Debbie Abrahams

Labour - Oldham East and Saddleworth

Shadow Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
27th Jun 2016 - 11th Mar 2018
Shadow Minister (Work and Pensions)
18th Sep 2015 - 27th Jun 2016
Work and Pensions Committee
8th Jul 2015 - 26th Oct 2015
Work and Pensions Committee
27th Jun 2011 - 30th Mar 2015


Department Event
Wednesday 7th September 2022
09:25
Department for Work and Pensions
Sixth Delegated Legislation Committee - Debate - General Committee
7 Sep 2022, 9:25 a.m.
The draft Chemicals (Health and Safety) Trade and Miscellaneous Amendments Regulations 2022
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Department Event
Monday 17th October 2022
14:30
Department for Work and Pensions
Oral questions - Main Chamber
17 Oct 2022, 2:30 p.m.
Work and Pensions (including Topical Questions)
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Division Votes
None available
Speeches
Wednesday 20th July 2022
Oral Answers to Questions
T6. Well insulated homes protect against extreme heat as well as extreme cold, while reducing energy demand and cutting bills, …
Written Answers
Tuesday 5th July 2022
Social Security Benefits: Injuries and Death
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many internal process reviews her Department has (a) started …
Early Day Motions
Monday 21st June 2021
Israel and Palestine
That this House expresses its profound concern at recent events in the occupied Palestinian territory and Israel; welcomes the ceasefire …
Bills
Tuesday 15th January 2019
Public Sector Supply Chains (Project Bank Accounts) Bill 2017-19
The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will …
MP Financial Interests
Monday 17th May 2021
8. Miscellaneous
Along with the Good Law Project and two other MPs, since 6 October 2020 I have been party to judicial …
EDM signed
Tuesday 19th July 2022
Recruiting and retaining NHS staff
That this House acknowledges there is a staffing crisis in the National Health Service, exacerbated by the coronavirus pandemic but …
Supported Legislation
Wednesday 14th July 2021
Planning and Local Representation Bill 2021-22
A Bill to give people who have made representations about development plans the right to participate in associated examination hearings; …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Debbie Abrahams has voted in 413 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
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Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Matt Hancock (Conservative)
(28 debate interactions)
Boris Johnson (Conservative)
Prime Minister, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, and Minister for the Union
(24 debate interactions)
Sajid Javid (Conservative)
(18 debate interactions)
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Department Debates
Department of Health and Social Care
(62 debate contributions)
Department for Work and Pensions
(41 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(40 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
Legislation Debates
Finance Act 2020
(2,424 words contributed)
Finance Act 2021
(1,228 words contributed)
View All Legislation Debates
View all Debbie Abrahams's debates

Oldham East and Saddleworth Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petition Debates Contributed

The Home Secretary said what happened to victims of child sexual exploitation gangs was “one of the biggest stains on our country’s conscience.” Last year local authorities identified 18,700 suspected victims of child sexual exploitation. We want an independent public inquiry into Grooming Gangs.

The Government is refusing to release official research on the characteristics of grooming gangs, claiming it is not in the “public interest”.

We, the British public, demand the release of the official research on grooming gangs undertaken by the Government in full.


Latest EDMs signed by Debbie Abrahams

22nd June 2022
Debbie Abrahams signed this EDM on Tuesday 19th July 2022

Recruiting and retaining NHS staff

Tabled by: Tony Lloyd (Labour - Rochdale)
That this House acknowledges there is a staffing crisis in the National Health Service, exacerbated by the coronavirus pandemic but predating it; recognises the intense pressure on healthcare staff, who having worked incredibly hard during the pandemic now face the vast challenge of clearing the backlog of care caused by …
57 signatures
(Most recent: 21 Jul 2022)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 36
Liberal Democrat: 10
Plaid Cymru: 3
Independent: 2
Green Party: 1
Social Democratic & Labour Party: 1
Alba Party: 1
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
Conservative: 1
Alliance: 1
Scottish National Party: 1
11th July 2022
Debbie Abrahams signed this EDM as a sponsor on Friday 8th July 2022

Accessible council meetings

Tabled by: Caroline Lucas (Green Party - Brighton, Pavilion)
That this House is concerned that the emergency regulations that allowed councils to conduct meetings remotely between 2 April 2020 and 7 May 2021, and which enabled disabled people and people with caring responsibilities to fully and fairly participate, are no longer in place; notes the Local Government Association's (LGA) …
17 signatures
(Most recent: 21 Jul 2022)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 6
Liberal Democrat: 5
Independent: 3
Green Party: 1
Plaid Cymru: 1
Conservative: 1
View All Debbie Abrahams's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Debbie Abrahams, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Debbie Abrahams has not been granted any Urgent Questions

2 Adjournment Debates led by Debbie Abrahams

Tuesday 14th December 2021
Monday 24th February 2020

2 Bills introduced by Debbie Abrahams


The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. a Bill to require public authorities to pay certain suppliers using project bank accounts; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 15th January 2019
(Read Debate)

A Bill to require listed companies, public bodies and voluntary agencies to report annually on the number and percentage of people they employ who have disabilities; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 25th February 2015

129 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
1 Other Department Questions
6th May 2020
What recent assessment she has made of the effect of the covid-19 outbreak on disabled people who are in receipt of social security.

DWP has made a number of changes to the benefits system in response to the pandemic to ensure the right support goes to those claimants who are more vulnerable, have a health condition or have a disability.

To provide greater financial security at this time, we have automatically extended awards by 6 months for existing claimants that were due to be reviewed or reassessed.

We have also suspended all face-to-face assessments of disability benefits for 3 months but continue to accept new claims, requests for a review where asked by a claimant and, as usual, prioritise claims made under the Special Rules for Terminal Illness.

13th May 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what information his Department holds on how many (a) Government departments and (b) agencies and non-departmental bodies have regularly refused to use Project Bank Accounts in the last three years; and what the reasons were for not using such accounts.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave to PQ185363 on 26 April 2021.

12th May 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, where a Department, agency or a non-departmental body has a compelling reason not to use a Project Bank Account what procedure is in place to record that reason and its justification; and who has the authority to sanction that reason.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave to PQ185363 on 26 April 2021.

11th May 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the lack of data on the use of Project Bank Accounts (PBAs) by Government construction procurers, what steps his Department plans to take to monitor the implementation of its policy that PBAs must be used unless there are compelling reasons not to use them.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave to PQ185363 on 26 April 2021.

21st Apr 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps he is taking to increase the use of Project Bank Accounts by (a) Government departments, (b) Government agencies and (c) non-departmental bodies.

This Department does not hold specific information on the use of Project Bank Accounts. However, as the PBA policy lead we do engage with departments and their ALBs about their PBA usage, including indicative spend.

Whilst the use of PBAs was being established we collected data on the value of government contracts making use of PBAs. During that period (2011-2015) over £10 billion was spent on a wide range of construction projects using PBAs.

PBAs are the preferred option by government when it is cost effective and efficient, and departments have made a commitment to use PBAs unless there are compelling reasons not to. This has been restated in the Construction Playbook (December 2020), which sets out key policies and guidance for government departments and their arms length bodies on how public works projects and programmes are assessed, procured and delivered. PBAs are just one way the government supports fair payment as part of the Government's Prompt Payment Code.

21st Apr 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what data his Department holds on the total value of Government works using a Project Bank Account.

This Department does not hold specific information on the use of Project Bank Accounts. However, as the PBA policy lead we do engage with departments and their ALBs about their PBA usage, including indicative spend.

Whilst the use of PBAs was being established we collected data on the value of government contracts making use of PBAs. During that period (2011-2015) over £10 billion was spent on a wide range of construction projects using PBAs.

PBAs are the preferred option by government when it is cost effective and efficient, and departments have made a commitment to use PBAs unless there are compelling reasons not to. This has been restated in the Construction Playbook (December 2020), which sets out key policies and guidance for government departments and their arms length bodies on how public works projects and programmes are assessed, procured and delivered. PBAs are just one way the government supports fair payment as part of the Government's Prompt Payment Code.

2nd Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what estimate he has made of the amount Government departments owe in late payments to small businesses since the start of the covid-19 outbreak.

Government does not maintain a central estimate of late payments owed to small businesses.

Since the beginning of the Covid-19 pandemic the Government has issued a number of procurement policy notes with the goal of supporting cash flow to suppliers by accelerating payment. These have included a range of approaches such as forward ordering, payment in advance/prepayment, interim payments and payment on order (not receipt).

14th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what data his Department holds on the total value of Government projects paid through Project Bank Accounts for each year from 2016-17.

Data on the use and value of Project Bank Accounts is held by departments, not centrally.

14th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many Government Departments have used Project Bank Accounts since March 2016; how many projects in each Government Department have used Project Bank Accounts since March 2016; and if he will publish a list of all Government clients using Project Bank Accounts since March 2016.

Data on the use and value of Project Bank Accounts is held by departments, not centrally.

25th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to help ensure that funding through Industry Initiatives to provide a safeguard for disabled people with high energy costs as a result of their impairments does not place a higher administrative burden on disabled people than the Warm Home Discount.

Industry Initiatives provide valuable support to households in, or at risk of, fuel poverty through a range of measures, including energy advice, financial assistance, and energy efficiency improvements.

To date, energy suppliers have only been required to report on the overall spending on Industry Initiatives measures to Ofgem. From the 2022/23 scheme year, suppliers will be required to report on the estimated value and proportion of Industry Initiatives spending on fuel poor households where someone has a disability or significant health problems.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he plans to take steps to help mitigate the impact on disabled people of the forthcoming changes to the eligibility criteria for the Warm Home Discount, which will remove eligibility for people who receive Personal Independence Payment and Disability Living Allowance.

