £323,285.

A dataset showing a full list of grant scheme recipients — including those in both Lincolnshire, and the South Holland and the Deepings constituency — since August 2022 is available here on gov.uk.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
5th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, pursuant to the Answer of 31 January 2024 to Question 11396 on Department for Culture, Media and Sport: Ministers' Private Offices, what the cost of the refurbishment was.

The cost of the refurbishment in 2022 was £15,336.92.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
5th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what steps her Department is taking to help support people in freelance creative professions.

The Government recognises the essential contribution freelancers make to the creative industries.

A key ambition of the Creative Industries Sector Vision, published in June 2023, is to improve the job quality and working practice of the sector, including the self-employed. As part of this ambition, Government and industry have agreed to work together to address the recommendations of the Good Work Review. An action plan is being developed and proposals include the recent launch of the British Film Institute’s £1.5 million Good Work Programme for screen.

Arts Council England’s current Delivery Plan includes ‘increasing our support for individuals’ as one of its five themes and sets high expectations for all cultural organisations which work with creative and cultural professionals. Its online toolkits support practitioners and employers by setting out good-practice approaches, and signposting people to other supportive resources.

Universal Credit and Jobcentre Plus support is available to those who are looking for work, and those who are in work but with low earnings, and this includes the self-employed. This support is available to all, regardless of sector.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
5th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, if she will make an assessment of the trends in the level of freelance employment in creative industries in the next five years; whether her Department is taking steps to help support growth in freelance employment in the sector; and if she will make an assessment with Cabinet colleagues of the potential merits of introducing social security programmes to help support freelance employees in the sector.

The Government recognises the essential contribution freelancers make to the creative industries.

A key ambition of the Creative Industries Sector Vision, published in June 2023, is to improve the job quality and working practice of the sector, including the self-employed. As part of this ambition, Government and industry have agreed to work together to address the recommendations of the Good Work Review. An action plan is being developed and proposals include the recent launch of the British Film Institute’s £1.5 million Good Work Programme for screen.

Arts Council England’s current Delivery Plan includes ‘increasing our support for individuals’ as one of its five themes and sets high expectations for all cultural organisations which work with creative and cultural professionals. Its online toolkits support practitioners and employers by setting out good-practice approaches, and signposting people to other supportive resources.

Universal Credit and Jobcentre Plus support is available to those who are looking for work, and those who are in work but with low earnings, and this includes the self-employed. This support is available to all, regardless of sector.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
5th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what discussions she has had with representatives of the film production industry on the standards of recruitment within the film industry.

There is regular discussion between the government and film industry at both Ministerial and official level on a range of topics, including on workforce and skills issues.

The Creative Industries Sector Vision sets out this Government’s ambitions, shared with industry, to support this high-growth sector up to 2030. The second chapter of the Sector Vision focuses on the creative workforce and includes our 2030 job quality objective: that all parts of the creative industries are recognised for offering high quality jobs, ensuring a resilient and productive workforce that reflects the whole of the UK. It is vital therefore that we ensure the right recruitment practices are in place to support the sector.

The Good Work Review, published in February 2023 by the Creative Industries Policy and Evidence Centre, was co-funded by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport and is the first sectoral deep dive of its kind into job quality and working practice in the creative industries. We have committed to, together with industry, set out an action plan to assess the recommendations of the review - including developing and reporting on recruitment practices.

To play their part in responding to the recommendations set out in the Good Work Review, the BFI has allocated £1,500,000 of National Lottery funds to a Good Work Programme for Screen. The programme aims to create a ‘one stop shop’ where businesses and individuals can access key resources, advice, support, and training to strengthen recruitment, management, and HR practices; build more inclusive workplaces; and aid workforce productivity.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
31st Jan 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government how many people aged (1) 20–30, (2) 31–40, (3) 41–50, (4) 51–60, (5) 61–75, and (6) 76 and over, were prosecuted in (a) 2021, (b) 2022, and (c) 2023, for non-payment of their TV licences.

