Geraint Davies Portrait

Geraint Davies

Labour (Co-op) - Swansea West

European Scrutiny Committee
6th Nov 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Welsh Affairs Committee
11th Sep 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Environmental Audit Committee
11th Sep 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Panel of Chairs
22nd Jun 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe (Substitute Member)
10th Nov 2010 - 3rd May 2017
Environmental Audit Committee
26th Oct 2015 - 3rd May 2017
European Scrutiny Committee
15th Jul 2015 - 3rd May 2017
Panel of Chairs
25th Jun 2015 - 3rd May 2017
European Scrutiny Committee
5th Jul 2013 - 30th Mar 2015
Welsh Affairs Committee
12th Jul 2010 - 30th Mar 2015
Public Accounts Committee
25th Jul 1997 - 10th Sep 2003


Select Committee Meeting
Tuesday 24th May 2022
14:00
Select Committee Meeting
Wednesday 25th May 2022
09:00
Welsh Affairs Committee - Oral evidence
Subject: Wales as a global tourist destination
25 May 2022, 9 a.m.
At 9.30am: Oral evidence
Graeme Farrow - Artistic and Creative Director at Wales Millennium Centre
Louise Miles-Payne - Director, Creu Cymru and Board Member at UK Theatre
Fiona Stewart - Managing Director at Green Man Festival
At 10.30am: Oral evidence
Mike Killingley - Head of Communications at Welsh Rugby Union
Mark Williams - Stadium Manager at Principality Stadium
Matthew Williams - Policy and Communications Manager at Welsh Sports Association
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Select Committee Meeting
Tuesday 14th June 2022
14:00
Department Event
Thursday 23rd June 2022
09:30
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Oral questions - Main Chamber
23 Jun 2022, 9:30 a.m.
Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (including Topical Questions)
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Note: This event involves a Department with which this person is linked, and does not guarantee their actual attendance.
Division Votes
Wednesday 18th May 2022
Achieving Economic Growth
voted Aye - in line with the party majority
One of 176 Labour Aye votes vs 0 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 229 Noes - 312
Speeches
Wednesday 18th May 2022
Achieving Economic Growth
The Chief Secretary to the Treasury mentioned that there are 500,000 more people on payrolls, but he neglected to say …
Written Answers
Tuesday 17th May 2022
Children: Speech and Language Therapy
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether mainstream schools are able to use the School-Led tutoring grant to …
Early Day Motions
Monday 21st February 2022
Universities' staff pensions
That this House notes that the University and College Union (UCU) and members are in industrial dispute over a prospective …
Bills
Wednesday 20th March 2019
Fracking (Measurement and Regulation of Impacts) (Air, Water and Greenhouse Gas Emissions) Bill 2017-19
The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will …
MP Financial Interests
Monday 30th March 2020
7. (i) Shareholdings: over 15% of issued share capital
Until 1 December 2019, Pure Crete Ltd, tour operator to Crete. (Updated 17 March 2020)
EDM signed
Tuesday 17th May 2022
Reduction in civil service employment
That this House condemns Government plans to cut 91,000 jobs from the civil service over the next three years; notes …
Supported Legislation
Wednesday 7th February 2018
Homelessness (End of Life Care) Bill 2017-19
The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Geraint Davies has voted in 351 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Geraint Davies Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Simon Hart (Conservative)
Secretary of State for Wales
(25 debate interactions)
Matt Hancock (Conservative)
(24 debate interactions)
Rebecca Pow (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
(14 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Cabinet Office
(38 debate contributions)
Department of Health and Social Care
(31 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Geraint Davies's debates

Swansea West Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petitions with highest Swansea West signature proportion
Petitions with most Swansea West signatures
Petition Debates Contributed

I would like the UK Government to make it law that nightclubs must search guests on arrival to prevent harmful weapons and other items entering the establishment. This could be a pat down search or metal detector, but must involve measures being put in place to ensure the safety of the public.


Latest EDMs signed by Geraint Davies

16th May 2022
Geraint Davies signed this EDM on Tuesday 17th May 2022

Reduction in civil service employment

Tabled by: Chris Stephens (Scottish National Party - Glasgow South West)
That this House condemns Government plans to cut 91,000 jobs from the civil service over the next three years; notes that departmental spending levels for the next three years have only recently been issued, following a process of assessing future staffing requirements; is angered to have learnt of these plans …
38 signatures
(Most recent: 18 May 2022)
Signatures by party:
Scottish National Party: 15
Labour: 12
Plaid Cymru: 3
Liberal Democrat: 3
Alba Party: 2
Green Party: 1
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
Independent: 1
Social Democratic & Labour Party: 1
21st February 2022
Geraint Davies signed this EDM as the primary signatory on Sunday 20th February 2022

Universities' staff pensions

Tabled by: Geraint Davies (Labour (Co-op) - Swansea West)
That this House notes that the University and College Union (UCU) and members are in industrial dispute over a prospective cut in pension entitlement for lecturers of 35 per cent; further notes that the University Superannuation Scheme (USS) was last valued during the 2020 pandemic and needs re-evaluation to account …
32 signatures
(Most recent: 29 Mar 2022)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 25
Plaid Cymru: 3
Independent: 2
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
Green Party: 1
View All Geraint Davies's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Geraint Davies, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Geraint Davies has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Geraint Davies has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

26 Bills introduced by Geraint Davies


The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to establish a right to breathe clean air; to make provision about reducing air pollution; to require the Secretary of State to set, measure, and report on air quality targets; to establish the National Clean Air Agency to enforce air quality targets; to make provision for the development of sustainable public, private and commercial transport by road, rail, air and sea; to restrict the use of polluting vehicles in urban areas; to prohibit the sale of new petrol- and diesel-powered vehicles from no later than 2030; to make it an offence to remove permanently devices that reduce vehicle emissions; to make requirements regarding indoor air quality; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 2nd October 2019
Next Event - 2nd Reading: House Of Commons
Date TBA

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to require the Secretary of State to measure and regulate the impact of unconventional gas extraction on air and water quality and on greenhouse gas emissions; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 20th March 2019

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to require the holding of a referendum in which one option is to approve the withdrawal agreement between the United Kingdom and the European Union and the other option is for the United Kingdom to remain a member of the European Union; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 26th February 2019

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to require the Secretary of State to set, measure, enforce and report on air quality targets; to make provision about mitigating air pollution, including through the use of clean air zones; to make provision about vehicle emissions testing; to restrict the approval and sale of vehicles with certain engine types; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 22nd November 2017

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to require the Secretary of State to set, measure, enforce and report on targets for the reduction and recycling of plastic packaging; to require that such targets following the United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the European Union at least match such targets set by the European Union; to establish enforcement mechanisms in respect of such targets and associated provisions; to make provision for support for the development of sustainable alternatives to plastic packaging; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 9th May 2018
(Read Debate)

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to require the Prime Minister to revoke the notification, under Article 50(2) of the Treaty on European Union, of the United Kingdom’s intention to withdraw from the European Union unless two conditions are met; to establish as the first condition for non-revocation that a withdrawal agreement has been approved by Parliament by 21 January 2019 or during an extension period agreed by that date under Article 50(3) of the Treaty on European Union; to establish as the second condition for non-revocation that a majority of participating voters have voted in favour of that agreement in a referendum in which the United Kingdom remaining as a member of the European Union was the other option; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 18th December 2018

A Bill to require the holding of a referendum to endorse the United Kingdom and Gibraltar exit package proposed by HM Government for withdrawal from the EU, or to decide to remain a member, following the completion of formal exit negotiations; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 6th September 2017
(Read Debate)

A Bill to require the Secretary of State to set, measure, enforce and report on air quality targets; to require that vehicle emissions targets and testing reflect on-road driving conditions; to make it an offence to remove permanently devices that reduce vehicle emissions; to provide powers for local authorities to establish low diesel emissions zones and pedestrian-only areas; to restrict the use of diesel vehicles in urban areas; to make provision about the promotion of electric and hydrogen powered vehicles and for the development of sustainable public, private and commercial transport by road, rail, air and sea; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 16th November 2016
(Read Debate)

A Bill to require the Secretary of State to set targets for sugar content in food and drinks; to provide that added sugar content on food and drink labelling be represented in terms of the number of teaspoonfuls of sugar; to provide for standards of information provision in advertising of food and drinks; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 14th September 2016

A Bill to require the holding of a referendum to endorse the United Kingdom and Gibraltar exit package proposed by HM Government for withdrawal from the EU, or to decide to remain a member, prior to the UK giving notice under Article 50 of the Treaty on European Union; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 6th July 2016

A Bill to make provision about the safeguarding of standards of environmental protection derived from European Union legislation, including for water, air, soil, flood protection, and climate change, after the withdrawal of the UK from the EU; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 13th July 2016

A Bill to require the Secretary of State to lay bilateral and multilateral trade and investment agreements before Parliament; to prohibit the implementation of such an agreement without the approval by resolution of each House; to provide a process for the amendment of such agreements, including any arrangements for investor-state dispute settlement, by Parliament; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 20th July 2016

A Bill to make provision about urban air quality targets; to require vehicle emissions targets and testing to reflect on-road driving conditions; to provide powers for local authorities to establish low diesel emissions zones and pedestrian-only areas; to restrict the use of roads in urban centres by diesel vehicles; to make provision about the promotion of the development of electric tram systems and buses and taxis powered by liquefied petroleum gas in urban centres; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 23rd February 2016

A Bill to require the Secretary of State to measure and regulate the impact of unconventional gas extraction on air and water quality and on greenhouse gas emissions; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 8th December 2015

A Bill to make provision about urban air quality targets relating to diesel emissions; to require vehicle emissions targets and testing to reflect on-road driving conditions; to make the removal or disablement of pollution-reducing devices in vehicles a criminal offence; to provide powers for local authorities to establish low diesel emissions zones and pedestrian-only areas and to restrict the use of roads in urban centres by diesel vehicles; to promote the development of trams, buses and taxis powered by electricity or hydrogen in urban centres for the purpose of improving air quality; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 14th September 2016

A Bill to require scrutiny of and enable amendments to international trade agreements, including investor state dispute settlements, by the European and UK Parliaments; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 16th September 2015

A Bill to require the Secretary of State to set targets for sugar content in food and drinks; to provide that sugar content on food and drink labelling be represented in terms of the number of teaspoonfuls of sugar; to provide for standards of information provision in advertising of food and drinks; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 21st October 2015