Around 62% of Personal Independence Payment (PIP) and Disability Living Allowance (DLA) recipients also receive one of the qualifying means-tested benefits and so would be considered low-income under the Core Group 2 criteria. Those with high energy costs would therefore be eligible for a rebate. The Government’s analysis shows that 160,000 more households, where there is a person with a disability or long-term illness, will receive a rebate each winter compared to the previous scheme. My Rt. Hon. Friend Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer has also announced a one-off £150 payment for people on disability benefits this year, alongside other cost of living support measures: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/cost-of-living-support/cost-of-living-support-factsheet-26-may-2022.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Government Response to the Warm Home Discount: Better targeted support from 2022 consultation, what recent assessment he has made of the adequacy of the value and proportion of energy suppliers' spending through Industry Initiatives to support fuel poor disabled people.

Industry Initiatives provide valuable support to households in, or at risk of, fuel poverty through a range of measures, including energy advice, financial assistance, and energy efficiency improvements.

To date, energy suppliers have only been required to report on the overall spending on Industry Initiatives measures to Ofgem. From the 2022/23 scheme year, suppliers will be required to report on the estimated value and proportion of Industry Initiatives spending on fuel poor households where someone has a disability or significant health problems.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
11th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make an assessment of the scale of the loss of retention monies by construction small and medium sized enterprises since January 2018.

While difficult to measure fully and comprehensively, the Government is aware of this important issue and continues to work with both officials and the Construction Leadership Council to implement a solution.

11th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he has plans to reform the practice of retentions payments in the construction industry.

While difficult to measure fully and comprehensively, the Government is aware of this important issue and continues to work with both officials and the Construction Leadership Council to implement a solution.

3rd Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if the Extra Costs Taskforce established in the National Disability Strategy will recommend measures to tackle the disproportional impact of increased fuel and food prices on disabled consumers.

The taskforce is on track to set up by summer 2022 and we are keen to engage in that process before drawing conclusions.

5th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many small businesses closed in each financial year from 2010-11 to date.

Data on business closures by size of business are not available. The data provided below covers all registered business closures in the UK for the periods specified.

According to the business counts published in 2020 by the Office for National Statistics in UK business: activity, size and location, 98.1% of all registered business are small (0 to 49 employees). Therefore, the vast majority of business closures are very likely to be small businesses.

Data on business closures over the last 3 financial years are shown in table 1:

Table 1: Number of business closures by financial year, all registered businesses

Financial Year

Number of business closures

2019/2020

383,000

2018/2019

348,000

2017/2018

351,000

Source: Office for National Statistics: Business Demography, quarterly experimental statistics, UK

Prior to 2017 data are only available for calendar years, rather than financial years. The number of closures in each calendar year is shown in table 2:

Table 2: Number of business closures by calendar year, all registered businesses

Calendar year

Number of business closures

2019

336,000

2018

311,000

2017

346,000

2016

281,000

2015

282,000

2014

246,000

2013

238,000

2012

252,000

2011

230,000

2010

277,000

Source: Office for National Statistics: Business demography, UK statistical bulletin

Paul Scully
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
26th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the (a) potential for and (b) benefits of local electricity generation.

There can be many benefits from local electricity generation, including greater consumer engagement with electricity and how it is generated.

In 2019, we generated record levels of solar and wind energy and continue to be the world’s leader for offshore wind.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
2nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of powers of (a) the Financial Conduct Authority and (b) the Advertising Standards Authority and (c) other regulators to effectively ensure that online platforms are protecting their users against fraudulent and scam content.

I am deeply concerned about the growth and scale of online fraudulent and scam content. My officials are working closely on this matter with those from other government departments, including the Home Office (as the government department responsible for tackling fraud), the Treasury as well as with industry, regulators, and consumer groups with a view to tackling this issue in a cohesive and robust way.

My department has been considering how online advertising is regulated through our Online Advertising Programme, and we will be consulting on this issue later this year following an initial call for evidence in 2020. Our aim is to foster fair, accountable and ethical online advertising that works for citizens, businesses, and society as a whole. In particular, we want to ensure standards about the placement and content of advertising can be effectively applied and enforced online so that consumers are protected from harmful or misleading advertising.

2nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent assessment he has made of the adequacy of the regulatory framework governing the responsibility of online platforms, including search engines and social media sites to protect their users against scam content on their sites.

We are deeply concerned about the growth and scale of online scams. My officials work closely on this matter with other government departments, including the Home Office as the government department responsible for tackling fraud, as well as with industry, regulators and consumer groups. Through an ongoing programme of work, the government is considering additional legislative and non-legislative solutions to effectively address the harms posed by all elements of online fraud in a cohesive and robust way.

Within my department, the Online Advertising Programme will be considering further regulation of online advertising to tackle harms including fraud. The government will launch a public consultation on measures to enhance how online advertising is regulated in the UK this year.

13th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what information he holds on the use of Project Bank Accounts by (a) his Department, (b) Government agencies his Department has responsibility for and (c) non-departmental bodies his Department has responsibility for.

As set out in the Construction Playbook, the Department for Education (DfE) has committed to use Project Bank Accounts (PBAs) on its school construction projects unless there are compelling reasons not to. PBAs are just one way that government departments support fair payment as part of the Government’s Prompt Payment Code.

DfE has considered the use of PBAs for school construction projects delivered through the DfE Construction Frameworks. However due to the specific nature, size and volume of DfE’s school construction projects, the DfE has assessed that it is not practical, efficient and cost effective to use them on our construction projects. Therefore, there are compelling reasons not to deploy PBAs on DfE projects. Accordingly, the DfE does not hold any information on the use of PBAs for its school construction projects as the DfE does not currently use PBAs.

22nd Jun 2020
What assessment he has made of the adequacy of educational support for disabled children during the covid-19 outbreak.

Every family has had challenges during this period but those families with disabled children face the greatest.

We have surveyed families, schools and local authorities to monitor the situation.

90% of special schools were open last week, and we have invested £10 million in the Family Fund and provided specialist online resources.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
1st Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps the Government is taking to (a) ban burning of peatland and (b) tackle accidental peat fires.

The Government has always been clear of the need to phase out burning of protected blanket bog to conserve these vulnerable habitats. We are currently looking at how legislation could achieve this and considering next steps. Real progress is being made in promoting sustainable alternatives. We have urged landowners to adopt these and continue to work with them constructively.

We are working across Government with a wide range of stakeholders including land managers, conservation bodies and wildfire management groups to ensure that we promote better planning for wildfire locally and take measures to mitigate against the risk of wildfire. We undertook a review of the impact of wildfire and upland environments in 2019 and will publish the findings in due course.

1st Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will bring forward legislative proposals to ban the burning of peatland in protected areas.

The Government has always been clear of the need to phase out burning of protected blanket bog to conserve these vulnerable habitats. We are currently looking at how legislation could achieve this and considering next steps. Real progress is being made in promoting sustainable alternatives. We have urged landowners to adopt these and continue to work with them constructively.

1st Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps his Department is taking to tackle the laying of illegal poison baits.

Biocidal products, including rodenticides and insecticides, have to be authorised under the Biocidal Products Regulation. The use of biocides must comply with specific terms and conditions, including on the placing of baits. Where the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) has enforcement responsibility, it seeks to ensure that high standards of compliance with biocides are achieved and maintained. The Wildlife Incident Investigation Scheme (WIIS), operated by HSE on behalf of Defra, investigates the deaths, not just of wildlife, but also of livestock and some pets, where there is evidence that biocide poisoning may be involved. Where poison baits are used illegally to harm wildlife, such as raptors, responsibility for enforcement lies with the police.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
28th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many full-time equivalent staff were employed by Natural England’s SSSI monitoring programme in each calendar year from 2009.

The information is only available for financial years rather than calendar years.

Year

FTE

2010/11

33.2

2011/12

24.3

2012/13

22.8

2013/14

16.0

2014/15

14.0

2015/16

11.0

2016/17

15.0

2017/18

11.0

2018/19

12.5

28th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what the cost to the public purse was of Natural England’s programme of monitoring of SSSIs in each calendar year since 2009.

Natural England (NE) expenditure on monitoring sites of special scientific interest (SSSIs) is set out in the following table.

Year

Expenditure

2010/11

£1,570,755

2011/12

£1,517,691

2012/13

£1,797,287

2013/14

£1,420,892

2014/15

£1,381,580

2015/16

£900,633

2016/17

£1,028,533

2017/18

£700,452

2018/19

£700,000

This includes NE staff time and the costs of specialist surveys.

This year NE is prioritising actions to address particular issues on SSSIs, especially those affecting upland SSSIs. NE continues to support and encourage partners in the work they do themselves to undertake SSSI monitoring.

NE is also developing an approach to the monitoring of SSSIs which will make better use of new technologies, such as remote sensing and greater partnership involvement. This is intended to improve efficiency of SSSI monitoring.

11th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what his Department's position is on the use of Project Bank Accounts throughout the supply chain, including for Tier Two and Tier Three contractors, for transport-related construction and infrastructure projects.

DfT, including its Arm’s Length Bodies, follow the principles of the Construction Playbook which sets out options to mitigate the risk of potential supplier insolvency, one of these options is the use of Project Bank Accounts.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
11th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what discussions he has had with HS2 on the use of Project Bank Accounts throughout their supply chain following the insolvency of HS2 contractor Roadbridge.

DfT, including its Arm’s Length Bodies, follow the principles of the Construction Playbook which sets out options to mitigate the risk of potential supplier insolvency, one of these options is the use of Project Bank Accounts.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
13th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what information he holds on the use of Project Bank Accounts by (a) his Department, (b) Government agencies his Department has responsibility for and (c) non-departmental bodies his Department has responsibility for.