The requirement to hold, and pay for, a television licence is set out in the Communications Act 2003 and the Communications (Television Licensing) Regulations 2004. Under the Communications Act 2003, the BBC is responsible for the collection and enforcement of the TV licensing system.

The Ministry of Justice currently publishes the number of prosecutions, convictions, and sentencing outcomes for the non-payment of TV licence fees annually as part of its quarterly criminal justice statistics, which can be viewed here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/criminal-justice-statistics-quarterly

The figures are not broken down in the exact age groups requested. A breakdown of people proceeded against for TV licence evasion in England and Wales broken down by the age groups provided in the Ministry of Justice’s figures is below:

21-29

2021 - 9,767

2022 - 7,498

2023 - 5,705

30-39

2021 - 18,635

2022 - 16,273

2023 - 13,139

40-49

2021 - 12,804

2022 - 11,712

2023 - 9,790

50-59

2021 - 8,337

2022 - 8,050

2023 - 6,927

60-69

2021 - 3,042

2022 - 3,071

2023 - 2,931

70+

2021 - 269

2022 - 279

2023 - 266

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
6th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, if she will make an estimate of the number of underage people that use (a) gambling apps and (b) online gambling.

The Gambling Commission’s ‘Young People and Gambling’ report has measured gambling behaviour in children since 2014. The latest edition for 2023 can be found here.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
1st Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what action they plan to take, if any, to tackle the ability of computer games players to ‘cash out’ loot box prizes through online platforms such as the Steam Community Market.

His Majesty’s Government and the Gambling Commission continue to monitor the convergence of video games and gambling closely. The majority of loot box rewards do not have a monetary value, cannot be cashed out, and are of value only in the context of a given game. They do not therefore meet the definition of gambling as set out in the Gambling Act 2005. All operators providing gambling services to consumers in Britain require a licence from the Gambling Commission. Offering any gambling activity without a licence is an offence. The Gambling Commission has demonstrated that it will take strong regulatory action where video game products do amount to unlicensed gambling, including in instances when the trading of items obtained from loot boxes brings loot box mechanics within the statutory definitions of gambling.

In July 2023, UK Interactive Entertainment published new, industry-led guidance on loot boxes. HM Government welcomes this guidance, which, if fully implemented, has the potential to meet the objectives set out in the Government’s response to our call for evidence on loot boxes, published in July 2022. We have agreed a 12-month implementation period during which we expect the industry to work with players, parents, academics, consumer groups and Government bodies to implement this guidance in full.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
1st Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what action they plan to take, if any, against gaming companies that generate transferable loot boxes, or loot box content that can be transferred.

His Majesty’s Government and the Gambling Commission continue to monitor the convergence of video games and gambling closely. The majority of loot box rewards do not have a monetary value, cannot be cashed out, and are of value only in the context of a given game. They do not therefore meet the definition of gambling as set out in the Gambling Act 2005. All operators providing gambling services to consumers in Britain require a licence from the Gambling Commission. Offering any gambling activity without a licence is an offence. The Gambling Commission has demonstrated that it will take strong regulatory action where video game products do amount to unlicensed gambling, including in instances when the trading of items obtained from loot boxes brings loot box mechanics within the statutory definitions of gambling.

In July 2023, UK Interactive Entertainment published new, industry-led guidance on loot boxes. HM Government welcomes this guidance, which, if fully implemented, has the potential to meet the objectives set out in the Government’s response to our call for evidence on loot boxes, published in July 2022. We have agreed a 12-month implementation period during which we expect the industry to work with players, parents, academics, consumer groups and Government bodies to implement this guidance in full.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
31st Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, if she will have discussions with local authorities on the long-term effect of the speaking of Welsh of inter-library loan charges for Welsh language books.

