Peter Aldous Portrait

Peter Aldous

Conservative - Waveney

Nuclear Energy (Financing) Bill
14th Nov 2021 - 14th Nov 2021
Draft Registration of Overseas Entities Bill (Joint)
19th Feb 2019 - 6th Nov 2019
Environmental Audit Committee
20th Jul 2015 - 3rd May 2017
Environmental Audit Committee
26th Jul 2010 - 30th Mar 2015


Scheduled Event
Thursday 8th September 2022
13:50
Westminster Hall debate - Westminster Hall
8 Sep 2022, 1:50 p.m.
General debate on supporting local food infrastructure
View calendar
Division Votes
None available
Speeches
Wednesday 20th July 2022
Oral Answers to Questions
T4.   Will my right hon. Friend outline the discussions he has had with his colleagues in Government so as to …
Written Answers
Monday 1st August 2022
Saltwater Fish: Conservation
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, in light of recent scientific advice published by …
Early Day Motions
Thursday 14th June 2018
RECYCLING OF PAPER COFFEE AND TEA CUPS
That this House welcomes the recycling initiative for paper coffee and tea cups launched by the Paper Cup Alliance, Alliance …
Bills
Wednesday 10th June 2020
Local Electricity Bill 2019-21
A Bill to enable electricity generators to become local electricity suppliers; and for connected purposes.
MP Financial Interests
Monday 27th June 2022
8. Miscellaneous
From 7 June 2022, Non-executive Chair of REAF, a Community Interest company with the objective of reviving the East Anglian …
EDM signed
Wednesday 8th September 2021
Communication of changes to the state pension age for 1950s-born women
That this House notes the recent findings of the Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman's report entitled Women's State Pension Age: …
Supported Legislation
Wednesday 13th July 2022
Fashion Supply Chain (Code and Adjudicator) Bill 2022-23
A Bill to provide for a Code of Practice to be followed by retailers of fashion clothing, footwear and accessories …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Peter Aldous has voted in 507 divisions, and 12 times against the majority of their Party.

9 Feb 2021 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
Peter Aldous voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 13 Conservative No votes vs 341 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 351 Noes - 276
19 Jan 2021 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
Peter Aldous voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 11 Conservative No votes vs 344 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 353 Noes - 277
12 Oct 2020 - Agriculture Bill - View Vote Context
Peter Aldous voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 14 Conservative No votes vs 327 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 332 Noes - 279
2 Sep 2020 - Recall of MPs (Change of Party Affiliation) - View Vote Context
Peter Aldous voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 41 Conservative No votes vs 47 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 55 Noes - 52
20 Jul 2020 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
Peter Aldous voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 12 Conservative Aye votes vs 323 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 263 Noes - 326
17 Jun 2020 - Health and Personal Social Services - View Vote Context
Peter Aldous voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 104 Conservative Aye votes vs 124 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 253 Noes - 136
22 Nov 2021 - Health and Care Bill - View Vote Context
Peter Aldous voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 19 Conservative No votes vs 269 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 272 Noes - 246
23 Nov 2021 - Health and Care Bill - View Vote Context
Peter Aldous voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 18 Conservative Aye votes vs 276 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 219 Noes - 280
30 Mar 2022 - Health and Care Bill - View Vote Context
Peter Aldous voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 10 Conservative No votes vs 243 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 249 Noes - 167
30 Mar 2022 - Health and Care Bill - View Vote Context
Peter Aldous voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 8 Conservative No votes vs 245 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 247 Noes - 150
25 Apr 2022 - Health and Care Bill - View Vote Context
Peter Aldous voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 11 Conservative No votes vs 276 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 278 Noes - 182
25 Apr 2022 - Health and Care Bill - View Vote Context
Peter Aldous voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 11 Conservative No votes vs 280 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 282 Noes - 183
View All Peter Aldous Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Boris Johnson (Conservative)
Prime Minister, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, and Minister for the Union
(16 debate interactions)
Gavin Williamson (Conservative)
(14 debate interactions)
George Eustice (Conservative)
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
(11 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Legislation Debates
Fisheries Act 2020
(4,520 words contributed)
Environment Act 2021
(1,968 words contributed)
Local Electricity Bill 2019-21
(1,430 words contributed)
Health and Care Act 2022
(997 words contributed)
View All Legislation Debates
View all Peter Aldous's debates

Latest EDMs signed by Peter Aldous

6th September 2021
Peter Aldous signed this EDM on Wednesday 8th September 2021

Communication of changes to the state pension age for 1950s-born women

Tabled by: Andrew Gwynne (Labour - Denton and Reddish)
That this House notes the recent findings of the Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman's report entitled Women's State Pension Age: our findings on the Department for Work and Pensions' communication of changes; urges the Government to recognise the negative effects of successive DWP maladministration; calls for compensation for 1950s-born women; …
94 signatures
(Most recent: 24 Jan 2022)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 45
Scottish National Party: 27
Democratic Unionist Party: 6
Liberal Democrat: 5
Independent: 4
Plaid Cymru: 3
Conservative: 2
Social Democratic & Labour Party: 2
Green Party: 1
Alba Party: 1
14th October 2019
Peter Aldous signed this EDM on Monday 28th October 2019

Women Against State Pension Inequality

Tabled by: Grahame Morris (Labour - Easington)
That this House calls on the Government to financially support women worst affected by the accelerated increase in the state pension age introduced through the Pensions Act 2011; notes with concern that significant numbers of women were unaware of pension age equalisation set out in the Pensions Act 1995; acknowledges …
45 signatures
(Most recent: 4 Nov 2019)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 20
Scottish National Party: 7
Independent: 4
Democratic Unionist Party: 4
Conservative: 3
Liberal Democrat: 3
Plaid Cymru: 3
Green Party: 1
View All Peter Aldous's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Peter Aldous, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Peter Aldous has not been granted any Urgent Questions

3 Adjournment Debates led by Peter Aldous

Tuesday 25th May 2021
Monday 20th January 2020

4 Bills introduced by Peter Aldous


A Bill to amend the law relating to mobile homes.

This Bill received Royal Assent on 26th March 2013 and was enacted into law.


A Bill to enable electricity generators to become local electricity suppliers; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading
Wednesday 10th June 2020
(Read Debate)

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to make provision about protecting retention deposits in connection with construction contracts; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 9th January 2018

A bill to require the inclusion on vehicle fuel receipts of the amounts of each tax paid; to require all retail fuel pumps to display the amounts of taxes paid when dispensing fuel; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 1st February 2017
(Read Debate)

164 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
2 Other Department Questions
28th Jun 2022
To ask the hon. Member for Broxbourne, representing the House of Commons Commission, if the Commission will undertake a review into the travel subsidy regime for schools to undertake educational visits to Parliament, in the context of disparities between the level of subsidy received by schools in Norfolk and Suffolk.

The Commission notes that the Finance Committee has recently requested a briefing on the specific issues raised and the request for a review. The Commission will write to the Member after the matter has been considered and any recommendations made.

22nd Jul 2020
What steps the Government is taking to ensure economic opportunity for women as the economy reopens and covid-19 lockdown restrictions are eased.

We came into this pandemic with a record employment rate for women at 72.9% to the end March 2020, and our measures so far have protected millions of jobs.

The Government has launched a plan for jobs to Get Britain Back into Work, targeting support to get those who can, back into work as quickly as possible. We will work to provide more intensive support for those who are further away from the labour market.

19th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether it is the Government's policy to advocate for the UK’s return to the North Sea Energy Cooperation.

The UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement provides for the establishment of a specific forum for cooperation in relation to offshore grid development and the large renewable energy potential of the North Seas region, similar to the previous North Seas Energy Cooperation. The Government is currently negotiating the terms of cooperation with the European Commission, with a view to agreeing a Memorandum of Understanding that is acceptable to both sides as soon as possible.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
19th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to engage his counterparts in other countries bordering the North Sea on energy cooperation in the North Sea.

The North Seas cooperation, as laid out by Government in its British Energy Security Strategy, will accelerate the development of offshore windfarms with links to continental power grids. This will unleash hundreds of gigawatts of clean energy into North Seas countries’ electricity systems.

The Government has strong, cooperative relationships with North Seas partners and has recently concluded a Treaty with Norway on interconnection and a Memorandum of Understanding with Belgium on offshore cooperation.

The Government has also been working with Denmark to agree to formalise cooperation on the energy transition and is currently negotiating the terms of cooperation on North Seas Energy Cooperation with the European Commission.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
19th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent conversations he has had with his counterpart in the Norwegian Government on the North Sea Link interconnector.

On 23 March 2022, my rt. hon. Friend the Secretary of State attended the International Energy Agency 2022 Ministerial meeting and met Mr Terje Aasland, Minister of Petroleum and Energy, Norway. Following this introduction, the Secretary of State wrote to Mr Terje Aasland on 1 April 2022 and copies of that letter will be placed in the Libraries of the House.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
19th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether officials in his Department have held discussions with representatives of network operators on the adequacy of the network's capacity to meet demand for heat pumps from 2025 and electric vehicle charging from 2023.

While network regulation is a matter for Ofgem, the Government maintains regular dialogue with network operators including on their plans to prepare for heat pump and electric vehicle charging rollout. Effective integration of technologies such as heat pumps and electric vehicles will enable more flexible consumption, helping minimise network and system costs.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
19th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department is taking steps to support the domestic heat pump manufacturing industry in advance of the implementation of the Future Homes Standard in 2025.

The Government is putting in place a package of measures to build a globally competitive UK heat pump manufacturing sector. This includes policies to help build demand for heat pumps, like the £450 million Boiler Upgrade Scheme, as well as those that incentivise inward investment in the supply chain, such as the Super Deduction Capital Allowance Scheme and the Heat Pump Investment Accelerator Competition. There has already been significant investment in the UK heat pump supply chain over the past 12 months from companies like Mitsubishi, Octopus Energy, Vaillant and Ideal Heating, and the Government expects this growth to continue.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
19th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department is taking steps to provide support for gas boilers installers retraining as heat pump installers in advance of the implementation of the Future Homes Standard in 2025.

The Government is working closely with industry to support gas boiler installers retraining to install heat pumps. In September 2020 the Government launched a £6 million skills competition to provide training opportunities for the energy-efficiency and low-carbon heating supply chains, including heat pump training for over 2000 heating engineers. The Government is developing plans for a further Skills Training Competition in 2022/23 and intends to continue work with industry to support retraining.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
19th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if his Department will make an assessment of the potential merits of a heat pump installer certification scheme, similar to the Gas Safe Register, to protect consumers who are purchasing heat pumps.

I refer my hon. Friend to the answer I gave to the hon. Member for Strangford on 1st July 2022 to Question 22437.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
19th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department is taking to increase consumer awareness of heat pumps in advance of the implementation of the Future Homes Standard in 2025.

The Government is working to review and improve its communication to ensure that the public has access to the information and advice they need to make the right decisions. The Government has recently published a series of heat pump user case studies and heat pump user guides with Energy Systems Catapult. There is also further information and advice on heat pumps available through Simple Energy Advice service and the recently launched ‘Check if your home could be suitable for a heat pump’ calculator on GOV.UK.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
8th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the level of consistency between the UK’s recently-negotiated carve-out of fossil fuels from the Energy Charter Treaty and the UK Government's net zero strategy.

The modernised Energy Charter Treaty recognises the urgent need to address climate change and align with the UNFCCC and Paris Agreement. The Treaty removes the protection for new fossil fuel investments in the UK, in line with the UK’s Net Zero Strategy.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
1st Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department is taking to reduce potential bureaucratic barriers for scientists wishing to access the £50 million funding for motor neurone disease research announced in November 2021.

Funding for Motor Neurone Disease (MND) research is available now through applications to the National Institute for Health and Care Research (NIHR) and UK Research and Innovation (UKRI). The NIHR and UKRI are undertaking new activities to support the MND research community in effectively accessing funding. This includes a new £4.25 million MND partnership, which the government is delivering alongside charity partners, to pool expertise and resources across the research community to coordinate access to the committed funding.

11th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when the outcome of the Designing a climate compatibility checkpoint for future oil and gas licensing in the UK Continental Shelf consultation will be announced; when he expects such a checkpoint to come into force; and whether the checkpoint will require primary or secondary legislation.

The Government invited contributions on the design of the checkpoint, with a public consultation which closed at the end of February.

The Government is considering the responses to the consultation, including consideration of whether to put the checkpoint on a statutory footing, and will respond to the consultation in due course.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
11th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many and what proportion of jobs supported directly and indirectly by the UK oil and gas industry are in the supply chain.

Industry representative body Offshore Energies UK estimates that 178,500 jobs were supported by the UK oil and gas industry in 2021, including 25,700 direct and 91,700 indirect jobs in the supply chain.

These estimates are set out in the Workforce Insight Report 2021, which is published at oeuk.org.uk/product/workforce-insight-report-2021.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
9th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, for what reasons customers that use hydrotreated vegetable oil for heating and hot water in rural, off-grid homes are not able to benefit from the discounts of up to 80p per litre through government-supported obligation schemes, that are available to customers who use that fuel for vehicles, mobile machinery and aircraft.

The Government recognises that biofuels such as hydrotreated vegetable oil biodiesel may play a role in future off-gas-grid decarbonisation, particularly for properties that are not suitable for a heat pump.

However, further evidence is needed to consider what role these biofuels could play and to develop the policy framework which would support such a role.

The forthcoming Biomass Strategy will consider evidence on the likely supply and sustainability of mass feedstocks, including those used to produce biofuels, available to the UK, the total lifecycle emissions for different biomass uses, and the best uses of biomass across the economy to achieve the Government’s net zero target.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
9th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many off gas grid homes that applied to join the electrification of heat demonstration project heat pump trial were declined on the grounds of technical reasoning, cost or disruption caused.

Due to high levels of interest in the Electrification of Heat Demonstration Project, the majority of applicants did not progress through to installation, because they either did not meet the project requirements - including a target of 85% of homes to be on the gas grid - or withdrew from the project. Further findings and data from the project will be published in due course.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
9th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether Government policy on the roll out of heat pumps will not be finalised until the trials of the electrification of heat demonstration project are complete and a full report has been published, including all technical and financial data, to enable time for sufficient scrutiny of the project.

As set out in the Heat and Buildings Strategy, the Government is taking action now to decarbonise heat in buildings and to stay on track to meet net zero. Extensive evidence suggests that heat pumps are a cost-effective means of decarbonising heat in homes and businesses. The Government will soon launch the Boiler Upgrade Scheme to support the installation of heat pumps. The Electrification of the Heat Demonstration Project will provide further insights into enabling heat pump deployment. Findings and data from the project will be published in due course.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
11th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what progress his Department is making on the Employment Bill; and when he plans to introduce that legislation.

The Employment Bill will support the Government’s aim to build a high skilled, high productivity, high wage economy that delivers on our ambition to make the UK the best place in the world to work and grow a business. COVID-19 is having a profound impact on the labour market, so it is right that we introduce the Employment Bill when we are sure it will address the needs of businesses and workers in the post-Covid economy. We will bring forward the Employment Bill when the Parliamentary time allows it. In the meantime, we will continue to take necessary action to support businesses and protect jobs.

We have already made significant progress in bringing forward legislation to protect workers’ rights, including:

  • Giving all workers the right to receive a statement of their rights from day one;
  • Introducing new rights to workers to receive a payslip and for payslips for hourly paid workers to include the numbers of hours worked;
  • Quadrupling the maximum additional penalty fine that Employment Tribunals can use for employers who treat their workers badly;
  • Closing a loophole which sees agency workers employed on cheaper rates than permanent workers;
  • Extending the holiday pay reference period from 12 to 52 weeks, ensuring those in seasonal or atypical roles get fair holiday pay; and

Announcing a new naming scheme for employers who fail to pay Employment Tribunal awards.

Paul Scully
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
16th Nov 2021
What steps his Department is taking to increase funding for research and development.

We are making the UK a Science Superpower and the Spending Review confirmed we will be funding the fastest increase in R&D spending ever. We are increasing core science funding, doubling Innovate UK’s budget, giving £800m for ARIA and putting £1.7bn into Net Zero R&D.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
15th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he plans to take in response to Ofgem’s July 2020 consultation, Supporting Retail Innovation, to provide derogations from standard licence conditions and grant supply licences for specific geographic areas or premises types; and whether Ofgem plans to progress its consideration of a local electricity supply licence.

The right to local energy supply already exists under the Electricity Act 1989. As the independent regulator, Ofgem has powers to award supply licenses that are restricted to specified geographical areas or premise types. In some circumstances, electricity suppliers can also apply to Ofgem for a derogation from a particular provision of their supply licence. If granted, those provisions of the supply licence will not apply.

In July 2020 Ofgem consulted on proposed changes to their approach to granting supply licences for specific geographical areas or premise types and to supply licence conditions relating to derogations, to support innovation in the retail energy market. The consultation closed on 12 October 2020, and we await Ofgem’s announcement on any next steps.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
15th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to Ofgem’s July 2018 Call for Evidence on Future Supply Market Arrangements, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of reforming the supplier hub model.

The December 2020 Energy White Paper committed the Government to review the overall retail market regulatory framework, including for energy supply, to make sure that it is fit for purpose in the future, and accommodates emerging and innovative business models that can best meet consumer needs and contribute to our net-zero ambitions. The Government will engage with industry and consumer groups this year to assess what market framework changes may be required, in advance of a formal consultation.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
15th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether, as part of the process of issuing a Strategy and Policy Statement to Ofgem as set out in the Energy White Paper, his Department plans to include guidance to Ofgem on steps to support community energy and to establish a right to local supply.

As set out in the Energy White Paper, the Government will consult on an energy sector Strategy and Policy Statement (SPS) for Ofgem during the course of 2021. The consultation will be a chance to engage with stakeholders from across the energy sector.

The SPS will reflect the strategic priorities and policy outcomes of the Government’s energy policy and the roles of Government, Ofgem and other parties which are collectively responsible for delivering these outcomes.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
15th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the follow-up to the recent call for evidence on the electricity exemptions regime, whether he has made an assessment of the potential merits of modifying the exemptions regime to enable community or local supply.

The current electricity licence exemptions regime already provides a framework for small scale electricity supply without the need for a licence. For example, there is an exemption for those who do not at any time supply more electrical power than 5 megawatts of which not more than 2.5 megawatts is supplied to domestic consumers.

The recent call for evidence is part of a wider review of the exemptions regime. We are currently considering responses to the call for evidence and will issue a response in due course.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
15th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether the Government plans to issue a call for evidence or consult on community energy and local supply in advance of the publication of the Net Zero Strategy to inform its proposals.

The Government has ongoing discussions with Community Energy England and other community and local energy groups, and the views and evidence provided are being taken into account as we consider future plans for community energy in the Net Zero Strategy.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
15th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when Ofgem plans to issue its first annual report on the Smart Export Guarantee (SEG) scheme; whether that report will include the range, nature and uptake of SEG tariffs; when his Department plans to carry out its review of the effectiveness of that scheme; and what steps his Department is planning to take to improve the route to market for community energy generators.