Project Bank Accounts are used to ensure fair payment terms on Government construction contracts. As these are specific to construction projects, they are not used by the Department for Transport nor its Agencies. However, the Department’s large non-departmental bodies engaged in construction works do use them to improve cash flow, mitigate risk of payment delay and to reduce the risk of supply chain failure. Use of these provide transparency and assurance over payments to suppliers lower down the supply chain in particular.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Parliamentary Secretary to the Treasury and Chief Whip
29th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many internal process reviews her Department has (a) started and (b) completed on incidences of (i) death or (ii) serious harm between (A) July 2019 and June 2020, (B) July 2020 and June 2021 and (C) July 2021 and June 2022.

The attached table shows the Internal Process Reviews (IPR) information requested:

July 2019 to June 2020

July 2020 to June 2021

July 2021 to June 2022

IPR Started - Death

43

59

38

IPR Started - Serious Harm

3

19

17

IPR Completed - Death

39

40

41

IPR Completed - Serious Harm

3

12

16

* Death includes the categories death, alleged suicide and confirmed suicide.

** Serious Harm includes the categories self-harm, serious harm, attempted suicide and ‘other’.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
25th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, which (a) organisations and (b) individuals have been approached to join the Extra Costs Taskforce; and if she will prioritise organisations that are led by disabled people for membership of that taskforce.

Delivery of the Extra Costs Taskforce has been paused at the request of the Secretary of State Work and Pensions, while permission is sought to appeal the High Court's declaration in Binder vs Secretary of State Work and Pensions.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
14th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, when her Department plans to bring forward legislative proposals to introduce a 12 month eligibility definition for fast-track access to Personal Independence Payments, Disability Living Allowance and Attendance Allowance.

The Department is committed to improving the way the benefits system supports people nearing the end of their life and announced its intention to make changes in this area, in July 2021. The Department has made changes to Universal Credit and Employment Support Allowance regulations to replace the current 6-month rule for determining who can claim under the Special Rules with a 12-month, end of life approach. These will come into force on 4th April. Similar changes will also be made to Personal Independence Payment, Disability Living Allowance and Attendance Allowance as soon as possible, when Parliamentary time allows.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
10th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many internal process reviews her Department has (a) started and (b) completed on incidences of death or serious harm since July 2019.

The Internal Process Reviews (IPRs) that have been started since July 2019, are as follows:

Death*

123

Serious Harm**

34

The IPRs that have been completed since July 2019, are as follows:

Death*

103

Serious Harm**

28

* Death includes the categories death, alleged suicide and confirmed suicide.

** Serious Harm includes the categories self-harm, serious harm, attempted suicide and ‘other’.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
17th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what estimate she has made of the number of people who have been affected by the underpayment of benefits after transitioning from incapacity benefit to employment and support allowance in Heywood and Middleton constituency.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 19th January to question number 104377.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
25th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many internal process reviews her Department has (a) started and (b) completed on cases of death or serious harm since July 2019.

The Internal Process Reviews (IPRs) that have been started since July 2019, are as follows:

Death*

114

Serious Harm**

31

The IPRs that have been completed since July 2019, are as follows:

Death*

93

Serious Harm**

21

* Death includes the categories death, alleged suicide and confirmed suicide.

** Serious Harm includes the categories self-harm, serious harm, attempted suicide and ‘other’.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
20th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to Written Statement HCWS294 of 20 September 2021, what estimate she has made of the number of personal independence payment claims (PIP) made since 6 April 2016 which need to be reviewed; by what date she estimates (a) the Administrative Exercise to review PIP claims will be completed and (b) affected claimants will have been contacted by her Department; and when she estimates to have completed all backdated payments for those found to be eligible.

We currently estimate between 320,000 and 340,000 claimants will need their claims to be reviewed as a result of the MM judgment. Early estimates are subject to uncertainty and we will be refining this estimate as the exercise progresses. The exercise includes claims that were in payment on 6 April 2016 (the date of the original Upper Tribunal decision) as well as claims where DWP made a decision on or after 6 April 2016, including some claims where we did not award PIP. Where these claimants have made more than one claim for PIP each claim will need to be reviewed. The Department published updated guidance implementing the judgment from 17 September 2020, so new PIP decisions from that date already reflect the judgment and will not be reviewed as part of the exercise.

We are not planning to invite claimants for an assessment. However, we may contact them for more information, so that we can make a decision on their claim. We will write to all claimants whose claim(s) we review. Claimants entitled to more PIP following a review will have their award increased and will receive backdated payments.

It is too early for us to give a date by which we expect to have completed all the reviews.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
20th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people who have applied for the new state pension and reached qualification age in (a) June, (b) July and (c) August 2021 are awaiting their initial payment.

This information is only available at disproportionate cost to The Department for Work and Pensions.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
11th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what recent progress her Department has made on tackling child poverty.

Throughout the pandemic, our priority has been to protect incomes, including additional spending of over £7.4 billion last year, to strengthen welfare support for people of working age.

The evidence shows having parents in work is the most effective way of tackling child poverty, which is why we have invested £407 billion in protecting jobs throughout the pandemic, and why we are spending over £30 billion on a comprehensive plan for jobs to help people back into work

Will Quince
Minister of State (Education)
26th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if she will publish details of the Internal Process Reviews completed by her Department from April 2019 to November 2020.

Internal Process Reviews are internal retrospective investigations, focussed on organisational learning. They are internal reviews that check if process was followed, to encourage learning and to drive change through the Department. We have no plans to publish any Internal Process Reviews, but will continue to follow our duties under the Freedom of Information Act in line with the 2016 First Tier Tribunal ruling in relation to what information can lawfully be disclosed.

Our priority is that claimants get the benefits to which they are entitled promptly and receive a supportive and compassionate service. In the vast majority of cases this happens but when, sadly, there is a tragic case we take it very seriously and seek to learn any lessons as appropriate.

26th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what estimate her Department has made of the number of disabled households whose benefit payments will (a) increase and (b) decrease when moved from legacy benefits to universal credit.

No such estimate has been made. The Managed Migration Pilot remains suspended as the Department continues to focus on delivering its part of the Government’s ongoing response to the COVID-19 pandemic. SDP transitional payments were available to eligible claimants who were previously entitled to the SDP as part of a legacy benefit and made a Universal Credit claim before the SDP Gateway came into effect on 16th January 2019. We have ensured that a transitional SDP element will be considered for those entitled to SDP who make a claim to Universal Credit following a change of circumstances on or after 27th January 2021.

26th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, with reference to the oral contribution of the Minister for Disabled People, Health and Work on 7 October 2019, Official Report, column 1480 that around 1 million disabled households will gain on average £100 a month on universal credit compared with legacy benefits, if she will publish the analysis supporting that statement.

The Department’s internal analysis was based on its INFORM volume forecast model and Policy Simulation Model. The underlying methodology was signed off by the Office for Budget Responsibility and set out in detail in the Welfare Trends Report 2018, which can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/welfare-trends-report-january-2018.

The Department will publish full analysis comparing the benefit entitlement of UC claimants and legacy claimants in due course.

5th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what recent assessment she has made of changes in the level of the (a) number and (b) proportion of (i) disabled people, (ii) children, (iii) working age people and (iv) people of state pension age living in poverty since the start of the covid-19 outbreak.

HMT’s recent distributional analysis released in March 2021 showed that Government interventions in response to Covid-19 are supporting the poorest working households the most (excluding any earnings gains). The poorest 10% of working households had seen no loss to household income as of November 2020. This is available here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/966207/DA_Document_Budget_2021.pdf

Will Quince
Minister of State (Education)
4th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many claimants for (a) universal credit, (b) employment and support allowance and (c) personal independence payments have ceased their claims between March 2020 to present.

The information requested for Universal Credit and Employment and Support Allowance is not readily available and to provide it would incur disproportionate cost. However, the latest Universal Credit statistics: user engagement survey report does include a statement, in section 4, regarding the development of Universal Credit flows data, as part of the Universal Credit statistics release strategy.

The Department publishes ESA quarterly caseload figures and UC monthly caseload figures and these can be found at:

https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/

Guidance for users is available at:

https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/webapi/online-help/Getting-Started.html

Table 1 below shows the number of claimants receiving PIP who ceased their PIP claim each month from March 2020 to October 2020, the latest data available, who were receiving PIP at the end of the previous month.

Table 1: Number of PIP claimants who ceased their PIP claim, March 2020 – October 2020

Month

Number of PIP claims that are ceased

Mar-20

14,270

Apr-20

16,460

May-20

8,660

Jun-20

9,120

Jul-20

7,720

Aug-20

11,610

Sep-20

11,290

Oct-20

14,930

Source: PIP Atomic Data Store

Notes:

  • This is unpublished data. It should be used with caution and it may be subject to future revision. In particular, it may take some time for a death to be notified to the Department, so the figure for October 2020 is likely to increase with the inclusion of future data.
  • Volumes of off-flows have fluctuated due to the Operational measures implemented in response to Covid-19. In particular, due to the suspension of Department instigated Reassessment and Review activity from March 2020 to July 2020. Planned Award Reviews restarted in July 2020.
  • These data include claimants whose claim ceased as the result of an Award Review, Change of Circumstances or the claimant’s death as well as for other reasons. Claimants may see their PIP claim resume as a result of a mandatory reconsideration or appeal.
  • PIP data includes claimants awarded both under normal rules and special rules for terminally ill claimants.
  • Claimants receiving PIP include those whose claims are in payment and those whose payment is suspended or part-suspended.
  • Data covers Great Britain only.
4th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people received Access to Work funding in (a) 2018-19, (b) 2019-20 and (c) 2020-21.

The number of people who have received an Access to Work payment broken down by financial year up to 2019/20 is available in Table 6 of the Access to Work statistics publications.

The information requested for 2020/21 is intended for future release in the 2020/21 Official Statistics publication.