A Bill to provide that the Health and Care Professionals Council be the regulatory body for counsellors and psychotherapists; to prohibit gay to straight conversion therapy; to make consequential provision for the protection of children and adults; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 16th July 2014

A Bill to prohibit the advertising of electronic cigarettes; to prohibit the sale of electronic cigarettes to persons under the age of 18; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 22nd October 2014

A Bill to require the Secretary of State to measure and regulate the impact of unconventional gas extraction on air and water quality and on greenhouse gas emissions; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 21st January 2015

A Bill to require scrutiny of and enable amendments to international trade agreements, including investor state dispute settlements, by the European and UK Parliaments; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Monday 27th October 2014

A Bill to prohibit the distribution of sexually explicit images via the internet and text message without the consent of the subjects of the images; to provide that mobile phones and other devices capable of connection to the internet be set by manufacturers as a default to deny access to pornography; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 10th September 2014

A Bill to require the Secretary of State to set targets for sugar content in food and drinks; to provide that sugar content on food and drink labelling be represented in terms of the number of teaspoonfuls of sugar; to provide for standards of information provision in advertising of food and drinks; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 15th July 2014

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to provide that the Health Professionals Council be the regulatory body for counsellors and psychotherapists; and for connected purposes


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 23rd October 2013

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to require multinational motor manufacturing companies to provide a duty of care to former employees in respect of pension provision


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 12th December 2012

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 21st July 2010

487 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
9 Other Department Questions
3rd Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, how much his Department has spent on social media advertising in (a) 2019, (b) 2020, (c) 2021 and (d) 2022 up to and including 28 February; and on which platforms that money was spent.

Our publicly available transparency data includes the spend information requested. Social media is a cost effective way of ensuring the public benefit from the policies and programmes of department and all spend represents value of money:

DLUHC: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/dluhc-departmental-spending-over-250

MHCLG: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/mhclg-departmental-spending-over-250

Eddie Hughes
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
17th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, with reference to the Climate Change Committee’s UK Health Expert Advisory Group’s report entitled Sustainable Health Equity: Achieving a Net Zero UK, published on 6 November 2020, what assessment he has ​made of the potential merits of the four recommendations of that report including setting a target date to eliminate home installations of wood burning and gas stoves and prioritising elimination in urban areas.

I welcome the Climate Change Committee’s report on Sustainable Health Equity: Achieving a Net Zero UK. My Department works closely with other government departments to deliver homes that are energy efficient, climate resilient and healthy.

On 15 December 2021 the Department published the government response to the Future Buildings Standard consultation, brought in the 2021 uplift to the Building Regulations and published a range of accompanying new statutory guidance.

The uplift is an important stepping stone on our way to implementation of the Future Homes Standard and the Future Buildings Standard from 2025. Together, the policy set out in the government response to the Future Buildings Standard consultation, and the Future Homes Standard consultation (published in January 2021) will ensure that new homes and buildings are highly efficient, with significantly lower carbon emissions. From June 2022, when the new regulations come into force, new homes will be expected to produce around 30% fewer carbon emissions and new non-domestic buildings will be expected to produce 27% fewer carbon emissions, becoming zero-carbon over time as the electricity grid continues to decarbonise. The consultation, uplift and new statutory guidance also delivered improvements to ventilation, and a new requirement to mitigate overheating in new-build residential buildings, particularly important for adapting to an increasingly warm climate.

We are considering how the planning system can further support our commitment to reaching net zero. As set out in the Net Zero Strategy, we will make sure that the reformed planning system supports our efforts to combat climate change and help bring greenhouse gas emissions to net zero by 2050.

The Government Response to the Committee on Climate Change’s 2020 Progress Report to Parliament sets out the further action they are taking across all sectors of the economy to reduce emissions and deliver net zero.

Eddie Hughes
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
17th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, what assessment he has made of the implications for his Department's policies of the Climate Change Committee’s UK Health Expert Advisory Group’s report, Sustainable Health Equity: Achieving a Net Zero UK, published 6 November 2020.

I welcome the Climate Change Committee’s report on Sustainable Health Equity: Achieving a Net Zero UK. My Department works closely with other government departments to deliver homes that are energy efficient, climate resilient and healthy.

On 15 December 2021 the Department published the government response to the Future Buildings Standard consultation, brought in the 2021 uplift to the Building Regulations and published a range of accompanying new statutory guidance.

The uplift is an important stepping stone on our way to implementation of the Future Homes Standard and the Future Buildings Standard from 2025. Together, the policy set out in the government response to the Future Buildings Standard consultation, and the Future Homes Standard consultation (published in January 2021) will ensure that new homes and buildings are highly efficient, with significantly lower carbon emissions. From June 2022, when the new regulations come into force, new homes will be expected to produce around 30% fewer carbon emissions and new non-domestic buildings will be expected to produce 27% fewer carbon emissions, becoming zero-carbon over time as the electricity grid continues to decarbonise. The consultation, uplift and new statutory guidance also delivered improvements to ventilation, and a new requirement to mitigate overheating in new-build residential buildings, particularly important for adapting to an increasingly warm climate.

We are considering how the planning system can further support our commitment to reaching net zero. As set out in the Net Zero Strategy, we will make sure that the reformed planning system supports our efforts to combat climate change and help bring greenhouse gas emissions to net zero by 2050.

The Government Response to the Committee on Climate Change’s 2020 Progress Report to Parliament sets out the further action they are taking across all sectors of the economy to reduce emissions and deliver net zero.

Eddie Hughes
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
5th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, if he will make an assessment of the implications for his policies on future building standards to protect occupants from infection with covid-19, including the omicron variant, of the study entitled The removal of airborne SARS-CoV-2 and other bioaerosols by air filtration on COVID-19 surge units, by Andrew Conway Morris an others, published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America on 30 October 2021.

It is through Part F of the Building Regulations that we set minimum ventilation standards for new buildings, or when work is done to an existing building. We have recently published our response to the Future Buildings Standard Consultation which sets out new guidance on Part F, to come into force in June 2022. COVID-19 has shown the importance of ventilation in reducing the spread of infection. The new guidance includes measures to mitigate the risks of airborne infection in new buildings, including CO2 monitoring and updated specifications for systems that recirculate air between rooms.

The study by Andrew Conway Morris and others is among extensive recent and ongoing research carried out during the COVID-19 pandemic on the effect of ventilation on airborne transmission of infectious agents. This is a rapidly developing area of knowledge and understanding. We intend to continue to monitor and review the available evidence and research in the context of any future changes to Part F.

Christopher Pincher
Treasurer of HM Household (Deputy Chief Whip, House of Commons)
10th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, whether any social events took place between three or more people within his Departmental buildings between (a) 5 November 2020 and 1 December 2020 and (b) 16 December 2020 and 22 February 2021.

This information is not collected. At the time, staff were expected to work from home and undertake meetings remotely, wherever possible.

Eddie Hughes
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the President of COP26, with reference to the report by Save the Children entitled Born Into The Climate Crisis, published on 27 September 2021, what assessment he has made of the analysis set out in that report of the potential impacts of climate change on children living in low income countries.

We have long recognised the threat that climate change and environmental degradation poses to the lives and wellbeing of individuals and communities across the world, including the most marginalised and vulnerable.

We share the concerns set out in the recent Save the Children report that climate and environmental threats are disrupting the education of nearly 40 million children each year and that the impacts of climate change will disproportionately affect women and girls, particularly those living in low income countries.

The UK is a global leader in girls’ education and the largest donor to Education Cannot Wait – the global fund for education in emergencies. At COP26, the UK will use our unique position as host and as a leading international donor on girls’ education to sound the alarm on the impact climate change is having on education, and advocate for the role of education in helping to tackle the crisis. This will include calling for action at both global and country levels and giving young people the opportunity to use their voices to call for the changes they think are needed. We will also be supporting Education Cannot Wait’s call for funding to ensure it can meet the needs of children in crisis.

The UK COP26 Presidency is committed to amplifying the voices of young people from across the world in the lead up to, and at, COP26 this November. I have committed to meeting with young people in every international visit over the last year and have established the COP26 Civil Society and Youth Advisory Council. At COP26, we will host a dedicated Youth & Public Empowerment Day to elevate youth voices and demonstrate the critical role of education and empowerment to drive climate action. We have been working closely with YOUNGO (the official children’s and youth constituency to the UNFCCC) to co-create the events programme for the day.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the President of COP26, what steps he is taking to help ensure that children’s rights are advanced globally through the outcomes of COP26.

We have long recognised the threat that climate change and environmental degradation poses to the lives and wellbeing of individuals and communities across the world, including the most marginalised and vulnerable.

We share the concerns set out in the recent Save the Children report that climate and environmental threats are disrupting the education of nearly 40 million children each year and that the impacts of climate change will disproportionately affect women and girls, particularly those living in low income countries.

The UK is a global leader in girls’ education and the largest donor to Education Cannot Wait – the global fund for education in emergencies. At COP26, the UK will use our unique position as host and as a leading international donor on girls’ education to sound the alarm on the impact climate change is having on education, and advocate for the role of education in helping to tackle the crisis. This will include calling for action at both global and country levels and giving young people the opportunity to use their voices to call for the changes they think are needed. We will also be supporting Education Cannot Wait’s call for funding to ensure it can meet the needs of children in crisis.

The UK COP26 Presidency is committed to amplifying the voices of young people from across the world in the lead up to, and at, COP26 this November. I have committed to meeting with young people in every international visit over the last year and have established the COP26 Civil Society and Youth Advisory Council. At COP26, we will host a dedicated Youth & Public Empowerment Day to elevate youth voices and demonstrate the critical role of education and empowerment to drive climate action. We have been working closely with YOUNGO (the official children’s and youth constituency to the UNFCCC) to co-create the events programme for the day.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
9th Sep 2021
To ask the President of COP26, what discussions he has had with his counterparts in other countries on the effects of air quality on health.

By tackling the causes of climate change, we can also reduce the impacts of poor air quality on premature deaths throughout the world. Through our COP26 campaigns, we are seeking closer integration with public health objectives to facilitate a global green, healthy and sustainable recovery from the COVID 19 pandemic.

Through the Foreign Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO) and Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC), the COP26 Unit is engaging with countries on the COP26 Health Programme which supports increased ambition on climate change and health, including the relationship with air quality. The engagements also highlight the opportunity for the health sector to reduce carbon emissions in a way that also improves air quality. The government is also working with non-governmental organisations, including the World Health Organisation, to engage with health professionals internationally to advocate for stronger climate action, including addressing the health impacts from air quality.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
3rd Mar 2022
To ask the Attorney General, how much her Department spent in total on social media advertising in (a) 2019, (b) 2020, (c) 2021 and (d) 2022 as of 28 February 2022; and on which platforms that money was spent.