Public libraries are funded and run by local authorities. It is for each local authority to determine operational matters such as its stock management policy, including participation in an inter-library loan service. This is a co-operative and voluntary agreement among libraries which allows books and other materials from one library to be loaned out to a user from another.

Library services providing an inter-library loan service can apply charges for all book titles requested for borrowing from other library services, and are not limited to Welsh language books.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
1st Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, if she will make an assessment of the potential implications for her policies of the study by Gabriel A. Brooks and Luke Clark entitled, The gamblers of the future? Migration from loot boxes to gambling in a longitudinal study of young adults, published in Computers in Human Behaviour, volume 141, in April 2023.

His Majesty’s Government struck a balanced and evidence-led approach in our review of gambling regulation. We continue to monitor research, and have carefully considered the findings in this study. We recognise that there is a growing body of research that provides evidence of an association between loot box purchases and gambling activity, as well as evidence of a link with a variety of harms, including harmful gambling. However, research has not established whether a causal relationship exists, and there are a range of plausible explanations.

In order to address gaps in research around these and similar areas, we have developed and published the Video Games Research Framework to support high quality independent research into video games, including loot boxes. We are also introducing a statutory levy charged to gambling operators which will raise trusted, long-term funding for gambling research. We are clear that we will continue to look carefully at any further research that results from that and take action if necessary.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
31st Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, if she will take steps to include anti-racism teaching in the objectives of the independent regulator for English football.

The Regulator’s primary strategic purpose will be to ensure that English football is financially sustainable for the benefit of fans and the local communities football clubs serve. This approach was set out in the football governance white paper, the Government’s subsequent consultation response, and the Government’s response to the Culture, Media and Sport Select Committee’s report on football governance. As such, the Regulator will focus on the financial sustainability of clubs, the financial resilience of the football pyramid, and safeguarding club heritage. Industry is therefore best placed to lead on such issues, and I continue to engage closely with football authorities on these important topics.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
1st Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, if she will make an assessment of the implications for her policies on gambling regulation of (a) Omaze and (b) other companies that engage in lottery-style giveaways outside of the scope of existing regulation.

The Gambling White Paper, published in April 2023, set out the Government's intention to explore the potential for regulating types of large prize draws, which resemble society lotteries, but are not regulated as gambling products. Because these products are not regulated there is currently limited information about the sector. As stated in the response to PQ 152, the department has also commissioned independent researchers to gather evidence about the size and nature of the prize draw sector, including its role in charity funding, risks and player protection and understanding. The research consists of an AI-powered web scrape, together with industry surveys and operator engagement. The research will conclude shortly and will inform a consultation on potential regulation in due course.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
5th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, pursuant to the Answer of 1 February 2024 to Question 11912, how many local authority swimming pools have opened in each region in each year since 2015.

245 local authority swimming pools have opened since 2015. The breakdown per region is as follows:

  • East Midlands: 27

  • Eastern: 21

  • London: 36

  • North East: 15

  • North West: 29

  • South East: 44

  • South West: 20

  • West Midlands: 28

  • Yorkshire and the Humber: 25

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
1st Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, whether she plans to bring forward legislative proposals to prevent the Civil Procedure Rule Committee making rules of court that would implement the recommendations in paragraphs 73 and 74 of Part L of the Leveson Report.

The Government is not proposing to instruct the Civil Procedure Rule Committee to amend rules of court to support the commencement and implementation of section 40 of the Crime and Courts Act 2013. This aligns with its commitment to repeal section 40.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
5th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, how many people were prosecuted for TV licence evasion in England in 2023.

The requirement to hold, and pay for, a TV Licence is set out in the Communications Act 2003 and the Communications (Television Licensing) Regulations 2004. Under the Communications Act 2003, the BBC is responsible for the collection and enforcement of the TV licensing system.

The Ministry of Justice currently publishes the number of prosecutions, convictions and sentencing outcomes for the non-payment of TV licence fees annually as part of their criminal justice statistics quarterly publications, which can be viewed here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/criminal-justice-statistics-quarterly.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
31st Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, whether she plans to bring forward legislative proposals to ensure freelance workers in the music industry receive the same protections from discrimination as employees.