The latest Access to Work official statistics can be found here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/access-to-work-statistics

3rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many claimants of (a) universal credit, (b) employment and support allowance and (c) personal independence payments have died between March 2020 and March 2021.

(a)Universal Credit can be claimed by a range of working age people, some of whom have health conditions or disabilities, which may be degenerative or life limiting. The decision to claim Universal Credit can be prompted by a range of a factors, including when someone is terminally ill, so mortality figures should not be viewed in isolation.

Between 1st March 2020 and 30th November 2020, 12,600 or 0.2 per cent of Universal Credit claimants died. The number of people who received Universal Credit at any point during this period was 6.2million.

(b) The information requested for Employment and Support Allowance is not readily available and could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

(c)Personal Independence Payment (PIP) is claimed by people with a range of health conditions and disabilities, many of which are degenerative or life limiting and the Department treats the death of any claimant sympathetically. The cause of death of claimants on PIP is not collated centrally by the Department. The decision to claim PIP can be prompted by a range of a factors, including when someone is terminally ill, so mortality figures should not be viewed in isolation.

Table 1 below shows the number of claimants receiving PIP who died each month from March 2020 to October 2020, the latest data available, who were receiving PIP at the end of the previous month. Note that the numbers of PIP claimant deaths in March and April 2020 here differ to those presented previously in PQ 59467, due to a methodological update.

Table 1: Number of PIP claimants with entitlement who died each month from March 2020 – October 2020

Month

Number of PIP Claimant Deaths

Mar-20

6,120

Apr-20

7,540

May-20

5,650

Jun-20

4,960

Jul-20

4,820

Aug-20

5,050

Sep-20

5,010

Oct-20

5,700

Source: PIP ADS and Customer Information System

Notes:

  • This is unpublished data. It should be used with caution and it may be subject to future revision.
  • PIP data includes claimants awarded both under normal rules and special rules for terminally ill claimants.
  • Claimants receiving PIP include those whose claims are in payment and those whose payment is suspended or part-suspended.
  • Claimants’ dates of death are as recorded on the system at 5th February 2021 and may be subject to change retrospectively.
  • Data covers Great Britain only.

Under the Social Security (Notification of Deaths) Regulations 2012 and s125 of Social Security Administration Act 1992 date of death is provided to the Department for all registered deaths. Additionally, next of kin also provide information on the date of death of an individual and this information is used appropriately in the administration of Departmental benefits.

3rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many new applications for Access to Work funding have been received by her Department from March 2020 to date.

The information requested on number of applications received is not readily available and to provide it would incur disproportionate costs.

However, the Access to Work statistics includes how many applications result in provision being approved from 2007/08 to 2019/20. Please see Table 3 of the Access to Work statistics.

The latest Access to Work statistics can be found here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/access-to-work-statistics-april-2007-to-march-2020

2nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what recent assessment she has made of the adequacy of the 0.5 per cent increase in legacy benefits in meeting the costs incurred by claimants as a result of the covid-19 outbreak.

In April 2020, legacy benefits were increased by £600m (1.7%), and, as part of the Government’s annual up-rating exercise, we will ensure that benefits retain their value against prices by raising benefits by a further £100m (0.5%) from April, in line with CPI

2nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what recent assessment she has made of the extent of the financial effect of the covid-19 outbreak on disabled people.

This Government is committed to supporting disabled people affected by the COVID-19 outbreak and has delivered an unprecedented package of support, injecting billions into the welfare system. We continue to monitor the impact on disabled people using existing and new data sources, whilst ensuring that they are able to access the support they need.

We are ensuring that disabled people continue to have access to disability benefits and other financial support, the food and essential goods that they need, as well as accessible communications and guidance during the COVID-19 outbreak. The Government continues to support disabled employees to access assistive technology and other forms of support they need to remain in work.

Access to Work prioritises applications from disabled people who have a job to start within 4 weeks of their application. Recognising the impact of COVID-19 has had on disabled people, Access to Work has expanded the prioritisation to include those in the Clinically Extremely Vulnerable group, keyworkers and introduced a new more flexible package of support to enable flex to work from more than one location, the workplace and home.

The disability benefits are not means–tested, non-contributory and thus paid regardless of any income or savings. They are also tax-free and worth up to £151.40 a week. PIP and DLA were not subject to the benefits freeze and were most recently uprated by 1.7 per cent from 6 April 2020.

The Government has introduced temporary measures to support those hardest hit, including the furlough scheme, self-employed income support scheme, and the £20 UC uplift. We spend over £55 billion a year on benefits to support disabled people and people with health conditions – This is around 2.6% of GDP. We have (up until the 20/21 year):

o Increased Employment and Support Allowance for people with the greatest needs – with the Support Group rate up by around £870 per year since 2010.

o Increased the higher rate of Attendance Allowance for people over State Pension Age who need someone to care for them – meaning around an additional £923 a year for disabled people since 2010.

o Increased Carer’s Allowance for those people who care for someone – meaning nearly an additional £700 a year for carers since 2010.

o Increased the rate of DLA paid to the most disabled children by over £130 a month since 2010, and spending more than ever on DLA for disabled children.

o Increased the enhanced rates of PIP which helps people meet the on-going costs of their disability – up by over £880 a year since its introduction in 2013.

o And there is a higher proportion of people on the top rates of Personal Independence Payment than there were on DLA – 33 per cent vs 15 per cent.

5th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether there is an easement in place for people who fail to (a) attend and (b) participate in a telephone assessment for (i) employment and support allowance and (ii) universal credit.

Our priorities are people’s safety and ensuring that they receive the support they are entitled to. We will contact anyone who has not engaged in a telephone Work Capability Assessment arranged since 2 November 2020 to establish if they have a good reason for not attending or participating. Claimants will be given the opportunity to explain why they did not, or could not attend or participate in the telephone assessment and where good cause is provided and accepted, support will continue

5th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people have (a) failed to attend or (b) failed to participate in a telephone assessment for the limited capability for work components within universal credit since March 2020.

We have interpreted your question (a) as being failed to attend and the case returned to the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP). From the introduction of telephony Work Capability Assessments to 6 November 2020, 38 Universal Credit (UC) cases have been returned to the DWP due to failure of the customer to attend their telephone assessment.

We are unable to provide a figure for how many people have failed to participate in a telephone assessment because the information requested is not available.

5th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what changes her Department have made to its policies on easements related to telephone assessments since such assessments were introduced in March 2020.

Our priorities are people’s safety and ensuring that they receive the support they are entitled to. We will be contacting anyone who did not engage in a telephone appointment for a Work Capability Assessment arranged since 2 November 2020, to establish if they have a good reason for not attending or participating. Claimants will be given the opportunity to explain why they did not, or could not attend or participate in the telephone assessment and where good cause is provided and accepted, they will be given a further opportunity to take part in an assessment.

5th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people have (a) failed to attend or (b) failed to participate in a telephone assessment for employment and support allowance since March 2020.

We have interpreted your question (a) as being failed to attend and the case returned to the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP). From the introduction of telephony Work Capability Assessments to 6 November 2020, 18 Employment and Support Allowance (ESA) cases have been returned to the DWP due to failure of the customer to attend their telephone assessment.

We are unable to provide a figure for how many people have failed to participate in a telephone assessment because the information requested is not available.

16th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many and what proportion of claimants in receipt of the limited capability for work component of universal credit died (a) from March to May 2020 and (b) from March to May 2019.

This information is not readily available and could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

15th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many and what proportion of total claimants in receipt of personal independence payment died between (a) March and May 2020, and (b) March and May 2019.

Personal Independence Payment (PIP) is claimed by people with a range of health conditions and disabilities, many of which are degenerative or life limiting and the Department treats the death of any claimant sympathetically. The cause of death of claimants to PIP is not collated centrally by the Department.

Table 1 below shows for each month from March 2019 – May 2019 and March 2020 – April 2020: (a) The number of PIP claimants with entitlement to PIP who died having had entitlement on the last day of each month.

(b) The total number of PIP claims with entitlement on the last day each month.

(c) The percentage of claimants entitled to PIP who died in each month which is calculated by dividing (a) the number of claimant deaths in each month by (b) the total number of PIP claims with entitlement in the same month.

Note that April 2020 is the latest month for which data is available.

Table 1: Summary of PIP claimants with entitlement who died from March 2019 – May 2019 and March 2020 – April 2020

Month

Mar-19

Apr-19

May-19

Mar-20

Apr-20

(a) Number of PIP Claimant Deaths

4,650

4,580

4,460

5,880

6,180

(b) Total PIP Claims with entitlement

2,098,090

2,113,170

2,134,400

2,455,300

2,485,600

(c) Death rate of PIP claimants with entitlement

0.22%

0.22%

0.21%

0.24%

0.25%

Source: PIP ADS and Customer Information System and Stat-Xplore

Notes:

  • This is unpublished data. It should be used with caution and it may be subject to future revision.
  • PIP data includes normal rules and special rules for the terminally ill claimants, and is for both new claims and DLA reassessment claims.
  • Data for the number of claimant deaths has been sourced from the PIP ADS and the Customer Information System and data for the number of total PIP claims with entitlement has been sourced from Stat-Xplore.
  • Number of claimants has been rounded to the nearest 10 and the data for the death rate of claimants has been rounded to the nearest 0.01%.
  • Claimants’ dates of death are as recorded on the system at 12th June 2020 and may be subject to retrospection.
  • GB only

Under the Social Security (Notification of Deaths) Regulations 2012 and s125 of Social Security Administration Act 1992 date of death is provided to the Department for all registered deaths. Additionally, next of kin also provide information on the date of death of an individual and this information is used appropriately in the administration of Departmental benefits.

15th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many and what proportion of claimants in receipt of employment support allowance died between (a) March and May 2020 and (b) March and May 2019.

