Kevin Hollinrake Portrait

Kevin Hollinrake

Conservative - Thirsk and Malton



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Division Votes
Wednesday 9th June 2021
Information Commissioner (Remuneration)
voted Aye - in line with the party majority
One of 359 Conservative Aye votes vs 0 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 369 Noes - 2
Speeches
Wednesday 14th July 2021
Health and Care Bill

My right hon. Friend has set out his plans to introduce a plan for social care by the end of …

Written Answers
Tuesday 27th July 2021
National Crime Agency: Staff
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many full-time equivalent staff have been employed by the …
Early Day Motions
Monday 23rd October 2017
THE BLACK SWAN
That this House congratulates The Black Swan at Oldstead, North Yorkshire, on being named the best restaurant in the world; …
Bills
Tuesday 12th January 2021
Abolition of Business Rates Bill 2019-21
A Bill to abolish business rates; and for connected purposes.
MP Financial Interests
Monday 17th May 2021
7. (ii) Other shareholdings, valued at more than £70,000
Until 19 March 2021, Hunters Property plc; estate agents. (Registered 05 June 2015; updated 26 April 2021)
EDM signed
Tuesday 16th June 2020
China's new National Security Law for Hong Kong
That this House notes with surprise and concern the decision by HSBC Bank Plc and Standard Chartered Plc to support …
Supported Legislation
Wednesday 5th February 2020
Education (Guidance about Costs of School Uniforms) Act 2021
A Bill to make provision for guidance to schools about the costs aspects of school uniform policies.

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Kevin Hollinrake has voted in 286 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
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Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
John Glen (Conservative)
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
(24 debate interactions)
Steve Barclay (Conservative)
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
(18 debate interactions)
Paul Scully (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
(15 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
HM Treasury
(139 debate contributions)
Department of Health and Social Care
(27 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Kevin Hollinrake's debates

Thirsk and Malton Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petitions with highest Thirsk and Malton signature proportion
Petitions with most Thirsk and Malton signatures
Petition Debates Contributed

Matthew was taken to, ‘a place of safety’, and died 7 days later.
24 others died by the same means, dating back to the year 2000. An indicator that little was done to address the growing problems.
Something went terribly wrong with the NHS Mental Health Services provided to my son.


Latest EDMs signed by Kevin Hollinrake

16th June 2020
Kevin Hollinrake signed this EDM on Tuesday 16th June 2020

China's new National Security Law for Hong Kong

Tabled by: Andrew Rosindell (Conservative - Romford)
That this House notes with surprise and concern the decision by HSBC Bank Plc and Standard Chartered Plc to support China’s proposals for a new National Security Law in Hong Kong; recognises that financial institutions, particularly those enjoying the benefits and protections of being based in the UK, have a …
21 signatures
(Most recent: 15 Sep 2020)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 5
Scottish National Party: 4
Democratic Unionist Party: 4
Conservative: 3
Liberal Democrat: 2
Independent: 1
Green Party: 1
Alba Party: 1
8th April 2019
Kevin Hollinrake signed this EDM on Monday 8th April 2019

ANTISEMITISM

Tabled by: Lord Mann (None - Bassetlaw)
That this House notes the contribution of one million euros made by Borussia Dortmund Football Club towards the expansion of Yad Vashem Holocaust memorial in Israel; congratulates the club for their commitment to the memory of the Holocaust and their ongoing action against modern day antisemitism; highlights an example of …
74 signatures
(Most recent: 3 Sep 2019)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 45
Conservative: 8
Independent: 6
Scottish National Party: 5
Liberal Democrat: 4
Non-affiliated: 2
Democratic Unionist Party: 2
Plaid Cymru: 1
Crossbench: 1
The Independent Group for Change: 1
View All Kevin Hollinrake's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Kevin Hollinrake, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Kevin Hollinrake has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Kevin Hollinrake has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

3 Bills introduced by Kevin Hollinrake


A Bill to make provision about leave and pay for employees whose children have died.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Thursday 13th September 2018 and was enacted into law.


A Bill to make provision about the property and affairs of missing persons; and for connected purposes.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Thursday 27th April 2017 and was enacted into law.


A Bill to abolish business rates; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading (Commons)
Tuesday 12th January 2021

81 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
13th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he has plans to create a single, independent regulatory body for insolvency practitioners before his power to do so expires in 2022 in accordance with the Small Business, Enterprise and Employment Act 2015.

The Government has conducted a call for evidence on Insolvency Practitioner regulation, which included seeking evidence and views on possible reforms of the regulatory framework. The Government will publish its response in due course.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent improvements he has made to the whistleblowing regime; when he plans to begin his review of whistleblowing legislation; and what plans he has for a public consultation once that review has been completed.

The Government remains committed to reviewing the UK whistleblowing framework and will carry this out once sufficient time has passed for there to be the necessary evidence available to assess the impact of the most recent reforms. The scope and timing of such a review will be confirmed in due course.

The most recent change introduced in 2017 was a new legislative requirement for most prescribed persons to produce an annual report on whistleblowing disclosures made to them by workers.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
23rd Mar 2021
What steps his Department is taking to increase renewable energy production.

The Government aims to deliver up to double the renewable electricity capacity at the next Contracts for Difference round at end of this year compared to AR3, while spending an estimated £1billion in 2020/21 to encourage the deployment of low carbon heating in homes and businesses through the Renewable Heat Incentive. We have also announced the Clean Heat Grant, the Green Heat Network Fund and will launch the Green Gas Support Scheme later this year.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy) (Energy and Clean Growth)
15th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of the increase in (a) temporary closures and (b) part-time opening of post offices on communities and community access to essential services across the UK; and if he will make a statement.

While the Post Office is publicly owned, it is a commercial business that operates independently of the Government. With a network of over 11,500 branches across the UK, it is inevitable there will be variations in the number of branches open at any one time. Where branches do temporarily close, the Post Office strives to find solutions, like mobile vans and other types of outreach services, before reinstating a bricks-and-mortar service offer.


I am committed to ensuring that everyone in the country can access essential services via the Post Office conveniently and locally. That is why Post Office Limited must ensure Network Access Criteria are met. These ensure that 99% of the population are within three miles of their nearest post office and 90% are within one mile, with additional requirements set for rural, urban and deprived urban customers.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
24th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make an assessment of the effectiveness of UK whistleblowing legislation to (a) ensure that it keeps pace with international developments and (b) maintain the UK’s position on worker rights.

The Government recognises how valuable it is that whistleblowers are prepared to shine a light on wrongdoing and believes that they should be able to do so without fear of recrimination. We have also been clear that there will be no reduction in workers’ rights.

The Government remains committed to reviewing the UK whistleblowing framework and will carry this out once sufficient time has passed for there to be the necessary evidence available to assess the impact of reforms. The most recent change introduced in 2017 was a new legislative requirement for most prescribed persons to produce an annual report on whistleblowing disclosures made to them by workers.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
8th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if his Department will work with regulators to expand the definition of microbusiness in the (a) energy and (b) communications sectors to ensure that small and medium-sized enterprises have access to redress.

The independent GB regulator, Ofgem, defines a microbusiness as - employing 10 or fewer full-time employees with an annual turnover of 2m Euros or less OR typically spending £10,000-£12,000 per year on gas or electricity.

An energy supply licence obligates suppliers to proactively identify their microbusiness customers and provide information on their formal complaints process. If microbusinesses cannot resolve their complaints in this way, they can complain to the Energy Ombudsman.

Ofcom, the independent UK telecommunications services regulator, has put in place general conditions, which all communication providers must follow, that offer protections to businesses of any size relating to specific provisions on contracting, tariff information, billing procedures and number porting. Ofcom's rules also provide additional protections to businesses with fewer than 10 employees, including access to alternative dispute resolution and protections against mis-selling. All providers must be registered with either the Consumer Ombudsman or the Centre for Effective Dispute Resolution.

The Government takes the view that larger businesses are better able to represent their interests by negotiating contracts for supply, and to make use of approved dispute resolution procedures where necessary.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy) (Energy and Clean Growth)
4th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will ensure that the successor loan scheme to the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme will continue the distinct individual guarantee cover and portfolio cap level for charities and social enterprises.

Details on the terms of the successor loan scheme will be announced in due course.

The Government takes very seriously the economic impact of Covid-19 on charities and social enterprises.