The Attorney General’s Office uses the free subscription services only on departmental social media accounts and therefore has had a nil spend on social media advertising.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
3rd Mar 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how much his Department spent in total on social media advertising in (a) 2019, (b) 2020, (c) 2021 and (d) 2022 as of 28 February 2022; and on which platforms that money was spent.

Social Media is an integral part of the Cabinet Office's strategy for communications, therefore data on how much we spend on social media is not split out from wider communications spend.


Routine transparency spend data, broken down by supplier for each year requested, can be found here. For reporting purposes, Cabinet Office accounts include No10, therefore specifics on the Prime Minister’s Office are not split out separately.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
3rd Mar 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how much the Prime Minister's Office spent in total on social media advertising in (a) 2019, (b) 2020, (c) 2021 and (d) 2022 as of 28 February 2022; and on which platforms that money was spent.

Social Media is an integral part of the Cabinet Office's strategy for communications, therefore data on how much we spend on social media is not split out from wider communications spend.


Routine transparency spend data, broken down by supplier for each year requested, can be found here. For reporting purposes, Cabinet Office accounts include No10, therefore specifics on the Prime Minister’s Office are not split out separately.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
5th Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 18 June 2021 to Question 14131, whether Arup made any specific recommendations on air pollution as part of their work on the G7 event.

The Cabinet Office worked with UK-based consulting firm Arup to provide independent expertise to secure ISO20121 sustainability accreditation for the G7 Summit and deliver a carbon neutral summit, as part of the Prime Minister’s commitment to hosting a sustainable and carbon-neutral event.

The Government plans to publish an executive summary of the Carbon Management Plan developed as part of this work in due course, following a full assessment. It is intended that this document will be made available publicly on the G7 website. https://www.g7uk.org/sustainability/

The Carbon Management Plan will include the final travel arrangements for all G7 and Partner Country Leaders and staff for the G7 summit, including air travel.

Arup did not make specific recommendations on air pollution, as this was not within the remit of their support for the Summit’s ISO20121 accreditation and assisting HMG in delivering a carbon neutral summit.

The cost for Arup’s work developing the Carbon Management Plan for the G7 Summit will be released under the usual transparency process, along with other Summit costs.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
5th Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 18 June 2021 to Question 14131, what the carbon emissions were from the travel by (a) the Prime Minister, (b) other G7 leaders and (c) staff for the G7 summit; and whether the Prime Minister's travel by private jet was included in the Carbon Management Plan designed by Arup.

The Cabinet Office worked with UK-based consulting firm Arup to provide independent expertise to secure ISO20121 sustainability accreditation for the G7 Summit and deliver a carbon neutral summit, as part of the Prime Minister’s commitment to hosting a sustainable and carbon-neutral event.

The Government plans to publish an executive summary of the Carbon Management Plan developed as part of this work in due course, following a full assessment. It is intended that this document will be made available publicly on the G7 website. https://www.g7uk.org/sustainability/

The Carbon Management Plan will include the final travel arrangements for all G7 and Partner Country Leaders and staff for the G7 summit, including air travel.

Arup did not make specific recommendations on air pollution, as this was not within the remit of their support for the Summit’s ISO20121 accreditation and assisting HMG in delivering a carbon neutral summit.

The cost for Arup’s work developing the Carbon Management Plan for the G7 Summit will be released under the usual transparency process, along with other Summit costs.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
5th Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the cost to the public purse was of Arup's work on the Carbon Management Plan for the G7 summit in Cornwall.

The Cabinet Office worked with UK-based consulting firm Arup to provide independent expertise to secure ISO20121 sustainability accreditation for the G7 Summit and deliver a carbon neutral summit, as part of the Prime Minister’s commitment to hosting a sustainable and carbon-neutral event.

The Government plans to publish an executive summary of the Carbon Management Plan developed as part of this work in due course, following a full assessment. It is intended that this document will be made available publicly on the G7 website. https://www.g7uk.org/sustainability/

The Carbon Management Plan will include the final travel arrangements for all G7 and Partner Country Leaders and staff for the G7 summit, including air travel.

Arup did not make specific recommendations on air pollution, as this was not within the remit of their support for the Summit’s ISO20121 accreditation and assisting HMG in delivering a carbon neutral summit.

The cost for Arup’s work developing the Carbon Management Plan for the G7 Summit will be released under the usual transparency process, along with other Summit costs.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
24th Jun 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether he has made an assessment of the implications for his policies of the report of the all-party group on air pollution entitled Air Quality Strategy to Reduce Coronavirus Infection, published on 29 May 2020.

The Cabinet Office welcomes the All-Party Group’s report and has noted its recommendations. Improving air quality is a priority for the Government. DEFRA has recently published the report of the Air Quality Expert Group (AQEG) on its Call for Evidence to understand more fully the impact that coronavirus is having on air pollution emissions, concentrations and exposure.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
21st Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how much his Department has spent supporting the community-owned renewable energy sector in each year since 2015.

The Government recognises that community energy groups have a role to play in the Department’s efforts to decarbonise the economy.

Through the introduction of UK-wide growth funding schemes, such as the UK Shared Prosperity Fund, the Government is enabling local areas to tackle net zero goals in ways that best suit their needs. The Government encourages community energy groups to work closely with their local authority to support the development of community energy projects within these schemes.

The Government also plans to reintroduce the Community Energy Contact Group to strengthen engagement with the sector.

There have been a range of government initiatives from different Government Departments that have supported the community energy sector since 2015. This includes grant funding through the £15 million Rural Community Energy Fund (RCEF) from Defra and BEIS, and broader schemes which have been open to community energy groups as well as other organisations, such as the Feed in Tariff scheme, the Towns Fund, and the Community Renewal Fund, where spend is not shown explicitly for community groups.

RCEF projects are currently in the delivery stage, and we expect to review the scheme in due course.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
21st Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department has taken to support the development of community owned renewable energy schemes.

The Government recognises that community energy groups have a role to play in the Department’s efforts to decarbonise the economy.

Through the introduction of UK-wide growth funding schemes, such as the UK Shared Prosperity Fund, the Government is enabling local areas to tackle net zero goals in ways that best suit their needs. The Government encourages community energy groups to work closely with their local authority to support the development of community energy projects within these schemes.

The Government also plans to reintroduce the Community Energy Contact Group to strengthen engagement with the sector.

There have been a range of government initiatives from different Government Departments that have supported the community energy sector since 2015. This includes grant funding through the £15 million Rural Community Energy Fund (RCEF) from Defra and BEIS, and broader schemes which have been open to community energy groups as well as other organisations, such as the Feed in Tariff scheme, the Towns Fund, and the Community Renewal Fund, where spend is not shown explicitly for community groups.

RCEF projects are currently in the delivery stage, and we expect to review the scheme in due course.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
21st Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the effectiveness of the Rural Community Energy Fund.

The Government recognises that community energy groups have a role to play in the Department’s efforts to decarbonise the economy.

Through the introduction of UK-wide growth funding schemes, such as the UK Shared Prosperity Fund, the Government is enabling local areas to tackle net zero goals in ways that best suit their needs. The Government encourages community energy groups to work closely with their local authority to support the development of community energy projects within these schemes.

The Government also plans to reintroduce the Community Energy Contact Group to strengthen engagement with the sector.

There have been a range of government initiatives from different Government Departments that have supported the community energy sector since 2015. This includes grant funding through the £15 million Rural Community Energy Fund (RCEF) from Defra and BEIS, and broader schemes which have been open to community energy groups as well as other organisations, such as the Feed in Tariff scheme, the Towns Fund, and the Community Renewal Fund, where spend is not shown explicitly for community groups.

RCEF projects are currently in the delivery stage, and we expect to review the scheme in due course.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
21st Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether the terms and conditions governing HETAS’s contract with his Department to manage the Biomass Suppliers List require it to declare (a) current and (b) future potential conflicts of interest.

The administrator of the Biomass Suppliers’ List is Woodsure. Woodsure is a fully owned subsidiary of HETAS.

The Department’s standard terms and conditions of contract include reference to conflict of interest, this requires contractors to declare any potential conflict of interest to the Secretary of State.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
21st Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what tender process his Department is using to select a provider to take over the running of the Government’s Biomass Suppliers List with effect from 1 July 2021.

The Biomass Suppliers List was publicly tendered from January to February 2021. The Government received 13 expressions of interest and two tenders. Following evaluation, the Government appointed Woodsure to administer the List for two years.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
21st Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he has undertaken a comparative assessment of the carbon emissions required to heat and cool a building (a) relying solely on natural ventilation and (b) recirculating air at a typical rate though a mechanical heating, ventilation and air conditioning system.

Most buildings in the UK rely solely on natural ventilation. Carbon emissions from heating and cooling is included in the UK greenhouse gas emissions national statistics~: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/provisional-uk-greenhouse-gas-emissions-national-statistics-2021. The Retrofit for the Future programme https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/retrofit-for-the-future-a-guide-to-making-retrofit-work compared natural ventilation with the use of mechanical ventilation with heat recovery when retrofitting buildings, but no comparative estimates of the carbon emissions was undertaken.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
21st Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the level of carbon emissions in tonnes from central or standalone (a) heating in winter and (b) cooling in summer from buildings for which he is responsible that rely solely on natural ventilation.

Most buildings in the UK rely solely on natural ventilation. Carbon emissions from heating and cooling is included in the UK greenhouse gas emissions national statistics: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/provisional-uk-greenhouse-gas-emissions-national-statistics-2021. The Government recently published a study on demand for cooling in UK buildings which is available at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/cooling-in-the-uk.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
31st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what payments have been under the Government’s Renewable Heat Incentive scheme in each of (a) 2020 and (b) 2021.

The Government’s Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI) scheme payments are accounted for by financial year (FY), ending 31 March. In terms of committed payments, which include actual payments made and expected payments due but not yet claimed for, our latest estimation is that committed payments for FY2020/21 are £917m and £992m for FY2021/22.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
31st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when he plans to publish a biomass strategy 2022.

The Government intends to publish the Biomass Strategy later this year.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
31st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many responses were received to the tender process to select a new provider to take over the running of the Government’s Biomass Suppliers List with effect from 1 July 2021.