This information is not readily available and could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

15th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many and what proportion of claimants in receipt of income support died between (a) March and May 2020 and (b) March and May 2019.

This information is not readily available and could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

15th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many and what proportion of claimants in receipt of jobseeker's allowance died between (a) March and May 2020 and (b) March and May 2019.

This information is not readily available and could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

15th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many and what proportion of claimants in receipt of universal credit died between (a) March to May 2020, and (b) March to May 2019.

Universal Credit can be claimed by a range of working age people, some of whom have health conditions or disabilities, which may be degenerative or life limiting. The decision to claim Universal Credit can be prompted by a range of a factors, including when someone is terminally ill, so mortality figures should not be viewed in isolation.

Between 1st March 2019 and 31st May 2019, 1,600, or less than 0.1 per cent, applications were made to Universal Credit where the claimant died. Over the same period the volume of people on Universal Credit stood at 2.3 million.

Between 1st March 2020 and 31st May 2020, 2,700, or less than 0.1 percent, applications were made to Universal Credit where the claimant died. Over the same period the volume of people on Universal Credit stood at 4.9 million.

Will Quince
Minister of State (Education)
11th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many times NHS England has met with representatives of dementia organisations since August 2021.

Since August 2021, NHS England has met with dementia organisations on 19 occasions and held 44 meetings or webinars with dementia networks and stakeholders in England. In addition to planned meetings and events, NHS England has engaged with the Alzheimer’s Society, Alzheimer’s Research UK and others on an ad hoc basis. NHS England has endorsed the Alzheimer’s Society’s revised dementia guide and delivered a joint webinar on the integration of dementia services.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
25th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many GP appointments there were per full time equivalent GP in (a) England and (b) each of the 7 NHS regions in each year since 2015 to date.

This data is not available in the format requested.

Maria Caulfield
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
25th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the average number of patients registered per full-time equivalent GP is in (a) England and (b) each of the NHS regions in each year from 2015 to 25 April 2022.

The attached table shows the median average number of registered patients per full time equivalent (FTE) general practitioner (GP) in England and each National Health Service region in each year from September 2015 to September 2021. Data for 25 April 2022 is not held.

Maria Caulfield
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
25th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what long-term workforce plan he has in place to increase (a) full time equivalent GPs of all contract types, (b) practice nurses and (c) other primary care clinical staff.

The Department is working with NHS England and NHS Improvement, Health Education England and the profession to increase the general practice workforce in England. This includes measures to increase recruitment, address the reasons why doctors leave the profession and encourage them to return to practice. In December 2021, there were an additional 1,672 full time equivalent doctors in general practice compared to December 2019.

The Additional Roles Reimbursement Scheme (ARRS) enables Primary Care Networks to employ a range of roles for 100% reimbursement of salary and on-costs. Through the GP Contract framework, NHS England and NHS Improvement have committed to review the effectiveness of the ARRS by 2023. We are currently on schedule to increase the number of registered nurses by 50,000, with nursing numbers 29,000 higher in January 2022 compared to September 2019. This commitment will be achieved through increased domestic and international recruitment and improved retention.

Maria Caulfield
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
31st Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the ability of patients in (a) Oldham, (b) Greater Manchester and (c) the North West to access NHS dental services in the context of the funding available to deliver NHS dental services relative to patient population.

The North West was allocated £7,310,000 from the additional £50 million recently secured for National Health Service dental services in 2021/22. NHS England set regional budgets based on weighted 2020/21 baseline payments. NHS regional teams are now working with local providers to commission additional activity to improve access for patients in the North West, including Oldham and Greater Manchester.

Maria Caulfield
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
31st Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans his Department has to reconsider the funding formulae for local authorities’ social care, service planning and preventative strategies to take into account inequalities in the need for and experience of adult social care.

On 7 September 2021 the Government announced £5.4 billion over three years for adult social care. This includes over £3.6 billion to reform the social care charging system and enable all local authorities to move towards paying providers a fair rate for care. These changes will remove unpredictable care costs and provide support to those who are currently not eligible for financial support with their care needs. Work is ongoing to consider the most appropriate approach for distributing this funding.

We are committed to ensuring that wider funding allocations for councils are based on an up-to-date assessment of their needs and resources. We will work closely with local partners to review challenges and opportunities before consulting on any potential funding reform.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
31st Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the experience of inequalities in adult social care need by ethnicity; and what plans his Department has to tackle that matter.

No assessment has been made. The Care Quality Commission’s (CQC’s) new strategy contains a core ambition to tackle inequalities in health and care, which includes regulating to advance equality and protect people’s human rights. As part of CQC’s commitment to drive improvement in quality, CQC expects services and local systems to address inequalities in access, experiences, and outcomes. Local authorities have a duty under the Care Act to prevent needs of the local population deteriorating.

We are committed to publishing a Health Disparities White Paper later this year which will set out a series of impactful measures to address health disparities and their causes, including those linked to geography, deprivation and ethnicity.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
31st Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans his Department has to address inequalities in adult social care receipt by (a) age, (b) gender, (c) ethnicity and (d) geography.

The white paper ‘People at the Heart of Care’, published on 1 December 2021, includes an enhanced assurance framework, data collections and additional funding to address inequalities by identifying and sharing good practice by local authorities and responding where standards are not being met.

Local authorities are best placed to understand and plan the care and support needs of their populations. The Care Act 2014 requires local authorities to shape their local markets to ensure a diverse range of quality, person-centred, sustainable care and support services are provided. Local authorities assess whether an individual is eligible for financial support to meet their care needs. Where individuals are not eligible for financial support, local authorities may assist them to make arrangements for care. From October 2023, we will enable more people who fund their own care in care homes to request their local authority to arrange care on their behalf.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
21st Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to help ensure that the CQC, NHS, local authorities, care providers and other relevant organisations are co-operating effectively to strengthen the discharge of their collective oversight and duty-of-care responsibilities to minimise the risks of harm to people in (a) mental health, (b) learning disability and (c) other care settings.

NHS England and NHS Improvement’s Mental Health Safety Improvement programme focuses on improving patient safety for those who use inpatient mental health and learning disability services. This work brings together individuals and organisations concerned with safer care and improved outcomes in mental health.

We are consulting on new duties to ensure the adequate supply of community services, placing Care, Education and Treatment Reviews on a statutory footing and putting in place a single point of Ministerial oversight. In any setting, local authorities must safeguard people with care and support needs who are at risk, in cooperation with the Care Quality Commission, care providers and other relevant organisations. These duties have remained through the pandemic and we have supported the sector with guidance, training and increased funding for local authorities.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
21st Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that local authorities where people are placed in care are undertaking their statutory Care Act 2014 Section 42 safeguarding duties consistently.

We work collaboratively with leaders in local government to support sector-led improvement in safeguarding practice and fund the Care and Health Improvement Programme. We have supported experts including the Social Care Institute for Excellence to provide information and resources on safeguarding. The Health and Care Bill will introduce a new duty for the Care Quality Commission (CQC) to assess local authorities’ delivery of their adult social care duties, including safeguarding. The Department is working closely with the CQC and other stakeholders to design a system which will ensure the best possible outcomes for care users.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of the proposal by charities supporting Carers Week 2021 for £1.2 billion additional Government funding for carers’ breaks.

The Government recognises that access to breaks and respite provides important support for people with care needs and their carers during the COVID-19 pandemic. We have provided approximately £1.8 billion in specific funding for adult social care. This includes the £1.35 billion Infection Control Fund, which has been used towards supporting day centres to re-open safely.

We are continuing to work with local authorities, in collaboration with Association of Directors of Adult Social Services and the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government to ensure, where possible, the safe resumption of these services. In addition we have provided over £2 billion this year to the Better Care Fund which local authorities can access to fund social care services in their areas, including respite services.

4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent estimate he has made of he number of carers able to access breaks from their caring responsibilities since the start of the covid-19 outbreak.

The Government recognises that access to breaks and respite provides important support for people with care needs and their carers during the COVID-19 pandemic. We have provided approximately £1.8 billion in specific funding for adult social care. This includes the £1.35 billion Infection Control Fund, which has been used towards supporting day centres to re-open safely.

We are continuing to work with local authorities, in collaboration with Association of Directors of Adult Social Services and the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government to ensure, where possible, the safe resumption of these services. In addition we have provided over £2 billion this year to the Better Care Fund which local authorities can access to fund social care services in their areas, including respite services.

19th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what data her Department (a) collects and (b) reports for patients who are already being treated by the NHS for cancer and who experience delays with (i) treatment, (ii) surgeries, and (iii) radiotherapies.

NHS England data includes information on patients waiting to start treatment for cancer and waits for subsequent cancer treatments including surgery, radiotherapy and anti-cancer drugs. This is available at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/statistics/statistical-work-areas/cancer-waiting-times/

National Health Service trusts use local patient tracking lists to effectively triage cancer patients, including those already receiving surgery, radiotherapy and anti-cancer drugs and use this data to minimise any delays in treatment.

4th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what representations he has received on the increase in prescribing of anti-psychotics to people with dementia during the covid-19 outbreak.

Stakeholders have made representations about an increase in the prescribing of anti-psychotic drugs to people with dementia during our regular discussions about the impact of the pandemic on people living with dementia and their carers.

NHS England and NHS Improvement continue to monitor the monthly data published by NHS Digital on the prescribing of anti-psychotic medication for people diagnosed with dementia and continue to have regular conversations with regional clinical network leads and local services to understand the patterns in prescribing and potential reasons for trends being seen.

3rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many and what proportion of care home workers have received a covid-19 vaccine to date.