However, I can confirm that the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme does not feature different guarantee levels (either for individual loans or at the portfolio level) for charities and social enterprises.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
4th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will ensure that the successor loan scheme to the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme will continue the exemption of creditworthy charities and social enterprises from the over 50 per cent trading criteria.

Details on the terms of the successor loan scheme will be announced in due course.

The Government takes very seriously the economic impact of Covid-19 on charities and social enterprises.

However, I can confirm that the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme does not feature different guarantee levels (either for individual loans or at the portfolio level) for charities and social enterprises.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
4th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will ensure that the successor scheme to the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme takes into account the specific needs of charities and social enterprises.

Details on the terms of the successor loan scheme will be announced in due course.

The Government takes very seriously the economic impact of Covid-19 on charities and social enterprises.

However, I can confirm that the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme does not feature different guarantee levels (either for individual loans or at the portfolio level) for charities and social enterprises.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
15th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the number of businesses unable to repay debt resulting from the effects of the covid-19 outbreak.

The Government will continue to work closely with local authorities, businesses, and business representative organisations to understand the impact of Covid-19 on businesses. This will include consideration of how payments for deferred VAT and loan repayments will impact businesses from March 2021.

We are developing a consistent industry-wide approach to the collections and recoveries of Bounce Back loans. This will ensure that lenders understand the full range of support they can provide to borrowers struggling to repay their loans.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
8th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Stragtegy, what steps he is taking to help businesses manage debt resulting from the effects of the covid-19 outbreak.

The Government has provided a comprehensive package of support to help businesses that have been affected by Covid-19. This package includes the small business grants, the coronavirus loan schemes, the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, as well as deferral of income tax payments.

The Government will continue to work closely with local authorities, businesses, and business representative organisations to understand the impact of Covid-19 on businesses. This will include consideration of how payments for deferred VAT and loan repayments will impact businesses from March 2021.

We are developing a consistent industry-wide approach to the collections and recoveries of Bounce Back loans. This will ensure that lenders understand the full range of support they can provide to borrowers struggling to repay their loans. The British Business Bank has created the online Finance Hub[1] which details potential types and sources of business finance and guidance.

Firms can access wide variety of government free support and advice online and in person on .gov.uk, the Business Support Helpline and the network of 38 Growth Hubs in England. The devolved administrations have their own business support service.

The Recovery Advice for Business scheme, supported by the government and hosted on the Enterprise Nation website[2], offers small firms access to free, one-to-one advice with an expert adviser to help them through the coronavirus pandemic and to prepare for long-term recovery.

In addition, Government has brought forward £5 billion of capital investment projects, supporting jobs and the overall economic recovery. £111million has been announced to triple the scale of traineeships, ensuring that more young people have access to high quality training needed for future jobs.

[1] https://www.british-business-bank.co.uk/finance-hub/

[2] https://www.enterprisenation.com/freesupport/

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
8th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy what plans he has to support companies facing insolvency as a result of debt arising from the effects of the covid-19 outbreak.

The Government has provided a comprehensive package of support to help businesses that have been affected by Covid-19. This package includes the small business grants, the coronavirus loan schemes, the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, as well as deferral of income tax payments.

The Government will continue to work closely with local authorities, businesses, and business representative organisations to understand the impact of Covid-19 on businesses. This will include consideration of how payments for deferred VAT and loan repayments will impact businesses from March 2021.

We are developing a consistent industry-wide approach to the collections and recoveries of Bounce Back loans. This will ensure that lenders understand the full range of support they can provide to borrowers struggling to repay their loans. The British Business Bank has created the online Finance Hub[1] which details potential types and sources of business finance and guidance.

Firms can access wide variety of government free support and advice online and in person on .gov.uk, the Business Support Helpline and the network of 38 Growth Hubs in England. The devolved administrations have their own business support service.

The Recovery Advice for Business scheme, supported by the government and hosted on the Enterprise Nation website[2], offers small firms access to free, one-to-one advice with an expert adviser to help them through the coronavirus pandemic and to prepare for long-term recovery.

In addition, Government has brought forward £5 billion of capital investment projects, supporting jobs and the overall economic recovery. £111million has been announced to triple the scale of traineeships, ensuring that more young people have access to high quality training needed for future jobs.

[1] https://www.british-business-bank.co.uk/finance-hub/

[2] https://www.enterprisenation.com/freesupport/

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
8th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans he has to help businesses who are in debt from the effects of the covid-19 to raise capital.

The Government has provided a comprehensive package of support to help businesses that have been affected by Covid-19. This package includes the small business grants, the coronavirus loan schemes, the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, as well as deferral of income tax payments.

The Government will continue to work closely with local authorities, businesses, and business representative organisations to understand the impact of Covid-19 on businesses. This will include consideration of how payments for deferred VAT and loan repayments will impact businesses from March 2021.

We are developing a consistent industry-wide approach to the collections and recoveries of Bounce Back loans. This will ensure that lenders understand the full range of support they can provide to borrowers struggling to repay their loans. The British Business Bank has created the online Finance Hub[1] which details potential types and sources of business finance and guidance.

Firms can access wide variety of government free support and advice online and in person on .gov.uk, the Business Support Helpline and the network of 38 Growth Hubs in England. The devolved administrations have their own business support service.

The Recovery Advice for Business scheme, supported by the government and hosted on the Enterprise Nation website[2], offers small firms access to free, one-to-one advice with an expert adviser to help them through the coronavirus pandemic and to prepare for long-term recovery.

In addition, Government has brought forward £5 billion of capital investment projects, supporting jobs and the overall economic recovery. £111million has been announced to triple the scale of traineeships, ensuring that more young people have access to high quality training needed for future jobs.

[1] https://www.british-business-bank.co.uk/finance-hub/

[2] https://www.enterprisenation.com/freesupport/

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
7th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he (a) holds information and (b) has received representations on the exclusion by the Post Office from the Horizon historical shortfall compensation scheme of the (i) 550 litigants who brought the Horizon scandal to light and (ii) (A) 600 subpostmasters employed through McColls and (B) 500 subpostmasters employed through the Co-op who were also affected by the Horizon system; and if he will make a statement.

The Historical Shortfall Scheme was designed for postmasters and companies who had or have a direct contract with Post Office, and therefore the individual or company had potential contractual liability for shortfalls found under previous versions of Horizon. On this basis, companies such as McColls and Co-Op were eligible to apply for the scheme. Claims could include consequential losses where appropriate. Assistants of postmasters or employees of other companies are not be eligible, as they had no contract with or contractual liability directly to the Post Office.

The Historical Shortfalls Scheme was designed for postmasters or companies who were not part of the group litigation and have had issues with historical shortfalls recorded in Horizon and want these to be investigated and addressed. Claimants in the settled litigation were therefore not eligible for the Historical Shortfalls Scheme.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many sub-postmasters employed directly by McColls stores are known to have been removed from their employment as managers of branch sub Post Offices in McColls stores on grounds of alleged shortfalls in their Post Office Horizon branch accounts since 2000.

The Government recognises the critical role that post offices play in communities and for small businesses across the UK.

While the Government sets?the strategic direction for the Post Office, it allows the company the commercial freedom to deliver this strategy as an independent business. As such, the number of postmasters employed by McColls and who were subsequently removed as managers on grounds of alleged Horizon shortfalls are an?operational matter for?Post Office Limited.

?I have asked Nick Read, the Group Chief Executive of Post Office Limited, to write to the Hon. Member about this matter. A copy of his reply will be placed in the Libraries of the House.??

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
15th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when he plans to bring forward changes to the Undertaking in Difficulty rules.

Although the UK has left the EU, under the terms of the Withdrawal Agreement the EU State aid rules continue to apply in the UK until the end of the Transition Period. The rules are an exclusive competence of the European Commission and it is not within the power of the United Kingdom or any EU Member State to unilaterally vary or suspend them.

The Government has announced that following the end of the Transition Period, a new domestic subsidy control regime will replace the EU State aid rules. The treatment of firms in difficulty will be considered as part of the work to develop the new regime, which will also take into account, amongst other factors, the arrangements agreed under the Northern Ireland Protocol. Announcements on the new regime will be made in due course.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
17th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions he has had with representatives from businesses on (a) investment plans and (b) the potential for job creation in shovel-ready hydrogen projects.