The Biomass Suppliers List was publicly tendered from January to February 2021. The Department received 13 expressions of interest and two tenders. Following evaluation, BEIS appointed Woodsure to administer the List for two years.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
31st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the availability of eco-label accreditation for producers of wood-burning stoves in the UK.

Producers and manufacturers of wood burning stoves in the UK must demonstrate compliance by following the conformity assessment procedures set out in the Ecodesign and Energy Labelling regulations, prior to placing a product on the market. The Office for Product Safety and Standards (OPSS) is the UK appointed market surveillance authority (MSA) responsible for ensuring manufacturers meet their obligations towards these regulations.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
31st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 10 December 2021 to Question 88605, Carbon Emissions: Health, what policies his Department has implemented in response to the report by the Climate Change Committee’s UK Health Expert Advisory Group entitled, Sustainable Health Equity: Achieving a Net Zero UK.

The Government considered the Climate Change Committee’s advice, alongside a range of relevant evidence, when setting the sixth carbon budget and to inform policy development. The Government’s Net Zero Strategy, published in October last year, sets out the Government’s vision to transition to net zero by 2050, including to grasp the health benefits from changes such as better insulated homes, cleaner air and more walking and cycling.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
31st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he has taken to ensure that payments made under the Government’s Renewable Heat Incentive scheme are provided to biomass boilers using wood fuel that meet certain (a) sustainability and (b) additional legal requirements.

The Renewable Heat Incentive scheme was introduced in 2011. In 2015, the Government introduced new legislation which required all biomass boilers on the scheme to adhere to certain land and sustainability criteria. The Government has also introduced a new fuel quality standard and annual maintenance checks for biomass boilers on the scheme, in line with its 2019 Clean Air Strategy. Both requirements came into force on 01 April 2022.

The scheme is administered by Ofgem who carry out frequent audits to ensure compliance.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
30th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 11 January 2022 to Question 98190 on Firewood, what assessment he has made of the reasons for the reduction in domestic wood consumption in 2018 of 67 per cent.

Domestic wood consumption was revised in July 2021 to incorporate the results of research undertaken by the Department for the Environment, Food, and Rural Affairs (Defra): link here.

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy compared the research findings with the existing methodology for the Digest of UK Energy Statistics and described methodological reasons that contributed to the reduction in estimated domestic wood consumption in an article published in March 2021: link here.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
10th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the total cost to the Government was of its agreement in September 2021 to meet the costs to CF Industries of reopening one or more of its sites producing commercial carbon dioxide.

This is commercially sensitive information that relates to a company’s production costs and sales. It is not appropriate to provide figures of costs at this time.  Details of our support will be published in the 2021-22 BEIS Annual Report and Accounts which will be available on gov.uk.

Lee Rowley
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
3rd Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how much his Department spent in total on social media advertising in (a) 2019, (b) 2020, (c) 2021 and (d) 2022 as of 28 February 2022; and on which platforms that money was spent.

Social media advertising spend by the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy is included in marketing spend data published on GOV.UK: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/beis-spend-control-data.

George Freeman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
31st Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the amount of CO2 that is produced per Megawatt-hour by the Drax power station through the burning of (a) coal and (b) wood pellets in terms of (i) supply chain and (ii) chimney emissions.

Data regarding the electricity generation in megawatt-hours derived from burning wood pellets and coal at the Drax Power Station is not available.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
31st Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he has made an assessment of the implications for his policies of the forecast of a 190 year carbon payback time for the switch from burning coal to burning wood in the Climatic Change journal article entitled Harvesting in boreal forests and the biofuel carbon debt.

The Government only supports biomass that complies with strict sustainability criteria. In a sustainably managed forest, there will be stands of trees each of different ages, which will be harvested in gradual sequence, and replaced, as they reach maturity. There is evidence to suggest that the overall age profile of the forest therefore remains constant, and carbon sequestration can be maintained decade after decade.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
24th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to page 43 of his Department's Statistical Release of 29 July 2021 entitled Digest of UK Energy Statistics Annual data for UK, 2020, for what reason domestic wood consumption was revised down from 2,241 kilotonnes to 733 kilotonnes in the 2018 reference year.

Domestic wood consumption was revised in July 2021 to incorporate the results of research undertaken by The Department for the Environment, Food, and Rural Affairs (Defra).

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
17th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many journalists or media organisations contacted his Department in December 2021 to enquire about the implementation of the new Ecodesign Regulations relating to wood or solid burning appliances in domestic premises from 1 January 2022.

The Department has no record of any media queries related to EcoDesign regulations in December 2021.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
17th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of the Climate Change Committee’s UK Health Expert Advisory Group’s report, Sustainable Health Equity: Achieving a Net Zero UK, published 6 November 2020; and when that assessment was made.

The Government is grateful to the Climate Change Committee for the wide range of advice it provides government, which is considered on an ongoing basis. In June 2021, the published impact assessment for the sixth carbon budget considered a range of relevant evidence to provide a solid basis for the government’s decision on the budget level, including the Climate Change Committee’s UK Health Expert Advisory Group’s report, ‘Sustainable Health Equity: Achieving a Net Zero UK’. The Net Zero Strategy, published in October 2021, then set out the Government’s vision for making the transition to net zero, which can bring significant benefits for physical and mental health.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
12th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to ensure consistently high standards in (a) approval processes and (b) testing for wood burning appliances or ranges of appliances before they receive an Ecolabel rating.

Prior to placing a product on the market, manufacturers must demonstrate conformity with the implementing measures as set out in the product specific regulations. This includes a declaration of conformity and technical documentation, and can include relevant standards used to demonstrate compliance. This technical documentation must be kept by the manufacturer for a period of 10 years after production and made available to the market surveillance authority, who can conduct independent testing after the product has launched on the market.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
12th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to ensure consistently high standards in (a) approval processes and (b) testing for individual wood burning appliances or ranges of appliances before they are certified as complying with the requirements of the Ecodesign Regulations.

Prior to placing a product on the market, manufacturers must demonstrate conformity with the implementing measures as set out in the product specific regulations. This includes a declaration of conformity and technical documentation, and can include relevant standards used to demonstrate compliance. This technical documentation must be kept by the manufacturer for a period of 10 years after production and made available to the market surveillance authority, who can conduct independent testing after the product has launched on the market.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
7th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he has plans to publish guidance on ecodesign following the implementation of the Ecodesign Regulations in January 2022.

The Office for Product Safety and Standards (OPSS) provides general guidance on ecodesign on GOV.UK. Whilst there is no published specific guidance on the new ecodesign requirements for solid fuel local space heaters, the OPSS routinely offers support to businesses with compliance and operate a well-established enquiry service.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
6th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what support his Department has provided to businesses to implement the Ecodesign regulation which came into force on 1 January 2022; and what assessment he has made of business compliance with that regulation.

The market surveillance authority, the Office for Product Safety and Standards routinely offers compliance support to businesses with all ecodesign and energy labelling regulations.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
5th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he will require the disclosure of the emission results for wood burning stoves, including efficiency, oxides of nitrogen, carbon monoxide, particulate matter and organic gaseous compounds, when they are sold in accordance with the Ecodesign regulations from 1 January 2022.

As of 1 January 2022, new Ecodesign regulations require that when a solid fuel local space heater (wood burning stove) is placed on the UK market, the product’s efficiency and its emissions of particulate matter, organic gaseous compounds, carbon monoxide and nitrogen oxides under standardised test conditions must be provided in the instruction manual for installers and end-users as well as on a free-access website.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
5th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Digest of UK Energy Statistics for the UK in 2020, published in July 2021, for what reason the reduction in domestic wood consumption in 2018 was 67 per cent.

Domestic wood consumption was revised in July 2021 to incorporate the results of research undertaken by the Department for the Environment, Food, and Rural Affairs (Defra): link here.

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy published an article in March 2021 to quantify the likely impact for DUKES 2021:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/energy-trends-march-2021-special-feature-article-domestic-wood-consumption-revised-baseline.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
15th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of the new Ecodesign regulations on improving the efficiency of wood burning appliances.

The new Ecodesign Regulations for solid fuel local space heaters (wood burning stoves) will ensure that the worst performing and most polluting products are phased out of the market. Therefore, the Regulations will have a positive effect on the average energy efficiency of wood burning stoves on the UK market when they come into force in January 2022.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
15th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to ensure that wood burning appliances placed on the market are accompanied with the necessary technical and performance information within appliance manufacturers' literature or sales websites.

From January 2022, wood burning stoves placed on the UK market will be regulated under ecodesign legislation, meaning that products placed on the UK market must meet minimum requirements for energy efficiency, as well as limits on the emissions of gaseous compounds and particulate matter. These new measures will ensure that the worst performing and most polluting wood burning stoves are phased out of the market.

The Ecodesign Regulations require certain technical and performance information about the product to be provided in the instruction manual as well as to be made freely available on the manufacturer’s website.

Manufacturers must ensure compliance with the ecodesign requirements before placing a product on the market. The market surveillance authority, the Office for Product Safety and Standards (OPSS) undertake a programme of market surveillance that is risk-based and proportionate whilst operating under The Regulators Code.

The OPSS have engaged with stakeholders to raise awareness of the new ecodesign requirements taking effect in January 2022, and routinely offer support with compliance.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
15th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to ensure that wood burning appliances placed on the market after 1 January 2022 have been independently tested and verified.

From January 2022, wood burning stoves placed on the UK market will be regulated under ecodesign legislation, meaning that products placed on the UK market must meet minimum requirements for energy efficiency, as well as limits on the emissions of gaseous compounds and particulate matter. These new measures will ensure that the worst performing and most polluting wood burning stoves are phased out of the market.

The Ecodesign Regulations require certain technical and performance information about the product to be provided in the instruction manual as well as to be made freely available on the manufacturer’s website.

Manufacturers must ensure compliance with the ecodesign requirements before placing a product on the market. The market surveillance authority, the Office for Product Safety and Standards (OPSS) undertake a programme of market surveillance that is risk-based and proportionate whilst operating under The Regulators Code.

The OPSS have engaged with stakeholders to raise awareness of the new ecodesign requirements taking effect in January 2022, and routinely offer support with compliance.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
15th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he has taken to ensure that only the cleanest wood burning stoves will be available for sale from 2022 under Ecodesign Regulations.

From January 2022, wood burning stoves placed on the UK market will be regulated under ecodesign legislation, meaning that products placed on the UK market must meet minimum requirements for energy efficiency, as well as limits on the emissions of gaseous compounds and particulate matter. These new measures will ensure that the worst performing and most polluting wood burning stoves are phased out of the market.