NHS England publish weekly data on the number of social care staff who are eligible for vaccination and the number of vaccines delivered to social care staff. The data is available at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/statistics/statistical-work-areas/covid-19-vaccinations/

Nadhim Zahawi
Chancellor of the Exchequer
2nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent estimate he has made of the number and proportion of care homes that are permitting a named family member to visit care home residents during the covid-19 outbreak.

The Department does not hold data on the number of care homes currently allowing a named family member to visit residents. New visiting arrangements will come into effect on 8 March. From that date, every care home should ensure that each resident can nominate one named person who can have regular, indoor visits.

We will work with the sector to support care homes to provide the visiting opportunities set out in our guidance. Each residents’ circumstances will be different and decisions on visiting will need to be taken in agreement between the care home, the resident and family.

19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what data NHS trusts are collecting on interruptions to cancer treatment for existing patients during the covid-19 outbreak.

Multi-disciplinary teams use patient tracking lists to ensure patients receive timely treatment and NHS England and NHS Improvement use a variety of data sources to calculate the number of patients waiting longer than a certain period for treatments, as well as informing action to reduce these numbers. This data includes published cancer waiting times data on activity, referrals and waiting times, as well as management information which can give a week to week view of activity and the current scale of the waiting list. Any decision to reschedule cancer surgery will be a last resort and patients will be given the dates for their new treatment at the earliest opportunity.

19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans his Department has to help prevent cancer patients from experiencing delays in their treatment in the event that pressures on hospitals due to the covid-19 outbreak increase in the future.

The key aims of the Cancer Recovery Plan is to restore urgent referrals at least to pre-pandemic levels, to reduce the number of people waiting over 62 days from urgent referral. By ensuring sufficient capacity to meet demand and re-establishing COVID-19 secure cancer hubs and consolidating cancer surgery, prioritising people for surgery centrally on the basis of clinical need and drawing on the independent sector (IS) to increase capacity, urgent cancer surgery patients are the first priority for accessing IS services.

19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of the number of patients that have been asked to reduce their cancer treatment during the covid-19 outbreak.

Information is not available in the format requested.

28th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent estimate he has made of the proportion of new diagnoses of recurrent and metastatic breast cancer which hospital trusts are submitting to the Cancer Outcomes and Services Dataset (COSD).

No recent estimate has been made.

It is a requirement for hospital trusts to report on new diagnoses of recurrent and metastatic breast cancer. Public Health England reports data on recurrent and metastatic breast cancer to National Health Service trusts to support improved data quality and ascertainment. Non-compliance with data standards is monitored through the local clinical commissioning groups.

28th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what mechanisms are in place to monitor hospital trust compliance with the requirement to collect data on new diagnoses of recurrent and metastatic breast cancer.

No recent estimate has been made.

It is a requirement for hospital trusts to report on new diagnoses of recurrent and metastatic breast cancer. Public Health England reports data on recurrent and metastatic breast cancer to National Health Service trusts to support improved data quality and ascertainment. Non-compliance with data standards is monitored through the local clinical commissioning groups.

6th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans his Department has to train health care professionals on communicating the (a) safety and (b) effectiveness of the covid-19 vaccine.

Public Health England produces comprehensive training and information materials for COVID-19 vaccinators. This includes information about the safety and effectiveness of the vaccines and key messages for healthcare professionals to convey to those being vaccinated. All vaccinating staff involved in the deployment programme are required to complete training that includes modules on the safety and effectiveness of vaccines. Communicating about the safety and effectiveness of the vaccine is a component of the process for gaining informed consent.

Nadhim Zahawi
Chancellor of the Exchequer
2nd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many and what proportion of people who have been notified by the NHS Test and Trace app to self-isolate are ineligible to apply for the Test and Trace Support Payment scheme because they have not been contacted by NHS Test and Trace by phone, email, letter or text message.

As COVID-19 app users are anonymous, we cannot determine who has or has not been contacted by Test and Trace contact tracers as well as receiving an app notification to self-isolate as a contact of a positive case.

From 10 December, app users who are identified as a contact of a positive case have been eligible to apply for the NHS Test and Support payment by exiting the app and registering with Test and Trace.

1st Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what equality impact assessment he has made of the disparity in rules for quarantine upon arrival in the UK for (a) carers of people with disabilities who are either directly employed as a personal assistant or employed through a care agency registered with the Care Quality Commission and (b) health and care workers with proof of professional registration with a UK-based regulator.

On 8 June new rules for international travellers were introduced in order to reduce the risk of new COVID-19 cases from abroad. An exemption to the requirement to self-isolate was added to allow registered health and care staff to return to England to provide essential healthcare, helping to strengthen the country’s response to the coronavirus outbreak and save lives.

On 30 July the Government removed the exemption for registered health and care staff, thereby requiring them to self-isolate for 14 days on return from a non-exempt country or territory. The removal of this exemption ensure consistency with wider self-isolation measures and continue to protect public health.

1st Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether care workers who are carrying out essential work for disabled people, either working directly as a personal assistant or being introduced through a CQC-registered care agency, are exempt from quarantine when entering the UK.

The Health Protection (Coronavirus, International Travel) (England) Regulations 2020 are clear in that they include an exemption for registered healthcare professionals from the requirement to quarantine, if they are required to return to, or start work within 14 days of arrival in the United Kingdom, if they are staying in England, Wales or Northern Ireland.

1st Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what discussions he has had with the Home Secretary on exempting carers of people with disabilities who are (a) directly employed as a personal assistant and (b) employed through a care agency registered with the Care Quality Commission from the 14-day quarantine period upon arrival in the UK.

These regulations and the exemptions are kept under constant review. The regulations make no exemption for direct care workers from the requirement to quarantine for 14 days.

10th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 4 February 2020 to Question 10385 on Dementia: Health Services, when the Government plans to publish the Implementation Plan for the review of the Challenge on Dementia to take that strategy forward from 2020 to 2025.

We have no plans to publish an implementation plan for the review of the Challenge on Dementia 2020.

We will be setting out our plans on dementia for England for the period 2020-2025 later this year.

30th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what progress the Government has made in response to the review of the Challenge on Dementia.

In 2018 we undertook a review of the progress made in implementing the Challenge on Dementia 2020. This was informed by a call for evidence. Respondents told us that we were largely on track to meet our commitments. In a small number of areas additional or refined actions were identified to help ensure that commitments could be met. The report of the review was published on 22 February 2019 and is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/dementia-2020-challenge-progress-review

Implementation of the Challenge on Dementia 2020 actions is overseen by the Department‘s Dementia Programme Board which brings together all Delivery Partners and is chaired by myself.

We continue to make significant progress in meeting the commitments made in the Challenge.

28th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how much funding from the public purse was allocated by local authorities for adult social care in each year since 2009-10, by local authority.

The amount of expenditure for adult social care by local authority is not available in the format requested. Funding for adult social care comes from several sources, including central Government grants, council tax revenue, business rates, and National Health Service funding through the Better Care Fund. Local authorities are responsible for setting their own overall budgets for adult social care.

The attached table from the NHS Digital Activity and Finance Report 2018-19 provides an overview of expenditure in England on adult social care including a number of sources of funding. However, these are not available at the local authority level.

A local authority level timeseries breakdown is not compiled centrally. However, raw data for local authority level breakdowns of expenditure is available on the NHS Digital website in their social care collections. Not all sources of funding are available at local authority level, such as the Better Care Fund. Links to the reports are below and include 2009-10 to 2018-19.

2016/17 to 2018/19

https://digital.nhs.uk/data-and-information/publications/statistical/adult-social-care-activity-and-finance-report

Before 2016/17

https://digital.nhs.uk/data-and-information/publications/statistical/personal-social-services-expenditure-and-unit-costs

14th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether the 2020 cross-government addiction strategy will include proposals on treatment for people who have become dependent on drugs prescribed by their doctor.

In September 2019 Public Health England published an evidence review of medicines associated with dependence or withdrawal, including benzodiazepines and z drugs. The report is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/prescribed-medicines-review-report

Alongside ongoing improvements to medicines safety and the use of prescribed drugs, NHS England is reviewing the recommendations from this review and other evidence to develop a set of actions to reduce and treat prescription medicine dependency.

A national review of overprescribing in the National Health Service is being led by Chief Pharmaceutical Officer Dr Keith Ridge and will be published in 2020. This will focus on people who take multiple medicines to ensure patients are receiving the most appropriate treatment for their needs. The review will consider how to improve management of non-reviewed repeat prescriptions including prescriptions beyond guidelines, and the role of digital technologies in reducing overprescribing.

The Government is committed to growing the workforce by 6,000 more doctors in general practice and 6,000 more primary care professionals, including pharmacists. This is on top of the additional 20,000 primary care professionals NHS England are providing funding towards recruiting. Community pharmacists have a key role in monitoring the care and treatment of patients, and would be in a position to review a patient’s medication usage and prescriptions.

14th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to ensure specialist withdrawal services are available to support patients dependent on prescribed benzodiazepine and z drug tranquillisers.

In September 2019 Public Health England published an evidence review of medicines associated with dependence or withdrawal, including benzodiazepines and z drugs. The report is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/prescribed-medicines-review-report

Alongside ongoing improvements to medicines safety and the use of prescribed drugs, NHS England is reviewing the recommendations from this review and other evidence to develop a set of actions to reduce and treat prescription medicine dependency.

A national review of overprescribing in the National Health Service is being led by Chief Pharmaceutical Officer Dr Keith Ridge and will be published in 2020. This will focus on people who take multiple medicines to ensure patients are receiving the most appropriate treatment for their needs. The review will consider how to improve management of non-reviewed repeat prescriptions including prescriptions beyond guidelines, and the role of digital technologies in reducing overprescribing.

The Government is committed to growing the workforce by 6,000 more doctors in general practice and 6,000 more primary care professionals, including pharmacists. This is on top of the additional 20,000 primary care professionals NHS England are providing funding towards recruiting. Community pharmacists have a key role in monitoring the care and treatment of patients, and would be in a position to review a patient’s medication usage and prescriptions.