The Government recognises the essential contribution freelancers make to the creative industries, including music.

Freelancers are already entitled to a number of legal rights at work, including protection against discrimination in the workplace, and the right to a safe working environment.

Everyone, including freelance workers, should be able to work without fear of harassment, discrimination or violence. The Government recognises that allegations of bullying, harassment and discrimination have been made in creative sub-sectors, including from freelancers. As outlined in our Creative Industries Sector Vision, the Government welcomes industry's progress on promoting fair treatment and addressing bullying, harassment and discrimination across the creative industries. This includes the work led by Creative UK, and the formation of the Creative Industries Independent Standards Authority (CIISA), established by the industry to address BHD and provide trusted support and advice, particularly tailored to meet the needs of freelancers.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
31st Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment the Government has made of the adequacy of the UK Interactive Entertainment principles and guidance on loot boxes; and what steps she plans to take to help ensure compliance with that guidance.

Following the Government response to the call for evidence on loot boxes in video games, the Government has welcomed new industry-led guidance that aims to address the concerns identified for all players, including young people.

Measures to protect players should ensure that the purchase of loot boxes should be unavailable to all children and young people unless enabled by a parent or guardian, and all players should have access to, and be aware of, spending controls and transparent information to support safe and responsible gameplay.

The Government has agreed a 12-month implementation period for the new guidance on loot boxes and has asked the industry, coordinated by Ukie, to report back to DCMS on the extent to which it has been implemented.

We will continue to keep our position on possible future legislative options under review, informed by academic scrutiny of the industry-led measures. We will provide a further update in due course, following the 12-month implementation period.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
31st Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what steps her Department plans to take to help ensure that the gaming industry complies with voluntary or self-regulatory measures to prevent gambling harms.

Following the Government response to the call for evidence on loot boxes in video games, the Government has welcomed new industry-led guidance that aims to address the concerns identified for all players, including young people.

Measures to protect players should ensure that the purchase of loot boxes should be unavailable to all children and young people unless enabled by a parent or guardian, and all players should have access to, and be aware of, spending controls and transparent information to support safe and responsible gameplay.

The Government has agreed a 12-month implementation period for the new guidance on loot boxes and has asked the industry, coordinated by Ukie, to report back to DCMS on the extent to which it has been implemented.

We will continue to keep our position on possible future legislative options under review, informed by academic scrutiny of the industry-led measures. We will provide a further update in due course, following the 12-month implementation period.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
31st Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, whether the she plans to bring forward legislative proposals to regulate loot boxes.

Following the Government response to the call for evidence on loot boxes in video games, the Government has welcomed new industry-led guidance that aims to address the concerns identified for all players, including young people.

Measures to protect players should ensure that the purchase of loot boxes should be unavailable to all children and young people unless enabled by a parent or guardian, and all players should have access to, and be aware of, spending controls and transparent information to support safe and responsible gameplay.

The Government has agreed a 12-month implementation period for the new guidance on loot boxes and has asked the industry, coordinated by Ukie, to report back to DCMS on the extent to which it has been implemented.

We will continue to keep our position on possible future legislative options under review, informed by academic scrutiny of the industry-led measures. We will provide a further update in due course, following the 12-month implementation period.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
31st Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, whether she has made an assessment of the relationship between (a) the use of in-game loot boxes and (b) the likelihood of future gambling related harms amongst young people.

Following the Government response to the call for evidence on loot boxes in video games, the Government has welcomed new industry-led guidance that aims to address the concerns identified for all players, including young people.

Measures to protect players should ensure that the purchase of loot boxes should be unavailable to all children and young people unless enabled by a parent or guardian, and all players should have access to, and be aware of, spending controls and transparent information to support safe and responsible gameplay.