The Ecodesign Regulations require certain technical and performance information about the product to be provided in the instruction manual as well as to be made freely available on the manufacturer’s website.

Manufacturers must ensure compliance with the ecodesign requirements before placing a product on the market. The market surveillance authority, the Office for Product Safety and Standards (OPSS) undertake a programme of market surveillance that is risk-based and proportionate whilst operating under The Regulators Code.

The OPSS have engaged with stakeholders to raise awareness of the new ecodesign requirements taking effect in January 2022, and routinely offer support with compliance.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
15th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will publish a definition of sustainably sourced in relation to wood burning in domestic appliances.

Sustainability in relation to wood burning for domestic appliances varies depending on the appliance. The sustainability requirement for fuel used in the Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI), which support biomass boilers and pellet stoves used for heating and hot water for domestic properties, includes a greenhouse gas emissions limit and specific land criteria. These requirements are set out in the RHI regulations through the obligation for ‘approved sustainable fuel’ to be used in domestic RHI accredited installations. There is no specific sustainability requirement for fuel for other domestic appliances such as traditional open fires or wood burning stoves.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
15th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions he had with the Climate Change Committee on the report by its UK Health Expert Advisory Group report entitled Sustainable Health Equity: Achieving a Net Zero UK before publication of the Sixth Carbon Budget in December 2020.

I refer the Hon. Member to the answer I gave to him on 10th December 2021 to Question 88605.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
8th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether domestic wood burning counts towards either (a) low-carbon heat or (b) renewable energy targets.

Sustainably sourced domestic wood burning does count towards our broader carbon reduction goals.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
7th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions he has had with the Climate Change Committee on its UK Health Expert Advisory Group report entitled Sustainable Health Equity: Achieving a Net Zero UK before publication of the Sixth Carbon Budget in December 2020.

We are grateful to the Climate Change Committee for the wide range of advice it provides government, which is discussed on an ongoing basis. The published impact assessment for the sixth carbon budget considered a range of relevant evidence to provide a solid basis for the government’s decision on the budget level, including the advice of the Climate Change Committee.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
18th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent discussions he has had with the Joint Air Quality Unit on (a) steps it is taking to deliver clean air and (b) how those steps are aligned with the Net Zero Strategy.

In the period leading up to the publication of the Net Zero Strategy, there were numerous cross-government discussions, including on air quality, reflecting the contribution that every sector of the UK economy needs to make to climate change mitigation.

As set out in the Strategy, as a principle of the transition to net zero the Government will pursue options that leave the environment in a better state for the next generation by improving biodiversity, air quality, water quality, natural capital, and resilience to climate change where appropriate.

Air quality policy is led by the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
20th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make it his policy to match funding for COP26 scholarships recently announced by universities.

The Government has been ensuring that science and research for climate action is part of our work towards a high ambition outcome at COP26. As such, the UK Presidency has been working closely with universities and academics all over the world, including the COP26 Universities Network (over 80 Universities across the UK) to mobilise research and academic knowledge in support of the COP26 Goals. The Government welcomes the great work they are doing to bring research to governments and the public, and to support action on climate change.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans the Government has to ensure that the Local Electricity Bill achieves its aim of unblocking the potential for community renewable energy generation.

The Government agrees with the broad aims of the Local Electricity Bill but does not support it as the means to enable local energy supply. There are already mechanisms in the market to allow local supply. The current Ofgem regulatory regime allows for a company to supply a specific geographic area, and small-scale generators can also apply for a licence exemption in some cases to reduce the regulatory burdens of operating at a community level.

The Government are supporting community energy projects through the Rural Community Energy Fund and the Government will work with Ofgem to ensure that local communities can play their role in delivering Net Zero and a Green Recovery.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
9th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department is taking to support research into the efficacy of a covid-19 vaccine in (a) older people and (b) other vulnerable groups.

The University of Oxford / Astra Zeneca Phase 3 trial includes branches that specifically looks at safety and efficacy of the vaccine in those aged between 56 – 69 and over 70. For these groups, researchers are assessing the immune response to the vaccine in people of different ages, to find out if there is variation in how well the immune system responds in older people. Other vaccine developers that the Government are working with may also decide to include specific groups such as these in their trials.

In addition to the work that vaccine developers are undertaking, the Government has funded the NHS Registry, developed by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR). This national registry is encouraging people who may be disproportionately affected by COVD19, such as older people, older people with underlying health conditions and people from different ethnic groups, to volunteer for clinical trials. This includes supporting the development of communications materials to provide information on taking part in COVID 19 vaccine trials via the NIHR website (Be Part of Research). These have been translated into other languages, including Urdu, Gujarati, Punjabi, Hindi and Bengali in order to reach the wider Asian community.

The Government also has a proactive communications programme aimed at the above-mentioned groups, to encourage greater sign up to the registry.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
9th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent discussions he has had with the Minister of the Cabinet Office on the UK’s future association with the Horizon Europe programme.

My Rt. Hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy regularly speaks to my Rt. Hon. Friend the Minister for the Cabinet Office about a range of policy issues, including the UK’s potential association with Horizon Europe.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
9th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department is taking to support research into understanding the biological mechanisms of long-term covid-19 symptoms and air pollution.

UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), in partnership with the Department of Health and Social Care, has provided research funding for programmes looking into the factors that contribute to the severity of Covid-19 cases. This includes £4.9m funding to the ISARIC consortium for research and provision of real time information into the factors, including existing respiratory conditions, that put people most at risk of developing severe hospitalised illness as a result of Covid-19; and £1m to OpenSAFELY, a secure platform linking the primary care NHS records of 24 million patients, which is able to identify patients at higher risk of admission, ventilation and death from Covid-19.

UKRI’s Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) provides a national capability in air pollution research that underpins ongoing evaluations of the potential relationship between long-term air pollution exposure, respiratory conditions and COVID-19 symptoms and mortality. UKRI has also funded or repurposed at least 12 research projects studying the links between Covid-19 and air quality.

Through the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), the Department of Health and Social Care funds 14 Health Protection Research Units (HPRUs), which are research partnerships between universities and Public Health England (PHE). One of these Units, the NIHR HPRU in Environmental Exposures and Health based at Imperial College London, undertakes research on the health effects associated with exposure to a range of environmental pollutants. This includes research to investigate possible links between air pollution and COVID-19. Further information on projects on COVID-19 that are underway at the Unit can be found here: https://eeh.hpru.nihr.ac.uk/covid-19-projects/.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
9th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department is taking to support research into covid-19 and respiratory conditions caused by air pollution.

UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), in partnership with the Department of Health and Social Care, has provided research funding for programmes looking into the factors that contribute to the severity of Covid-19 cases. This includes £4.9m funding to the ISARIC consortium for research and provision of real time information into the factors, including existing respiratory conditions, that put people most at risk of developing severe hospitalised illness as a result of Covid-19; and £1m to OpenSAFELY, a secure platform linking the primary care NHS records of 24 million patients, which is able to identify patients at higher risk of admission, ventilation and death from Covid-19.

UKRI’s Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) provides a national capability in air pollution research that underpins ongoing evaluations of the potential relationship between long-term air pollution exposure, respiratory conditions and COVID-19 symptoms and mortality. UKRI has also funded or repurposed at least 12 research projects studying the links between Covid-19 and air quality.

Through the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), the Department of Health and Social Care funds 14 Health Protection Research Units (HPRUs), which are research partnerships between universities and Public Health England (PHE). One of these Units, the NIHR HPRU in Environmental Exposures and Health based at Imperial College London, undertakes research on the health effects associated with exposure to a range of environmental pollutants. This includes research to investigate possible links between air pollution and COVID-19. Further information on projects on COVID-19 that are underway at the Unit can be found here: https://eeh.hpru.nihr.ac.uk/covid-19-projects/.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
9th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department is taking to support research into covid-19 and ageing.

I refer the Hon. Member to the answer I gave the Hon. Member for Dulwich and West Norwood on 7th September 2020 to Question 77719.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
20th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will publish the minutes of the discussions between his Department and the Office for Product Safety and Standards in February 2020 on (a) updating and (b) removing children’s products from the scope of the Furniture and Furnishings (Fire) (Safety) Regulations 1988.

The Office for Product Safety and Standards is a departmental office within the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy. We do not publish minutes of internal policy development meetings.

The Government published its response to the Environmental Audit Committee's Twentieth Report of Session 2017–19 on Toxic Chemicals in Everyday Life (EAC) on 16 September 2019. It committed to reviewing the scope of the furniture and fire safety regs including baby and children’s products.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
14th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he plans to publish a review of the Furniture and Furnishings (Fire) (Safety) Regulations 1988 in response to his Department's 2014 consultation on amendments to those regulations and the accompanying technical annex.

The Government consulted in 2014 and 2016 on amending the Furniture and Furnishings (Fire) (Safety) Regulations 1988. The Government published a response to the 2016 consultation on 18 July 2019.

There are no plans to publish a review of the Furniture and Furnishings (Fire) (Safety) Regulations 1988. In its response to the 2016 consultation the Government announced that it will now develop a new approach to the regulations which is based on essential safety requirements to bring the regulations in line with modern product safety legislation.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
13th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the (a) remit (b) purpose, (c) terms of reference and (b) membership application process is for the British Standards Institute (i) Expert Advisory Group and (ii) Working Group FW/6 on flammability performance and fire tests for furniture.

The British Standards Institution (BSI) is appointed by government as the UK’s National Standards Body. Standards are voluntary and BSI is independent from government. The BSI are responsible for ensuring their standards committees are balanced and broadly represent the views of all interested stakeholders. This is formally set out in the British Standard, “BS 0: A standard for standards: principles of standardization”. Section 7 of this standard makes it clear that “committee membership is at the discretion of BSI”.

The Government announced in July 2019 that it would developing a new approach to the Furniture and Fire Safety Regulations and it will seek appropriate expert advice to inform the policy development.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
13th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps is his Department taking to ensure that it appoints a wide range of (a) stakeholders, (b) representative organisations (c) experts and (d) professionals to the British Standards Institute (i) Expert Advisory Group and (ii) Working Group FW/6 on flammability performance and fire tests for furniture.