14th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many prescriptions were issued for tranquillisers in each year from 2015 to date, which exceeded the Committee on Safety of Medicines two to four week guidelines issued in 1988.

The Department does not hold the information requested as the NHS Business Services Authority does not capture the duration for which a prescription is intended to be used.

14th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking on the prescription of benzodiazepines and z drugs by doctors beyond the two to four week guidelines issued by the Committee on Safety in Medicines in 1988.

In September 2019 Public Health England published an evidence review of medicines associated with dependence or withdrawal, including benzodiazepines and z drugs. The report is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/prescribed-medicines-review-report

Alongside ongoing improvements to medicines safety and the use of prescribed drugs, NHS England is reviewing the recommendations from this review and other evidence to develop a set of actions to reduce and treat prescription medicine dependency.

A national review of overprescribing in the National Health Service is being led by Chief Pharmaceutical Officer Dr Keith Ridge and will be published in 2020. This will focus on people who take multiple medicines to ensure patients are receiving the most appropriate treatment for their needs. The review will consider how to improve management of non-reviewed repeat prescriptions including prescriptions beyond guidelines, and the role of digital technologies in reducing overprescribing.

The Government is committed to growing the workforce by 6,000 more doctors in general practice and 6,000 more primary care professionals, including pharmacists. This is on top of the additional 20,000 primary care professionals NHS England are providing funding towards recruiting. Community pharmacists have a key role in monitoring the care and treatment of patients, and would be in a position to review a patient’s medication usage and prescriptions.

5th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of the (a) adequacy and (b) speed of the covid-19 vaccination roll out in Pakistan to Pakistan-administered Kashmir.

The UK continues to monitor the response to Covid-19 globally, including in Kashmir. The FCDO is working with global institutions, including the World Health Organisation, to ensure supplies are directed to those in greatest need. We are monitoring information on supplies in both India-administered and Pakistan-administered Kashmir.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
5th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of the (a) adequacy and (b) speed of the covid-19 vaccination roll out in India to Indian-administered Kashmir.

The UK continues to monitor the response to Covid-19 globally, including in Kashmir. The FCDO is working with global institutions, including the World Health Organisation, to ensure supplies are directed to those in greatest need. We are monitoring information on supplies in both India-administered and Pakistan-administered Kashmir.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
3rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of whether the TRIPS waiver proposal at the WTO that would suspend global patent rules during the covid-19 pandemic will enable the scale-up of manufacturing required to make enough doses to vaccinate the world.

The UK does not consider waiving intellectual property (IP) rights to be an appropriate action to boost the manufacturing of safe, effective, and quality vaccines. The existing intellectual property framework has mobilised research and development to deliver a host of new medicines and technologies to detect, treat, and defend against COVID-19. We have not yet seen evidence of how such a waiver of IP rights would improve the current situation. The UK continues to engage in constructive and evidence-based discussions at the TRIPS Council on the waiver proposal, and to address the multiple factors outside of IP on which access to medicines depends.

The UK is among the biggest global donors on COVID-19, and committed to supporting rapid, equitable access to COVID-19 vaccines. We have pledged over £1 billion of UK aid to counter the health, humanitarian, and economic risks. To support global vaccine access, we have funded a range of international organisations with the expertise to deliver an 'end to end' approach from research, development, and clinical trials, through to supporting manufacturing scale-up and delivery.

Wendy Morton
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
26th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of the decision to reduce the Official Development Assistance budget at the 2020 Spending Review on (a) levels of international migration and (b) global peacebuilding.

As announced on Thursday 26 November, in order to maximise our strategic focus in the use of Official Develolpment Assistance (ODA) next year, the Foreign Secretary will lead a short cross-government process to review, appraise and finalise all of the UK's ODA allocations. Decisions on support for international migration and global peacebuilding will be taken as part of this process and based on assessments of need, and evidence of where UK ODA can make a difference.

James Cleverly
Secretary of State for Education
14th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what recent assessment he has made of the level of white-supremacist violent extremism in Ukraine.

There are several peripheral groups with neo-Nazi sympathies in Ukraine, some of which have made statements in support of white supremacism. We take seriously any reports of violent extremism and hate crime in Ukraine.

The UK is committed to pursuing a comprehensive human rights agenda in Ukraine, including taking action against racially-motivated hate crime. Since 2014, the UK has co-sponsored a UN resolution supporting quarterly debates of reports on Ukraine by the Monitoring Mission of the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR). The UK Government provides financial support to the Monitoring Mission, which works to report and reduce human rights violations and abuses in Ukraine.

Whilst Ukraine has cooperated fully with the Monitoring Mission, we remain extremely concerned by the restrictions of access for human rights bodies to the non-government controlled areas of eastern Ukraine and illegally annexed Crimea, and the resulting limited reporting on those areas. It is essential that independent investigations take place to deliver accountability for serious allegations of hate crime in all of Ukraine. We will continue to work closely with the Ukrainian government, our international partners and local agencies to support efforts to report, investigate and reduce incidences of hate crime in Ukraine.

Wendy Morton
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
25th May 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, when he will publish his assessment of how groups with protected characteristics will be affected by the Council Tax Rebate in line with the Public Sector Equality Duty.

The Government announced a package of support on 3 February 2022 to help households with rising energy bills. This included a £150 non-repayable council tax rebate from April this year for households in England in council tax bands A-D and £144 million of discretionary funding to support households who need help with their energy bills but are not eligible.

Treasury Ministers carefully considered the equalities impacts of the Council Tax Rebate and had due regard to these impacts when making decisions, in line with the legal obligations under the Public Sector Equality Duty (PSED) in the Equality Act 2010.

3rd Mar 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the impact of (a) the repayable £200 discount and (b) other measures introduced to support energy consumers on disabled people.

The Government is providing significant financial support worth up to £350 to the majority of households. This covers more than half of the forecast £700 rise in energy bills for the average household. This support – worth £9.1bn in 2022-23 – is composed of:

  • A £200 reduction in households’ energy bills this autumn, paid back automatically over the next 5 years (known as the Energy Bill Support Scheme (EBSS));
  • A £150 non-repayable council tax rebate from April, paid to all households in council tax bands A-D; and
  • £144 million of discretionary funding for Local Authorities to support households who may need support but are not eligible for the Council Tax reduction.

The Chancellor has also confirmed plans to go ahead with existing proposals to expand eligibility for the Warm Home Discount by almost a third - so that three million vulnerable households will now benefit.

Ministers consider a range of evidence and analysis as part of policy development and when making decisions, including assessments of how options under consideration would affect members of groups with protected characteristics, in line with the Government's aims and statutory duties.

3rd Mar 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether he has carried out an equality impact assessment of the measures he has introduced to support energy consumers.

The Government is providing significant financial support worth up to £350 to the majority of households. This covers more than half of the forecast £700 rise in energy bills for the average household. This support is worth £9.1bn in 2022-23, delivered through a new Energy Bill Support Scheme (EBSS), a targeted Council Tax rebate, and discretionary funds for Local Authorities.

Ministers consider a range of evidence and analysis as part of policy development, including assessments of how options under consideration would affect members of groups with protected characteristics, as part of the Government's aims and duties.

The EBSS is still under development. The Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy will publish a consultation on the detailed implementation of the policy in due course. Ministers will consider a full assessment of the impact of the EBSS as they make final decision on the detailed policy design.

The policy development for the Council Tax Rebate included an assessment of how groups with protected characteristics might be affected, in line with the Public Sector Equalities Duty.

2nd Dec 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to his Departments R&D Tax Reliefs report published in November 2021, how much and what proportion of the £47.5 billion of research and development expenditure that UK companies claimed tax relief on was for activities taking place outside of the UK.

HMRC previously produced an estimate of £4 billion to £7 billion for overseas expenditure in the year ending March 2018 out of £36.8 billion of the total Research and Development expenditure used to claim tax credits.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
2nd Dec 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to the Autumn Budget and Spending Review 2021, what discussions he has had with relevant sector stakeholders on the potential effect of the proposed changes to the research and development tax reliefs on (a) the economy, (b) jobs in that sector and (c) levels of research and development investment in the UK.

The report published at Tax Administration and Maintenance Day sets out further detail on the reforms announced at Autumn Budget 2021 and the next steps for the review. The Government has invited written responses and will be consulting with stakeholders on the final policy details. Any effects on the public finances will be scored once final policy decisions have been reached.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
4th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how much has been paid under the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme by local authority to date.

HMRC publish statistics on the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme (SEISS) available at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/self-employment-income-support-scheme-statistics-february-2021.

Table 5a provides a breakdown of claims by local authority.

2nd Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the effect of the construction industry VAT reverse charge on cashflow for small businesses in the context of the economic effect of the (a) covid-19 pandemic and (b) end of the transition period.

The Government recognised that the introduction of the reverse charge will have an impact on cashflow for some affected businesses in the construction sector, and provided a long lead in time. The measure has also been delayed twice previously in order to allow businesses more time to prepare and also in recognition of the impact of COVID-19. HMRC have published guidance on reducing cash flow impacts and have written to affected businesses on three occasions signposting where to obtain information and outlining the steps they need to take to prepare.

16th Jun 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many people were estimated to be paid employees according to HMRC's PAYE and RTI data in (a) England, (b) the North West, (c) Oldham local authority and (d) Oldham East and Saddleworth constituency in each month from April 2019 to May 2020.

The table below sets out the quarterly numbers for paid employees in England and the North West, from April 2019 to March 2020, from HMRC PAYE RTI data.