We are in regular discussions with businesses about their investment plans for hydrogen projects, including those that are ready for very near-term deployment. In addition we are undertaking extensive stakeholder engagement as we develop new policy to help bring forward the technologies and supply chain we will need to grow the UK hydrogen economy.

We recently published the Energy Innovation Needs Assessment (EINA) for hydrogen and fuel cells which identified that up to 15,000 jobs per annum by 2050 could be created through domestic hydrogen opportunities.

We are also looking to formalise regular engagement between Government and industry to discuss and drive development if the UK hydrogen economy. This will consider how we can best work together to retain and expand jobs and skills in hydrogen and related sectors; as well as developing the UK supply chain.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
17th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions he has had with businesses about (a) investment plans and (b) potential for jobs in shovel-ready hydrogen projects.

We are in regular discussions with businesses about their investment plans for hydrogen projects, including those that are ready for very near-term deployment. In addition we are undertaking extensive stakeholder engagement as we develop new policy to help bring forward the technologies and supply chain we will need to grow the UK hydrogen economy.

We recently published the Energy Innovation Needs Assessment (EINA) for hydrogen and fuel cells which identified that up to 15,000 jobs per annum by 2050 could be created through domestic hydrogen opportunities.

We are also looking to formalise regular engagement between Government and industry to discuss and drive development if the UK hydrogen economy. This will consider how we can best work together to retain and expand jobs and skills in hydrogen and related sectors; as well as developing the UK supply chain.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
9th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department plans to publish its response to its consultation on corporate transparency and register reform before the 2020 summer recess.

The Government is currently considering a broad package of reforms to Companies House to ensure it is fit for the future and continues to contribute to the UK’s business environment. This would amount to the most significant reform of the UK’s company registration framework since a?companies?register was first introduced in 1844, and it is important, therefore, to take the time to get it right.

The consultation received a significant number of responses and an official government response with proposals for the way forward will be published in due course.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
9th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the consultation published by his Department on 5 May 2019 on corporate transparency and register reform, what assessment he has made of the level of resources required by Companies House to implement the reforms recommended in that consultation.

Companies House ensures it has the appropriate amount of resources to effectively manage the register. Staffing levels are made available in the Companies House Annual Report which is published after the end of the financial year.

The Department’s consultation received a significant number of responses and an official government response with proposals for the way forward will be published in due course. An assessment of the staffing levels required to implement the recommended reforms will be finalised as the proposals are finalised.

As proposals under the consultation have not yet been finalised, the staffing levels required have not been finalised.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
5th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether the Government has plans to encourage (a) Ofgem and (b) Ofcom to cooperate on producing guidance for best practice in their dealings with SMEs operating in the (i) energy, (ii) communications and (iii) other sectors.

The Government wants all consumers to pay a fair price for their energy. In 2019 Ofgem launched a Strategic Review of the Microbusiness Retail Market to better understand the customer journey for microbusinesses and consider what solutions may be necessary to safeguard them as consumers. The regulator plans to publish a consultation this spring setting out its detailed policy solutions in response to the Review’s findings.

Microbusinesses display similar characteristics to domestic consumers when buying energy. Therefore, where they have exhausted their energy company’s own complaints procedure, businesses with up to 10 employees can make a complaint to the Ombudsman Services: Energy.

Larger businesses are more likely to be able to effectively procure their energy supply, as they procure other commodities for their businesses.


The Communications Act 2003 places a duty on Ofcom to ensure that Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) procedures are available for domestic and small business customers (defined as up to 10 employees). All communications providers must be a member of an approved scheme, Ofcom currently approves two ADR Schemes: Ombudsman Services: Communications (OS) and the Communications and Internet Services Adjudication Scheme (CISAS).

In 2019 Ofcom published an independent review of the two approved ADR schemes. The review found that both schemes show a high level of decision-making accuracy with regard to case acceptance or rejection, and Ofcom is satisfied that both ADR Schemes are following the requirements set out in the ADR regulations and the Communications Act.

It is for Ofgem and Ofcom to review the evidence and to work with Government to determine whether further regulatory intervention, or other steps, are necessary to assist SMEs.

Though there are currently no plans to offer joint guidance between Ofcom, Ofgem and the FCA, they continue to cooperate on dealing with issues affecting SMEs in their respective sectors.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
5th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will introduce a redress service for SMEs in the (a) energy and (b) communications sectors that is equivalent to that service offered by the Financial Ombudsman Service to SMEs operating in the financial sector.

The Government wants all consumers to pay a fair price for their energy. In 2019 Ofgem launched a Strategic Review of the Microbusiness Retail Market to better understand the customer journey for microbusinesses and consider what solutions may be necessary to safeguard them as consumers. The regulator plans to publish a consultation this spring setting out its detailed policy solutions in response to the Review’s findings.

Microbusinesses display similar characteristics to domestic consumers when buying energy. Therefore, where they have exhausted their energy company’s own complaints procedure, businesses with up to 10 employees can make a complaint to the Ombudsman Services: Energy.

Larger businesses are more likely to be able to effectively procure their energy supply, as they procure other commodities for their businesses.


The Communications Act 2003 places a duty on Ofcom to ensure that Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) procedures are available for domestic and small business customers (defined as up to 10 employees). All communications providers must be a member of an approved scheme, Ofcom currently approves two ADR Schemes: Ombudsman Services: Communications (OS) and the Communications and Internet Services Adjudication Scheme (CISAS).

In 2019 Ofcom published an independent review of the two approved ADR schemes. The review found that both schemes show a high level of decision-making accuracy with regard to case acceptance or rejection, and Ofcom is satisfied that both ADR Schemes are following the requirements set out in the ADR regulations and the Communications Act.

It is for Ofgem and Ofcom to review the evidence and to work with Government to determine whether further regulatory intervention, or other steps, are necessary to assist SMEs.

Though there are currently no plans to offer joint guidance between Ofcom, Ofgem and the FCA, they continue to cooperate on dealing with issues affecting SMEs in their respective sectors.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
5th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of the definition of a microbusiness on access to complaint handling and dispute resolution processes by SMEs in the (a) energy and (b) communications sectors.

The Government wants all consumers to pay a fair price for their energy. In 2019 Ofgem launched a Strategic Review of the Microbusiness Retail Market to better understand the customer journey for microbusinesses and consider what solutions may be necessary to safeguard them as consumers. The regulator plans to publish a consultation this spring setting out its detailed policy solutions in response to the Review’s findings.

Microbusinesses display similar characteristics to domestic consumers when buying energy. Therefore, where they have exhausted their energy company’s own complaints procedure, businesses with up to 10 employees can make a complaint to the Ombudsman Services: Energy.

Larger businesses are more likely to be able to effectively procure their energy supply, as they procure other commodities for their businesses.


The Communications Act 2003 places a duty on Ofcom to ensure that Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) procedures are available for domestic and small business customers (defined as up to 10 employees). All communications providers must be a member of an approved scheme, Ofcom currently approves two ADR Schemes: Ombudsman Services: Communications (OS) and the Communications and Internet Services Adjudication Scheme (CISAS).

In 2019 Ofcom published an independent review of the two approved ADR schemes. The review found that both schemes show a high level of decision-making accuracy with regard to case acceptance or rejection, and Ofcom is satisfied that both ADR Schemes are following the requirements set out in the ADR regulations and the Communications Act.

It is for Ofgem and Ofcom to review the evidence and to work with Government to determine whether further regulatory intervention, or other steps, are necessary to assist SMEs.

Though there are currently no plans to offer joint guidance between Ofcom, Ofgem and the FCA, they continue to cooperate on dealing with issues affecting SMEs in their respective sectors.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
16th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps she is taking to support the deployment of rooftop solar PV; and if she will make a statement.

Low carbon electricity, including solar – whether at the household level or the national level – is central to the transition to the smart and flexible energy systems of the future.

Since 2010, we have quadrupled the electricity we generate from renewables – installing 99% of the UK’s solar capacity and over 800,000 installations – exceeding our historic projections on solar PV deployment. We now have over 13.3GW of solar capacity installed in the UK, which is enough to power over 3 million UK homes.

The Smart Export Guarantee, which came into force on 1 January 2020, gives small scale low-carbon electricity generators, such as homes with solar panels, the right to be paid for the renewable electricity they export to the grid. Renewable generators now have a several competitive tariffs to choose from, in some cases even higher than the FIT export tariff.