Ofgem are required to publish a report on the SEG each calendar year, starting in 2021. Ofgem are currently in the process of collecting data from suppliers, with plans to publish the first report later this year. This will include information regarding available SEG tariffs, the size and technology of installations, the electricity exported, and the payments provided. BEIS will review the findings and consider whether any changes to the SEG are required in the future.

On route to market for community energy generators, our recent call for evidence, as part of a wider review of the licence exemptions regime for supply and generation, is designed to ensure licence exemptions are fit for purpose in the changing landscape. BEIS are currently considering responses and will issue a response in due course.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
8th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to increase the production of green hydrogen from nuclear energy.

My Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Minister’s 10 Point Plan confirmed our aim, working with industry, for 5GW of low carbon hydrogen production capacity by 2030 for use across the economy.

The Government welcomes the nuclear industry’s ambition to support low-carbon hydrogen production. BEIS funded EdF’s ‘Hydrogen to Heysham’ feasibility study[1] showing that current nuclear technologies are technically capable of producing low-carbon hydrogen in the 2020s. Recognising planned decommissioning and the time required to build new nuclear, we assess that the amount of hydrogen produced from nuclear in this period will be determined by the availability of nuclear power for this purpose.

The forthcoming UK Hydrogen Strategy will set out further detail on the role of hydrogen production technologies in meeting our 5GW ambition. This ambition will be supported by a range of measures, including a £240 million Net Zero Hydrogen Fund, and our preferred long term, sustainable business model, which we will finalise in 2022. We intend to support a range of low carbon production methods but will be guided by timing, volumes and other considerations to meet our 5GW ambition. We will be consulting shortly on these measures, alongside the publication of the UK Hydrogen Strategy.

[1] https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/hydrogen-supply-competition

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
8th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent assessment he has made of the UK's potential to produce green hydrogen from nuclear energy between (a) 2021 and 2025 and (b) 2025 and 2030.

My Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Minister’s 10 Point Plan confirmed our aim, working with industry, for 5GW of low carbon hydrogen production capacity by 2030 for use across the economy.

The Government welcomes the nuclear industry’s ambition to support low-carbon hydrogen production. BEIS funded EdF’s ‘Hydrogen to Heysham’ feasibility study[1] showing that current nuclear technologies are technically capable of producing low-carbon hydrogen in the 2020s. Recognising planned decommissioning and the time required to build new nuclear, we assess that the amount of hydrogen produced from nuclear in this period will be determined by the availability of nuclear power for this purpose.

The forthcoming UK Hydrogen Strategy will set out further detail on the role of hydrogen production technologies in meeting our 5GW ambition. This ambition will be supported by a range of measures, including a £240 million Net Zero Hydrogen Fund, and our preferred long term, sustainable business model, which we will finalise in 2022. We intend to support a range of low carbon production methods but will be guided by timing, volumes and other considerations to meet our 5GW ambition. We will be consulting shortly on these measures, alongside the publication of the UK Hydrogen Strategy.

[1] https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/hydrogen-supply-competition

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
8th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to increase the production of green hydrogen from onshore renewable energy.

My Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Minister’s 10 Point Plan confirmed our aim, working with industry, for 5GW of low carbon hydrogen production capacity by 2030 for use across the economy.

The UK has abundant sources of renewable electricity, and the Prime Minister has made a further commitment to deploying 40 gigawatts of offshore wind by 2030, alongside further deployment of onshore wind.

Our ongoing work with stakeholders suggests there is a strong pipeline of electrolytic hydrogen projects ready to deploy in the 2020s, building on our existing investment in research and innovation to ensure we can achieve the scale up in low carbon hydrogen production necessary to meet our future energy needs.

The forthcoming UK Hydrogen Strategy will set out further detail on the role of hydrogen production technologies in meeting our 5GW ambition, including electrolytic projects using offshore and onshore wind as a primary electricity input. This ambition will be supported by a range of measures, including a £240 million Net Zero Hydrogen Fund, and our preferred long term, sustainable business model, which we will finalise in 2022. We will be consulting shortly on these measures, alongside the publication of the UK Hydrogen Strategy.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
8th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to increase the production of green hydrogen from offshore renewable energy.

My Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Minister’s 10 Point Plan confirmed our aim, working with industry, for 5GW of low carbon hydrogen production capacity by 2030 for use across the economy.

The UK has abundant sources of renewable electricity, and the Prime Minister has made a further commitment to deploying 40 gigawatts of offshore wind by 2030, alongside further deployment of onshore wind.

Our ongoing work with stakeholders suggests there is a strong pipeline of electrolytic hydrogen projects ready to deploy in the 2020s, building on our existing investment in research and innovation to ensure we can achieve the scale up in low carbon hydrogen production necessary to meet our future energy needs.

The forthcoming UK Hydrogen Strategy will set out further detail on the role of hydrogen production technologies in meeting our 5GW ambition, including electrolytic projects using offshore and onshore wind as a primary electricity input. This ambition will be supported by a range of measures, including a £240 million Net Zero Hydrogen Fund, and our preferred long term, sustainable business model, which we will finalise in 2022. We will be consulting shortly on these measures, alongside the publication of the UK Hydrogen Strategy.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
8th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent assessment he has made of the UK's potential to produce hydrogen from onshore renewable energy between (a) 2021 and 2025 and (b) 2025 and 2030.

My Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Minister’s 10 Point Plan confirmed our aim, working with industry, for 5GW of low carbon hydrogen production capacity by 2030 for use across the economy.

The UK has abundant sources of renewable electricity, and the Prime Minister has made a further commitment to deploying 40 gigawatts of offshore wind by 2030, alongside further deployment of onshore wind.

Our ongoing work with stakeholders suggests there is a strong pipeline of electrolytic hydrogen projects ready to deploy in the 2020s, building on our existing investment in research and innovation to ensure we can achieve the scale up in low carbon hydrogen production necessary to meet our future energy needs.

The forthcoming UK Hydrogen Strategy will set out further detail on the role of hydrogen production technologies in meeting our 5GW ambition, including electrolytic projects using offshore and onshore wind as a primary electricity input. This ambition will be supported by a range of measures, including a £240 million Net Zero Hydrogen Fund, and our preferred long term, sustainable business model, which we will finalise in 2022. We will be consulting shortly on these measures, alongside the publication of the UK Hydrogen Strategy.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
8th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent assessment he has made of the UK's potential to produce hydrogen from offshore renewable energy between (a) 2021 and 2025 and (b) 2025 and 2030.

My Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Minister’s 10 Point Plan confirmed our aim, working with industry, for 5GW of low carbon hydrogen production capacity by 2030 for use across the economy.

The UK has abundant sources of renewable electricity, and the Prime Minister has made a further commitment to deploying 40 gigawatts of offshore wind by 2030, alongside further deployment of onshore wind.

Our ongoing work with stakeholders suggests there is a strong pipeline of electrolytic hydrogen projects ready to deploy in the 2020s, building on our existing investment in research and innovation to ensure we can achieve the scale up in low carbon hydrogen production necessary to meet our future energy needs.

The forthcoming UK Hydrogen Strategy will set out further detail on the role of hydrogen production technologies in meeting our 5GW ambition, including electrolytic projects using offshore and onshore wind as a primary electricity input. This ambition will be supported by a range of measures, including a £240 million Net Zero Hydrogen Fund, and our preferred long term, sustainable business model, which we will finalise in 2022. We will be consulting shortly on these measures, alongside the publication of the UK Hydrogen Strategy.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
26th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department is planning to take to help the British steel sector to decarbonise.

Decarbonising UK industry is a core part of the Government’s ambitious plan for the green industrial revolution. The Industrial Decarbonisation Strategy published on 17 March, commits to work with the Steel Council to consider the implications of the recommendation of the Climate Change Committee to ‘set targets for ore-based steelmaking to reach near-zero emissions by 2035’.

Hydrogen, electrification, and carbon capture utilisation and storage (CCUS) are the main technological options being examined as part of this process. The industry decarbonisation pathways technical annex of the strategy (pg. 153-155) presents two possible options for the decarbonisation of the iron and steel industry.

Our wide-ranging support for the steel sector includes: providing over £500m in recent years to help with the costs of energy; a £315m Industrial Energy Transformation Fund, which aims to support businesses with high energy use to cut their bills and reduce carbon emission; and our £250m Clean Steel Fund that will support the decarbonisation of the steel sector.

Nadhim Zahawi
Chancellor of the Exchequer
26th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when he plans to publish the Government's hydrogen strategy; and what assessment his Department’s has made of progress on expanding the UK’s hydrogen production capacity to date.

The first ever UK Hydrogen Strategy is set to be published before summer recess and will lay out what is required to build a hydrogen economy fit for 2030, Carbon Budget 6 and beyond, whilst maximising economic benefits and supporting jobs and skills.

The UK currently produces only a minimal amount of low carbon hydrogen, for localised transport projects or trials and testing in other end uses, and a significant increase in production levels will be required to meet our future energy needs. My Rt hon Friend the Prime Minister’s 10 Point Plan was clear on our aim for 5GW of low carbon hydrogen production capacity by 2030 for use across the economy. We have already published an expression of interest for our Low Carbon Hydrogen Supply 2 Competition to support further innovation in this area.

We will also consult, alongside the Hydrogen Strategy, on policy instruments to further support an increase in low carbon hydrogen production, including the £240m Net-Zero Hydrogen Fund (NZHF) and our preferred long term, sustainable business model, which we will finalise in 2022.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
26th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of allocating funding to hydrogen-based steelmaking to decarbonise the UK steel industry.

My Rt hon Friend the Prime Minister’s 10 Point Plan was clear on our aim for 5GW of low carbon hydrogen production capacity by 2030 for use across the economy. The forthcoming Hydrogen Strategy will set out what is required to build a hydrogen economy fit for 2030, Carbon Budget 6 and beyond, whilst maximising economic benefits. We will also consult on priority policies, including hydrogen business models, a low carbon hydrogen standard, and the £240m Net Zero Hydrogen Fund.

The Industrial Decarbonisation Strategy, published on 17 March, commits to work with the newly constituted Steel Council to consider the implications of the recommendation of the Climate Change Committee to ‘set targets for ore-based steelmaking to reach near-zero emissions by 2035’. Hydrogen-based steelmaking is one of the technological approaches being examined as part of this process.

To support these efforts, the Government has announced a £250 million Clean Steel Fund to support the UK steel sector to transition to lower carbon iron and steel production, through investment in new technologies and processes. The decarbonisation of the steel sector and industry more widely will also be supported through the £1 billion CCUS Infrastructure Fund (CIF) and the £240m NetZero Hydrogen Fund.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
22nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department is taking to (a) tackle Bounce Back Loan Scheme fraud and (b) help ensure that loans under that scheme are provided to businesses based on (i) need, (ii) long-term viability and (iii) potential repayment ability.

As part of the Bounce Back Loan Scheme (BBLS) application process, lenders undertake fraud checks, including Know Your Customer and Anti Money Laundering checks as required. In addition, the application form is clear – any individual who knowingly provides false information is at risk of criminal prosecution. We are working across Departments, along with lenders and law enforcement agencies to tackle fraudulent abuse of the scheme.

The borrower is required to self-declare that they meet the eligibility criteria for the scheme and are required to state whether they understand the costs associated with the repayment of the loan. They must also confirm that they are able, and intend to, complete timely repayments in future. Furthermore, the maximum facility size for any business borrowing under BBLS is subject to affordability limits specific to each business.

Paul Scully
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
22nd Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what her timetable is for the introduction of the Online Safety Bill to Parliament.

In May we published the Online Safety Bill in draft for pre-legislative scrutiny. Pre-legislative scrutiny finished on 14 December, when the Joint Committee reported with its recommendations. The DCMS sub-Committee and the Petitions Committee have both since also published reports relating to the Bill. Our intention remains to introduce the Bill as soon as possible, subject to the parliamentary timetable.

We have listened to stakeholders’ and parliamentarians’ views and have already announced several major policy changes to the Bill as a result. These include strengthening and clarifying the approach to illegal content, and widening the scope of the Bill to ensure that all pornography websites will have a duty to protect children from accessing their sites. We expect companies to take steps now to improve safety, and not wait for the legislation to come into force before acting.

8th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether he has made an assessment of the potential merits of introducing a bespoke financial support package for bingo clubs.

The government recognises that the ongoing impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic continue to be very challenging for businesses, including in the bingo sector. In recognition of the impact of requiring some businesses to remain closed for a longer period, an enhanced package of support was introduced, including Restart Grants of up to £18,000 per premises, specifically for those which were required to remain closed beyond Step 2. The package also included extensions to the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme and Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme, with further discretionary funding for allocation by Local Authorities.

Bingo clubs have accessed £44m of government support via the Coronavirus Jobs Retention Scheme (£26.8m), Eat Out to Help Out (£600k), Business Rates Relief (£15.9m) and Grant funding (£1.6m). We are continuing to work with organisations in the land-based gambling sector to understand the impacts now that they are open.

8th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether he has plans to introduce additional financial support for bingo clubs in England.

The government recognises that the ongoing impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic continue to be very challenging for businesses, including in the bingo sector. In recognition of the impact of requiring some businesses to remain closed for a longer period, an enhanced package of support was introduced, including Restart Grants of up to £18,000 per premises, specifically for those which were required to remain closed beyond Step 2. The package also included extensions to the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme and Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme, with further discretionary funding for allocation by Local Authorities.

Bingo clubs have accessed £44m of government support via the Coronavirus Jobs Retention Scheme (£26.8m), Eat Out to Help Out (£600k), Business Rates Relief (£15.9m) and Grant funding (£1.6m). We are continuing to work with organisations in the land-based gambling sector to understand the impacts now that they are open.

26th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what his timescale is for publication of the Tourism Recovery Plan; and if he will include measures to develop rather than maintain the domestic tourism industry in that Plan.

The Government intends to publish the Tourism Recovery Plan shortly. Alongside addressing short and medium term challenges, the plan will set out a long-term framework for how the Government will work with the sector to build back better from the pandemic - and ultimately develop a more sustainable, innovative, and data-driven tourism industry.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
19th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the Answer to Question 900784 in Prime Minister's Questions on 29 June 2022, Official Report, col 291, if he will publish a breakdown of the planned allocation of the £52m being invested to support the staffing situation in further education.

The department’s £52 million investment in the 2022/23 financial year will allow us to continue to support the further education (FE) sector with the recruitment, retention and development of teachers. The programmes allocated funding from this investment include Taking Teaching Further, T Level Professional Development, bursaries, mentoring support, and the Teach in FE recruitment campaign and digital service.

Andrea Jenkyns
Assistant Whip
11th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, which local authorities applied to his Department for permission to transfer funding from the school's block to the high needs block within the Dedicated Schools Grant for the financial years 2021-22 and 2022-23; and what the outcomes of those applications were.

The dedicated schools grant (DSG) conditions of grant permit local authorities to transfer 0.5% or below of their schools block funding, with the consent of their schools forum. Where the schools forum does not agree, or the transfer is above 0.5%, the local authority can apply to my right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education, to disapply the conditions of grant. This is known as a disapplication request.

In the 2021/22 financial year, the department received 16 block movement disapplication requests. One of these was withdrawn before a decision was made.

The table below details the further 15 requests, the name of the local authority, the amount of transfer requested in both percentage and cash, and the final decision. To note, the table below represents what was approved. Actual amounts transferred may differ.

Local Authority Name

Amount as a % of the schools block

Amount £

Decision

Swindon

0.12%

£191,100

Rejected

West Sussex

0.50%

£2,500,000

Rejected

Oxfordshire

0.50%

£2,000,000

Rejected

Surrey

0.50%

£3,400,000

Rejected

Cheshire East

0.50%

£1,100,000

Rejected

Cambridgeshire

1.00%

£3,800,000

Rejected

Dudley

1.00%

£2,180,000

Rejected

Barnsley

1.00%

£1,633,650

Approved

Kent

1.00%

£12,266,780

Approved

BCP*

1.10%

£2,406,161

Rejected (Forum agreed 0.50%)

Southwark

1.20%

£3,100,000

Approved

South Gloucestershire

1.30%

£2,200,000

Approved

Norfolk

1.50%

£8,000,000

Rejected (Forum agreed 0.50%)

Rotherham

1.50%

£3,000,000

Approved

Hillingdon

2.30%

£5,500,000

Rejected

In the 2022/23 financial year, the department received 19 block movement disapplication requests. Six of these were withdrawn before a decision was made. The table below details the further 13 requests, the name of the local authority, the amount of transfer requested in both percentage and cash, and the final decision. To note, the table below represents what was approved. Actual amounts transferred may differ.

Local Authority Name

Amount as a % of the schools block

Amount £

Decision

Leicestershire

0.50%

£2,300,000

Rejected

Staffordshire

0.50%

£2,800,000

Rejected

Wokingham

0.50%

£630,000

Rejected

Cheshire East

0.50%

£1,200,000

Rejected

Oxfordshire

0.50%

£1,600,000

Rejected

West Northamptonshire

0.69%

£2,100,000

Approved

Merton

0.70%

£1,000,000

Approved

Halton

1.00%

£1,017,926

Approved

Kent

1.00%

£10,000,000

Approved

Barnsley

1.00%

£1,697,773

Approved

South Gloucestershire

1.18%

£2,200,000

Approved

Norfolk

1.50%

£8,473,445

Approved

Rotherham

1.50%

£3,235,707

Approved

*BCP = Bournemouth, Christchurch and Poole

18th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when his Department plans to publish proposals for the GCSE in British Sign Language; and what his timetable is for including that subject in the National Curriculum.

The department is aiming to introduce a GCSE in British Sign Language (BSL) as soon as possible, if it meets the rigorous requirements that apply to all GCSEs. Officials are currently working closely with subject experts and Ofqual to develop the draft subject content. The department plans to consult publicly on the draft content later this year.

There are no current plans to make BSL a compulsory part of the national curriculum. Schools are free to teach BSL as part of their school curriculum to meet the needs of their pupils.

25th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether he will provide in-year funding for Further Education college courses that help tackle skills gaps in the economy.

The lagged funding mechanism for 16-19 education provides institutions with clear allocations, allowing them to make plans with confidence. However, from the 2020/21 academic year we have introduced T Levels which are currently funded in-year and have been developed in collaboration with employers and businesses so that the content meets the needs of industry. Further education colleges can also benefit from a High Value Course Premium (HVCP) of £400 per student. The HVCP was introduced in the 2020/21 academic year to encourage and support delivery of courses that are both associated with higher earnings and strategically important. We have announced this premium will increase by 50% to £600 per student in the 2022/23 academic year, to further strengthen the impact of the premium in encouraging and supporting colleges to deliver these key subjects.