The British Standards Institution (BSI) is appointed by government as the UK’s National Standards Body. Standards are voluntary and BSI is independent from government. The BSI are responsible for ensuring their standards committees are balanced and broadly represent the views of all interested stakeholders. This is formally set out in the British Standard, “BS 0: A standard for standards: principles of standardization”. Section 7 of this standard makes it clear that “committee membership is at the discretion of BSI”.

The Government announced in July 2019 that it would developing a new approach to the Furniture and Fire Safety Regulations and it will seek appropriate expert advice to inform the policy development.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
13th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Government Response to the Environmental Audit Committee's Twentieth Report of Session 2017–19 on Toxic Chemicals in Everyday Life, published on 30 October 2019, HC160, if he will report on his Department’s review of the status of baby and children’s products within the Furniture and Furnishings (Fire Safety) Regulations 1988; and what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of the evidence heard by that Committee on the effect of the chemicals in flame retardants on children’s health.

The Government published its response to the Environmental Audit Committee's Twentieth Report of Session 2017–19 on Toxic Chemicals in Everyday Life (EAC) on the 16 September 2019. It committed to reviewing the scope of the furniture and fire safety regs including baby and children’s products. This remains the case.

We will consider all available evidence including that which was submitted to the EAC and we will source a wide range of expertise in consultation with Chief Scientific Advisor.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
13th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how much funding his Department (a) has supplied to the Hartley Anderson Group in the last year and (b) will supply to that group in the coming year for the investigation of deflagration as a method of unexploded ordnance disposal.

The Department’s contractor for provision of project management for the maintenance of Strategic Environmental Assessments, Hartley Anderson Ltd, commissioned the National Physical Laboratory for this project. Funding for financial year 2019-2020 totalled £221,000 (excl. VAT), which includes third party costs for munition manufacture and experimental site hire.

The funding allocated to this project to date in financial year 2020-2021 is £7,500 (excl. VAT).

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
25th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will take steps to introduce a car scrappage schemes for (a) old and (b) polluting vehicles.

The Government is investing a total of £2.5 billion to support consumers to make the transition to zero emission vehicles. We have no current plans to introduce a scrappage scheme.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
25th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the barriers which prevent people from working from home.

As part of its ongoing work to support and promote the more widespread adoption of flexible working, Government has commissioned a programme of research. The results will be published in due course.

Since Covid-19 measures were introduced there have been high proportions of people working from home with many businesses rapidly adapting to remote working, using new technology and finding new ways of working. As we move beyond the current situation, and the economy begins to reopen, we are very keen to do more to promote flexible working in all its forms. In our manifesto we said that, subject to consultation, we would introduce measures to make flexible working the default.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
24th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he has made an assessment of the implications for his policies of the report of the all-party group on air pollution entitled Air Quality Strategy to Reduce Coronavirus Infection, published on 29 May 2020.

As we recover from COVID-19, the Government intends to deliver a UK economy which is stronger, cleaner, more sustainable and more resilient. This includes ensuring we improve air quality while cutting emissions, for example through more building UK supply chains in low carbon transport.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
3rd Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how much her Department spent in total on social media advertising in (a) 2019, (b) 2020, (c) 2021 and (d) 2022 as of 28 February 2022; and on which platforms that money was spent.

Social media and digital communications are an essential part of government communications, helping to inform the public directly about matters which may affect their lives or interests. To reliably reach key audiences, DCMS commits a modest amount of budget to social media advertising each year. All DCMS communications spend is compliant with the communications spend control, which ensures any money spent on government communications is cost-effective and reflects best practices.

a) 2019: £4,912.00 on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter
b) 2020: £61,671.00 on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and LinkedIn advertising
c) 2021: £9,250 on Facebook and Twitter advertising
d) 2022 (up to 28 February): £42,706.34 on Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat and YouTube advertising

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
5th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment she has made of the implications for her policies on the protection of vulnerable people and others in (a) entertainment and hospitality venues and (b) cultural institutions of the findings of the study entitled The removal of airborne SARS-CoV-2 and other bioaerosols by air filtration on COVID-19 surge units published by Andrew Conway Morris PhD et al.

The Government continues to closely monitor the risks posed by COVID-19 and the Omicron variant based on scientific advice, and will respond accordingly to help keep our most vulnerable communities safe. We are committed to working alongside all of our sectors to ensure maximum safety and we continue to share the COVID-19: ventilation of indoor spaces to stop the spread of coronavirus guidance during our sector engagements, to help minimise the risk of transmission in public settings.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
14th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps he has taken to increase digital connectivity and training to allow people to work from home.

On March 29th, the Government and Ofcom agreed a set of voluntary commitments with the UK’s major telecommunications providers to support and protect vulnerable consumers and those who might become vulnerable due to circumstances arising from Covid-19. These included commitments to lift data allowance caps on all current fixed broadband services, and to offer new, generous mobile and landline packages to vulnerable consumers. A further set of smaller providers signed up to the same commitments in mid-May.

The sector has also provided reassurances that, to date, the UK’s broadband network has been able to handle home working alongside the other demands being placed on it such as gaming, using streaming services and home learning, as well as other leisure usage.

DCMS continues to work closely with the key telecommunications providers who are monitoring traffic levels on an ongoing basis. Similarly, the mobile network operators are managing network performance including a shift from typical inner city demand to suburban home working.

14th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the correlation between regular exercise in childhood and levels of exercise of those same people in adulthood.

Levels of physical activity for children and young people are captured through the Active Lives Children and Young People Survey which was launched in schools in September 2017. Levels of physical activity for adults 16+ are captured through the Active Lives Survey. Reports and data tables for both surveys are available on Sport England’s website. Data is collected through national randomised samples, so individual results cannot be tracked, and the surveys use different methodologies so data cannot be directly compared.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
24th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether he has made an assessment of the implications for his policies of the report of the all-party group on air pollution entitled, Air Quality Strategy to Reduce Coronavirus Infection, published on 29 May 2020.

The Secretary of State for DCMS welcomes the all-party group’s report and has noted its recommendations with interest. Improving air quality is a top priority for the Government and, especially during these unprecedented times, we will continue to take robust and comprehensive action to improve air quality in the UK and minimise public health impacts. DEFRA recently launched a rapid Call for Evidence to understand more fully the impact that coronavirus is having on air pollution emissions, concentrations and exposure and DEFRA’s Air Quality Expert Group (AQEG) are currently analysing the responses.

11th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether mainstream schools are able to use the School-Led tutoring grant to pay for additional speech and language therapy support, where children have fallen behind in their speech, language and communication development as a result of the covid-19 outbreak.

There are a limited number of speech and language therapists (SALTs) available in the sector and their remit must remain on providing speech and language therapy. Therefore, the school-led tutoring (SLT) grant cannot be used to help subsidise the cost of SALTs. This applies to all schools, including special schools

However, special schools can use their higher rate of recovery premium funding to help subsidise the cost of SALTs should they wish to do so.

In special schools, the SLT grant can be used for tutoring to support catch-up in the broader curriculum, such as practising and consolidating techniques in speech and language therapy. In practice, tutors and internal staff will understand the pupils’ individual learning needs and can ensure support is tailored accordingly. They may also choose to support pupils further by incorporating exercises set by the SALT into the tutoring session. It is important to note that this provision must be additional to a pupil’s existing learning programme set out by the school or an education, health and care plan.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
11th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what plans his Department has to mark Verbal Dyspraxia Awareness Day on 14 May 2022.

Verbal Dyspraxia Awareness Day on 14 May 2022 was an important opportunity to raise awareness of this condition.

The department is committed to ensuring that all children and young people with special education needs and disabilities (SEND), including those with speech and language needs, receive the support they need to succeed in their education.

On 29 March 2022, we published the SEND and AP green paper, which sets out our plans to create a coherent education, health and care system that works for all children and young people with SEND in England. We have launched a full, accessible consultation on these proposals so that everyone can have their say.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
7th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of the finding in the report by the Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse, The residential schools investigation, that children in residential special schools are particularly vulnerable because their communication needs may impact on their ability to tell people about sexually abusive behaviours.

We welcome the Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse’s report on residential schools, published on 1 March 2022. We will carefully consider the Inquiry’s recommendations and will respond within the Inquiry’s deadline of 6 months.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
7th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of the findings in the report by the Disabled Children’s Partnership and Let Us Learn Too, The SEND Money Survey, that 33 per cent of parents and carers said that they could not afford to spend money on speech and language therapy, occupational therapy and physiotherapy in the last five years, that 26 per cent of parents and carers said that they had spent between £1,000 and £5,000 on those therapies and that 11 per cent said that had spent between £5,000 and £10,000 on those therapies.

The government recognises that the current special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) system does not consistently deliver the outcomes we want and expect for children and young people with SEND, their families or the people and services who support them, as highlighted by the SEND Money Survey conducted by Let Us Learn Too and the Disabled Children’s Partnership.

We are conducting a Review of the SEND system and looking at ways to make sure the system is more consistent, high quality, and integrated across education, health, and care. The outcome of that Review will be published as a green paper for full public consultation by the end of March 2022.

Throughout the Review, we have engaged with people and organisations, including representatives from Let Us Learn Too and the Disabled Children’s Partnership. We will continue to do so through a full, public consultation following publication.

We know that COVID-19 has impacted on services and, as a result, many specialist services have adjusted their delivery models during their recovery. As services resume, we are keen to ensure the right support is available and that children and young people are given access to therapies and equipment. We continue to work closely with the Department of Health and Social Care and NHS England to look at ways to improve therapies access. In support of this, we issued joint guidance in September 2021 for education and health providers, working with a cross-sector group including the Royal Colleges and professional organisations. This guidance sets out the expectations for the delivery of specialist support for children and young people, and is available here: https://councilfordisabledchildren.org.uk/about-cdc/media-centre/news-opinion/delivery-specialist-11-and-group-interventions-children-and.

Education policy is a devolved matter, so arrangements covering SEND policy and provision in Wales are a matter for the Welsh Government.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
7th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of the finding in the final report of the spotlight inquiry by the All-Party Parliamentary Group for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, published on 22 February 2022, that speech, language and communication needs can be a key barrier which when unsupported can act to limit the development of important relationships and community networks.

The department wants all children and young people, no matter what their special educational need or disability, to be able to reach their full potential and receive the right support to succeed in their education and as they move into adult life. This includes looked-after children and care leavers with speech, language and communication needs (SLCN).

All local authorities must appoint a virtual school head (VSH), who has a statutory duty to promote the educational achievement of all children in their care, wherever they live or are educated. All looked-after children attract pupil premium plus funding of £2,345 per child per year, which is managed by the VSH to address educational and development needs, including SLCN, identified in their personal education plan, and the support needed to address them.