Permitted development rights have been introduced allowing the installation of solar panels up to 1 megawatt on domestic properties, schools, businesses and farm buildings without any need for planning permission.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
16th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps the Government is taking to encourage (a) innovation and (b) product development in the UK solar PV industry.

UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) provides grant funding to innovative businesses in many different ways, including Innovate UK‘s SMART grants, which deliver ambitious R&D innovations that can make a significant impact on the UK economy.

Through the Clean Growth Strategy, BEIS has committed £900 million of public funds to innovation, which includes £177 million to further reduce the cost of renewables.

We are also investing over £3 billion to support low carbon innovation in the UK up to 2021, to ensure that the UK continues to reap the benefits from the transition to a low carbon economy.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
17th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether indoor play centres and other children’s activities in venues for that purpose can commence from 12 April 2021 as covid-19 lockdown restrictions are eased.

The ‘COVID-19 Response - Spring 2021’ published 22 February advises that indoor entertainment and visitor attractions can resume at Step 3, which will commence no earlier than 17 May. This includes indoor play centres.

The timings outlined in the roadmap are indicative, and the Government will be led by data, rather than fixed dates. Before taking each step, the Government will review the latest data and will only ease restrictions further if it is safe to do so. The indicative, ‘no earlier than’ dates in the roadmap are all contingent on the data and subject to change.

Each full step of the roadmap will be informed by the latest available science and data and will be five weeks apart in order to provide time to assess the data and provide one week’s notice to businesses and individuals.

Nigel Huddleston
Assistant Whip
5th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps he plans to take to ensure that the consultation on Remote customer interaction published by the Gambling Commission aligns with the Government’s forthcoming review of the Gambling Act 2005.

The Gambling Commission requires operators to monitor play and to intervene where players may be at risk of harm. Its consultation and call for evidence on Remote Customer Interaction is considering whether further requirements are needed for how operators identify and interact with customers who may be at risk.

The Commission will be led by the evidence it receives in deciding its next steps, and its findings may also inform its advice to government on the Review of the Gambling Act 2005. Following a one month extension to allow extra evidence to be submitted, the deadline for submissions was 9 February.

The government launched the Review of the Gambling Act 2005 in December with a Call for Evidence, which runs until 31 March. The Review aims to strike the right balance between preventing harm and respecting consumers’ freedom of choice. More information about the Call for Evidence and how to make a submission is available here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/review-of-the-gambling-act-2005-terms-of-reference-and-call-for-evidence/review-of-the-gambling-act-2005-terms-of-reference-and-call-for-evidence

Nigel Huddleston
Assistant Whip
3rd Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what further funding will be made available to support small charities affected by the covid-19 outbreak, in addition to the £750 million announced in April 2020.

Small charities play an invaluable role in this country in providing public services and the government recognises the challenges and uncertainty that some small charities are dealing with, particularly those organisations that rely on trading or fundraised income

which have been hit by the covid-19 national restrictions.

The £750 million package will continue to support charities’ and social enterprises’ vital work in the fight against the coronavirus crisis over the winter period. In addition to this, an unprecedented package of measures across the economy has been set up to support people and businesses through this period of financial uncertainty. For example, the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme has been, and continues to be a lifeline to a multitude of organisations, including charities. The Chancellor has announced that the government is extending the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme until 31 March 2021 to support individuals and businesses who are impacted by disruption caused by COVID-19 this winter. More details on all of the business support measures and eligibility details are available on GOV.UK.

Government is continuing to work closely with the civil society sector to understand the ongoing impact of the crisis on small charities, and to consider what additional policy measures might be appropriate in the months ahead. This includes working with the Institute of Fundraising to publish guidance on how to fundraise safely as an important source of income for small charities. To support this work we have set up a cross government network to share intelligence on challenges facing critical organisations and sub-sectors.

John Whittingdale
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
30th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent discussions his Department has had with representatives of the ornamental horticulture industry on the effect of fees for the inspection of plant and tree imports from the EU on that industry.

Defra took the decision to delay the introduction of fees for import checks of high-priority plants from the EU for 5 months to give businesses more time to prepare and adjust to the new charging arrangements. This has enabled an accurate calculation of the fees and allowed businesses more time to successfully implement the change. During this time, Defra communicated extensively with industry and stakeholder groups to ensure they were prepared for the new fees coming in.

The methodology used to calculate fees for plant health services was agreed with trade following a fees review and consultation in 2017.

It has long been UK Government policy to charge for many publicly provided goods and services. The standard approach is to set fees to recover the full costs of service delivery. This relieves the general taxpayer of costs, so that they are properly borne by users who benefit from a service. This allows for a more equitable distribution of public resources and enables lower public expenditure and borrowing. Defra plant health services operate in line with that principle and have done for many years. Plant health fees are reviewed regularly and adjusted to ensure no under, or over, recovery of costs and amended as necessary.

Victoria Prentis
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
14th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what discussions he has had with his counterparts in EU member states to build competence and trust in respective phytosanitary processes with the aim of establishing inspections at points of embarkation for plant and tree imports.

Defra officials have been looking at a wide range or measures to make the import of plants and trees as efficient as possible, without compromising our high biosecurity standards. There is regular dialogue between our plant health services and those of our key trading partners in the EU, including on e-certification most recently, which will streamline the exchange of phytosanitary certificates for the benefit of businesses and regulators alike.

As to checks at point of embarkation, there are legal limitations with locating GB officials in a different jurisdiction to perform statutory functions, and whilst internationally there are precedents for locating inspectors in other countries, these staff typically perform an audit and assurance role rather than performing pre-import checks. Consequently, we are not actively pursuing this option with trading partners now, but Defra officials will continue to work with stakeholder organisations and those that import regulated plants and plant products from the EU to ensure GB plant health controls work as effectively and efficiently as possible.

Victoria Prentis
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
25th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of permitting driven shoots on moorland in North Yorkshire on specified days during the current covid-19 restrictions.

We have not made any assessment of the potential merits of permitting driven shoots on moorland in North Yorkshire on specified days during the current Covid-19 restrictions. Organised events are not permitted during the National Lockdown.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
14th Jan 2021
What steps her Department is taking to agree a free trade agreement with the US.

We have made great progress in negotiations and are in an excellent position to strengthen the economic partnership between our two countries through a Free Trade Agreement. We congratulate Katherine Tai on her nomination to be appointed United States Trade Representative by the incoming administration and look forward to working with her.

Elizabeth Truss
Minister for Women and Equalities
17th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what steps she is taking to (a) promote the UK's hydrogen sector to international markets and (b) develop new export opportunities.

The Department for International Trade (DIT) is engaging with UK suppliers from the hydrogen industry, sector specific research centres and trade associations to understand the UK’s capability across hydrogen technologies. Officials have been raising awareness of the UK’s capability to our domestic and overseas networks, to enable the promotion of the hydrogen sector and support discussions with potential buyers.

DIT undertakes a range of activities to support exports from the renewable energy sector, including in hydrogen. For example, earlier this year the Department participated in HyVolution in Paris, with a departmental representative giving a speech to attendees on UK capabilities in Hydrogen.

Graham Stuart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
12th May 2020
What steps she is taking to facilitate trade with Saudi Arabia.

Total exports to Saudi Arabia from the United Kingdom last year were up £1.0bn from 2018 and we want this growth to continue. My Rt Hon. Friend the Secretary of State for International Trade recently engaged with her counterpart to remove trade barriers during this difficult period, and we continue to identify ways of opening up more opportunities in the country to businesses in the United Kingdom.

My Hon. Friend for Thirsk and Malton will also be aware that we are carefully considering the implications of the Court of Appeal Judgement for export licence decision-making and are working to enable the re-taking of decisions on the correct legal basis, which I understand is a process which will have a bearing on businesses in his constituency.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
20th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the effect on levels of investment in the production of non fossil fuels for transport in the UK of removing derogation c from paragraph 6.84 of the 2018 RTFO Carbon and Sustainability Guidance in the updated guidance published in January 2020; what steps he is taking to incentivise the production of non fossil fuels for transport in the UK; and what commitments he has made to the decarbonisation of the public transport network.