In the 2021/22 financial year we made £95 million available for further education providers to deliver the free courses for jobs offer, which gives all adults access to their first level 3 qualifications in sector subject areas with strong wage outcomes and the ability to address key skills needs. It was confirmed at Budget that funding will be available for the next three years, and from April 2022 eligibility for the level 3 free courses for jobs offer will be expanded to also include any adult in England who is unemployed or earns under the national living wage annually, even if they have a level 3 qualification or higher.

We are continuing to invest in education and skills training for adults through the Adult Education Budget (AEB) (£1.34 billion in 2021/22). The principal purpose of the AEB is to engage adults and provide the skills and learning they need to equip them for work, an apprenticeship or further learning.

Currently, approximately 60% of the AEB is devolved to nine Mayoral Combined Authorities and the Mayor of London, acting where appropriate through the Greater London Authority. These authorities are now responsible for the provision of AEB-funded adult education for their residents and allocation of the AEB to providers. The Education and Skills Funding Agency (ESFA) will continue to be responsible for the remaining AEB in non-devolved areas.

ESFA providers’ AEB allocations for financial year 2021/22 have stayed the same as in 2020/21, with adjustments for the impact of devolution and to remove allocations that were for one year only. This was the fairest approach, enabling providers to support local economic recovery in 2021/22.

In-year performance management processes and rules are in place and these are detailed in the Adult education budget (AEB) funding rules 2021 to 2022, found here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/adult-education-budget-aeb-funding-rules-2021-to-2022.

For the financial year 2021/22, we are also giving providers the opportunity to earn an additional 3% on top of their ESFA AEB allocation for over-delivery to support growth in adult skills participation.

3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the IFS's briefing note, Further education and sixth form spending in England, published on 18 August 2021, what assessment he has made of potential effect the IFS-predicted 17% rise in the number of these students aged between 16-18 between 2019 and 2024 on education provision; and if he will provide a longer-term revenue and capital budget for education for students aged between 16-18.

The department forecasts 16-19 year old student numbers, taking into account population forecasts, when considering the need for future education funding for 16-19 year olds. The future budgets for this education provision will be considered in the Spending Review this autumn.

The department invested an additional £291 million in 16-19 education in the 2021-22 financial year. This was in addition to the £400 million awarded in the 2019 Spending Review. This allowed us to maintain the base rate of funding at £4,188 for all types of providers and to continue with the increased funding for high value and high cost subjects, including the High Value Courses Premium.

This year, the department has also made £83 million in capital funding available through the Post-16 Capacity Fund to support eligible post-16 providers to accommodate the upcoming increase in 16-19 year olds. Bids are currently being assessed and the outcome will be announced in due course.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will work with the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions to reform universal credit rules to ensure that no claimant is prevented from accessing training that will help them find meaningful employment.

My right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education and my right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, have already been working on Universal Credit matters, and the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) has announced a temporary extension to the length of time people can undertake training to develop work-related skills and qualifications, whilst still receiving Universal Credit to support their living costs. The length of time that Universal Credit claimants can spend on work-related, full-time training has been extended from up to 8 weeks to up to 12 weeks throughout the UK, and up to 16 weeks in England for the purpose of attending Skills Bootcamps. The change was implemented on 26 April and will run for a 6-month period, after which time the impact of this change will be reviewed.

There is already close and cross working across the government in respect of skills and employment. In England, the pre-employment training element of the DWP-led sector-based work academy programme (SWAP) is funded by the Department for Education through the adult education budget, which in several regions is managed by the relevant mayoral combined authority. The department is working with DWP to help deliver the extra 80,000 SWAP places for financial year 2021/22 announced by DWP in February this year. Professional, impartial careers information, advice and guidance underpins the range of measures being offered via the Plan For Jobs. Careers advisers help individuals and organisations to consider the different programmes, including apprenticeships, traineeships, Kickstart, SWAP, learning and upskilling opportunities, and help them to determine which route would be best for them. The department continues to work closely with DWP to make sure that our respective offers for job seekers and universal credit claimants complement each other and that customers enjoy a joined-up user experience, which helps them to progress.

The department is also working with the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy on the green jobs task force, which focuses on the immediate and longer-term challenges of delivering skilled workers for the UK’s transition to a net zero agenda.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether he plans to increase long-term funding to meet the needs of the further education sector.

We are investing an additional £291 million in 16-19 education in the 2021/22 financial year. This is in addition to the £400 million awarded in the 2019 Spending Review. This will allow us to maintain the base rate of funding at £4,188 for all types of providers and to continue with the increased funding for high value and high cost subjects, including the High Value Courses Premium. Overall, there has been an increase in cash terms of funding per student of over 9% in published allocations for the 2020/21 academic year compared with the 2019/20 academic year. This is following the rate increases in the 2019 Spending Review, and these higher rates will be maintained in 2021/22 allocations.

We are continuing to invest in education and skills training for adults through the Adult Education Budget (AEB): £1.34 billion in the 2020/21 academic year.

Future funding for 16-19 and AEB provision beyond 2021/22 is subject to the upcoming Spending Review.

We are also investing £138 million from the National Skills Fund for Free Courses for Jobs and Skills Bootcamps offers over the current Spending Review period. We remain committed to £2.5 billion investment, in England, for the National Skills Fund across five years.

In the 2021/22 financial year, funding available for investment in apprenticeships in England is almost £2.5 billion, double what was spent in 2010/11.

We are supporting employers to increase the use of apprenticeships by increasing the incentive payments for employer to £3,000 for each new apprentice they hire as a new employee.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what proportion of adults have Level 2 as their highest qualification; and how many of those people are (a) in employment, (b) unemployed and (c) claiming benefits.

The latest estimate as of the end of 2019 for the proportion of adults, aged between 19 and 64 years, who have level 2 as their highest qualification is 18%, as estimated by the Labour Force Survey and reported in the publication education and training statistics for the UK.

Data on employment, unemployment, pay and income, and benefits by highest qualification level for the wider age group of 16 to 64 year olds in the UK is estimated using the Annual Population Survey of 2019.

The table below shows the percentage and number of working age people, aged 16 to 64 years old, in the UK who are and not in full time education and either employed, economically inactive or unemployed who reported their highest qualification as level 2 in 2019. Those claiming benefits would either be classified as unemployed or economically inactive in the table below.

Percentage with level 2 as highest qualification

Number with level 2 as highest qualification

Employed

76%

4,640,000

Unemployed

3%

210,000

Economically Inactive

21%

1,277,000

Total

100%

6,128,000

Percentages in tables are rounded to whole numbers and figures are rounded to the nearest 1000.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
22nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 9 Mar 2021 to Question 159297 on Schools: Coronavirus, what other information or advice has been provided to (a) schools, (b) parents and (c) young people on applying exemptions from wearing face coverings in schools and classrooms; and which advice or guidance from his Department sets out what action should be taken if masks are removed to aid communication between teachers and pupils.

The Department’s advice on face coverings is outlined clearly in published guidance, which can be found at the following links: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/actions-for-schools-during-the-coronavirus-outbreak; https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/face-coverings-in-education.

We have also published information for parents and carers about attending schools, nurseries and colleges in the spring term 2021. This can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/what-parents-and-carers-need-to-know-about-early-years-providers-schools-and-colleges-during-the-coronavirus-covid-19-outbreak.

Our recommendation regarding the use of face coverings in classrooms applies to those in schools and colleges where Year 7 and above are educated unless social distancing can be maintained in classrooms. Whilst we recognise that the wearing of face coverings may impact communication, increased use of face coverings will strengthen the current safety measures in place in schools and support the return to face to face education.

As the guidance outlines, those who rely on visual signals for communication, or communicate with or provide support to such individuals, are currently exempt from any requirement to wear face coverings in schools and colleges or in public places. The same exemptions apply in schools and we expect staff, pupils and students to be sensitive to those needs, noting that some people are less able to wear face coverings and that the reasons for this may not be visible to others.

Schools should follow the system of controls as outlined in our guidance and put in place proportionate control measures that suit their individual circumstances, based on a thorough risk assessment. This should include making reasonable adjustments for disabled pupils and students to support them to access education successfully.

We continue to provide information to the sector on our guidance, and any changes to it, through regular departmental communications. These additional precautionary measures will be kept under review and we will update guidance as necessary.

26th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what advice he plans to give to secondary schools on how they can apply exemptions from wearing face coverings from the 8 March 2021 as covid-19 lockdown restrictions are eased.

The Department continues to work closely with other Government Departments throughout its response to the COVID-19 outbreak, including Public Health England (PHE) and the Department of Health and Social Care, as well as stakeholders across the sector. We continue to work to ensure that our policy is based on the latest scientific and medical advice, to continue to develop comprehensive guidance based on the PHE-endorsed ‘system of controls’ and to understand the impact and effectiveness of these measures on staff, pupils and parents.

The Department has recently published updated guidance for schools to support the return to full attendance from 8 March 2021, which includes updated advice on face coverings. The guidance can be found here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/964351/Schools_coronavirus_operational_guidance.pdf.

As the guidance outlines, where pupils in Year 7 and above are taught, we recommend that face coverings should be worn by adults and pupils when moving around the premises, outside of classrooms, such as in corridors and communal areas where social distancing cannot easily be maintained.

In addition, from 8 March 2021, we now also recommend that in those schools where pupils in Year 7 and above are taught, face coverings should be worn in classrooms unless social distancing can be maintained.

Some individuals are exempt from wearing face coverings. This includes people who cannot put on, wear or remove a face covering because of a physical or mental illness or impairment, or disability, or if you are speaking to or providing assistance to someone who relies on lip reading, clear sound or facial expressions to communicate. The same legal exemptions that apply to the wearing of face coverings in shops and on public transport also apply in schools.

Transparent face coverings, which may assist communication with someone who relies on lip reading, clear sound or facial expression to communicate, can also be worn. There is currently very limited evidence regarding the effectiveness or safety of transparent face coverings, but they may be effective in reducing the spread of COVID-19.

We are recommending these additional precautionary measures for a for a time limited period until Easter. As with all measures, we will keep this under review and update guidance as necessary.

26th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to his press release, dated Monday 22 February 2021 on the planned extended use of face coverings in class rooms in secondary schools in England, what guidance he (a) has issued and (b) plans to issue to (i) teachers and (ii) parents on (A) deaf and (B) other pupils who require lip reading, clear sound or facial expressions to communicate within such settings when face coverings are worn.

The Department continues to work closely with other Government Departments throughout its response to the COVID-19 outbreak, including Public Health England (PHE) and the Department of Health and Social Care, as well as stakeholders across the sector. We continue to work to ensure that our policy is based on the latest scientific and medical advice, to continue to develop comprehensive guidance based on the PHE-endorsed ‘system of controls’ and to understand the impact and effectiveness of these measures on staff, pupils and parents.

The Department has recently published updated guidance for schools to support the return to full attendance from 8 March 2021, which includes updated advice on face coverings. The guidance can be found here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/964351/Schools_coronavirus_operational_guidance.pdf.

As the guidance outlines, where pupils in Year 7 and above are taught, we recommend that face coverings should be worn by adults and pupils when moving around the premises, outside of classrooms, such as in corridors and communal areas where social distancing cannot easily be maintained.

In addition, from 8 March 2021, we now also recommend that in those schools where pupils in Year 7 and above are taught, face coverings should be worn in classrooms unless social distancing can be maintained.

Some individuals are exempt from wearing face coverings. This includes people who cannot put on, wear or remove a face covering because of a physical or mental illness or impairment, or disability, or if you are speaking to or providing assistance to someone who relies on lip reading, clear sound or facial expressions to communicate. The same legal exemptions that apply to the wearing of face coverings in shops and on public transport also apply in schools.

Transparent face coverings, which may assist communication with someone who relies on lip reading, clear sound or facial expression to communicate, can also be worn. There is currently very limited evidence regarding the effectiveness or safety of transparent face coverings, but they may be effective in reducing the spread of COVID-19.

We are recommending these additional precautionary measures for a for a time limited period until Easter. As with all measures, we will keep this under review and update guidance as necessary.

1st May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what proportion of children reported to be experiencing domestic abuse have an Education, Health and Care plan in the most recent period for which figures are available; and how many of those children are attending school during the covid-19 outbreak.

252,580 children were recorded as having domestic abuse as a factor at the end of their referral assessment[1] in the year ending 31 March 2019. This includes children where the assessment has raised concerns about the child, concerns about the parent(s) or concerns about other adults in the household. We do not publish figures showing where there are solely concerns about the child being the victim of domestic abuse. 46.0% of children in need on 31 March 2019 have special educational needs (SEN), including 21.6% with an education, health and care (EHC) plan. Figures for the number of children with domestic abuse as an assessment factor and an EHC plan are not available.

For school attendance, 69,000 of the children and young people in attendance on Thursday 7 May were classed by schools as vulnerable. Of these, around 20,800 of the children and young people in attendance on Thursday 7 May were children and young people with SEN who have an EHC plan. Figures for the number of children with domestic abuse as an assessment factor are not available in the school attendance data collection.

Please note that the department has set an expectation that children with a social worker, including those where domestic abuse is a factor, are to attend. This is the expectation unless their social worker decides that they are at less risk at home or in their placement, for example, due to underlying health conditions. In the event of non-attendance, providers should follow up with the parent or carer – and social worker or local authority, where appropriate – to explore reasons for absence. Where a vulnerable child does not take up their place at school or college or discontinues, the provider should notify their social worker. Where appropriate, they should keep in contact with the family.

[1] When a child is referred to children’s social care, an assessment is carried out to identify if the child is in need of services, which local authorities have an obligation to provide under section 17 of the Children Act 1989. These services can include, for example, family support (to help keep together families experiencing difficulties), leaving care support (to help young people who have left local authority care), adoption support or disabled children’s services (including social care, education and health provision).

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what plans he has to promote physical literacy and competitive sport within schools.

?The Government is already taking significant steps to promote physical literacy and competitive sport in schools. Through the Primary Physical Education and Sport Premium, we have invested over £1 billion of ring-fenced funding to primary schools to improve physical education (PE) and sport since 2013. Positive outcomes reported by schools include increases in the level of competitive sport, increases in the proportion of children doing 30 minutes of activity each day at school, and increases in teacher knowledge and confidence.

The Government also provides support for competitive sport through the School Games programme funded by Sport England and delivered by the Youth Sport Trust. It provides events at local, regional and national levels in 40 different sports. Schools can also enter competitions run by the different National Governing Bodies for sports.

The Department is working with DCMS to develop further proposals to deliver on the manifesto commitment to invest in primary school PE teaching and ensure that it is being properly delivered to develop physical literacy. We will also build on our existing School Sport and Activity Action plan to do more to help schools make good use of their sports facilities including for competitive sport. Proposals will be confirmed later in the year.

19th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, in light of recent scientific advice published by ICES, whether the Government will (a) support a position of zero catch of blackspot seabream, (b) introduce additional unilateral measures for their conservation in UK waters and (c) introduce closures to protect spawning sites.

Blackspot seabream (western red seabream) is recognised as seriously depleted by the International Council for Exploration of the Sea (ICES). The recent catch advice issued by ICES, for zero catches of blackspot seabream, will form a central part of the UK position for this stock for the forthcoming consultations. This approach is consistent with the UK’s commitments to make the best use of scientific advice for the management of fishing activities. Blackspot seabream is a shared stock with the EU. The UK and EU are developing improved management measures to support its long-term recovery through the Specialised Committee on Fisheries.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
19th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, which species the UK considers to be forage fish; and whether the Government will adopt a more precautionary approach to the management of the species based on their wider ecological importance.

Forage fish are important to the ecosystem as they provide food for predator fish and sea birds. We are reviewing our policy on forage fish that are caught for industrial purposes. In the context of the Northeast Atlantic, there are specific fleet segments that specialise in this type of fishing, and their effort within UK waters is targeted on particular species, principally sandeel and Norway pout.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
19th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether the Government has plans to replace combined turbot and brill and witch and lemon sole total allowable catches (TACs) with single species TACs in the context of recent scientific advice published by ICES that multi-species TACs prevent effective management.

We have asked ICES to update its advice from 2018 on the effectiveness of management arrangements for these stocks which are managed by joint TACs. ICES have indicated their advice will be available during the autumn and we expect to make it our policy for the annual fisheries negotiation with the EU to manage these stocks based on the updated advice provided by ICES. This request to ICES is an example of the work we are doing through the Specialised Committee for Fisheries to address challenges where we think new or different advice is needed.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
19th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to ICES Advice 2022 on UK cod stocks, if he will establish catch limits for cod at sustainable levels.

The UK advocates an approach towards setting total allowable catches (TACs) for cod stocks and other species that is founded on the best available scientific advice, which seeks to maintain or rebuild sustainable fish stocks and fisheries in the long term. For many whitefish stocks, such as cod, a further key consideration when setting the TAC is their interaction with other stocks caught in the same mixed fishery.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
19th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will make an assessment of the effectiveness of his policies on the protection of deep sea species from overexploitation.

Each year, the UK publishes the sustainability outcomes of the annual fisheries negotiations. This sets out the number of Total Allowable Catches (TACs) that have been set in line with the International Council for the Exploration Sea (ICES) advice. The UK is committed to promoting the sustainability for all fisheries stocks including deep sea species.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
8th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will mark World Oceans Day by committing that the UK will not set any future fishing quotas in excess of scientific advice.

The UK’s approach is that Total Allowable Catches for all species should be based on the best available scientific advice. The goal is to seek to maintain fish stocks and fisheries at sustainable levels in the long term or to rebuild them to such levels, where necessary.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
8th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will mark World Oceans Day by committing that the UK will ban (a) bottom-towed fishing gear and (b) other destructive fishing activities from all offshore Marine Protected Areas.

This is a devolved matter and the information provided therefore relates to England only.

We have designated over 100 Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) since 2010, so that now 40% of English waters are within the protected area network. We have already committed that the next step is to ensure all of our MPAs are properly protected, supported by our proposed legally binding target under the Environment Act which we are consulting on at present. We have already introduced byelaws in the first four sites which ban bottom towed gear over sensitive habitats and published a call for evidence relating to the next thirteen sites. We are aiming to have all MPAs in English offshore waters protected from damaging fishing activity by 2024.

11th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of a package of support for the UK fishing industry to help manage the rising cost of fuel.

The increasing cost of fuel is affecting a wide range of sectors including the fishing industry. Our primary focus is on analysing how the UK fleet is being affected by fuel and fish prices. Defra Ministers and officials are working with colleagues across government, along with a wide range of stakeholders, and are closely monitoring the situation.

The Government has shown long term commitment to the sector and will continue to do so in the future. As part of this long term commitment we are not planning to repurpose funds to mitigate the impacts of high fuel prices. We consider this is a cross cutting issue, and so are liaising with colleagues across government to determine the longer-term impacts and any mitigating actions.