Under the Children and Families Act 2014, all schools are required to identify and address the special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) of the pupils they support, including looked-after children and care leavers with SLCN. Schools are also required to make sure that a child or young person gets the support they need.

The government recognises that the current SEND system does not deliver the outcomes we want and expect for all children and young people with SEND, their families or the people and services who support them. The government is reviewing the system and looking at ways to make sure it is more consistent, high quality, and integrated across education, health and care. The outcome of that review will be published as a green paper for full public consultation by the end of March 2022.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
5th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will make an assessment of the implications for his policies on protection of (a) children and (b) adults in educational establishments from infection with covid-19, including the omicron variant, of the study entitled The removal of airborne SARS-CoV-2 and other bioaerosols by air filtration on COVID-19 surge units, by Andrew Conway Morris an others, published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America on 30 October 2021.

During the autumn term, we provided over 350,000 CO2 monitors to all state-funded education providers, including early years, schools and further education colleges, backed by £25 million in government funding. Feedback suggests that schools are finding the monitors helpful to manage ventilation and, in the majority of providers, existing ventilation measures are sufficient.

Where an area of poor ventilation has been identified that cannot be resolved through simple measures such as opening doors and windows, schools are advised to explore what remedial works may be required to improve ventilation. Where it is not possible to maintain adequate ventilation, it may be appropriate to consider the use of an air cleaning unit while the underlying ventilation issue is addressed.

When used properly, air cleaning units can help reduce airborne contaminants in a poorly ventilated space, including viruses like COVID-19. Air cleaning units are not a substitute for ventilation and should never be used as a reason to reduce ventilation. They are not necessary in spaces that are adequately ventilated.

The department’s decision to make up to 8,000 air cleaning units available for poorly ventilated spaces in education and care institutions has been informed by advice from the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) and external consultation with specialists. The academic paper on portable air cleaners referenced is part of a wider body of scientific literature considered by the department, including: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/939173/S0867_EMG_Potential_application_of_air_cleaning_devices_and_personal_decontamination_to_manage_transmission_of_COVID-19.pdf. The department will continue to develop its policy and guidance on ventilation in line with the latest scientific advice and in consultation with industry wide experts.

Deliveries of air cleaning units will start from this week to special educational needs and disabilities and alternative provision providers. These were allocated in the first application round announced in November for special and alternative provision . The second round of applications is open until 9am on 17 January. All state funded schools (primary and secondary), further education colleges and nurseries can apply.Special and alternative provision providers that were not successful or did not apply in the first round are also eligible to apply in this round. Once applications have closed, all applications will be assessed against strict criteria and allocated to providers based on need. Providers with successful applications will be contacted individually to arrange delivery, with deliveries expected from February 2022.

For those providers that are not eligible for funded units, the online marketplace provides a route to purchasing air cleaning units directly from suppliers at a suitable specification and competitive price. The marketplace is available to view here: https://s107t01-webapp-v2-01.azurewebsites.net/list/air-cleaning.

Throughout the COVID-19 outbreak, we have emphasised the importance of ventilation and provided guidance to providers on ventilation requirements. In addition to our existing guidance on ventilation we have provided schools, colleges and nurseries with guidance on how to use the air cleaning units as well as how to order a unit via the marketplace. The application process has been communicated to providers via our Daily Bulletin and we continue to support schools, colleges and nurseries with their queries via the department’s Coronavirus Helpline.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
5th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to encourage applications by schools to buy air cleaning units through its online marketplace to help reduce covid-19 transmission.

During the autumn term, we provided over 350,000 CO2 monitors to all state-funded education providers, including early years, schools and further education colleges, backed by £25 million in government funding. Feedback suggests that schools are finding the monitors helpful to manage ventilation and, in the majority of providers, existing ventilation measures are sufficient.

Where an area of poor ventilation has been identified that cannot be resolved through simple measures such as opening doors and windows, schools are advised to explore what remedial works may be required to improve ventilation. Where it is not possible to maintain adequate ventilation, it may be appropriate to consider the use of an air cleaning unit while the underlying ventilation issue is addressed.

When used properly, air cleaning units can help reduce airborne contaminants in a poorly ventilated space, including viruses like COVID-19. Air cleaning units are not a substitute for ventilation and should never be used as a reason to reduce ventilation. They are not necessary in spaces that are adequately ventilated.

The department’s decision to make up to 8,000 air cleaning units available for poorly ventilated spaces in education and care institutions has been informed by advice from the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) and external consultation with specialists. The academic paper on portable air cleaners referenced is part of a wider body of scientific literature considered by the department, including: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/939173/S0867_EMG_Potential_application_of_air_cleaning_devices_and_personal_decontamination_to_manage_transmission_of_COVID-19.pdf. The department will continue to develop its policy and guidance on ventilation in line with the latest scientific advice and in consultation with industry wide experts.

Deliveries of air cleaning units will start from this week to special educational needs and disabilities and alternative provision providers. These were allocated in the first application round announced in November for special and alternative provision . The second round of applications is open until 9am on 17 January. All state funded schools (primary and secondary), further education colleges and nurseries can apply.Special and alternative provision providers that were not successful or did not apply in the first round are also eligible to apply in this round. Once applications have closed, all applications will be assessed against strict criteria and allocated to providers based on need. Providers with successful applications will be contacted individually to arrange delivery, with deliveries expected from February 2022.

For those providers that are not eligible for funded units, the online marketplace provides a route to purchasing air cleaning units directly from suppliers at a suitable specification and competitive price. The marketplace is available to view here: https://s107t01-webapp-v2-01.azurewebsites.net/list/air-cleaning.

Throughout the COVID-19 outbreak, we have emphasised the importance of ventilation and provided guidance to providers on ventilation requirements. In addition to our existing guidance on ventilation we have provided schools, colleges and nurseries with guidance on how to use the air cleaning units as well as how to order a unit via the marketplace. The application process has been communicated to providers via our Daily Bulletin and we continue to support schools, colleges and nurseries with their queries via the department’s Coronavirus Helpline.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
6th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what training in (a) special educational needs and disabilities and (b) speech, language and communication tutors receive as part of the National tutoring programme.

A free online training course focusing on best practice tutoring is available to all school staff who are nominated as tutors by their school leaders. The training is mandatory for any staff who do not hold Qualified Teacher Status.

The curriculum covers core topics including how to adapt tutoring for pupils with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND).

When selecting tuition partners for the current academic year, the programme is inviting applications from providers with relevant experience in working with children with SEND in both mainstream and specialist settings, so that as many pupils as possible can be supported. In total, 26 of the current 41 tuition partners specialise in supporting students with SEND, with more providers being asked to apply as part of the second round of applications. We will be looking to accredit more tuition partners with special needs expertise throughout this year.

Additional weighting has been applied to the funding of special schools and units in recognition of the higher per pupil costs they face for tutoring. For these schools, the department has estimated that a 15 hour package of tuition will cost £705 per pupil, which averages £47 per hour per pupil. The department will subsidise 75% of this, with special schools and units funding the remaining 25% through other budgets.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
23rd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will have discussion with the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care on the merits of using the NHS Number as a single unique identifier for children.

The primary identifiers for education are the unique pupil number for school aged pupils and the unique learner number for post-16 and adult education. These identifiers are developed to provide operational and analytical linkage between departments, and sector facing services, and are essential for delivery of policy and operational analysis both within the department and the wider sector.

However, the department is continually analysing the effectiveness of its unique identifiers for stages in education and will work with colleagues across government, including from the Department of Health and Social Care, on improving the effectiveness of how identifiers contribute to the broader interoperability of data across our shared domains and the life events of citizens. This will include consideration of the merits of greater use of the NHS number as an identifier for children.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
15th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what plans his Department has to mark Developmental Language Disorder Awareness Day on 15 October 2021.

Developmental Language Disorder (DLD) Awareness Day on 15 October 2021 is an important opportunity to raise awareness of DLD. It is key that schools are aware of how to best support pupils diagnosed with DLD.

The department will be highlighting Developmental Language Disorder Awareness Day to schools through its communication routes and encouraging settings to draw on best practice to support pupils with DLD.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
9th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the Government's announcement of 3 February 2021 on the appointment of the Education Recovery Commissioner, what plans the Commissioner has to ensure that there is a comprehensive programme of catch-up for children and young people with speech, language and communication needs whose support and learning may have been impacted by school closures during the covid-19 outbreak.

The Government is committed to helping children and young people recover education lost as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak.

In June 2020, the Department announced a catch-up package worth £1 billion, including a ‘Catch Up Premium’ worth a total of £650 million to support schools to make up for lost teaching time and £350 million for the National Tutoring Programme.

In January 2021, my right hon. Friend, the Prime Minister, also committed a further £300 million for tutoring and to engage with parents, pupils and teachers to develop and deliver a plan to help all pupils catch up over the course of this Parliament.

To support the Government with this, the Prime Minister and my right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education, have appointed Sir Kevan Collins as the Education Recovery Commissioner. Sir Kevan will advise ministers on the best approach for education recovery, with a particular focus on helping all pupils catch up on learning lost as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak.

We know that one size does not fit all and will be looking at how interventions can address the individual needs of pupils, including those with speech, language and communication needs.

We will set out more detailed plans in due course.

9th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what discussions he has had with the (a) Secretary of State for Health and Social Care and (b) Secretary of State for Justice on the recommendation that Government should be levelling up on spending on speech and language therapy around the country as set out in the Children’s Commissioner’s report, Still not safe: The public health response to youth violence, published in February 2021.

Spending on speech and language therapy is determined at a local level.

We do not prescribe in detail how local authorities should allocate their high needs funding, but local authorities and schools have statutory duties under the Children and Families Act 2014 to support children and young people with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND), including those who require speech and language therapies.

The department remains committed to continuous improvement. The cross-government SEND Review was announced in September 2019 and is looking at ways to make sure the SEND system is consistent, high quality, and integrated across education, health, and care. It is also considering measures to make sure that money is being spent fairly, efficiently, and effectively, and that the support available to children and young people is sustainable in the future.

The SEND Review is looking at ways to support mainstream settings to identify and get support to children and young people more quickly, through making best use of precious expertise such as speech and language therapists and educational psychologists. These issues are long-standing and complex, but the government is determined to deliver real, lasting change. We intend to publish the SEND Review in spring 2021.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
9th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the Prime Minister's announcement of 3 February 2021 on the appointment of the Youth Mental Health Ambassador, what plans the (a) Ambassador has and (b) Mental Health in Education Action Group have to ensure the (i) identification of and (ii) appropriate support for children and young people with speech, language and communication needs.