The Department’s Renewable Transport Fuel Obligation Guidance version 2020, Part One and Part Two, still provides that “derogation c.” applies. The Department has no current plans to remove the derogation, but it is now in Part One, paragraph 3.43, of the guidance.

Non-fossil fuels, including renewable hydrogen, are incentivised under the Renewable Transport Fuel Obligation (RTFO), a certificate trading scheme. Renewable hydrogen is categorised as a development fuel, which potentially benefits from a higher tradeable certificate value.

At the end of March, we published a document “Decarbonising Transport: Setting the Challenge”, kicking off our work on preparing a Transport Decarbonisation Plan. This holistic and cross-modal approach to decarbonising the entire transport system, including public transport, will set out a credible and ambitious pathway to delivering transport’s contribution to carbon budgets and meet net zero by 2050.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
17th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps he is taking to increase the number of zero emission buses in rural areas.

In February, the Government announced a £5 billion funding package for buses and cycling, which includes support for the purchase of at least 4,000 zero-emission buses. The details of these programmes will be announced in due course.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
24th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to provide health facilities for people who experience long-term effects of covid-19 in (a) Thirsk and Malton constituency and (b) North Yorkshire.

NHS England has provided £10 million to fund over 40 pioneering ‘long COVID-19’ specialist clinics including seven in the North East and Yorkshire region. The plans for these clinics were published on 15 November and commissioning guidance was made available on 6 November.

NHS England and NHS Improvement have committed to ensuring clinics will be available from early December 2020. In response, each integrated care system is working towards the provision of at least one such service, although the exact location for each is yet to be provided.

A number of these clinics are already established, and new clinics will start to accept patients at the end of November. More details will be made available shortly.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
23rd Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what discussions his Department has had with NHS England and NHS Improvement on replacing the NHS safety thermometer.

NHS England and NHS Improvement have no plans to replace the National Health Service safety thermometer. The data generated from the thermometer has been shown to be not fit for current purposes and is available from other existing sources.

NHS England and NHS Improvement discussed discontinuing the NHS safety thermometer with the Department during 2018/19 and 2019/20, due to emerging evidence that the data collected was incomplete and not being used as intended to support safety improvement. The specific decision to stop data collection in March 2020, in part to support the COVID-19 response by freeing up nursing time, was discussed with Departmental officials during March 2020.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
23rd Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to World Patient Safety Day 2020, what steps his Department is taking to improve the (a) tracking and (b) prevention of catheter acquired urinary tract infections; and if he will make a statement.

Public Health England’s (PHE’s) continuous routine laboratory surveillance does not include device use or procedures associated with urinary infections, such as urinary catheters. Therefore, no estimate has been made of the number of catheter-acquired urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) which develop into a gram-negative bloodstream infection.

No assessment has been made on the effect of CAUTIs on antimicrobial resistance and antibiotic over-prescription.

However, PHE’s English surveillance programme for antimicrobial utilisation and resistance (ESPAUR) is working with the National Health Service and across sectors, to develop and maintain surveillance systems for monitoring trends in antimicrobial use and resistance in England. Further details are available in the ESPAUR report 2018-19 at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/english-surveillance-programme-antimicrobial-utilisation-and-resistance-espaur-report

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
23rd Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of catheter acquired urinary tract infections on (a) antimicrobial resistance and (b) antibiotic over-prescription; and if he will make a statement.

Public Health England’s (PHE’s) continuous routine laboratory surveillance does not include device use or procedures associated with urinary infections, such as urinary catheters. Therefore, no estimate has been made of the number of catheter-acquired urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) which develop into a gram-negative bloodstream infection.

No assessment has been made on the effect of CAUTIs on antimicrobial resistance and antibiotic over-prescription.

However, PHE’s English surveillance programme for antimicrobial utilisation and resistance (ESPAUR) is working with the National Health Service and across sectors, to develop and maintain surveillance systems for monitoring trends in antimicrobial use and resistance in England. Further details are available in the ESPAUR report 2018-19 at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/english-surveillance-programme-antimicrobial-utilisation-and-resistance-espaur-report

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
23rd Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate his Department has made of the number of catheter acquired urinary tract infections which develop into a gram negative bloodstream infection; and if he will make a statement.

Public Health England’s (PHE’s) continuous routine laboratory surveillance does not include device use or procedures associated with urinary infections, such as urinary catheters. Therefore, no estimate has been made of the number of catheter-acquired urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) which develop into a gram-negative bloodstream infection.

No assessment has been made on the effect of CAUTIs on antimicrobial resistance and antibiotic over-prescription.

However, PHE’s English surveillance programme for antimicrobial utilisation and resistance (ESPAUR) is working with the National Health Service and across sectors, to develop and maintain surveillance systems for monitoring trends in antimicrobial use and resistance in England. Further details are available in the ESPAUR report 2018-19 at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/english-surveillance-programme-antimicrobial-utilisation-and-resistance-espaur-report

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
19th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to tackle the rise of carbapenem-resistant bacteria in secondary care.

Carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) are carbapenem-resistant infections with the ability to transfer resistance to different bacterial species. Public Health England conducts monitoring and surveillance of these infections and publishes toolkits to support acute and non-acute organisations to prevent and control the spread of CPE.

The Government recognises that identifying where carbapenemase-producing Gram-negative infections occur, and acting to prevent them, is essential to maintain the effectiveness of our most important antibiotics. Work is underway to add these infections to the list of notifiable diseases as part of our national action plan for antimicrobial resistance.

NHS England and NHS Improvement continues to work to reduce the burden of all healthcare-associated infections and is tasked with delivering the Government’s ambition to halve all healthcare associated Gram-negative blood stream infections by 2023-24.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, if he will make representations to the Government of Croatia on halting the extradition to Monaco of UK whistleblower, Jonathan Taylor, in the context of concerns expressed by international human rights and whistleblowing experts that that extradition is an abuse of process and in breach of Mr Taylor’s human rights.

I spoke to the Monegasque Foreign Minister and the Croatian Secretary of State for European Affairs on 13 November 2020 and sought assurances that both authorities would treat Mr Taylor fairly and give full consideration to the whistle-blowing activities Mr Taylor has reported. Both Croatia and Monaco have provided those assurances. On 12 and 13 April, our Ambassador in Croatia spoke to the Croatian authorities to reiterate the importance of fair treatment. I have continued to raise Mr Taylor's case with the Croatian Secretary of State for European Affairs, so that they are aware of our concerns, most recently during my visit to Zagreb on 8 June. Consular officials in Croatia are in regular contact with Mr Taylor. Mr Taylor's welfare and fair treatment is our priority.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, if he will make representations to the Croatian justice minister, Ivan Malenica, on halting the extradition of the UK whistleblower, Jonathan Taylor to Monaco.

It is for Croatia to determine whether Mr Taylor should be extradited to Monaco, and for Monaco to investigate allegations of attempted extortion. In accordance with the Vienna Convention on Consular Relations, we are compelled both to exercise our consular functions in foreign States in accordance with local laws and regulations and to refrain from interfering in the internal affairs of foreign States.

On 12 and 13 April, our Ambassador in Croatia spoke to the Croatian authorities to understand the latest timelines for court action and to reiterate the importance of fair treatment.

I have raised Mr Taylor's case with the Croatian Secretary of State for European Affairs, multiple times, most recently during my visit to Zagreb on 8 June.

Consular officials are in regular contact with the Croatian courts to ensure that we understand the process being followed.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
20th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, with reference to the UK whistleblower Jonathan Taylor's (a) application to appeal the extradition ruling being refused by the Supreme Court in Croatia and (b) detention of more than ten months in Croatia, whether he has had discussions with his Monegasque counterparts on alternative ways of proceeding regarding Mr Taylor's situation.

The UK has raised Mr Taylor's case. I spoke to the Monegasque Foreign Minister and the Croatian Secretary of State for European Affairs on 13 November and sought assurances that both authorities would treat Mr Taylor fairly and give full consideration to the whistle-blowing activities Mr Taylor has reported. Monaco provided direct assurances to Croatia in January. On 12 and 13 April, our Ambassador in Croatia spoke to the Croatian authorities to understand the latest timelines for court action and to reiterate the importance of fair treatment.

On 22 April, I spoke again to the Croatian State Secretary for European Affairs and reiterated the assurances made in November.