Defra will continue to support the sector through the £100 million UK Seafood Fund, which as one of its main objectives seeks to increase the sustainability of the sector, including through investing in the transition to renewable energy.

Defra is also making £32.7 million in annual funding available across all four nations of the UK which last year enabled grant schemes to be opened in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland, benefiting hundreds of UK businesses. The grant scheme for England, the Fisheries and Seafood Scheme, delivers investment to safeguard the long-term sustainability, resilience and prosperity of the seafood sector.

In recognition of the challenges in the maritime sector, including the fishing industry, in the 2022 Spring Budget the Chancellor overturned the 2020 announcement to remove the red diesel entitlement for commercial boat operators, meaning the industry can continue to use red diesel, in addition to the Marine Voyages Relief, which gives 100% relief on fuel duty costs.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
11th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether his Department has made an assessment of the impact of the rising fuel costs on the UK fishing industry and coastal communities.

The increasing cost of fuel is affecting a wide range of sectors including the fishing industry. Our primary focus is on analysing how the UK fleet is being affected by fuel and fish prices. Defra Ministers and officials are working with colleagues across government, along with a wide range of stakeholders, and are closely monitoring the situation.

The Government has shown long term commitment to the sector and will continue to do so in the future. As part of this long term commitment we are not planning to repurpose funds to mitigate the impacts of high fuel prices. We consider this is a cross cutting issue, and so are liaising with colleagues across government to determine the longer-term impacts and any mitigating actions.

Defra will continue to support the sector through the £100 million UK Seafood Fund, which as one of its main objectives seeks to increase the sustainability of the sector, including through investing in the transition to renewable energy.

Defra is also making £32.7 million in annual funding available across all four nations of the UK which last year enabled grant schemes to be opened in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland, benefiting hundreds of UK businesses. The grant scheme for England, the Fisheries and Seafood Scheme, delivers investment to safeguard the long-term sustainability, resilience and prosperity of the seafood sector.

In recognition of the challenges in the maritime sector, including the fishing industry, in the 2022 Spring Budget the Chancellor overturned the 2020 announcement to remove the red diesel entitlement for commercial boat operators, meaning the industry can continue to use red diesel, in addition to the Marine Voyages Relief, which gives 100% relief on fuel duty costs.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
11th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what discussions his Department has had with (a) HM Treasury and (b) the Department for Transport on providing support to the UK fishing industry and coastal communities regarding the rising cost of fuel.

The increasing cost of fuel is affecting a wide range of sectors including the fishing industry. Our primary focus is on analysing how the UK fleet is being affected by fuel and fish prices. Defra Ministers and officials are working with colleagues across government, along with a wide range of stakeholders, and are closely monitoring the situation.

The Government has shown long term commitment to the sector and will continue to do so in the future. As part of this long term commitment we are not planning to repurpose funds to mitigate the impacts of high fuel prices. We consider this is a cross cutting issue, and so are liaising with colleagues across government to determine the longer-term impacts and any mitigating actions.

Defra will continue to support the sector through the £100 million UK Seafood Fund, which as one of its main objectives seeks to increase the sustainability of the sector, including through investing in the transition to renewable energy.

Defra is also making £32.7 million in annual funding available across all four nations of the UK which last year enabled grant schemes to be opened in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland, benefiting hundreds of UK businesses. The grant scheme for England, the Fisheries and Seafood Scheme, delivers investment to safeguard the long-term sustainability, resilience and prosperity of the seafood sector.

In recognition of the challenges in the maritime sector, including the fishing industry, in the 2022 Spring Budget the Chancellor overturned the 2020 announcement to remove the red diesel entitlement for commercial boat operators, meaning the industry can continue to use red diesel, in addition to the Marine Voyages Relief, which gives 100% relief on fuel duty costs.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
11th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what discussions his Department has had with representative bodies of the UK fishing industry on the impact of the rising cost of fuel on fishing fleets and coastal communities.

The increasing cost of fuel is affecting a wide range of sectors including the fishing industry. Our primary focus is on analysing how the UK fleet is being affected by fuel and fish prices. Defra Ministers and officials are working with colleagues across government, along with a wide range of stakeholders, and are closely monitoring the situation.

The Government has shown long term commitment to the sector and will continue to do so in the future. As part of this long term commitment we are not planning to repurpose funds to mitigate the impacts of high fuel prices. We consider this is a cross cutting issue, and so are liaising with colleagues across government to determine the longer-term impacts and any mitigating actions.

Defra will continue to support the sector through the £100 million UK Seafood Fund, which as one of its main objectives seeks to increase the sustainability of the sector, including through investing in the transition to renewable energy.

Defra is also making £32.7 million in annual funding available across all four nations of the UK which last year enabled grant schemes to be opened in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland, benefiting hundreds of UK businesses. The grant scheme for England, the Fisheries and Seafood Scheme, delivers investment to safeguard the long-term sustainability, resilience and prosperity of the seafood sector.

In recognition of the challenges in the maritime sector, including the fishing industry, in the 2022 Spring Budget the Chancellor overturned the 2020 announcement to remove the red diesel entitlement for commercial boat operators, meaning the industry can continue to use red diesel, in addition to the Marine Voyages Relief, which gives 100% relief on fuel duty costs.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, for what reason his Department has removed catch limits for fly-shooters targeting non-quota species for 2021.

The UK EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) provides for each Party to grant access to fish non-quota species at the average tonnage fished in the reference period 2012-2016, for a five and a half year adjustment period. There are no catch limits for individual vessels fishing for non-quota species.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what the (a) length and (b) power is of the fishing vessels that have used fly shooting equipment in the (i) southern North Sea and (ii) English Channel in 2021.

The engine power of UK vessels fishing with fly seining equipment in the southern North Sea and English Channel ranges from 749kW to 1325KW. While the length of these vessels varies between 23.9 and 36.6 metres. European Commission vessels with fly seining equipment are listed on the public EC fleet register.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many existing fishing vessel licences issued by the UK Single Issuing Authority entitle the vessels to use fly shooting equipment in the (a) southern North Sea and (b) English Channel.

Vessels are currently not required to have a specific permit for Scottish seining (fly shooting). Fishing licences issued to fish in UK water are not restricted by area other than for those vessels fishing in Territorial waters.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if the Government will ban pelagic trawlers over 55 metres and fly-shooters from the English Channel and Southern North Sea.

The Government is currently reviewing its policy on fly-shooting vessels and large pelagic trawlers in UK waters. Any action taken needs to be evidence-based, and in line with the UK/EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many fishing vessels have been fly shooting in UK waters in the (a) southern North Sea and (b) English Channel in 2021; and of those vessels, how many (i) are foreign registered and (ii) have been able to demonstrate previous a track record of using this equipment in the same areas.

In 2021 there were nine UK vessels fishing with fly seining equipment in the southern North Sea and the English Channel in the International Council for Exploration of the Sea (ICES) areas 7d and 7e (these area codes refer to ICES Rectangles which are a sub-division of the sea surface area each approximately 30 nautical miles by 30 nautical miles in size; ICES Rectangle is the highest resolution of spatial landings data available for all UK fishing vessels). European vessels with fly seining equipment are listed on the public European Commission fleet register. Under the Trade and Cooperation Agreement, licensing arrangements in the Territorial waters between the UK and the EU were based on vessels that were active in the respective zones during the reference period. This track record arrangement is not gear specific.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, for what reason an environmental impact assessment has not been conducted on the use of fly shooting equipment in the southern North Sea and English Channel prior to licenses for that activity being issued by the UK Single Issuing Authority.

Licences are issued to all vessels that have eligibility to fish in UK waters and have no history of illegal fishing. As a newly independent Coastal State we will be considering the impacts of various fishing activities when we undertake our programme of domestic fisheries management reform.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
14th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether the Government plans to introduce pre-notification requirements for foods of animal origin and certain foods of non-animal origin from 1 October 2021 and (b) physical checks for foods of animal origin and certain foods of non-animal origin at border control posts from 1 January 2022.

The requirement to pre-notify imports of Products of Animal Origin (POAO) for human consumption will be introduced on 1 January 2022. From 1 July 2022, these imports of POAO must also be accompanied by a certified Export Health Certificate and enter via a point of entry with a designated Border Control Post (BCP), where they will be subject to documentary, ID, and physical checks.

The requirement for pre-notification, phytosanitary certificates and risk-based import checks (documentary, identity and physical) have been in place for many years for all regulated plants and plant products from non-EU countries.

In January 2021, these requirements were extended to also include ‘high priority’ plants and plant products from the EU, Liechtenstein and Switzerland. ‘High priority’ plants and plant products are those which present the greatest potential biosecurity risk to GB and includes all plants for planting, potatoes and some seed.

The requirements will be further extended during 2022, to include all other regulated plants and plant products from the EU, Liechtenstein and Switzerland, such as fresh fruit, vegetables and cut flowers, starting with pre-notification on 1 January and followed by phytosanitary certificates and risk-based import checks on 1 July 2022.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
6th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what the estimated value is of the increase in UK quota agreed with the EU for (a) North Sea sole and (b) North Sea plaice for 2021 compared to 2020.

Information relating to this question is already published:

The data requested is set out in the below table.

North Sea sole

2021 Total allowable catch (a)

21,361 tonnes

2021 UK opening quota (a)

2,446 tonnes

2021 UK under-10m fleet pool allocation (a)

797 tonnes

2021 EU opening quota (b)

18,817 tonnes

2021 estimated value of the increase in the UK’s opening quota compared to 2020 (based on 2019 UK average landings prices)

£13.0m

North Sea plaice

2021 Total allowable catch (a)

143,419 tonnes

2021 UK opening quota (a)

37,113 tonnes

2021 UK under-10m fleet pool allocation (a)

88 tonnes

2021 EU opening quota (a)

51,985 tonnes

2021 estimated value of the increase in the UK’s opening quota compared to 2020 (based on 2019 UK average landings prices)

£18.8m

(a) post-landing obligation exemption deductions, and pre-allocations adjustments (e.g. quota banked from previous year)

(b) taken from the UK-EU negotiation Written Record as the final EU TAC and Quota Regulation is not yet published, so this is pre-landing obligation exemption deductions and allocations adjustments (e.g. quota banked from previous year)

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
6th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 16 June 2021 to Question 12119, what the Total Allowable Catches are for North Sea sole and plaice for 2021; and what the (a) UK’s opening quota is for those species under the 10m fleet pool quota allocation and (b) EU's opening quota is for 2021.

Information relating to this question is already published:

The data requested is set out in the below table.

North Sea sole

2021 Total allowable catch (a)

21,361 tonnes

2021 UK opening quota (a)

2,446 tonnes

2021 UK under-10m fleet pool allocation (a)

797 tonnes

2021 EU opening quota (b)

18,817 tonnes

2021 estimated value of the increase in the UK’s opening quota compared to 2020 (based on 2019 UK average landings prices)

£13.0m

North Sea plaice

2021 Total allowable catch (a)

143,419 tonnes

2021 UK opening quota (a)

37,113 tonnes

2021 UK under-10m fleet pool allocation (a)

88 tonnes

2021 EU opening quota (a)

51,985 tonnes

2021 estimated value of the increase in the UK’s opening quota compared to 2020 (based on 2019 UK average landings prices)

£18.8m

(a) post-landing obligation exemption deductions, and pre-allocations adjustments (e.g. quota banked from previous year)

(b) taken from the UK-EU negotiation Written Record as the final EU TAC and Quota Regulation is not yet published, so this is pre-landing obligation exemption deductions and allocations adjustments (e.g. quota banked from previous year)

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
8th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what estimate he has made of the (a) volume of North Sea (i) common sole and (ii) plaice made available to vessels under 10m through the Pool for each year between 2016 and 2021 and (b) take up within the Pool of those stocks between 2016 and 2020.

The data requested is set out in the tables below

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

North Sea plaice

Total Allowable catch (a)

131,714

129,917

112,643

125,435

146,852

UK Opening Quota (a)

34,864

34,388

29,816

26,336

25,538

EU Opening Quota (excl. UK) (a)

87,630

86,435

74,942

90,319

111,034

UK landings

18,733

14,962

9,550

7,323

5,525

EU landings (excl. UK)

59,610

49,562

39,957

32,044

25,856

Catches from within the UK EEZ

13,203

12,663

11,513

9,391

6,038

U10m fleet pool landings

96

73

36

28

19

U10m fleet pool quota allocation

226

1,012

329

837

68

North Sea sole

Total Allowable catch (a)

13,262

16,123

15,694

12,555

17,545

UK Opening Quota (a)

568

691

672

538

751

EU Opening Quota (excl. UK) (a)

12,684

15,422

15,012

12,007

16,784

UK landings

705

511

432

334

543

EU landings (excl. UK)

11,750

11,207

10,263

8,005

6,384

Catches from within the UK EEZ

3,554

3,517

3,460

2,987

3,408

U10m fleet pool landings

164

159

113

103

81

U10m fleet pool quota allocation

185

324

293

232

87

(a) before adjustments (e.g. Quota banked from previous year)

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
8th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what estimate he has made of the catch levels within the UK EEZ of North Sea (a) common sole and (b) plaice for each year from 2016 to 2020.

The data requested is set out in the tables below

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

North Sea plaice

Total Allowable catch (a)

131,714

129,917

112,643

125,435

146,852

UK Opening Quota (a)

34,864

34,388

29,816

26,336

25,538

EU Opening Quota (excl. UK) (a)

87,630

86,435

74,942

90,319

111,034

UK landings

18,733

14,962

9,550

7,323

5,525

EU landings (excl. UK)

59,610

49,562

39,957

32,044

25,856

Catches from within the UK EEZ

13,203

12,663

11,513

9,391

6,038

U10m fleet pool landings

96

73

36

28

19

U10m fleet pool quota allocation

226

1,012

329

837

68

North Sea sole

Total Allowable catch (a)

13,262

16,123

15,694

12,555

17,545

UK Opening Quota (a)

568

691

672

538

751

EU Opening Quota (excl. UK) (a)

12,684

15,422

15,012

12,007

16,784

UK landings

705

511

432

334

543

EU landings (excl. UK)

11,750

11,207

10,263

8,005

6,384

Catches from within the UK EEZ

3,554

3,517

3,460

2,987

3,408

U10m fleet pool landings

164

159

113

103

81

U10m fleet pool quota allocation

185

324

293

232

87

(a) before adjustments (e.g. Quota banked from previous year)

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
8th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what the volume of catches was by (a) the UK and (b) EU member state vessels of (i) common sole and (ii) plaice in the North Sea in each year from 2016 to 2020.

The data requested is set out in the tables below

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

North Sea plaice

Total Allowable catch (a)

131,714

129,917

112,643

125,435

146,852

UK Opening Quota (a)

34,864

34,388

29,816

26,336

25,538

EU Opening Quota (excl. UK) (a)

87,630

86,435

74,942

90,319

111,034

UK landings

18,733

14,962

9,550

7,323

5,525

EU landings (excl. UK)

59,610

49,562

39,957

32,044

25,856

Catches from within the UK EEZ

13,203

12,663

11,513

9,391

6,038

U10m fleet pool landings

96

73

36

28

19

U10m fleet pool quota allocation

226

1,012

329

837

68

North Sea sole

Total Allowable catch (a)

13,262

16,123

15,694

12,555

17,545

UK Opening Quota (a)

568

691

672

538

751

EU Opening Quota (excl. UK) (a)

12,684

15,422

15,012

12,007

16,784

UK landings

705

511

432

334

543

EU landings (excl. UK)

11,750

11,207

10,263

8,005

6,384

Catches from within the UK EEZ

3,554

3,517

3,460

2,987

3,408

U10m fleet pool landings

164

159

113

103

81

U10m fleet pool quota allocation

185

324

293

232

87

(a) before adjustments (e.g. Quota banked from previous year)

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
8th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what the North Sea total allowable catch limits are for the (a) common sole and (b) plaice for each year from 2016 to 2021; and what the (i) UK's and (ii) EU member states’ quota allocations are for those stocks for each year from 2016 to 2021.

The data requested is set out in the tables below

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

North Sea plaice

Total Allowable catch (a)

131,714

129,917

112,643

125,435

146,852

UK Opening Quota (a)

34,864

34,388

29,816

26,336

25,538

EU Opening Quota (excl. UK) (a)

87,630

86,435

74,942

90,319

111,034

UK landings

18,733

14,962

9,550

7,323

5,525

EU landings (excl. UK)

59,610

49,562

39,957

32,044

25,856

Catches from within the UK EEZ

13,203

12,663

11,513

9,391

6,038

U10m fleet pool landings

96

73

36

28

19

U10m fleet pool quota allocation

226

1,012

329

837

68

North Sea sole

Total Allowable catch (a)

13,262

16,123

15,694

12,555

17,545

UK Opening Quota (a)

568

691

672

538

751

EU Opening Quota (excl. UK) (a)

12,684

15,422

15,012

12,007

16,784

UK landings

705

511

432

334

543

EU landings (excl. UK)

11,750

11,207

10,263

8,005

6,384

Catches from within the UK EEZ

3,554

3,517

3,460

2,987

3,408

U10m fleet pool landings

164

159

113

103

81

U10m fleet pool quota allocation

185

324

293

232

87

(a) before adjustments (e.g. Quota banked from previous year)

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
29th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when he plans to conclude the review of the licence conditions that require vessels catching quota species in UK waters to demonstrate an economic link with the UK.

The Government intends to consult on proposals to strengthen the condition and increase the economic benefits to the UK in October. The response to the consultation will be published in line with the principles for consultation published by the Cabinet Office.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
29th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what checks are made by the Marine Management Organisation when applying the economic link condition to ascertain whether 50 per cent of the total crew man days at sea were accounted for by crew normally resident in UK coastal areas; and what qualifies as (a) normally resident and (b) coastal areas in that assessment.

All UK fishing vessels are registered to UK companies (or individuals); the Marine Management Organisation (MMO) does not hold data relating to the degree of foreign investment or beneficial ownership of these companies or fishing opportunities associated with them. Therefore, it is not possible to provide data on landings, quota compliance or vessel numbers split between UK and foreign ownership. The economic link conditions apply to all UK fishing vessels and are enforced through conditions in the fishing licence to ensure that genuine benefits to the UK are realised by the whole fleet.

The licence condition relating to crewing is audited by the MMO through the requirement of a crew manifest detailing the names and addresses of all crew members. The condition requires residence in the UK and does not specifically relate to distance of residence from the coast.

During 2019 quota donations made though the economic link requirements were estimated to have a value of £2.1 million based on average first sale prices. The donated quota totalled 714 tonnes across the range of stocks as detailed in the table below. Donated quota is provided directly to the 10m and under fleet or traded by the MMO for more beneficial stocks for the 10m and under fleet as necessary. The MMO carries out a large number of trades each year through domestic and international swaps to ensure the most beneficial fishing opportunities for the fleet. Economic link related quota donations form part of the overall trading package along with multiple other sources of quota, so it is not possible to state the precise value of this component. For this reason the MMO uses the first sale value of donated quota to assess the economic link compliance.