April 2019 - June 2019

July 2019 - September 2019

October 2019 - December 2019

January 2020 - March 2020

England

25,578,000

25,873,000

25,800,000

25,737,000

North West

3,272,000

3,306,000

3,305,000

3,291,000

Paid Employees in England and the North West

Figures rounded to the nearest thousand

It is not possible for HMRC to provide answers to the other aspects of this question due to the time taken to calculate these figures.

8th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the correspondence of 27 October 2021, 10 November 2021, 7 December 2021, 12 January 2022 and 17 February 2022 from the hon. Member for Oldham East and Saddleworth, reference DA43798, when her Department plans to make a decision on case MPAM/0198564/21, in the context of the decision date of 29 May 2022 having passed.

All Asylum Further Submissions lodged in the UK are carefully considered on their individual merits against a background of relevant case law and up to date country information.

We ensure those seeking asylum based on their Further Submissions are given every opportunity to disclose information relevant to their claim before a decision is taken. We aim to make decisions on Further Submissions cases as quickly as possible whilst ensuring the required security checks have been conducted.

We do not comment publicly on individual cases.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
8th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether she has received representations from Greater Manchester child and migrant rights organisation on concerns that children seeking asylum in the UK are at a higher risk of criminal exploitation, self-harm and dying by suicide; and what steps she is taking to resolve backlog of children seeking asylum.

The Home Office regularly receive representations from Greater Manchester child and migrants’ rights organisations on children seeking asylum in the UK.

The department most recently received a courtesy copy of an open letter dated 16 December 2021, from the Greater Manchester Immigration Aid Unit (GMIAU) in which 25 child and migrant rights organisations wrote to us and we replied to this on the 20 January 2022.

The department maintains a working relationship with GMIAU and other regional organisations through our strategic partnerships; including the Strategic Engagement Group (SEG) and National Asylum Stakeholder Forum (NASF), who continue to work collaboratively to ensure asylum claims from children and young people remains one of our top priorities.

The Home Office have established two dedicated case working Hubs for deciding children’s asylum claims which are now fully operational. The hubs have established improved focus on and greater control of children’s cases to build expertise, identify efficiencies and provide a consistency of decision making (and quicker outcomes) for our customers.

We continue to work collaboratively with Local Authorities nationally on the remote interview process for Accompanied and Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children and young people utilising digital interviewing video capabilities to complement in person interviews.

Since May 2021 we have increased Local Authority opt in for digital interviewing to 108 Local Authorities helping to speed up processes, reduce delays and the numbers of children and young people who have an outstanding claim.

We are continuing to recruit additional decision-makers who will be trained to process children’s asylum claims to further reduce the number outstanding.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
8th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether she has plans to give people seeking asylum the right to work in the UK.

The Home Office already allows asylum seekers the right to work in the UK if their claim has been outstanding for 12 months or more, through no fault of their own.

Those permitted to work are restricted to jobs on the Shortage Occupation List, which is based on expert advice from the independent Migration Advisory Committee. We have no plans to change this approach.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
8th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many places remain to be allocated on the Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme; and how many and what proportion of the people given protection under that scheme are British nationals or living in the UK as of 8 February 2022.

The Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme (ACRS) commenced on 6th January. The ACRS will provide up to 20,000 women, children and others at risk with a safe and legal route to resettle in the UK.

We are not giving a running commentary on statistics of those in the scheme due to the continuing flow of people being welcomed. We will include this data within published resettlement statistics later in 2022.

8th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what proportion of people crossing the Channel in small boats had existing family members in the UK in (a) 2019, (b) 2020 and (c) 2021.

The Home Office is unable to state what proportion of people crossing the Channel in small boats had existing family members in the UK in (a) 2019, (b) 2020 and (c) 2021, as this information is not recorded in a way that is reportable.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
8th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department is taking to (a) support Afghan nationals after their six months leave to remain in the UK ends and (b) provide information, advice and support for those people prior to the end of their leave to remain.

The Home Office has written to Afghan families advising them of the next steps to progress permanent residence in the UK.

The Home Office has established a dedicated caseworking team, which is working jointly with the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office and the Ministry of Defence. This team will contact those here in the UK under the Afghan Relocation and Assistance Policy and those moving onto the Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme, to assist them to obtain Indefinite Leave to Remain status.

While families are being accommodated in Bridging Hotel accommodation, we remain committed to ensuring that there essential living needs are being met.

We also have Home Office Liaison Officers (HOLO’s) allocated to Bridging Hotel Accommodation.

The role of the HOLO is to provide both face to face support and remote support when not physically present. They are reactive to the needs of those accommodated in hotels and can provide signposting to other government departments and Local Authorities and ensure safeguarding concerns are appropriately acted upon.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
12th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when she plans to respond substantively to correspondence originally sent by the hon. Member for Oldham East and Saddleworth on 28 January 2021, reference DA39000 and MPAM/0131372/21, which has since been followed up with her Department on 4 March 2021, 22 April 2021, 17 June 2021, 29 July 2021, 1 September 2021, 21 October 2021 and 9 December 2021.

I apologise for the unacceptable delay. The Home Office responded to the correspondence on 13 January 2022.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
23rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent assessment she has made of the effectiveness of the Joint Emergency Services Interoperability Principles.

The Joint Emergency Services Interoperability Principles (JESIP) portfolio is continually reviewed to ensure it reflects the most recent learning and understanding. The JESIP Joint Doctrine is in its third edition, and each version incorporates learning from operational incidents and exercises as well as inquests and inquiries. The effectiveness of JESIP is dependent on how well it has been embedded within each emergency service organisation, and how well it is applied during an incident.

23rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment the JESIP Ministerial Board has made of the potential merits of commissioning a new HMIC-led tri-service review of the level of JESIP embeddedness across the emergency services.

In recent months the Home Office has worked to increase the JESIP content in the current inspection regime undertaken by Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary and Fire and Rescue Services (HMICFRS), and further consideration will be made about the merits of commissioning another tri-service review of JESIP in the future.

23rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, by what mechanism the findings of the Manchester Arena Inquiry will be analysed in the JESIP Joint Doctrine Review 2021.

The third edition of the JESIP Joint Doctrine was published on 11 October 2021. The refreshed Doctrine incorporates learning from evidence heard during the Manchester Arena Inquiry. It has also incorporated key learning from the other terrorist attacks, and the Grenfell Tower fire.

The Joint Doctrine is updated as a process of continuous improvement and learning from the Inquiry’s Phase 2 report will be taken into consideration as part of this process.

23rd Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 12 October 2020 to Question 100398 on Asylum: Employment, to list the independent evidence showing that good economic conditions and essential services can create an incentive for people to choose to go to a particular country illegally referred to.

Asylum seeker right to work is a complex issue and we are currently reviewing this policy. The Home Office will be happy to discuss the content of the review once it has been completed.

7th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether the Government’s review on the restrictions on asylum seekers’ right to work, initiated in December 2018, will provide an assessment of (a) the potential benefits to people’s wellbeing while they are in the asylum system and (b) their integration prospects upon receipt of a positive asylum decision.

There is already published, independent evidence showing that good economic conditions and essential services can create an incentive for people to choose to go to a particular country illegally. This is because it is easier to work under such conditions – and we cannot ignore that access to the labour market is among the reasons that so many people choose to come to the UK illegally, rather than remain in any of the countries through which they transit.

That is why it is important to distinguish between those who need protection and those seeking to work here, who can apply for a work visa under the Immigration Rules. Our wider policy could be undermined if migrants bypassed work visa Rules by lodging unfounded asylum claims here.

Asylum seeker right to work is a complex issue. This is under review; it is crucial we take the time to get this right and we are listening carefully to the arguments and considering the evidence put forward on the issue. The Home Office will be happy to discuss the content of the review once it has been completed.

1st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, how many and what proportion of second homes in England are used as holiday homes or weekend homes, in each Council Tax Band.

The Department does not collect information on the use of second homes that are liable for council tax. However, Table 2 from the 2021 Council Taxbase statistical release provides the number of second homes that are liable for council tax by council tax band. The release can be found at the following link: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/council-taxbase-2021-in-england .

Stuart Andrew
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
13th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what information he holds on the use of Project Bank Accounts by (a) his Department, (b) Government agencies his Department has responsibility for and (c) non-departmental bodies his Department has responsibility for.

Project Bank Accounts (PBAs) are just one way that government departments support fair payment as part of the Government's Prompt Payment Code.

We do not hold data on PBAs if we have assessed it is not practical, efficient and cost effective to use them on our current construction projects.

Along with all government departments, and as set out in the Construction Playbook, we have committed to use PBAs on our construction projects unless there are compelling reasons not to.

Eddie Hughes
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
3rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what estimate he has made of the (a) number and (b) proportion of (i) private and (ii) social renters who are at risk of eviction in 2021 as a result of rent arrears accrued during the covid-19 outbreak.

Data from the English Housing Survey (EHS) Household Resilience Study for June-July 2020 shows that 7% of private rented households and 11% of social rented households were in rent arrears in June/July. The Department does not hold data to estimate the number or proportion of renters who are at risk of eviction in 2021 as a result of those arrears.

2nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what estimate he has made of the number and proportion of (a) private (b) social renters in rent arrears during the covid-19 pandemic.

Data from the English Housing Survey (EHS) Household Resilience Study for June-July 2020 details rental arrears during the pandemic. It says that 7% of private rented households and 11% of social rented households were in rent arrears in June/July. The English Housing Survey Headline Report 2019-20 details rent arrears in the year before pandemic, finding that 3% of private renters and 11% of social renters were in arrears at time of survey.

22nd Feb 2021
What discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care on the provision of public health grants for 2021-22.

The Department of Health and Social Care distributes the public health grant annually to local authorities in England. MHCLG Ministers and officials regularly engage with counterparts in DHSC, Treasury and local authorities on matters relating to local authorities’ finances.