Consular officials are in regular contact with the Croatian courts to ensure that we understand the process being followed.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
22nd Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, if he will make representations to the Croatian authorities on the case of Mr Jonathan Taylor who has been detained in that country since his arrest for alleged bribery or corruption.

We are providing ongoing support to Mr Taylor. Consular staff are in regular contact with him and continue to seek updates on his case from the Croatian courts. As set out in the Vienna Convention on Consular Relations, we cannot interfere in the internal affairs of other countries, or bypass their laws, just as we would not accept similar interference here. As part of our consular assistance to British nationals overseas we can raise concerns about individuals on diplomatic channels. I spoke to the Monegasque Foreign Secretary and the Croatian State Secretary for European Affairs on 13 November 2020 and sought assurances that both authorities would treat Mr Taylor fairly. On 22 April, I spoke again to the Croatian State Secretary for European Affairs who reiterated those assurances and noted the significant level of ministerial and parliamentary interest in Mr Taylor's case.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
20th Apr 2021
What diplomatic steps he is taking to secure the release of whistleblower Jonathan Taylor from detention in Croatia.

We are providing ongoing support to Mr Taylor. Consular staff are in regular contact with him and continue to seek updates on his case from the Croatian courts.

Our priority is Mr Taylor’s welfare and fair treatment, including the assurances of fair treatment which we have received from the Croatian and Monegasque authorities.

The FCDO cannot interfere to secure Mr Taylor’s release. In accordance with the Vienna Convention on Consular Relations, we must exercise our consular functions in foreign States in accordance with local laws and regulations and refrain from interfering in their internal affairs, which includes their judicial processes.

In December 2020 the British Ambassador in Zagreb met Mr Taylor to discuss his concerns and explain how the FCDO could assist him. The Acting Deputy Head of Mission spoke to Mr Taylor on 10 March, and the Ambassador spoke to him again on 16 April. The FCDO’s Consular Director spoke to Mrs Taylor on 14 April.

The FCDO can, and does, raise concerns about individuals with other countries. I spoke to the Monegasque Foreign Secretary and the Croatian Secretary of State for European Affairs on 13 November 2020 and sought assurances that both authorities would treat Mr Taylor fairly.

I specifically asked for Mr Taylor to be treated in accordance with Croatia’s obligations as a State Party to the Council of Europe Criminal Law Convention on Corruption.

Monaco has provided assurances directly to Croatia since I raised Mr Taylor’s case.

On 12 and 13 April, our Ambassador spoke to the Croatian authorities to understand the latest timelines for court action and to reiterate the importance of fair treatment.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
20th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, with reference to reports that the arrest warrant has been withdrawn in relation to whistleblower Jonathan Taylor, whether he has had discussions with the Monegasque Authorities on the status of relevant extradition proceedings.

The Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office were informed on 23 December 2020 that Monaco has not withdrawn its extradition request for Jonathan Taylor. I raised Mr Taylor's case in a call with the Monegasque Foreign Minister and sought assurances that they are giving full consideration to what protections Mr Taylor should be provided with as a whistle-blower and the need for a fair trial. Our Embassy in Paris has also raised Mr Taylor's case on with the Monegasque embassy in Paris.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
20th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what support his Department and the UK consulate in Croatia are providing to whistleblower Jonathan Taylor in response to the Croatian courts' upholding of the extradition request of which he is the subject.

I raised Mr Taylor's case with the Foreign Ministers of Croatia and Monaco to seek assurances that he would be treated fairly. Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO) officials are providing ongoing consular support to Mr Taylor and his family. Consular staff have been in regular contact with Mr Taylor. The British Ambassador in Zagreb has also met Mr Taylor and his wife to discuss with them their concerns and explain the FCDO's consular functions.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
20th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, if he will make representations to the Monegasque Authorities to encourage their withdrawal of the extradition request in relation to UK whistleblower Jonathan Taylor.

As set out in the Vienna Convention on Consular Relations, we cannot interfere in the internal affairs of other countries, or bypass their laws, just as we would not accept similar interference here. As part of our consular assistance to British nationals overseas we can raise concerns about individuals on diplomatic channels. I raised Mr Taylor's case with the Foreign Ministers of Croatia and Monaco to seek assurances that he would be treated fairly.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
1st Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what the Government’s is on future development assistance for fossil fuel projects to (a) Mozambique, and (b) other developing countries.

Tackling climate change is a key priority for the UK. The Government is committed to working with countries across the world, including Mozambique, to unlock their renewable energy potential and support their transition away from fossil fuels to cleaner alternatives. The UK will continue to lead by example through aligning our Official Development Assistance (ODA) with the Paris Agreement temperature goals, including our support for energy. This will include our ODA support for Mozambique and any other developing country.

The Prime Minister announced in January that the Government would end direct ODA, investment, export credit and trade promotion support for thermal coal mining and coal power plants overseas. The Government continues to keep its approach to other fossil fuel investments and financing overseas under review.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
18th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of the implications of the widening diagnostic gap for tuberculosis and other infectious diseases on efforts to curb antimicrobial resistance.

It is still too early to establish the impact of COVID-19 on the spread of antimicrobial resistance. The UK is supporting countries to respond to the pandemic, maintain essential health services, including diagnosis and treatment of infectious diseases like TB, and to strengthen health systems to combat antimicrobial resistance. This includes our investments in WHO, Global Fund and Gavi as well as bilateral support to country health systems.

The FCDO funds research programmes to promote the development of new diagnostics, medicines and vaccines. For TB and multidrug-resistant-TB, this includes our support to the Foundation for Innovative New Diagnostics (FIND). With our support, FIND have developed five new diagnostic tests for TB, now approved by WHO and being rolled out in over 27 countries. FCDO also funds UNITAID, which aims to triple access to rapid testing for MDR-TB, and to reduce MDR-TB drug prices.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
12th May 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what plans he has to bring forward regulations for Mutual Deferred Shares under the Mutuals’ Deferred Shares Act 2015.

The Government has consulted widely with industry representatives in considering whether to lay secondary legislation to enable mutual insurers to raise equity by issuing Mutual Deferred Shares. Mutual insurers and their representatives made clear that Mutual Deferred Shares would only be issued if they both qualified as Tier 1 regulatory capital and would not alter the tax treatment of the issuing mutual. The Government’s decision in 2018 not to lay secondary legislation was taken based on an assessment that it was not possible to design Mutual Deferred Shares to meet both these conditions. The Government is committed to supporting the mutuals sector, but continues to have no plans to bring forward such legislation.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
12th May 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what plans he has to establish mutual banks from dormant funds in banks.

The Government welcomes the efforts to establish regional mutual banks and recognises the importance of diversity in the banking system. Officials have been engaging with prospective mutual banks over their efforts to raise capital and look forward to further discussions.

Banking Competition Remedies Ltd (BCR) was established in 2018 as the independent body to implement and oversee the NatWest (previously RBS)-funded Alternative Remedies Package (the Package), including the £425m Capability and Innovation Fund (CIF). This consists of 23 pre-determined grants divided into five pools (A – E). Each pool has a distinct pro-competition purpose based on criteria agreed between HM Treasury (HMT) and the European Commission.

Eligible financial services providers competed for these grants to improve their financial products and services available to SMEs, and to improve their capability to compete with NatWest in the provision of banking services to SMEs. Most of the grants have now been allocated, except £5m worth of funds returned to BCR in January 2021. BCR intend to run a ‘Pool F’ consultation process for the returned funds in August 2021 and bodies eligible for pools A, B or C will be able to apply.

BCR is independent from government and has sole responsibility for evaluating applications and allocating grants to eligible bodies under the CIF. HMT plays no role in the ongoing delivery of the Package and does not have any influence over the decision-making process.

BCR has responsibility for communicating information regarding the Package to the market. Further information on the Package, including eligibility criteria and timelines for implementation is available on BCR’s website.

The distribution of dormant accounts money is governed by the Dormant Bank and Building Society Accounts Act 2008. Following the government's commitment to expanding the Dormant Assets Scheme, the Dormant Assets Bill was introduced to the House of Lords on Wednesday 12 May.