Stock donated in 2019 through economic link conditions

Sum of Quantity

Anglers NS (ANF/2AC4-C)

30

Anglers WS (ANF/56-14)

1.1

Cod NS exc IV Norway (COD/2A3AX4)

6

Haddock VIIa (HAD/07A.)

0.2

Hake NS (HKE/2AC4-C)

1

Hake WS incl VII (HKE/571214)

2

Megrim NS IIa(EC), IV(EC) (LEZ/2AC4-C)

6

Megrim WS (LEZ/56-14)

0.2

Nephrops NS (NEP/2AC4-C)

313.7

Nephrops WC (NEP/5BC6.)

7.1

Other Species IV ex EC Norway (OTH/04-N.)

6.4

Plaice VIIa (PLE/07A.)

2

Plaice WS (PLE/56-14)

0.1

Pollack VII (POL/07.)

154

Saithe VII (POK/7/3411)

10

Saithe WS (POK/56-14)

1

Skates & Rays NS (SRX/2AC4-C)

15.5

Skates & Rays VI, VII a-k exc D (SRX/67AKXD)

15

Skates & Rays VIId (SRX/*07D.) [counts against /67AKXD]

9.2

Sole NS (SOL/24-C.)

37

Turbot & Brill NS IIa(EC), IV(EC) (T/B/2AC4-C)

26

Whiting VIIa (WHG/07A.)

1

Whiting VIIb-k (WHG/7X7A-C)

69.6

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
29th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what the total sale price value was of the fish donated by vessel owners under the economic link rule in 2019.

All UK fishing vessels are registered to UK companies (or individuals); the Marine Management Organisation (MMO) does not hold data relating to the degree of foreign investment or beneficial ownership of these companies or fishing opportunities associated with them. Therefore, it is not possible to provide data on landings, quota compliance or vessel numbers split between UK and foreign ownership. The economic link conditions apply to all UK fishing vessels and are enforced through conditions in the fishing licence to ensure that genuine benefits to the UK are realised by the whole fleet.

The licence condition relating to crewing is audited by the MMO through the requirement of a crew manifest detailing the names and addresses of all crew members. The condition requires residence in the UK and does not specifically relate to distance of residence from the coast.

During 2019 quota donations made though the economic link requirements were estimated to have a value of £2.1 million based on average first sale prices. The donated quota totalled 714 tonnes across the range of stocks as detailed in the table below. Donated quota is provided directly to the 10m and under fleet or traded by the MMO for more beneficial stocks for the 10m and under fleet as necessary. The MMO carries out a large number of trades each year through domestic and international swaps to ensure the most beneficial fishing opportunities for the fleet. Economic link related quota donations form part of the overall trading package along with multiple other sources of quota, so it is not possible to state the precise value of this component. For this reason the MMO uses the first sale value of donated quota to assess the economic link compliance.

Stock donated in 2019 through economic link conditions

Sum of Quantity

Anglers NS (ANF/2AC4-C)

30

Anglers WS (ANF/56-14)

1.1

Cod NS exc IV Norway (COD/2A3AX4)

6

Haddock VIIa (HAD/07A.)

0.2

Hake NS (HKE/2AC4-C)

1

Hake WS incl VII (HKE/571214)

2

Megrim NS IIa(EC), IV(EC) (LEZ/2AC4-C)

6

Megrim WS (LEZ/56-14)

0.2

Nephrops NS (NEP/2AC4-C)

313.7

Nephrops WC (NEP/5BC6.)

7.1

Other Species IV ex EC Norway (OTH/04-N.)

6.4

Plaice VIIa (PLE/07A.)

2

Plaice WS (PLE/56-14)

0.1

Pollack VII (POL/07.)

154

Saithe VII (POK/7/3411)

10

Saithe WS (POK/56-14)

1

Skates & Rays NS (SRX/2AC4-C)

15.5

Skates & Rays VI, VII a-k exc D (SRX/67AKXD)

15

Skates & Rays VIId (SRX/*07D.) [counts against /67AKXD]

9.2

Sole NS (SOL/24-C.)

37

Turbot & Brill NS IIa(EC), IV(EC) (T/B/2AC4-C)

26

Whiting VIIa (WHG/07A.)

1

Whiting VIIb-k (WHG/7X7A-C)

69.6

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
29th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what the total quota trading value was of the fish donated by vessel owners under economic link conditions in 2019.

All UK fishing vessels are registered to UK companies (or individuals); the Marine Management Organisation (MMO) does not hold data relating to the degree of foreign investment or beneficial ownership of these companies or fishing opportunities associated with them. Therefore, it is not possible to provide data on landings, quota compliance or vessel numbers split between UK and foreign ownership. The economic link conditions apply to all UK fishing vessels and are enforced through conditions in the fishing licence to ensure that genuine benefits to the UK are realised by the whole fleet.

The licence condition relating to crewing is audited by the MMO through the requirement of a crew manifest detailing the names and addresses of all crew members. The condition requires residence in the UK and does not specifically relate to distance of residence from the coast.

During 2019 quota donations made though the economic link requirements were estimated to have a value of £2.1 million based on average first sale prices. The donated quota totalled 714 tonnes across the range of stocks as detailed in the table below. Donated quota is provided directly to the 10m and under fleet or traded by the MMO for more beneficial stocks for the 10m and under fleet as necessary. The MMO carries out a large number of trades each year through domestic and international swaps to ensure the most beneficial fishing opportunities for the fleet. Economic link related quota donations form part of the overall trading package along with multiple other sources of quota, so it is not possible to state the precise value of this component. For this reason the MMO uses the first sale value of donated quota to assess the economic link compliance.

Stock donated in 2019 through economic link conditions

Sum of Quantity

Anglers NS (ANF/2AC4-C)

30

Anglers WS (ANF/56-14)

1.1

Cod NS exc IV Norway (COD/2A3AX4)

6

Haddock VIIa (HAD/07A.)

0.2

Hake NS (HKE/2AC4-C)

1

Hake WS incl VII (HKE/571214)

2

Megrim NS IIa(EC), IV(EC) (LEZ/2AC4-C)

6

Megrim WS (LEZ/56-14)

0.2

Nephrops NS (NEP/2AC4-C)

313.7

Nephrops WC (NEP/5BC6.)

7.1

Other Species IV ex EC Norway (OTH/04-N.)

6.4

Plaice VIIa (PLE/07A.)

2

Plaice WS (PLE/56-14)

0.1

Pollack VII (POL/07.)

154

Saithe VII (POK/7/3411)

10

Saithe WS (POK/56-14)

1

Skates & Rays NS (SRX/2AC4-C)

15.5

Skates & Rays VI, VII a-k exc D (SRX/67AKXD)

15

Skates & Rays VIId (SRX/*07D.) [counts against /67AKXD]

9.2

Sole NS (SOL/24-C.)

37

Turbot & Brill NS IIa(EC), IV(EC) (T/B/2AC4-C)

26

Whiting VIIa (WHG/07A.)

1

Whiting VIIb-k (WHG/7X7A-C)

69.6

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
29th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether the (a) sale price of fish or (b) the tradable quota value is used by the Marine Management Organisation in assessing whether vessel owners have satisfied the economic link condition.

All UK fishing vessels are registered to UK companies (or individuals); the Marine Management Organisation (MMO) does not hold data relating to the degree of foreign investment or beneficial ownership of these companies or fishing opportunities associated with them. Therefore, it is not possible to provide data on landings, quota compliance or vessel numbers split between UK and foreign ownership. The economic link conditions apply to all UK fishing vessels and are enforced through conditions in the fishing licence to ensure that genuine benefits to the UK are realised by the whole fleet.

The licence condition relating to crewing is audited by the MMO through the requirement of a crew manifest detailing the names and addresses of all crew members. The condition requires residence in the UK and does not specifically relate to distance of residence from the coast.

During 2019 quota donations made though the economic link requirements were estimated to have a value of £2.1 million based on average first sale prices. The donated quota totalled 714 tonnes across the range of stocks as detailed in the table below. Donated quota is provided directly to the 10m and under fleet or traded by the MMO for more beneficial stocks for the 10m and under fleet as necessary. The MMO carries out a large number of trades each year through domestic and international swaps to ensure the most beneficial fishing opportunities for the fleet. Economic link related quota donations form part of the overall trading package along with multiple other sources of quota, so it is not possible to state the precise value of this component. For this reason the MMO uses the first sale value of donated quota to assess the economic link compliance.

Stock donated in 2019 through economic link conditions

Sum of Quantity

Anglers NS (ANF/2AC4-C)

30

Anglers WS (ANF/56-14)

1.1

Cod NS exc IV Norway (COD/2A3AX4)

6

Haddock VIIa (HAD/07A.)

0.2

Hake NS (HKE/2AC4-C)

1

Hake WS incl VII (HKE/571214)

2

Megrim NS IIa(EC), IV(EC) (LEZ/2AC4-C)

6

Megrim WS (LEZ/56-14)

0.2

Nephrops NS (NEP/2AC4-C)

313.7

Nephrops WC (NEP/5BC6.)

7.1

Other Species IV ex EC Norway (OTH/04-N.)

6.4

Plaice VIIa (PLE/07A.)

2

Plaice WS (PLE/56-14)

0.1

Pollack VII (POL/07.)

154

Saithe VII (POK/7/3411)

10

Saithe WS (POK/56-14)

1

Skates & Rays NS (SRX/2AC4-C)

15.5

Skates & Rays VI, VII a-k exc D (SRX/67AKXD)

15

Skates & Rays VIId (SRX/*07D.) [counts against /67AKXD]

9.2

Sole NS (SOL/24-C.)

37

Turbot & Brill NS IIa(EC), IV(EC) (T/B/2AC4-C)

26

Whiting VIIa (WHG/07A.)

1

Whiting VIIb-k (WHG/7X7A-C)

69.6

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
29th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what the weight was of the fish donated by vessel owners under economic link conditions, by species, in 2019.

All UK fishing vessels are registered to UK companies (or individuals); the Marine Management Organisation (MMO) does not hold data relating to the degree of foreign investment or beneficial ownership of these companies or fishing opportunities associated with them. Therefore, it is not possible to provide data on landings, quota compliance or vessel numbers split between UK and foreign ownership. The economic link conditions apply to all UK fishing vessels and are enforced through conditions in the fishing licence to ensure that genuine benefits to the UK are realised by the whole fleet.

The licence condition relating to crewing is audited by the MMO through the requirement of a crew manifest detailing the names and addresses of all crew members. The condition requires residence in the UK and does not specifically relate to distance of residence from the coast.

During 2019 quota donations made though the economic link requirements were estimated to have a value of £2.1 million based on average first sale prices. The donated quota totalled 714 tonnes across the range of stocks as detailed in the table below. Donated quota is provided directly to the 10m and under fleet or traded by the MMO for more beneficial stocks for the 10m and under fleet as necessary. The MMO carries out a large number of trades each year through domestic and international swaps to ensure the most beneficial fishing opportunities for the fleet. Economic link related quota donations form part of the overall trading package along with multiple other sources of quota, so it is not possible to state the precise value of this component. For this reason the MMO uses the first sale value of donated quota to assess the economic link compliance.

Stock donated in 2019 through economic link conditions

Sum of Quantity

Anglers NS (ANF/2AC4-C)

30

Anglers WS (ANF/56-14)

1.1

Cod NS exc IV Norway (COD/2A3AX4)

6

Haddock VIIa (HAD/07A.)

0.2

Hake NS (HKE/2AC4-C)

1

Hake WS incl VII (HKE/571214)

2

Megrim NS IIa(EC), IV(EC) (LEZ/2AC4-C)

6

Megrim WS (LEZ/56-14)

0.2

Nephrops NS (NEP/2AC4-C)

313.7

Nephrops WC (NEP/5BC6.)

7.1

Other Species IV ex EC Norway (OTH/04-N.)

6.4

Plaice VIIa (PLE/07A.)

2

Plaice WS (PLE/56-14)

0.1

Pollack VII (POL/07.)

154

Saithe VII (POK/7/3411)

10

Saithe WS (POK/56-14)

1

Skates & Rays NS (SRX/2AC4-C)

15.5

Skates & Rays VI, VII a-k exc D (SRX/67AKXD)

15

Skates & Rays VIId (SRX/*07D.) [counts against /67AKXD]

9.2

Sole NS (SOL/24-C.)

37

Turbot & Brill NS IIa(EC), IV(EC) (T/B/2AC4-C)

26

Whiting VIIa (WHG/07A.)

1

Whiting VIIb-k (WHG/7X7A-C)

69.6

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
29th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what the (a) value and (b) weight was of fish donated by vessel owners under economic link conditions made available to under 10m vessels through the pool in 2019.

All UK fishing vessels are registered to UK companies (or individuals); the Marine Management Organisation (MMO) does not hold data relating to the degree of foreign investment or beneficial ownership of these companies or fishing opportunities associated with them. Therefore, it is not possible to provide data on landings, quota compliance or vessel numbers split between UK and foreign ownership. The economic link conditions apply to all UK fishing vessels and are enforced through conditions in the fishing licence to ensure that genuine benefits to the UK are realised by the whole fleet.

The licence condition relating to crewing is audited by the MMO through the requirement of a crew manifest detailing the names and addresses of all crew members. The condition requires residence in the UK and does not specifically relate to distance of residence from the coast.

During 2019 quota donations made though the economic link requirements were estimated to have a value of £2.1 million based on average first sale prices. The donated quota totalled 714 tonnes across the range of stocks as detailed in the table below. Donated quota is provided directly to the 10m and under fleet or traded by the MMO for more beneficial stocks for the 10m and under fleet as necessary. The MMO carries out a large number of trades each year through domestic and international swaps to ensure the most beneficial fishing opportunities for the fleet. Economic link related quota donations form part of the overall trading package along with multiple other sources of quota, so it is not possible to state the precise value of this component. For this reason the MMO uses the first sale value of donated quota to assess the economic link compliance.

Stock donated in 2019 through economic link conditions

Sum of Quantity

Anglers NS (ANF/2AC4-C)

30

Anglers WS (ANF/56-14)

1.1

Cod NS exc IV Norway (COD/2A3AX4)

6

Haddock VIIa (HAD/07A.)

0.2

Hake NS (HKE/2AC4-C)

1

Hake WS incl VII (HKE/571214)

2

Megrim NS IIa(EC), IV(EC) (LEZ/2AC4-C)

6

Megrim WS (LEZ/56-14)

0.2

Nephrops NS (NEP/2AC4-C)

313.7

Nephrops WC (NEP/5BC6.)

7.1

Other Species IV ex EC Norway (OTH/04-N.)

6.4

Plaice VIIa (PLE/07A.)

2

Plaice WS (PLE/56-14)

0.1

Pollack VII (POL/07.)

154

Saithe VII (POK/7/3411)

10

Saithe WS (POK/56-14)

1

Skates & Rays NS (SRX/2AC4-C)

15.5

Skates & Rays VI, VII a-k exc D (SRX/67AKXD)

15

Skates & Rays VIId (SRX/*07D.) [counts against /67AKXD]

9.2

Sole NS (SOL/24-C.)

37

Turbot & Brill NS IIa(EC), IV(EC) (T/B/2AC4-C)

26

Whiting VIIa (WHG/07A.)

1

Whiting VIIb-k (WHG/7X7A-C)

69.6

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
29th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what the (a) value and (b) weight was of fish donated by vessel owners under economic link conditions made available through the pool and landed by under 10m vessels in 2019.

All UK fishing vessels are registered to UK companies (or individuals); the Marine Management Organisation (MMO) does not hold data relating to the degree of foreign investment or beneficial ownership of these companies or fishing opportunities associated with them. Therefore, it is not possible to provide data on landings, quota compliance or vessel numbers split between UK and foreign ownership. The economic link conditions apply to all UK fishing vessels and are enforced through conditions in the fishing licence to ensure that genuine benefits to the UK are realised by the whole fleet.

The licence condition relating to crewing is audited by the MMO through the requirement of a crew manifest detailing the names and addresses of all crew members. The condition requires residence in the UK and does not specifically relate to distance of residence from the coast.

During 2019 quota donations made though the economic link requirements were estimated to have a value of £2.1 million based on average first sale prices. The donated quota totalled 714 tonnes across the range of stocks as detailed in the table below. Donated quota is provided directly to the 10m and under fleet or traded by the MMO for more beneficial stocks for the 10m and under fleet as necessary. The MMO carries out a large number of trades each year through domestic and international swaps to ensure the most beneficial fishing opportunities for the fleet. Economic link related quota donations form part of the overall trading package along with multiple other sources of quota, so it is not possible to state the precise value of this component. For this reason the MMO uses the first sale value of donated quota to assess the economic link compliance.

Stock donated in 2019 through economic link conditions

Sum of Quantity

Anglers NS (ANF/2AC4-C)

30

Anglers WS (ANF/56-14)

1.1

Cod NS exc IV Norway (COD/2A3AX4)

6

Haddock VIIa (HAD/07A.)

0.2

Hake NS (HKE/2AC4-C)

1

Hake WS incl VII (HKE/571214)

2

Megrim NS IIa(EC), IV(EC) (LEZ/2AC4-C)

6

Megrim WS (LEZ/56-14)

0.2

Nephrops NS (NEP/2AC4-C)

313.7

Nephrops WC (NEP/5BC6.)

7.1

Other Species IV ex EC Norway (OTH/04-N.)

6.4

Plaice VIIa (PLE/07A.)

2

Plaice WS (PLE/56-14)

0.1

Pollack VII (POL/07.)

154

Saithe VII (POK/7/3411)

10

Saithe WS (POK/56-14)

1

Skates & Rays NS (SRX/2AC4-C)

15.5

Skates & Rays VI, VII a-k exc D (SRX/67AKXD)

15

Skates & Rays VIId (SRX/*07D.) [counts against /67AKXD]

9.2

Sole NS (SOL/24-C.)

37

Turbot & Brill NS IIa(EC), IV(EC) (T/B/2AC4-C)

26

Whiting VIIa (WHG/07A.)

1

Whiting VIIb-k (WHG/7X7A-C)

69.6

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
29th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what the proportion of landings abroad by UK registered vessels were by UK registered vessels with foreign owners, by value, in 2019.

All UK fishing vessels are registered to UK companies (or individuals); the Marine Management Organisation (MMO) does not hold data relating to the degree of foreign investment or beneficial ownership of these companies or fishing opportunities associated with them. Therefore, it is not possible to provide data on landings, quota compliance or vessel numbers split between UK and foreign ownership. The economic link conditions apply to all UK fishing vessels and are enforced through conditions in the fishing licence to ensure that genuine benefits to the UK are realised by the whole fleet.

The licence condition relating to crewing is audited by the MMO through the requirement of a crew manifest detailing the names and addresses of all crew members. The condition requires residence in the UK and does not specifically relate to distance of residence from the coast.