The Government has agreed a 12-month implementation period for the new guidance on loot boxes and has asked the industry, coordinated by Ukie, to report back to DCMS on the extent to which it has been implemented.

We will continue to keep our position on possible future legislative options under review, informed by academic scrutiny of the industry-led measures. We will provide a further update in due course, following the 12-month implementation period.

Under the Gambling Act 2005, gambling is defined as playing a game of chance for a prize of money or money’s worth. The prizes that can be won via most loot boxes do not have a monetary value, cannot be cashed-out, and are of value only within the context of the game. They therefore do not meet that definition. As set out in the Government’s response to the call for evidence, there are also a number of disadvantages to changing the definition of gambling including the likelihood of capturing unintended activities, creating logistical difficulties in increasing the remit of the Gambling Commission, and undermining gambling taxation.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
31st Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, on what evidential basis the decision not to define loot boxes as gambling as part of the Gambling White Paper was made.

Following the Government response to the call for evidence on loot boxes in video games, the Government has welcomed new industry-led guidance that aims to address the concerns identified for all players, including young people.

Measures to protect players should ensure that the purchase of loot boxes should be unavailable to all children and young people unless enabled by a parent or guardian, and all players should have access to, and be aware of, spending controls and transparent information to support safe and responsible gameplay.

The Government has agreed a 12-month implementation period for the new guidance on loot boxes and has asked the industry, coordinated by Ukie, to report back to DCMS on the extent to which it has been implemented.

We will continue to keep our position on possible future legislative options under review, informed by academic scrutiny of the industry-led measures. We will provide a further update in due course, following the 12-month implementation period.

Under the Gambling Act 2005, gambling is defined as playing a game of chance for a prize of money or money’s worth. The prizes that can be won via most loot boxes do not have a monetary value, cannot be cashed-out, and are of value only within the context of the game. They therefore do not meet that definition. As set out in the Government’s response to the call for evidence, there are also a number of disadvantages to changing the definition of gambling including the likelihood of capturing unintended activities, creating logistical difficulties in increasing the remit of the Gambling Commission, and undermining gambling taxation.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
31st Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, whether her Department plans to take steps to help prevent prevent a potential normalisation of gambling among young people via loot boxes in Apps and video games.

Following the Government response to the call for evidence on loot boxes in video games, the Government has welcomed new industry-led guidance that aims to address the concerns identified for all players, including young people.

Measures to protect players should ensure that the purchase of loot boxes should be unavailable to all children and young people unless enabled by a parent or guardian, and all players should have access to, and be aware of, spending controls and transparent information to support safe and responsible gameplay.

The Government has agreed a 12-month implementation period for the new guidance on loot boxes and has asked the industry, coordinated by Ukie, to report back to DCMS on the extent to which it has been implemented.

We will continue to keep our position on possible future legislative options under review, informed by academic scrutiny of the industry-led measures. We will provide a further update in due course, following the 12-month implementation period.

Under the Gambling Act 2005, gambling is defined as playing a game of chance for a prize of money or money’s worth. The prizes that can be won via most loot boxes do not have a monetary value, cannot be cashed-out, and are of value only within the context of the game. They therefore do not meet that definition. As set out in the Government’s response to the call for evidence, there are also a number of disadvantages to changing the definition of gambling including the likelihood of capturing unintended activities, creating logistical difficulties in increasing the remit of the Gambling Commission, and undermining gambling taxation.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
1st Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, if she will take steps to place further restrictions on the advertisement of alcohol.

The Advertising Standards Authority (ASA), which operates independently of government, is responsible for regulating advertising in the UK across traditional forms of media such as print, radio and TV, as well as online. It administers the Advertising Codes of Practice, which are drawn up by the Committee of Advertising Practice (CAP) and Broadcast Committee of Advertising Practice (BCAP).