The government recognises the public interest in how this funding is spent in England and has concluded that some increased flexibility in determining this would be beneficial. The Bill therefore amends the approach to restrictions in England in the 2008 Act to mirror the model used for the devolved administrations. This is intended to allow the Government to respond to public feedback and evolving social and environmental needs in England over time by setting the causes through secondary legislation, which is subject to due consultation and parliamentary approval. Should the measure pass, the Government intends to launch a public consultation on the causes to which future funding can be distributed in England.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
12th May 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether new funds are planned to be open to start up mutual banks from banking competition remedies.

The Government welcomes the efforts to establish regional mutual banks and recognises the importance of diversity in the banking system. Officials have been engaging with prospective mutual banks over their efforts to raise capital and look forward to further discussions.

Banking Competition Remedies Ltd (BCR) was established in 2018 as the independent body to implement and oversee the NatWest (previously RBS)-funded Alternative Remedies Package (the Package), including the £425m Capability and Innovation Fund (CIF). This consists of 23 pre-determined grants divided into five pools (A – E). Each pool has a distinct pro-competition purpose based on criteria agreed between HM Treasury (HMT) and the European Commission.

Eligible financial services providers competed for these grants to improve their financial products and services available to SMEs, and to improve their capability to compete with NatWest in the provision of banking services to SMEs. Most of the grants have now been allocated, except £5m worth of funds returned to BCR in January 2021. BCR intend to run a ‘Pool F’ consultation process for the returned funds in August 2021 and bodies eligible for pools A, B or C will be able to apply.

BCR is independent from government and has sole responsibility for evaluating applications and allocating grants to eligible bodies under the CIF. HMT plays no role in the ongoing delivery of the Package and does not have any influence over the decision-making process.

BCR has responsibility for communicating information regarding the Package to the market. Further information on the Package, including eligibility criteria and timelines for implementation is available on BCR’s website.

The distribution of dormant accounts money is governed by the Dormant Bank and Building Society Accounts Act 2008. Following the government's commitment to expanding the Dormant Assets Scheme, the Dormant Assets Bill was introduced to the House of Lords on Wednesday 12 May.

The government recognises the public interest in how this funding is spent in England and has concluded that some increased flexibility in determining this would be beneficial. The Bill therefore amends the approach to restrictions in England in the 2008 Act to mirror the model used for the devolved administrations. This is intended to allow the Government to respond to public feedback and evolving social and environmental needs in England over time by setting the causes through secondary legislation, which is subject to due consultation and parliamentary approval. Should the measure pass, the Government intends to launch a public consultation on the causes to which future funding can be distributed in England.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
10th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what plans he has to extend the Digital Services Tax to goods provided directly from Amazon.

The Digital Services Tax is a tax that ensures search engines, social media platforms, and online marketplaces pay UK tax that reflects the value they derive from UK users.

The Government is unable to discuss tax in relation to specific businesses. The DST is a temporary measure and will be removed once an appropriate global solution is in place.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
10th Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the effect on SMEs of the covid-19 lockdown announced in January 2021.

Throughout this crisis, the Government has sought to protect people’s jobs and livelihoods, while also supporting businesses and public services across the UK. To do this, the Government has spent over £280 billion to put in place an economic package of support which will provide businesses and individuals with certainty over the coming months.

In order to ensure that any decisions continue to meet the evolving challenges presented by Covid-19, the Government is working intensively with employers, delivery partners, industry groups and other Government departments to understand the impacts of COVID-19 and specific challenges facing UK businesses – including SMEs. That is why, in response to the latest national lockdown in January, the Chancellor announced £4.6 billion of further support to businesses on top of the measures adopted at our previous economic responses.

The Treasury remains committed to ensuring we take the right action at the right time to support individuals and businesses in every region and nation of the United Kingdom. We will continue to take a flexible approach and keep all restrictions and policies under review.

Kemi Badenoch
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
26th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of the net zero target on (a) the banking industry and (b) SMEs.

Our analysis of the impacts of net zero is ongoing and applies across the whole economy. In the coming year, HM Treasury will publish the Final Report of its Net Zero Review, which will set out the costs and opportunities of the transition to net zero. An interim report was published in December 2020 that set out the analysis undertaken so far. The final report will take this analysis further, focusing on innovation and growth, competitiveness, household impacts, and embedding the findings.

The government has also committed to publishing its comprehensive Net Zero Strategy this year, including further plans for reducing emissions across all the UK’s major economic sectors.

Kemi Badenoch
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
22nd Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what proportion by value of taxes typically owed by businesses at the point of insolvency are expected to be covered by the extension of secondary preferential creditor status for HMRC to include VAT, PAYE, and other taxes.

The recent change to HMRC’s creditor status for certain debts ensures that when a business enters insolvency, more of the taxes paid in good faith by its employees and customers, but held temporarily by the business, go to fund public services as intended, rather than be distributed to other creditors. This measure is forecast to raise up to £255 million a year, and the average recovery will be determined on a case by case basis.

While there is no specific analysis of the impact for individual sectors the Government has engaged extensively with stakeholders in the finance industry and held a formal consultation on the policy design. Having considered all views carefully, the Government believes these reforms take a fair and proportionate approach, balancing the interests of taxpayers, the Exchequer and other creditors.

Bank lending to small and medium-sized businesses alone in 2019 was £57 billion, and the majority of business lending is by fixed charges and is unaffected by this measure. In part for this reason, this change is not expected to have a significant impact on financial institutions, the lending market or wider economy. The OBR did not make any adjustments to their economic forecast in response to this measure.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
22nd Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of the extension of secondary preferential creditor status for HMRC on business lending in the (a) retail and (b) manufacturing sector.

The recent change to HMRC’s creditor status for certain debts ensures that when a business enters insolvency, more of the taxes paid in good faith by its employees and customers, but held temporarily by the business, go to fund public services as intended, rather than be distributed to other creditors. This measure is forecast to raise up to £255 million a year, and the average recovery will be determined on a case by case basis.

While there is no specific analysis of the impact for individual sectors the Government has engaged extensively with stakeholders in the finance industry and held a formal consultation on the policy design. Having considered all views carefully, the Government believes these reforms take a fair and proportionate approach, balancing the interests of taxpayers, the Exchequer and other creditors.

Bank lending to small and medium-sized businesses alone in 2019 was £57 billion, and the majority of business lending is by fixed charges and is unaffected by this measure. In part for this reason, this change is not expected to have a significant impact on financial institutions, the lending market or wider economy. The OBR did not make any adjustments to their economic forecast in response to this measure.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
22nd Jan 2021
VAT
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate his Department has made of the value of deferred VAT payments under the Deferral Scheme for VAT that will become payable on or after 1 December 2020.

Approximately £34bn of the VAT that was due between 20 March and 30 June 2020 was deferred until 31 March 2021. Some businesses have started to pay deferred VAT ahead of 31 March 2021 but most of the £34bn remains outstanding.

Businesses can pay deferred VAT in full by 31 March 2021 or, should they wish, they can spread payment of deferred VAT over smaller monthly instalments. Further details are available at www.gov.uk/hmrc/vat-deferral.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
6th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how much additional revenue has been raised as a result of the decision to restrict mortgage interest relief for residential landlords to the basic rate of income tax, in each year since April 2017.

From April 2017 to April 2020, the Government phased in a restriction of deductions for finance costs for landlords of residential properties to the equivalent of the basic rate of income tax. The restriction makes the tax system fairer by ensuring landlords with higher incomes no longer receive the most generous tax treatment.

The restriction is estimated to have increased income tax liabilities by about £150 million in its first year (2017-18). Estimates for subsequent years are not available.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
12th Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what progress has been made on implementing the rules governing the extension of the maximum loan term under the coronavirus business interruption loan scheme from six to 10 years.

As part of the Winter Economy Plan, the Chancellor announced a range of measures to extend and reinforce the support provided to businesses during this challenging time.

The Chancellor announced Pay as you Grow options, providing greater flexibility to help Bounce Back Loan borrowers repay their loans on the terms which work best for them. In addition, we have since extended the application deadline for the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme, the Coronavirus Large Business Interruption Loan Scheme, the Bounce Back Loan Scheme and the Future Fund until 31 January.

The Chancellor also announced our intention to allow lenders to extend the repayment period for CBILS loans where this is needed up to 10 years. This is not a blanket extension of the term of CBILS loans. Rather, the change is to enable lenders to offer an extension of the term as forbearance where a borrower is in difficulty and could be helped by the extension. We are working to implement this change as soon as possible and will provide an update in due course.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
18th Jun 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of establishing a hydrogen strategy similar to those in (a) Germany, (b) Norway, (c) Canada, (d) the Netherlands, (e) Portugal or the European Commission's proposed EU-wide hydrogen strategy.