During 2019 quota donations made though the economic link requirements were estimated to have a value of £2.1 million based on average first sale prices. The donated quota totalled 714 tonnes across the range of stocks as detailed in the table below. Donated quota is provided directly to the 10m and under fleet or traded by the MMO for more beneficial stocks for the 10m and under fleet as necessary. The MMO carries out a large number of trades each year through domestic and international swaps to ensure the most beneficial fishing opportunities for the fleet. Economic link related quota donations form part of the overall trading package along with multiple other sources of quota, so it is not possible to state the precise value of this component. For this reason the MMO uses the first sale value of donated quota to assess the economic link compliance.

Stock donated in 2019 through economic link conditions

Sum of Quantity

Anglers NS (ANF/2AC4-C)

30

Anglers WS (ANF/56-14)

1.1

Cod NS exc IV Norway (COD/2A3AX4)

6

Haddock VIIa (HAD/07A.)

0.2

Hake NS (HKE/2AC4-C)

1

Hake WS incl VII (HKE/571214)

2

Megrim NS IIa(EC), IV(EC) (LEZ/2AC4-C)

6

Megrim WS (LEZ/56-14)

0.2

Nephrops NS (NEP/2AC4-C)

313.7

Nephrops WC (NEP/5BC6.)

7.1

Other Species IV ex EC Norway (OTH/04-N.)

6.4

Plaice VIIa (PLE/07A.)

2

Plaice WS (PLE/56-14)

0.1

Pollack VII (POL/07.)

154

Saithe VII (POK/7/3411)

10

Saithe WS (POK/56-14)

1

Skates & Rays NS (SRX/2AC4-C)

15.5

Skates & Rays VI, VII a-k exc D (SRX/67AKXD)

15

Skates & Rays VIId (SRX/*07D.) [counts against /67AKXD]

9.2

Sole NS (SOL/24-C.)

37

Turbot & Brill NS IIa(EC), IV(EC) (T/B/2AC4-C)

26

Whiting VIIa (WHG/07A.)

1

Whiting VIIb-k (WHG/7X7A-C)

69.6

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
29th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many UK registered foreign owned vessels fished against the UK quota in 2019.

All UK fishing vessels are registered to UK companies (or individuals); the Marine Management Organisation (MMO) does not hold data relating to the degree of foreign investment or beneficial ownership of these companies or fishing opportunities associated with them. Therefore, it is not possible to provide data on landings, quota compliance or vessel numbers split between UK and foreign ownership. The economic link conditions apply to all UK fishing vessels and are enforced through conditions in the fishing licence to ensure that genuine benefits to the UK are realised by the whole fleet.

The licence condition relating to crewing is audited by the MMO through the requirement of a crew manifest detailing the names and addresses of all crew members. The condition requires residence in the UK and does not specifically relate to distance of residence from the coast.

During 2019 quota donations made though the economic link requirements were estimated to have a value of £2.1 million based on average first sale prices. The donated quota totalled 714 tonnes across the range of stocks as detailed in the table below. Donated quota is provided directly to the 10m and under fleet or traded by the MMO for more beneficial stocks for the 10m and under fleet as necessary. The MMO carries out a large number of trades each year through domestic and international swaps to ensure the most beneficial fishing opportunities for the fleet. Economic link related quota donations form part of the overall trading package along with multiple other sources of quota, so it is not possible to state the precise value of this component. For this reason the MMO uses the first sale value of donated quota to assess the economic link compliance.

Stock donated in 2019 through economic link conditions

Sum of Quantity

Anglers NS (ANF/2AC4-C)

30

Anglers WS (ANF/56-14)

1.1

Cod NS exc IV Norway (COD/2A3AX4)

6

Haddock VIIa (HAD/07A.)

0.2

Hake NS (HKE/2AC4-C)

1

Hake WS incl VII (HKE/571214)

2

Megrim NS IIa(EC), IV(EC) (LEZ/2AC4-C)

6

Megrim WS (LEZ/56-14)

0.2

Nephrops NS (NEP/2AC4-C)

313.7

Nephrops WC (NEP/5BC6.)

7.1

Other Species IV ex EC Norway (OTH/04-N.)

6.4

Plaice VIIa (PLE/07A.)

2

Plaice WS (PLE/56-14)

0.1

Pollack VII (POL/07.)

154

Saithe VII (POK/7/3411)

10

Saithe WS (POK/56-14)

1

Skates & Rays NS (SRX/2AC4-C)

15.5

Skates & Rays VI, VII a-k exc D (SRX/67AKXD)

15

Skates & Rays VIId (SRX/*07D.) [counts against /67AKXD]

9.2

Sole NS (SOL/24-C.)

37

Turbot & Brill NS IIa(EC), IV(EC) (T/B/2AC4-C)

26

Whiting VIIa (WHG/07A.)

1

Whiting VIIb-k (WHG/7X7A-C)

69.6

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
29th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what proportion of demersal fish landed by UK registered foreign owned vessels were in excess of their fixed quota allocation holdings, in 2019.

All UK fishing vessels are registered to UK companies (or individuals); the Marine Management Organisation (MMO) does not hold data relating to the degree of foreign investment or beneficial ownership of these companies or fishing opportunities associated with them. Therefore, it is not possible to provide data on landings, quota compliance or vessel numbers split between UK and foreign ownership. The economic link conditions apply to all UK fishing vessels and are enforced through conditions in the fishing licence to ensure that genuine benefits to the UK are realised by the whole fleet.

The licence condition relating to crewing is audited by the MMO through the requirement of a crew manifest detailing the names and addresses of all crew members. The condition requires residence in the UK and does not specifically relate to distance of residence from the coast.

During 2019 quota donations made though the economic link requirements were estimated to have a value of £2.1 million based on average first sale prices. The donated quota totalled 714 tonnes across the range of stocks as detailed in the table below. Donated quota is provided directly to the 10m and under fleet or traded by the MMO for more beneficial stocks for the 10m and under fleet as necessary. The MMO carries out a large number of trades each year through domestic and international swaps to ensure the most beneficial fishing opportunities for the fleet. Economic link related quota donations form part of the overall trading package along with multiple other sources of quota, so it is not possible to state the precise value of this component. For this reason the MMO uses the first sale value of donated quota to assess the economic link compliance.

Stock donated in 2019 through economic link conditions

Sum of Quantity

Anglers NS (ANF/2AC4-C)

30

Anglers WS (ANF/56-14)

1.1

Cod NS exc IV Norway (COD/2A3AX4)

6

Haddock VIIa (HAD/07A.)

0.2

Hake NS (HKE/2AC4-C)

1

Hake WS incl VII (HKE/571214)

2

Megrim NS IIa(EC), IV(EC) (LEZ/2AC4-C)

6

Megrim WS (LEZ/56-14)

0.2

Nephrops NS (NEP/2AC4-C)

313.7

Nephrops WC (NEP/5BC6.)

7.1

Other Species IV ex EC Norway (OTH/04-N.)

6.4

Plaice VIIa (PLE/07A.)

2

Plaice WS (PLE/56-14)

0.1

Pollack VII (POL/07.)

154

Saithe VII (POK/7/3411)

10

Saithe WS (POK/56-14)

1

Skates & Rays NS (SRX/2AC4-C)

15.5

Skates & Rays VI, VII a-k exc D (SRX/67AKXD)

15

Skates & Rays VIId (SRX/*07D.) [counts against /67AKXD]

9.2

Sole NS (SOL/24-C.)

37

Turbot & Brill NS IIa(EC), IV(EC) (T/B/2AC4-C)

26

Whiting VIIa (WHG/07A.)

1

Whiting VIIb-k (WHG/7X7A-C)

69.6

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
29th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what proportion of (a) UK owned and (b) foreign owned and UK registered vessels landed at least 50 per cent of the weight of their landings of EC quota stocks in UK ports in 2019.

All UK fishing vessels are registered to UK companies (or individuals); the Marine Management Organisation (MMO) does not hold data relating to the degree of foreign investment or beneficial ownership of these companies or fishing opportunities associated with them. Therefore, it is not possible to provide data on landings, quota compliance or vessel numbers split between UK and foreign ownership. The economic link conditions apply to all UK fishing vessels and are enforced through conditions in the fishing licence to ensure that genuine benefits to the UK are realised by the whole fleet.

The licence condition relating to crewing is audited by the MMO through the requirement of a crew manifest detailing the names and addresses of all crew members. The condition requires residence in the UK and does not specifically relate to distance of residence from the coast.

During 2019 quota donations made though the economic link requirements were estimated to have a value of £2.1 million based on average first sale prices. The donated quota totalled 714 tonnes across the range of stocks as detailed in the table below. Donated quota is provided directly to the 10m and under fleet or traded by the MMO for more beneficial stocks for the 10m and under fleet as necessary. The MMO carries out a large number of trades each year through domestic and international swaps to ensure the most beneficial fishing opportunities for the fleet. Economic link related quota donations form part of the overall trading package along with multiple other sources of quota, so it is not possible to state the precise value of this component. For this reason the MMO uses the first sale value of donated quota to assess the economic link compliance.

Stock donated in 2019 through economic link conditions

Sum of Quantity

Anglers NS (ANF/2AC4-C)

30

Anglers WS (ANF/56-14)

1.1

Cod NS exc IV Norway (COD/2A3AX4)

6

Haddock VIIa (HAD/07A.)

0.2

Hake NS (HKE/2AC4-C)

1

Hake WS incl VII (HKE/571214)

2

Megrim NS IIa(EC), IV(EC) (LEZ/2AC4-C)

6

Megrim WS (LEZ/56-14)

0.2

Nephrops NS (NEP/2AC4-C)

313.7

Nephrops WC (NEP/5BC6.)

7.1

Other Species IV ex EC Norway (OTH/04-N.)

6.4

Plaice VIIa (PLE/07A.)

2

Plaice WS (PLE/56-14)

0.1

Pollack VII (POL/07.)

154

Saithe VII (POK/7/3411)

10

Saithe WS (POK/56-14)

1

Skates & Rays NS (SRX/2AC4-C)

15.5

Skates & Rays VI, VII a-k exc D (SRX/67AKXD)

15

Skates & Rays VIId (SRX/*07D.) [counts against /67AKXD]

9.2

Sole NS (SOL/24-C.)

37

Turbot & Brill NS IIa(EC), IV(EC) (T/B/2AC4-C)

26

Whiting VIIa (WHG/07A.)

1

Whiting VIIb-k (WHG/7X7A-C)

69.6

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
1st Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the potential implications for his air quality policies of the British Lung Foundation’s survey of 4 June that found that one in six people with lung conditions experienced reduced symptoms during the covid-19 lockdown; and what steps he is taking to ensure that public health is central to his Department’s strategy on air pollution.

The Government is taking a proactive approach to understand the possible links between air quality and COVID-19. That is why, with our Air Quality Expert Group (AQEG), we ran a rapid Call for Evidence to ensure we can more fully understand the impact that COVID-19 is having on air pollutant emissions, concentrations and human exposure. This report was published on 1 July. We welcome the work of the British Lung Foundation (BLF) and their survey was discussed at our recent round table meeting with health stakeholders, including the BLF.

Improving air quality remains a top priority for the Government and, especially during these unprecedented times, we will continue to take robust and comprehensive action to improve air quality in the UK and minimise public health impacts.

1st May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 28 April 2020 to Question 38589 on Air Pollution: Pollution Control, whether he has commissioned further analysis of the (a) economic viability and (b) practical deliverability of the WHO guideline limit for PM2.5.

We are developing a clear evidence-based process for setting the fine particulate matter (PM2.5) target introduced in the Environment Bill. This process will involve thorough analysis and independent expert advice, considering economic, social and technological factors. It will also involve detailed analysis to assess what additional action would be needed to achieve potential targets. Stakeholders, Parliament and the public will have the opportunity to comment on and provide input to the development of an ambitious and achievable target.

We are committed to taking action on PM2.5, as it is the pollutant that has the most significant impact on health.

1st May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 28 April 2020 to Question 38589 on Air Pollution: Pollution Control, whether he has commissioned further analysis of a pathway to achieving the WHO guideline limit for PM2.5.

We are developing a clear evidence-based process for setting the fine particulate matter (PM2.5) target introduced in the Environment Bill. This process will involve thorough analysis and independent expert advice, considering economic, social and technological factors. It will also involve detailed analysis to assess what additional action would be needed to achieve potential targets. Stakeholders, Parliament and the public will have the opportunity to comment on and provide input to the development of an ambitious and achievable target.

We are committed to taking action on PM2.5, as it is the pollutant that has the most significant impact on health.

21st Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment his Department has made of the steps required to meet the World Health Organization guideline values for PM2.5; and if he will publish those assessments.

In July 2019, the Government published a report assessing the progress that will be made towards World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines under a range of scenarios. The report concluded that while significant progress would be made, additional action would be required in large urban areas such as London. The analysis did not outline a pathway to achieve the WHO guideline level for fine particulate matter (PM2.5) across the country, and did not take into account full economic viability and practical deliverability.

The Environment Bill establishes a legally binding duty to set a target for PM2.5, demonstrating our commitment to action on the air pollutant that has the most significant impact on human health. We are committed to setting challenging targets and following an evidence based process, seeking advice from a range of experts, in addition to giving consideration to the WHO’s air quality guidelines. Stakeholders, Parliament and the public will have the opportunity to comment on and provide input for the process of developing this target.

21st Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will publish the improved rail capacity outline business case for the Ely area capacity enhancement scheme; and what steps he is taking to increase rail capacity through Haughley Junction.

An update on the Ely Area Capacity Enhancement (EACE) programme, and associated proposals at Haughley Junction, will be provided in the upcoming update to the Rail Network Enhancement Portfolio (RNEP).

Andrew Stephenson
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
21st Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to his Transport Decarbonisation Plan and Future of Freight Plan, what assessment he has made of his Department's progress on increasing the modal share of rail freight; and what steps he is taking to increase capacity for moving rail freight sustainably.

The Government is fully committed to growing rail freight and unlocking the economic and environmental benefits that the sector can deliver. Our Transport Decarbonisation Plan (TDP) set out our ambition to remove all diesel-only trains (passenger and freight) from the network by 2040. The Future of Freight Plan reflects the growing importance of the freight sector as a whole; until now, there has never been a cross Government and cross modal plan for the sector. In both the TDP and the William Shapps Plan for Rail we committed to introducing a rail freight growth target and to incentivising the early take up of low carbon traction to help operators have the confidence they need to invest in green technologies.

We continue to encourage and incentivise modal shift from road to rail through the £20m Mode Shift Revenue Support Scheme (MSRS), which delivers high value for money and in 2020/21 removed around 900,000 HGV lorries off our congested road network, saving 58,000 tonnes of CO2 emissions. Earlier this year the Department successfully secured MSRS funding of £20m a year for the next three years.

Wendy Morton
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
21st Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether commitments on increasing the modal share of freight in the (a) Transport Decarbonisation and (b) Future of Freight plans will inform the (i) assessment and (ii) delivery of essential rail freight schemes such as that planned for Ely Junction.

This Government is committed to delivering a net zero railway and recognises the considerable benefits of shifting goods from road to rail. Our Transport Decarbonisation and Future of Freight plans set out our support for rail freight, recognising that freight trains emit around a quarter of the carbon dioxide per tonne-mile of road haulage. As we build back from the pandemic, and following the 2021 Spending Review, we want to provide as much clarity and certainty as possible on rail enhancements and will set out our plans shortly. We also continue to invest in rail freight through grants such as the Mode Shift Revenue Support scheme.

Wendy Morton
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
21st Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether his Department prioritises decarbonisation benefits alongside cost considerations when assessing schemes to increase rail freight capacity.

This Government is committed to delivering a net zero railway and recognises the considerable benefits of shifting goods from road to rail. Our Transport Decarbonisation and Future of Freight plans set out our support for rail freight, recognising that freight trains emit around a quarter of the carbon dioxide per tonne-mile of road haulage. As we build back from the pandemic, and following the 2021 Spending Review, we want to provide as much clarity and certainty as possible on rail enhancements and will set out our plans shortly. We also continue to invest in rail freight through grants such as the Mode Shift Revenue Support scheme.

Wendy Morton
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, when he plans to publish the Government's response to his Department's consultation entitled Pavement parking: options for change, published in August 2020.

We are giving careful consideration to the large volume of responses to this consultation and will publish the outcome as soon as possible.

18th Aug 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, when he plans to make a decision on the potential extension of the Renewable Transport Fuel Obligation to cover hydrogen produced from nuclear energy.

Officials from the Department for Transport and the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy are in regular contact on the development of our green hydrogen policies. This includes engagement to better understand the merits of any support for hydrogen production using nuclear energy.

The Renewable Transport Fuel Obligation (RTFO) has reduced carbon emissions from UK transport fuels by of 275 mega tonnes from 2008 to 2020 through supporting the use of renewable fuels. There have been no recent ministerial discussions to expand the RTFO to cover nuclear derived fuels. Any decision on extension of the RTFO to support fuels derived from nuclear energy would need to be carefully considered because this could divert nuclear energy from the electricity grid where it plays a valuable role in providing low carbon energy.

We will set out a plan for the path to zero carbon shipping in 2022. The Sustainable Aviation Fuel (SAF) consultation launched on 23rd July this year seeks to explore the suitability of nuclear energy for producing SAF.

Any proposals would be the subject of a public consultation, published economic analysis and require primary and secondary legislation.

18th Aug 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy on the potential merits of extending the Renewable Transport Fuel Obligation to cover hydrogen produced from nuclear energy.

Officials from the Department for Transport and the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy are in regular contact on the development of our green hydrogen policies. This includes engagement to better understand the merits of any support for hydrogen production using nuclear energy.

The Renewable Transport Fuel Obligation (RTFO) has reduced carbon emissions from UK transport fuels by of 275 mega tonnes from 2008 to 2020 through supporting the use of renewable fuels. There have been no recent ministerial discussions to expand the RTFO to cover nuclear derived fuels. Any decision on extension of the RTFO to support fuels derived from nuclear energy would need to be carefully considered because this could divert nuclear energy from the electricity grid where it plays a valuable role in providing low carbon energy.

We will set out a plan for the path to zero carbon shipping in 2022. The Sustainable Aviation Fuel (SAF) consultation launched on 23rd July this year seeks to explore the suitability of nuclear energy for producing SAF.

Any proposals would be the subject of a public consultation, published economic analysis and require primary and secondary legislation.

25th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether people in receipt of universal credit will have access to short courses of between six weeks to a year in areas where there are skills gaps, starting from September 2022.

Universal Credit (UC) does not duplicate the financial support provided by the student loan system. This system of student loans and grants are designed to meet their needs.

Where learning meets the work-related requirements, as described in their claimant commitment, UC claimants can participate in learning opportunities designed to improve their prospects of securing work and progressing.