The Advertising Codes impose a wide range of restrictions to ensure that alcohol advertising is responsible and not targeted at children. These include that adverts must not link alcohol with social or sexual success, imply that it is indispensable or include elements that appeal particularly to people under 18. Online platforms have also introduced stringent measures to monitor alcohol ads and ensure safe advertising, such as age gating and age verification.

The packaging of alcoholic drinks is overseen by the Portman Group, the social responsibility body and regulator for alcohol labelling, packaging and promotion in the UK, which operates its Codes of Practice to ensure that alcohol is marketed in a socially responsible way, only to those aged 18 and over, and in a way that does not appeal particularly to those who are vulnerable.

The Government’s Online Advertising Programme aims to increase protections for children and young people under 18 from online exposure to advertisements for products and services that are illegal to be sold to them, and we will consult further in due course.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
1st Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, if she will make an assessment of the potential merits of placing further restrictions on advertising on the packaging of alcoholic drinks.

The Advertising Standards Authority (ASA), which operates independently of government, is responsible for regulating advertising in the UK across traditional forms of media such as print, radio and TV, as well as online. It administers the Advertising Codes of Practice, which are drawn up by the Committee of Advertising Practice (CAP) and Broadcast Committee of Advertising Practice (BCAP).

The Advertising Codes impose a wide range of restrictions to ensure that alcohol advertising is responsible and not targeted at children. These include that adverts must not link alcohol with social or sexual success, imply that it is indispensable or include elements that appeal particularly to people under 18. Online platforms have also introduced stringent measures to monitor alcohol ads and ensure safe advertising, such as age gating and age verification.

The packaging of alcoholic drinks is overseen by the Portman Group, the social responsibility body and regulator for alcohol labelling, packaging and promotion in the UK, which operates its Codes of Practice to ensure that alcohol is marketed in a socially responsible way, only to those aged 18 and over, and in a way that does not appeal particularly to those who are vulnerable.

The Government’s Online Advertising Programme aims to increase protections for children and young people under 18 from online exposure to advertisements for products and services that are illegal to be sold to them, and we will consult further in due course.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
31st Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, with reference to the Second Report of the Women and Equalities Committee of Session 2023-24 on Misogyny in music, what steps is her Department taking to tackle (a) misogyny and (b) sexual harassment in the music industry.

The Government welcomes the publication of the Women and Equalities Committee’s report on Misogyny in Music, and thanks the committee for their work. My department is carefully considering the recommendations made by the committee and will respond in full by the deadline provided.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
30th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, whether she has made an assessment of the (a) long-term viability and (b) economic sustainability of freelance journalism.

Journalists, including freelancers, play an important role in holding power to account and keeping the public informed by providing reliable, high-quality information.

As the independent Cairncross Review into the future of journalism identified, society is increasingly moving online and news publishers are facing significant challenges in transitioning to sustainable digital business models, particularly at local level - and this presents challenges both for publishers and the freelancers that they contract.

The Government is taking action to support journalists. We set up the National Committee for the Safety of Journalists (NCSJ) in 2020, bringing together government, representatives bodies for journalists, police and prosecuting authorities as well as civil society groups to improve ways journalists, especially freelancers, can be supported and given the resources and training they need and set this our in the 2021 National Action Plan for the Safety of Journalists.

We are also supporting the news publishers that employ or contract journalists. To date, this support has included the introduction of the Digital Markets, Competition and Consumer Bill, which among many other things will help to rebalance the relationship between publishers and platforms; the delivery of a £2 million Future News Fund, designed to invest in new technological prototypes, start-ups and innovative business models to explore new ways of sustaining the industry in this changing landscape; the zero rating of VAT on e-newspapers; the extension of a 2017 business rates relief on local newspaper office space until 2025; We continue to consider all possible options in the interests of promoting and sustaining news journalism.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
30th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, how many ministerial red boxes belonging to her Department have been reported (a) lost and (b) stolen in each of the last three years.

No ministerial red boxes belonging to the Department for Culture, Media and Sport were reported lost or stolen between 2021 and 2023.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)