The Government takes its environmental responsibilities very seriously and welcomes international efforts to invest in technologies that will be needed to decarbonise the energy used in our economies.

We are committed to meeting our climate change targets, including net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. Hydrogen could be an important part of the transition to net zero.

We are investing in innovation, providing up to £121m to support a range of projects to explore and develop the potential of low carbon hydrogen. This includes production, storage and end use in heat, industry and transport.

In 2019 the Government published a consultation on business models for Carbon Capture and Storage, which sought views on support for low-carbon hydrogen. The response to the consultation will be published in due course.

Kemi Badenoch
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
25th Feb 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what representations he has received on the scope of the forthcoming review of business rates; and if he will ensure that the review assesses the potential merits of solutions from across the business tax system.

The Government has committed to a fundamental review of business rates and will set out further details in due course, including how interested groups and individuals can engage with and contribute to the review.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
25th Feb 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the scope is of the forthcoming review of business rates; and what plans he has for consulting industry during that review.

The Government has committed to a fundamental review of business rates and will set out further details in due course, including how interested groups and individuals can engage with and contribute to the review.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
10th Feb 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps he plans to take to build infrastructure at ports for undertaking customs checks on (a) vehicles and (b) goods coming from the EU from 1 January 2021.

HMRC will continue to engage with port authorities at key border locations to understand the constraints on different sites, and to discuss how to ensure that ports are operationally ready for the end of the transition period.

HMRC will also continue to keep their plans for additional infrastructure under review, depending on what is needed as part of the future trading relationship between the United Kingdom and the European Union.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much and what proportion of the National Crime Agency's budget has been spent on tackling economic crime in each of the last three years.

The National Crime Agency (NCA)’s overall budget is distributed across the agency according to need and operational priority. As serious and organised crime threats change, the agency retains the ability to flex its resources to react. It is not possible to provide a breakdown of budget allocated to tackling economic crime as there are a number of agency wide capabilities and functions that all commands have access to. We are, however, able to provide the total expenditure by the National Economic Crime Centre (NECC) which provides a partial figure of expenditure for our overall response to tackling economic crime.

The NCA Annual Report and Accounts provide the following Gross Expenditure over the past three years:

2018/19 - Gross expenditure for the Prosperity Command - £22.0m (Note the NECC was formally launched on 31 October 2018, before which the NCA’s Prosperity Command fulfilled some of the same functions. In the 2019/20 Annual Report, an apportionment of £6.7m in 2018/19 was made for the NECC.)

2019/20 - Gross expenditure for the NECC - £30.0m

2020/21 – Gross expenditure for the NECC - £35.5m

An important element of tackling economic crime and illicit finance is by denying criminals the benefit of their crimes. This disrupts organised crime groups and illicit finance flows and on this we have achieved some significant successes. The NCA’s success in denying criminal assets over the same three years totals £646.5m, which could have derived from any serious and organised crime threat. This demonstrates one element of our impact across all illicit finance for which we have readily available data.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many full-time equivalent staff have been employed by the National Crime Agency to tackle economic crime in each of the last three years.

In terms of the operational response, the Agency has a wide range of capabilities and functions that operate across different threat areas including economic crime. We are unable to provide a figure for the number of full-time equivalent staff who have been employed by the National Crime Agency (NCA) to tackle economic crime for the past three years as many units contribute to the efforts in different and varying amounts.

However, we are able to report on the number of staff within the Economic Crime Command which includes the National Economic Crime Centre (NECC) and the UK Financial Intelligence Unit (UKFIU).

The following table contains the approximate number of full time equivalent (FTE) staff for the Economic Crime Command, UK Financial Intelligence Unit and NECC since 2018. This is therefore a partial figure that does not reflect, for example, officers in Intelligence and Investigations Commands who conduct work in this threat area.

ECC (NECC and UKFIU) FTE (approximate)

2019 FY end

240

2020 FY end

300

2021 FY end

350

An important element of tackling economic crime and illicit finance is by denying criminals the benefit of their crimes. This disrupts organised crime groups and illicit finance flows and on this we have achieved some significant successes. The NCA’s success in denying criminal assets over the same three years totals £646.5m, which could have derived from any serious and organised crime threat. This demonstrates one element of our impact across all illicit finance for which we have readily available data.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate Sir Craig Mackey made of how much additional funding would be required to enable UK law enforcement to successfully tackle serious and organised crime.

My department published the key findings of Sir Craig Mackey’s Review on 16 March 2021. The recent Integrated Review of Security, Defence, Development and Foreign Policy set out the Government’s priorities for tackling serious and organised crime in response to Sir Craig’s Review, including strengthening the NCA and increasing regional and local policing capacity. We will assess future funding needed as part of the next spending review.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
19th Apr 2021
What steps he is taking to promote homeownership.

This Government cares deeply about helping even more people to achieve the dream of owning their own home, and turning Generation Rent into Generation Buy.

And today we see many of the country’s largest lenders launch the new 95% mortgages – backed by the Government’s new mortgage guarantee announced by the Chancellor at last month’s Budget.

This comes on top of our Shared Ownership reforms, our new Help to Buy scheme, and our First Homes scheme – all of which will help more people get onto the housing ladder and have a home they can call their own.

Robert Jenrick
Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government
10th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what discussions he has had with the Chancellor of the Exchequer on the redesign of the Housing Infrastructure Fund.

We have developed a range of funding initiatives to help tackle the housing crisis and deliver new housing. Those schemes include the Housing Infrastructure Fund, which has allocated around £4 billion to support the delivery of new and improved infrastructure which will unlock up to 320,000 homes.

However, to achieve our ambitions we need to go further. That is why we announced in the Queen’s speech and as part of Budget 2020, that we will launch a new £10 billion Single Housing Infrastructure Fund (SHIF) to provide the roads, schools and GP surgeries needed to support new homes by funding the provision of strategic infrastructure and assembling land for development.

As we made clear at Budget, we will make further statements at the Spending Review.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
30th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, if he will make an assessment of the effectiveness of the 80:20 funding formula used by Homes England to ensure an equitable distribution of funding; and if he will make a statement.

This government is committed to unlocking potential right across the country, and whilst some funds have been primarily targeted towards those places where homes are too expensive or in too short supply, they have been utilised in all regions. It is important in some respects to direct funding to areas where there is the greatest affordability challenge, but any government that wants to level up must also direct infrastructure investment for housing to other parts of the country as well, and we will be bearing this in mind going forward.

As we respond to the effects of the coronavirus pandemic, I agree we need to take a fresh look at how all corners of the country can prosper and benefit from the funding they need, building on the action we've already taken through the £3.6 billion Towns Fund, £400 million Brownfield Fund, and £900 million Getting Building Fund.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
1st Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what plans his Department has to fast-track reforms to permitted development rights as part of Project Speed to assist the deployment of mobile networks and 5G, and benefit rural coverage through the Shared Rural Network Initiative.

In August 2019, a joint consultation by the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government and the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport was launched to consider amending permitted development rights to support increased mobile coverage and 5G deployment.

The consultation closed on 04 November 2019. The Government is considering the replies and will issue a response in due course. Subject to the outcome of this consultation, if the proposals are taken forward, we anticipate undertaking a further consultation on the detail of those proposals.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what steps his Department is taking to use the Home Building Fund and land owned by Homes England to diversify the house building sector and support micro and small to medium-sized house builders.

Continuing to build the homes the country needs is a priority for the Government and we recognise the important role that small and medium enterprises (SMEs) play in delivering new homes. We have been supporting the sector through various measures to boost confidence and retain capacity. £2.5 billion of the £4.5 billion Home Building Fund is targeted at SME builders and innovators and helps viable development schemes progress. The Home Building Fund encourages greater innovation, improves market resilience and diversifies housing delivery by enabling SMEs to increase their output.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
10th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what progress he has made on bringing forward legislative proposals to introduce a corporate offence of failure to prevent fraud and money laundering.

The Government is considering the case for reforming the law on CCL and will publish a response to the Call for Evidence in due course.

Lucy Frazer
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)