Using existing flexibilities within UC, DWP’s Train and Progress (TaP) initiative expands claimants’ access to training, including new offers under the Lifetime Skills Guarantee, for example, being able to undertake Skills Bootcamps, ensuring they gain new skills and access better employment opportunities. DWP TaP better aligns the employment and skills support offer and increases the amount of time UC claimants can take part in suitable full-time training. Claimants could take up to 12 weeks for work-related course and up to 16 weeks in areas where Skills Bootcamps exist.

8th Nov 2021
When her Department will bring forward legislative proposals to introduce a 12 month eligibility definition for the Special Rules for Terminal Illness.

The Department plans to implement the 12-month end-of-life approach across five DWP benefits, beginning in Universal Credit alongside Employment and Support Allowance next year. This will be followed by Attendance Allowance, Disability Living Allowance and Personal Independence Payment subject to Parliamentary processes.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
6th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, with reference to the Department for Education’s Skills for Jobs: Lifelong Learning for Opportunity and Growth White Paper, published in January 2021, what steps her Department is taking to help ensure that people move into good quality employment; and what relationship officials in her Department has with the Department for Education's Skills and Productivity Board.

The Department works closely with Department for Education and others, including the Skills Productivity Board, to understand current and future skills shortages. Our DWP Train and Progress initiative expands claimants’ access to training, with new offers under the Lifetime Skills Guarantee such as the Skills Bootcamps, ensuring they gain new skills and obtain good jobs.

18th Aug 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many and what proportion of universal credit claimants had deductions made to their monthly payment (a) in March 2020 and (b) in the most recent month for which figures are available, by (i) categories of third party debt deductions, (ii) advance payments and (iii) benefit overpayments and (iv) other types of deductions.

We carefully balance our duty to the taxpayer to recover overpayments, with support for claimants. Safeguards are in place to ensure deductions are manageable. From 12 April 2021, we further reduced the cap on deductions from Universal Credit awards to 25 per cent and lengthened the period from 12 to 24 months, meaning in effect someone can receive 25 payments over 24 months, giving them more flexibility over the payments of their Universal Credit award. This will also allow claimants to retain more of their award, giving additional financial security, and follows a previous change in October 2019 that reduced the cap from 40% to 30%.

Customers can contact the Department if they are experiencing financial hardship to discuss a reduction in their rate of repayment, depending on their financial circumstances, whilst work coaches can also signpost claimants to other financial support.

The information requested is provided in the attached spreadsheet.

Will Quince
Minister of State (Education)
18th Aug 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what recent assessment she has made of the potential merits of changing the universal credit childcare payments system to allow parents looking for work to claim costs upfront.

No assessment has been made. There is currently an on-going Judicial Review on Universal Credit childcare and the payment of upfront costs. An appeal hearing took place in the Court of Appeal in July and a decision is awaited. It is therefore not appropriate to comment directly on this matter at this time. It should be noted there are no changes to the current processes and the legislation remains the same.

Childcare costs should not be a barrier to getting into work – this Government is committed to helping parents into work. Universal Credit pays up to 85% of childcare costs for working parents, compared to 70% in legacy benefits, and childcare costs can be claimed up to a month before starting a job.

In cases where people need to pay for childcare upfront, prior to starting work, Work Coaches may be able to use the Flexible Support Fund for eligible claimants to meet these costs until their first wage is received. Budgeting advances are also available to eligible claimants who require help with upfront costs, for example when altering hours worked or changing childcare providers. Claimants on Universal Credit are encouraged to manage their own finances and budgets to better mirror the world of work and the majority of claimants can, and do, manage their childcare payments effectively.

Will Quince
Minister of State (Education)
11th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what recent estimate she has made of the cost to the public purse of reinstating the state pension for 1950s women; and if she will make a statement.

Changes to State Pension age were made over a series of Acts by successive governments from 1995 onwards; including the Coalition 2010-2015, Labour 1997-2010 and the Conservatives 1995-1997, following public consultations and extensive debates in both Houses of Parliament. Through the welfare system, the Government is committed to providing financial support for people at every stage of their life, including when they near or reach retirement.

Women born between 6 April 1950 and 5 April 1953 were affected by State Pension age equalisation under the Pensions Act 1995. The Pensions Act 2011 accelerated the equalisation of State Pension age, and included transitional arrangements limiting State Pension age delays, affecting women born between 6 April 1953 and 5 December 1953. It also brought forward the increase in State Pension age from 65 to 66 which affected women born between 6 December 1953 and 5 April 1960.

The Department published estimates on the cost of reversing the women’s State Pension age to 60 and men’s State Pension age to 65 on the 7th June 2019.

The publication shows the estimated cost of reversing women’s State Pension age back to 60 and men’s State Pension age back to 65 over the period 2010/11 to 2025/26, to be £181.4bn for women and £33.8bn for men with an overall cost estimate of £215.2bn.

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/analysis-relating-to-state-pension-age-changes-from-the-1995-and-2011-pensions-acts/analysis-relating-to-state-pension-age-changes-from-the-1995-and-2011-pensions-acts

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
19th Dec 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what estimate she has made of the cost to the public purse of increasing by 25 pence the state pension for people over the age of 80.

The Age Addition is paid to people who reached State Pension age prior to 6th April 2016 when they claim their State Pension and attain 80 years of age. It is not payable to those people who reached State Pension age on or after 6th April 2016.

In March 2019, the most recent date for which data are available, there were approximately 3.3m people in receipt of the payment, at a weekly cost of approximately £820,000.

Source: DWP Administrative data, March 2019

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
15th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he has plans to consult with representatives of health and social care (a) organisations and (b) charities on the forthcoming NHS England workforce strategy.

We intend to engage with a range of stakeholders in developing this plan, including health and social care organisations and charities where appropriate.

11th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to reduce deaths in NHS maternity units.

The Maternity Safety Strategy has funded initiatives such as the Saving Babies Lives Care Bundle, Maternal Medicine Networks and Maternal Mental Health Hubs to halve the number of stillbirths, maternal and neonatal deaths by 2025. Since 2010, these initiatives have contributed to a 25% reduction in the stillbirth rate, a 36% reduction in the neonatal mortality rate for babies born over the 24-week gestational age of viability, and a 17% reduction in maternal mortality.

NHS England are investing £127 million into the maternity system to ensure safe staffing levels in maternity and neonatal care. This is in addition to £95 million to support the recruitment of 1,200 more midwives and 100 more consultant obstetricians. A further £6.8 million is being provided to support Local Maternity Systems to implement equity and equality action plans and implement enhanced Continuity of Carer to improve safe outcomes for mothers and babies from black, Asian and mixed ethnic groups and those living in the most deprived areas.

Maria Caulfield
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
11th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what proportion of the total adult social care budget has been spent on people with neurological conditions annually from 2013-14 to 2020-21; and if he will make a statement.

The data is not collected in the format requested as NHS Digital’s data does not show neurological conditions recorded as a primary support reason.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
11th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to improve recruitment and retention in the midwifery service.

NHS England recently announced a £127 million investment to increase staffing numbers in maternity and neonatal services. This is in addition to £95 million allocated in 2021 to support the recruitment of 1,200 more midwives and 100 more consultant obstetricians. Health Education England is working with stakeholders to provide an additional 3,650 midwifery student training places by March 2023, leading to professional registration. In 2019/20, there were 626 additional places and 1,140 in 2020/21 and we are on schedule to meet the target for 2021/22.

The NHS People Plan includes a programme for organisations to retain staff through prioritising health and wellbeing, building an inclusive and compassionate culture in the National Health Service and strengthening support for flexible working. The NHS Retention Programme also seeks to understand why staff leave, resulting in targeted interventions to support staff to stay whilst keeping them well.

11th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department collects information when staff leave the midwifery profession on their reasons for leaving.

The National Health Service Electronic Staff Record (ESR) collects information through a ‘reason for leaving’ data field linked to staff recorded as leaving active service.

11th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to support the midwifery service in its recovery from the covid-19 pandemic.

The Chief Midwifery Officer’s Health and Wellbeing Taskforce has been established to listen and respond to concerns raised by midwives following the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. The number of Professional Midwifery Advocates (PMAs) has increased by 160, providing restorative clinical supervision to the maternity workforce in England. Psychological support training is being provided for all 750 PMAs in England to incorporate into the practice and supervision PMAs provide, whilst maintaining their own wellbeing. A midwifery leadership and support course is currently being piloted. Following an evaluation of the pilot, further courses will be commissioned.

NHS England recently announced a £127 million investment in maternity services to increase the number of staff. This is in addition to £95 million to support the recruitment of 1,200 midwives and 100 consultant obstetricians. In 2022/23, NHS England will invest a further £8 million to ensure that each maternity unit can offer enhanced supernumerary support to newly qualified and returning midwives to aid retention and pastoral support.

Maria Caulfield
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
11th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that the recommendations of the Ockenden Report are implemented in all hospitals where there is a maternity unit.

The Ockenden Report outlined 15 immediate and essential actions to improve care and safety in maternity services in England. NHS England has written to all trusts with maternity services to request that maternity providers assess services against these 15 actions and ensure that services meet the standards expected.

We have also committed to the creation of a new working group to guide the Maternity Transformation Programme on the implementation of the recommendations in the report. NHS England has also announced a £127 million investment in the National Health Service maternity workforce and to improve neonatal care.

Maria Caulfield
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
11th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department is taking steps to ensure that maternity staff do not undertake training on their own.

Individual National Health Service trusts are responsible for investing in post-registration training, ensuring that staff are trained and competent to carry out their role and are adequately supported throughout their training. All training undertaken by post-registration qualified staff should be in line with national and local guidelines covering the training being undertaken.

11th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to increase the neuroscience workforce in England.

No specific assessment has been made. However, from August 2022 we are expanding the number of postgraduate neurology training posts in England. As of January 2022, there are 1,638 full time equivalent (FTE) doctors working in the specialty of neurology, an increase of 4.9% since January 2021. There were also 951 FTE doctors working in the specialty of neurosurgery in January 2022, including 375 consultants - an increase of 5.6% since January 2021.

11th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the adequacy of the neuroscience workforce in England.

No specific assessment has been made. However, from August 2022 we are expanding the number of postgraduate neurology training posts in England. As of January 2022, there are 1,638 full time equivalent (FTE) doctors working in the specialty of neurology, an increase of 4.9% since January 2021. There were also 951 FTE doctors working in the specialty of neurosurgery in January 2022, including 375 consultants - an increase of 5.6% since January 2021.

26th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to reduce dental health inequalities within and between regions of the UK.

National Health Service dentists throughout the country have been asked to maximise safe throughput to meet as many prioritised needs as possible, focussing first on urgent care and vulnerable groups followed by overdue appointments. In addition, NHS England and NHS Improvement have provided a toolkit to local commissioners to help focus the available capacity on those that need it most and to reduce oral health inequalities.

We are committed to consulting on rolling out a supervised toothbrushing scheme in more pre-school and primary school settings in England. We are also taking steps through the Health and Care Bill to make it easier to expand water fluoridation schemes so that more of the population can benefit from this clinically and cost-effective intervention. The Government’s sugar reduction programme will also have a positive effect on improving oral health and reducing health in equalities.

26th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to promote preventative-focused, patient-centred dental care.

The Department will work with the British Dental Association and NHS England and NHS Improvement to design proposals that address the key challenges facing the delivery of National Health Service dentistry and encourage a more preventative approach to dentistry.

In addition, Public Health England has published an evidence-based toolkit, ‘Delivering Better Oral Health’ for dental teams to provide preventive advice and treatment for their patients. Work is underway to review the toolkit and an updated version will be published in the autumn. The toolkit is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/delivering-better-oral-health-an-evidence-based-toolkit-for-prevention

26th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Steele review on NHS Dentistry, what steps he is taking to implement the Dental Transformation Strategy 2020-22.

The Department will work with the British Dental Association and NHS England and NHS Improvement to design proposals that address the key challenges facing the delivery of National Health Service dentistry and encourage a more preventative approach to dentistry.

In addition, Public Health England has published an evidence-based toolkit, ‘Delivering Better Oral Health’ for dental teams to provide preventive advice and treatment for their patients. Work is underway to review the toolkit and an updated version will be published in the autumn. The toolkit is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/delivering-better-oral-health-an-evidence-based-toolkit-for-prevention

19th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of removing the 45 per cent target on dental practices for units of dental activity.

No assessment has been made of removing the 45% target.

However, an assessment has been made of the attainment of the 45% activity thresholds. These lower levels of activity support continued payment of full contractual value to National Health Service providers during the pandemic period, when infection control requirements necessarily restrict the numbers of patients that can be seen.

This assessment supported the recent increase in thresholds from 45% to 60%. Arrangements will continue to be monitored, with reduced clawback of contract payments between attainment levels of 36% to 60% and flexibility for NHS commissioners to make exceptions, for instance in cases where a dental practice has been impacted by staff being required to self-isolate.

19th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to increase the availability of dental appointments for patients in (a) Lowestoft and (b) the East of England.

NHS East of England are working with stakeholders to amend the Directory of Service to improve pathways for urgent patients to urgent dental centres and dental practices across the East of England. In addition, a web-based programme called ‘Service Finder’ has recently been launched which provides up-to-date information about services that are available locally to a potential patient. A Transformational Dental Strategy has also been developed in the East of England, the aim of which is to prioritise urgent care, prevention and inequalities. Plans to procure additional primary care dental services across Suffolk, Norfolk and Waveney are currently being reviewed.

16th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to improve (a) the recruitment and retention of NHS dentists and (b) access to those dentists in England.

NHS England and NHS Improvement are responsible for commissioning primary care dentistry to meet local need and the interim NHS People Plan commits to addressing shortages.

We are working both on improving career pathways and the current dental contract. In the summer, Health Education England will publish the report of their ‘Advancing Dental Care’ programme which has explored opportunities for flexible dental training pathways and the Department will publish a report on the learning from dental contract reform programme. NHS England and NHS Improvement have been asked to lead the next stage of dental contract reform to design implementable proposals taking the learning from reform programme into account.

National Health Service dentists have been asked to maximise safe throughput, focussing first on urgent care and vulnerable groups followed by overdue appointments. This has been underpinned, taking into account current infection prevention and control guidelines, by the requirement for dental providers to deliver 60% of normal activity volumes for the first six months of 2021/22 for full payment of the NHS contractual value.

11th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to make covid-19 testing kits available to close relatives of extremely vulnerable people that are presenting symptoms.

Testing is available to all symptomatic people across the whole of the United Kingdom. Anyone with any of the three main coronavirus symptoms should self-isolate and access a test as soon as possible, this includes those who are considered clinically extremely vulnerable.

Where a person is exhibiting COVID-19 symptoms but cannot order a test for themselves, there is the ability for a member of their family or community to order a test on their behalf. Should their condition worsen they should call 111, their own general practitioner or in the event of a medical emergency, 999.

28th Jun 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what discussions his Department has had with (a) Cabinet colleagues and (b) stakeholders on the potential merits of a windfall tax on electricity generators.

On 26th May, the Chancellor announced that the Government was urgently evaluating the scale of extraordinary profits in the energy generation sector and the appropriate next steps.

As part of this process, officials have been engaging with industry stakeholders to gather evidence on energy generators’ level of profitability and the operation of their business models.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
15th Jun 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to his oral statement of 26 May 2022 on Economy Update, Official Report, column 451, if he will make an assessment of the likely impact of the energy profits levy on (a) investor confidence in the energy sector, (b) additional costs of capital for future electricity generation projects and (c) the costs faced by electricity bill payers in the next 10 years.

As the Chancellor announced in the Economy Update 2022, the Government is introducing the Energy Profits Levy, a new 25 per cent surcharge on the extraordinary profits the oil and gas sector is making.

The new Energy Profits Levy will raise around £5 billion over the next year which will go towards supporting people with the new cost of living measures, also announced by the Chancellor.

Within the Levy, a new ‘super-deduction’ style relief is being introduced to encourage firms to invest in oil and gas extraction in the UK. The new 80 per cent Investment Allowance will mean businesses will overall get a 91 pence tax saving for every £1 they invest.

The Levy ensures the extraordinary profits that oil and gas companies have benefited from are taxed fairly, and provides a significant incentive for companies to invest. Officials and Ministers regularly engage with representatives from the sector.

Within the Economy Update, the Chancellor also set out that the Government is urgently evaluating the scale of extraordinary profits in the energy generation sector and the appropriate next steps.

As part of this process, officials are urgently engaging with industry stakeholders on this matter to gather evidence on energy generators’ level of profitability and the operation of their business models. The Government remains committed to achieving a Net Zero Economy and to fully decarbonising the power system by 2035, subject to security of supply. As we transition to net zero, we will make sure the costs of doing so are distributed fairly. The Government will take these factors into consideration when deciding on the appropriate action with regard to energy generators’ profits.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
15th Jun 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to his oral statement of 26 May 2022 on Economy Update, Official Report, column 451, if he will take steps to ensure that any policy proposals take full account of investments being made by electricity generators to deliver net zero.

As the Chancellor announced in the Economy Update 2022, the Government is introducing the Energy Profits Levy, a new 25 per cent surcharge on the extraordinary profits the oil and gas sector is making.

The new Energy Profits Levy will raise around £5 billion over the next year which will go towards supporting people with the new cost of living measures, also announced by the Chancellor.

Within the Levy, a new ‘super-deduction’ style relief is being introduced to encourage firms to invest in oil and gas extraction in the UK. The new 80 per cent Investment Allowance will mean businesses will overall get a 91 pence tax saving for every £1 they invest.

The Levy ensures the extraordinary profits that oil and gas companies have benefited from are taxed fairly, and provides a significant incentive for companies to invest. Officials and Ministers regularly engage with representatives from the sector.

Within the Economy Update, the Chancellor also set out that the Government is urgently evaluating the scale of extraordinary profits in the energy generation sector and the appropriate next steps.

As part of this process, officials are urgently engaging with industry stakeholders on this matter to gather evidence on energy generators’ level of profitability and the operation of their business models. The Government remains committed to achieving a Net Zero Economy and to fully decarbonising the power system by 2035, subject to security of supply. As we transition to net zero, we will make sure the costs of doing so are distributed fairly. The Government will take these factors into consideration when deciding on the appropriate action with regard to energy generators’ profits.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
15th Jun 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to his oral statement of 26 May 2022 on Economy Update, Official Report, column 451, if he will take steps to ensure that such a policy is (a) fair and equitable given and (b) reflects the comparative complexity of the oil and gas sector.

As the Chancellor announced in the Economy Update 2022, the Government is introducing the Energy Profits Levy, a new 25 per cent surcharge on the extraordinary profits the oil and gas sector is making.

The new Energy Profits Levy will raise around £5 billion over the next year which will go towards supporting people with the new cost of living measures, also announced by the Chancellor.

Within the Levy, a new ‘super-deduction’ style relief is being introduced to encourage firms to invest in oil and gas extraction in the UK. The new 80 per cent Investment Allowance will mean businesses will overall get a 91 pence tax saving for every £1 they invest.

The Levy ensures the extraordinary profits that oil and gas companies have benefited from are taxed fairly, and provides a significant incentive for companies to invest. Officials and Ministers regularly engage with representatives from the sector.

Within the Economy Update, the Chancellor also set out that the Government is urgently evaluating the scale of extraordinary profits in the energy generation sector and the appropriate next steps.

As part of this process, officials are urgently engaging with industry stakeholders on this matter to gather evidence on energy generators’ level of profitability and the operation of their business models. The Government remains committed to achieving a Net Zero Economy and to fully decarbonising the power system by 2035, subject to security of supply. As we transition to net zero, we will make sure the costs of doing so are distributed fairly. The Government will take these factors into consideration when deciding on the appropriate action with regard to energy generators’ profits.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
15th Jun 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to his oral statement of 26 May 2022 on Economy Update, Official Report, column 451, what representations he has received from energy investors on the energy profits levy.

As the Chancellor announced in the Economy Update 2022, the Government is introducing the Energy Profits Levy, a new 25 per cent surcharge on the extraordinary profits the oil and gas sector is making.

The new Energy Profits Levy will raise around £5 billion over the next year which will go towards supporting people with the new cost of living measures, also announced by the Chancellor.

Within the Levy, a new ‘super-deduction’ style relief is being introduced to encourage firms to invest in oil and gas extraction in the UK. The new 80 per cent Investment Allowance will mean businesses will overall get a 91 pence tax saving for every £1 they invest.

The Levy ensures the extraordinary profits that oil and gas companies have benefited from are taxed fairly, and provides a significant incentive for companies to invest. Officials and Ministers regularly engage with representatives from the sector.

Within the Economy Update, the Chancellor also set out that the Government is urgently evaluating the scale of extraordinary profits in the energy generation sector and the appropriate next steps.

As part of this process, officials are urgently engaging with industry stakeholders on this matter to gather evidence on energy generators’ level of profitability and the operation of their business models. The Government remains committed to achieving a Net Zero Economy and to fully decarbonising the power system by 2035, subject to security of supply. As we transition to net zero, we will make sure the costs of doing so are distributed fairly. The Government will take these factors into consideration when deciding on the appropriate action with regard to energy generators’ profits.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
24th May 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether his Department has made an assessment of the potential merits of introducing a UK carbon border adjustment mechanism.

As the UK transitions to Net Zero, the Government recognises the importance of addressing the risk of carbon leakage. The best solution would be for all countries to move together in the pricing and regulation of carbon emissions. However, international solutions will take time to develop, and so the Government is considering options for domestic action in parallel.

As I set out in a Written Ministerial Statement on 16 May 2022, later in the year the Government intends to consult on a range of carbon leakage mitigation options, including on whether measures such as product standards and a carbon border adjustment mechanism (CBAM) could be appropriate tools in the UK’s policy mix.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
11th May 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how much tax has been paid by (a) oil and gas producers over the lifetime of the UK basin and (b) month in the last 12 months by oil and gas producers operating in the UK Continental Shelf.

Government revenues received from North Sea oil and gas operators between 1968 to 1969 and 2020 to 2021 are presented in Table 2 of HM Revenue & Custom’s (HMRC) “Statistics of government revenues from UK oil and gas production” publication, available on GOV.UK.

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/government-revenues-from-uk-oil-and-gas-production--2

Data for 2021 to 2022 onwards can be found in the “HMRC tax receipts and National Insurance contributions for the UK” tables, also available on GOV.UK.

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/hmrc-tax-and-nics-receipts-for-the-uk

11th May 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what projection he has made of how much tax will be paid by oil and gas producers in 2022-23.

Forecasts for government revenues from oil and gas production are provided by the Office for Budget Responsibility (OBR). Their most recent published forecast, provided for Spring Statement 2022 on 23 March, is available on the OBR website at the following link https://obr.uk/efo/economic-and-fiscal-outlook-march-2022/. HM Revenue and Customs publishes monthly tax receipts statistics, including for UK oil and gas production, on a cash receipts basis, at GOV.UK at the following link https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/hmrc-tax-and-nics-receipts-for-the-uk.

11th May 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether he plans to amend the differences in funding under the Homes for Ukraine Scheme, for which local authorities receive £10,500 of integration funding per refugee, and the Ukraine Family Scheme, for which local authorities do not receive that funding.

This government cares deeply about helping those fleeing the conflict in Ukraine. This is why we have announced two visa schemes which both support the integration of Ukrainian refugees by providing them with full access to social services and welfare in the UK for up to three years.

The Ukraine Family Scheme is similar to existing family visa routes, and provision of public services from this route will be managed in the usual way. The UK-based family member is expected to provide support and accommodation for those coming to join them, who in turn benefit from the wider integration advantages in joining an existing family network.

Homes for Ukraine on the other hand is a unique scheme that has been set up specifically to support those escaping the conflict in Ukraine who are not able to rely on family support. The government is providing additional funding to local authorities which includes resource to enable them to carry out sponsorship-specific functions such as safeguarding checks and property checks, administering payments, as well as providing support such as English language training to help their integration into communities.

Simon Clarke
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
8th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of reintroducing the Job Retention Bonus to help support employment after the furlough scheme ends.

The purpose of the Job Retention Bonus (JRB) was to encourage employers to keep people in work until the end of January 2021. However, when it was announced in December 2020 that the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS) would be extended to the end of April 2021, the policy intent of the JRB fell away.

As the health situation deteriorated rapidly last autumn and winter, it was right that the Government instead extended the CJRS to reflect the increased number of closures that were expected over autumn and winter. However, the situation has changed moving into summer 2021 with the roll-out of the vaccine and the firm footing that gives to economic reopening. In this context, extending the CJRS further at Budget 2021, to the end of September, allowed the Government to strike the right balance between supporting the economy as it reopens, continuing to provide support and protect incomes, and ensuring incentives are in place to get people back to work as demand returns.

26th May 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of extending the reduction in VAT to 5 per cent for tourism to amusement arcades.

The temporary reduced rate of VAT was introduced on 15 July to support the cash flow and viability of over 150,000 businesses and protect 2.4 million jobs in the hospitality and tourism sectors. This relief already comes at a significant cost of over £7 billion to the Exchequer and, while the Government keeps all taxes under review, there are no plans to extend the scope of the reduced rate.

The Government has introduced a wider package of support worth billions to help businesses through the coronavirus period, which includes extensions to the furlough scheme; extensions to the COVID-19 loan schemes; grant support; a business rates holiday for all retail, hospitality and leisure business properties; mortgage holidays; enhanced Time to Pay for taxes; and VAT deferrals.

26th May 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of extending Business Rates Relief to the end of the 2021-22 financial year.

The Budget announced a three-month extension to the business rates holiday for eligible businesses in the retail, hospitality and leisure sectors that was provided at Budget 2020. This means over 350,000 properties will pay no business rates for three months this year.

From 1 July 2021, 66% relief will be available subject to a cash cap that depends on whether businesses were required to close or were able to open on 5 January 2021. This additional relief takes the total value of support in 2021-22 to £6 billion and means the vast majority of businesses will on average receive 75% relief across the year.

12th Apr 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that end-clients administer IR35 status accurately for contractors in instances where contractors are working in a genuinely independent manner.

HMRC are continuing to help businesses get determinations right. HMRC set up dedicated teams to provide education and support to all businesses, public bodies and charities affected by the off-payroll working reform. This includes topic-based webinars, workshops as well as targeted one-to-one calls with affected businesses.

This is further supported by updated off-payroll working guidance, online learning and attendance at stakeholder events.

HMRC have also outlined how they will support customers to comply with the changes to the off-payroll working rules: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/hmrc-issue-briefing-supporting-organisations-to-comply-with-changes-to-the-off-payroll-working-rules-ir35.

HMRC developed the Check Employment Status for Tax (CEST) tool to help organisations and individuals determine employment status for tax and decide whether the off-payroll working rules apply.

CEST is a free service which was developed working closely with tax specialists, contractors and other stakeholders. It was tested rigorously against known case law and settled cases, and HMRC stand by its results if the tool is used in accordance with HMRC's guidance.

The Government has also ensured there is a client-led status disagreement process where contractors and deemed employers can lodge a complaint, if they disagree on how a contractor has been categorised.

12th Apr 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether HMRC has made an assessment of the potential merits of updating its CEST tool used for determining employment status to account for Mutuality of Obligation in the determination of independent contract work.

‘Mutuality of obligation’ (MoO) is a term often used to describe the basic obligations that exist between a hirer and a worker. These basic obligations are where the hirer is obliged to pay remuneration, of any kind, and the worker is obliged to provide their work or skill in return.

MoO is important because without it there can be no contract for the supply of a worker. CEST does account for MoO on these terms and is clear in guidance to users that it can only be used to determine employment status for tax where there is such a contract in place. CEST then considers this contract, testing the employment status factors, and determines whether the engagement is more likely to be employed or self-employed for Income Tax and National Insurance contributions purposes.

After receiving feedback during user testing, HMRC provided a link to guidance on MoO on CEST’s landing page to make this understanding clearer to users of the tool. The guidance can be found on GOV.UK: https://www.gov.uk/hmrc-internal-manuals/employment-status-manual/esm0543.

30th Jun 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether he plans to undertake a Capital Gains Tax rebasement for assets acquired after 31 March 1982.

The Government does not have plans to rebase assets for the purposes of calculating CGT. Revaluation would be costly and burdensome for both individuals and the government, as a professional valuation of the assets in question would be necessary.

13th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when she will publish the updated statutory fees guidance for recovery operators.

The Home Office does not issue statutory fees guidance. The Home Office’s role is limited to setting the statutory fees which the Police and National Highways can levy when they have exercised their vehicle recovery powers.

In May 2021, the Home Office launched a consultation seeking views on new levels of fees applied to the removal, storage and disposal of vehicles in England and Wales.

We will shortly announce the next steps following our consultation.

Kit Malthouse
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
11th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she is taking to remove the barriers that prevent Ukrainian refugees from working in the hospitality and care sectors if they wish to do so.

The Homes for Ukraine Sponsorship Scheme, the Ukraine Family Scheme and the Ukraine Extension Scheme grant leave with no restriction on work rights and access to public funds. There are therefore no immigration barriers to Ukrainians under these schemes working in any sector of the economy, including hospitality and care.

The Department for Work and Pensions is best placed to work with people who are looking to find work in these sectors.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
25th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department is taking to support Ukrainian refugees.

The UK has a long history of supporting refugees in need of protection.

In response to the ongoing conflict, the Home Office has launched the Ukraine Family Scheme and the Homes for Ukraine Scheme.

Both of these schemes are free, and people applying under the schemes will be able to live and work in the UK for up to three years. They will have full and unrestricted access to benefits, healthcare, employment, and other support.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
1st May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what guidance has been provided to the Police to ensure they are investigating the safeguarding concerns of children who are breaching lockdown measures by being outside of their home.

The police continue to apply the usual safeguarding and referral procedures, working in partnership with agencies such as social services and local authorities to support vulnerable children. This has not changed under the new social distancing measures. The National Police Chief’s Council and College of Policing have issued guidance to forces that specifically asks officers to consider safeguarding issues and ensure the child’s welfare.

Kit Malthouse
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
1st May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment Government has made of whether there has been an increase in adolescent to parent violence and abuse during the lockdown due to covid-19; and what support her Department has made available to families experiencing such violence and abuse.

We are working closely with domestic abuse organisations, the Domestic Abuse Commissioner and police to monitor the impact of covid-19 on incidents of all forms of domestic abuse.

The Government has provided a £76?million package of support to ensure the most vulnerable in society including victims of domestic and sexual abuse, vulnerable children and victims of modern slavery get the support they need during the pandemic. This is in addition to £2m of funding announced by the Home Secretary to bolster support for helplines and web based services.

An awareness campaign has been launched to signpost victims of domestic abuse to appropriate support.

19th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, with reference to the transitionary arrangements for implementing the Future Homes Standard, if his Department will make an assessment of the potential merits of a phased implementation of those arrangements to enable developments to proceed based on planning permission already granted and energy infrastructure already laid.

We have listened to calls for a swifter and more certain pathway to 2025 and have already accelerated our work on a full technical specification for the Future Homes Standard, which is planned for Spring 2023. In the meantime, to provide greater certainty for all stakeholders, we have published a draft notional building specification for the Future Homes Standard. The specification is not final but provides a basis on which we are already beginning to engage with industry on the indicative technical detail of the Future Homes Standard.

A full impact assessment on the Future Homes Standard will be carried out ahead of implementation and published online. Government's intention is to publish a draft impact assessment alongside the consultation in 2023.

As part of the consultation, we will consider what transitional arrangements are appropriate. Transitional arrangements are important as they provide all developers with certainty about the standards they are building to, and assurance that they should not have to make material amendments to work which is already underway when new Regulations came into force.

Marcus Jones
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
19th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, if his Department will make an assessment of the potential merits of bringing forward the technical consultation on the Future Homes Standard from 2023 to provide greater certainty to housing developers and companies in their supply chains.

We have listened to calls for a swifter and more certain pathway to 2025 and have already accelerated our work on a full technical specification for the Future Homes Standard, which is planned for Spring 2023. In the meantime, to provide greater certainty for all stakeholders, we have published a draft notional building specification for the Future Homes Standard. The specification is not final but provides a basis on which we are already beginning to engage with industry on the indicative technical detail of the Future Homes Standard.

A full impact assessment on the Future Homes Standard will be carried out ahead of implementation and published online. Government's intention is to publish a draft impact assessment alongside the consultation in 2023.

As part of the consultation, we will consider what transitional arrangements are appropriate. Transitional arrangements are important as they provide all developers with certainty about the standards they are building to, and assurance that they should not have to make material amendments to work which is already underway when new Regulations came into force.

Marcus Jones
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
19th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, whether his Department has carried out an impact assessment on the impact of the Future Homes Standard on new house build completions from 2025.

We have listened to calls for a swifter and more certain pathway to 2025 and have already accelerated our work on a full technical specification for the Future Homes Standard, which is planned for Spring 2023. In the meantime, to provide greater certainty for all stakeholders, we have published a draft notional building specification for the Future Homes Standard. The specification is not final but provides a basis on which we are already beginning to engage with industry on the indicative technical detail of the Future Homes Standard.

A full impact assessment on the Future Homes Standard will be carried out ahead of implementation and published online. Government's intention is to publish a draft impact assessment alongside the consultation in 2023.

As part of the consultation, we will consider what transitional arrangements are appropriate. Transitional arrangements are important as they provide all developers with certainty about the standards they are building to, and assurance that they should not have to make material amendments to work which is already underway when new Regulations came into force.

Marcus Jones
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
17th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, how many properties have been completed through the Older Person’s Shared Ownership scheme over the last five financial years; and what steps his Department is taking to increase uptake of that scheme.​

This Government is committed to increasing the supply of specialist housing for older people and improving the diversity and quality of accommodation available so that they can choose the best housing option for them in the place they want to live.

That is why we are launching a new task force on the issue of older people’s housing which will look at ways we can provide greater choice, quality and security of housing for older people and support the growth of a thriving older people’s housing sector in this country.

The Older Person’s Shared Ownership (OPSO) scheme is a Shared Ownership scheme intended for specific groups of properties developed for people aged 55 and over. It is the same as the standard Shared Ownership scheme, but applicants can only purchase up to 75% of a home’s equity, with no rent charged on the remaining 25%. Over the last five years, a total of 1,238 homes have been delivered by Homes England through the OPSO scheme.

As with all forms of housing offered through government schemes, including the Affordable Homes Programme, OPSO’s availability is contingent on the engagement of Registered Providers of Social Housing (RPs). As independent organisations, RPs are free to make their own commercial decisions as to the types of housing schemes they engage with.

Stuart Andrew
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
25th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, what the deadline is for local authorities to submit a local investment plan to his Department to unlock UK Shared Prosperity Fund funding from the year 1 tranche of that fund.

The Government will publish a full Prospectus on the fund later in Spring 2022 in order for places to be fully equipped to write an Investment Plan.

The pre-launch guidance document provides further information on the overall focus of the fund, geographies over which the fund will operate and a summary of its investment priorities. This information will enable places to start planning and preparing for the full launch later in Spring 2022.

11th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, whether he has plans to permit councils to hold meetings remotely.

The Department has been considering the responses to the call for evidence on local authority remote meetings and the Government will respond shortly.

11th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, what recent representations his Department has received from local government on permitting councils to hold meetings remotely.

The Department has been considering the responses to the call for evidence on local authority remote meetings and the Government will respond shortly.

11th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, what recent assessment he has made of the potential merits of allowing councils to hold meetings remotely.

The Department has been considering the responses to the call for evidence on local authority remote meetings and the Government will respond shortly.

6th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what recent assessment he has made of the potential merits of establishing a new taskforce to assess how to accelerate the delivery of housing for older people.

Both the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government and the Department of Health and Social Care are committed to further improving the diversity of housing options available to older people. We are engaging closely with both the sector and a range of other stakeholders on this issue. This includes considering the merits of different engagement and delivery models including proposals from the sector for a cross-Government taskforce.

16th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what plans the Government has for the Coastal Communities Fund.

Whether there will be another round of the Coastal Communities Fund or the Coastal Revival Fund is a matter for the next Comprehensive Spending Review.

The Government is committed to levelling up all parts of the UK. We published a prospectus at Budget for the £4.8 billion Levelling Up Fund which will invest in infrastructure that improves everyday life across the UK. In addition, as announced at Spending Review 2020, the UK Shared Prosperity Fund will help to level up and create opportunity across the UK in places most in need, such as ex-industrial areas, deprived towns and rural and coastal communities, and for people who face labour market barriers. We will publish a UK-wide investment framework for the UK Shared Prosperity Fund later this year and confirm multiyear funding profiles at the next Spending Review.

The Government is supporting coastal communities to recover from the pandemic. On 20 March we announced a new £56 million Welcome Back Fund to support a safe and successful reopening of our high streets and seaside resorts, giving people the reassurance that they can shop and socialise in a COVID-secure way. This builds on the £50 million Reopening High Streets Safely Fund (RHSSF) announced on 25 May 2020, doubling local authority funding allocations and significantly increasing the scope of eligible activity.

16th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what plans he has for the future of the Coastal Communities Fund; and whether those plans include providing grant for (a) ports, (b) harbours and (c) other infrastructure to support the UK fishing industry.

This Government recognises the unique challenges facing coastal communities and is committed to levelling up all areas of the UK. However, whether there is another round of the Coastal Communities Fund is a matter for the comprehensive Spending Review.

16th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what discussions his Department has had with the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs on the infrastructure requirements of the UK fishing industry.

This Government recognises the unique challenges facing coastal communities and is committed to levelling up all areas of the UK. However, whether there is another round of the Coastal Communities Fund is a matter for the comprehensive Spending Review.