The Mental Health in Education Action Group will look at the impact of the COVID-19 outbreak on the mental health and wellbeing of children, young people and staff in nurseries, schools, colleges, and universities. It will consider how to support mental wellbeing while children and young people are being taught remotely, as they return to education settings and with transitions period between education settings in September 2021.

In the first instance we will engage with health experts to bring together the evidence of impact on children and young people, identify the existing range of support and how to make sure it is easy to access and has the greatest possible impact. The department will also engage with education stakeholders, including staff and leadership unions, to ensure that we understand the issues that are facing staff in nurseries, schools, colleges, and universities and how those can be supported in the coming months. We will also work with the existing higher education task force to ensure that the issues it is considering around mental health are reflected. Further information about the remit of the group will be available in due course, but it will look at the specific mental health and wellbeing issues faced by children and young people with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND), including children with speech, language and communication needs.

The SEND Review was announced in September 2019 and is looking at ways to make sure the SEND system is consistent, high quality, and integrated across education, health, and care. It is also considering measures to make sure that money is being spent fairly, efficiently, and effectively, and that the support available to children and young people is sustainable in the future. The SEND Review is looking at ways to support mainstream settings to identify and get support to children and young people more quickly, through making best use of precious expertise such as speech and language therapists and educational psychologists. These issues are long-standing and complex, but the government is determined to deliver real, lasting change. We intend to publish the SEND Review in spring 2021.

On the 4 February 2021, my right hon. Friend, the Prime Minister, appointed Dr Alex George as Youth Mental Health Ambassador to advise the government and raise the profile of mental health education and wellbeing in schools, colleges, and universities. As Youth Mental Health Ambassador, he will use his clinical expertise and personal experience to champion the government’s work on children’s and young people’s mental health, and help shape policy on improving support for young people in schools, colleges, and universities.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
14th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will make it his policy to issue an update of the Building Bulletin 101:'Guidelines on ventilation, thermal comfort and indoor air quality in schools for (a) BS EN ISO 16890:2016, (b) BS EN ISO 10121-2:2013 and (c) BS EN 16798-3:2017.

The design and construction standards for new school buildings are under regular review to reflect any changes in regulations or best practice nationally. There are no plans at present to update Building Bulletin 101 'Guidelines on ventilation, thermal comfort and indoor air quality in schools' which was published in 2019.

We published guidance on 3 June on the reopening of buildings and campuses to help providers make informed decisions about their provision in ways that protect the health and well-being of both staff and students. Our guidance contains links to other sources of relevant advice, including on safer workplaces: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/working-safely-during-coronavirus-covid-19, which includes references to the importance of ventilation, particularly in advance of reopening buildings.

7th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether he plans to ensure that funding is allocated to local authority areas to enable evidence-based catch-up interventions for children and young people’s speech, language and communication needs; and if he will make a statement.

In 2020-21, we are allocating £7.2 billion in high needs funding across England for children with complex special educational needs and disabilities, which includes those with speech, language and communication needs.

Specifically, in response to COVID-19, we are introducing an additional catch-up premium worth a total of £650 million to support schools to rise to make up for lost teaching time. Our expectation is that this funding will be spent on the additional activities required to support children to catch up after a period of disruption to their education. Headteachers will decide how the universal catch up premium is spent to best meet the needs of their pupils. The Education Endowment Foundation has published guidance on effective interventions to support schools:
https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/covid-19-resources/covid-19-support-guide-for-schools/.

We will set out how this funding will be distributed between individual schools shortly.

Local authorities’ core allocations to support children with high needs in 2021-22 will also be published shortly.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
7th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what plans he has to ensure that speech and language therapy services are adequately resourced to enable services to tackle the level of referrals as a result of the reopening of education and childcare settings.

In 2020-21, we are allocating £7.2 billion in high needs funding across England for children with complex special educational needs and disabilities, which includes those with speech, language and communication needs.

Specifically, in response to COVID-19, we are introducing an additional catch-up premium worth a total of £650 million to support schools to rise to make up for lost teaching time. Our expectation is that this funding will be spent on the additional activities required to support children to catch up after a period of disruption to their education. Headteachers will decide how the universal catch up premium is spent to best meet the needs of their pupils. The Education Endowment Foundation has published guidance on effective interventions to support schools:
https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/covid-19-resources/covid-19-support-guide-for-schools/.

We will set out how this funding will be distributed between individual schools shortly.

Local authorities’ core allocations to support children with high needs in 2021-22 will also be published shortly.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
7th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what plans he has to ensure that (a) children’s early language and communication development and (b) the timely identification and support for speech, language and communication needs are prioritised in (a) local and (b) national covid-19 recovery plans.

Supporting the most vulnerable children and young people, including those with speech, language and communication needs (SLCN), is a priority for us, especially at this time. Throughout the COVID-19 outbreak, educational settings have been asked to ensure that vulnerable children and young people can attend where appropriate.

Local authorities are responsible for their own strategic planning and have statutory requirements to offer SLCN provision where a child or young person requires it as part of their education, health and care (EHC) plan. Since May, as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak, it has been necessary to modify the duty on local authorities and health commissioners so that they could use their ‘reasonable endeavours’ to secure or arrange the specified special educational and health care provision in EHC plans. However, we are committed to removing these flexibilities as soon as possible and my right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education, has confirmed that, unless the evidence changes, he will not be issuing further national notices to modify this duty.

We have also been working to support early language and communication development specifically. Since 2018, we have committed more than £60 million to programmes to improve early language and literacy. We will work with the sector to explore how best to continue to support children’s early development, including through the Early Years Foundation Stage reforms and the department’s Hungry Little Minds campaign, which we will continue to use to provide support for parents to develop their children’s early language and literacy.

More widely, we are ensuring that resources are available. We have announced a package worth £1 billion to ensure that schools across England have the resources they need to help all pupils make up for lost teaching time, with extra support for those who need it most. £650 million will be spent on ensuring all pupils have the chance to catch up and supporting schools to rise to the challenge. For pupils with complex needs, we strongly encourage schools to spend this funding on catch-up support to address their individual needs, which could include speech and language therapy where appropriate. We will set out how this funding will be distributed between individual schools shortly.

We will also roll out a National Tutoring Programme, worth up to £350 million, which will deliver one-to-one tuition to the most disadvantaged young people. More details are available here:
https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/covid-19-resources/national-tutoring-programme/.

We are providing the Oak National Academy with an additional £4.3 million to produce another 10,000 lessons over the course of the next academic year. This includes for the Oak National Academy's specialist curriculum, which includes speech and language therapy.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
24th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs and the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government on reducing air pollution around schools, to help protect (a) teaching staff and (b) children attending schools during the covid-19 outbreak.

Local authorities are responsible for the mitigation of air pollution hot spots in areas where people may be exposed, including schools. They have discretionary powers to take action to improve local air quality. For example, they can issue fixed penalty notices to drivers leaving engines running unnecessarily after being asked to turn them off. In areas with poor air quality, local authorities have a statutory duty to publish air quality plans for reducing air pollution.

Local authorities also have a statutory duty to promote sustainable school travel. The department’s guidance sets out that this duty should have a broad impact, including improvements in air quality to which children are particularly vulnerable.

Government advice, particularly during the COVID-19 outbreak, is to walk or cycle to school where possible. The Department for Transport’s cycling and walking investment strategy sets out the government’s ambition to make cycling and walking the natural choice for shorter journeys, or as part of a longer journey. Details can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/cycling-and-walking-investment-strategy.

On 9 May the Department for Transport announced a £2 billion package to promote cycling and walking:

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/2-billion-package-to-create-new-era-for-cycling-and-walking.

24th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent steps he has taken to increase access to school bus services.

Local authorities have a statutory duty to provide free home to school transport for eligible children. A child is eligible if they are of compulsory school age, attend their nearest suitable school and it is more than the statutory walking distance from their home. The statutory walking distance is 2 miles for children under the age of 8 and 3 miles for children aged 8 and over. A child is also eligible if they live within the statutory walking distance but could not reasonably be expected to walk to school because of their special educational needs, disability or mobility problems, or because the nature of the route means it would be unsafe for them to do so.

There are additional entitlements to free home to school transport for those children who are eligible for free school meals, or if a parent they live with receives the maximum amount of Working Tax Credit. These are known as extended rights and are intended to support low income families in exercising school choice.

It is for local authorities to decide how they will provide free transport for eligible children depending on local circumstances. They might, for example, provide a pass for free travel on a service bus, or they might provide a dedicated school bus or a taxi to transport children.

24th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the effect of (a) walking and (b) cycling to school on children's health.

Local authorities have a statutory duty to promote sustainable school travel. The Department’s guidance sets out that this duty should have a broad impact, including providing health benefits for children, and their families, through active journeys, such as walking and cycling; as well as improvements in air quality to which children are particularly vulnerable.

Government advice, particularly during the COVID-19 outbreak, is to walk or cycle to school where possible. This will not only help reduce the spread of infection and reduce demand on public transport, but also have enormous benefits for children’s health.

The Department for Transport’s cycling and walking investment strategy sets out the Government’s ambition to make cycling and walking the natural choice for shorter journeys, or as part of a longer journey. Details can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/cycling-and-walking-investment-strategy.

On 9 May the Department for Transport announced a £2 billion package to create new era for cycling and walking: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/2-billion-package-to-create-new-era-for-cycling-and-walking.

24th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of the recommendations made by the School Streets Initiative in relation to (a) healthier learning environments for school children and (b) increased space to ensure social distancing at schools.

Outdoor air quality and road traffic restrictions are the responsibility of local authorities. Where there are concerns about air quality the local authority must prepare an air quality action plan.

We are not aware of any recommendations to the Department on the impact of the School Streets Initiative on healthier educational environments. The Department published guidance (Building Bulletin 101) on achieving good indoor air quality in new and refurbished schools in 2019.

As my right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education, made clear when he spoke at the daily press briefing on 19 June, the Department is working towards bringing all children and young people back to school in September. We have published further information and guidance to help schools prepare for September. The guidance is available here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/actions-for-schools-during-the-coronavirus-outbreak/guidance-for-full-opening-schools.

24th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether he has made an assessment of the implications for his policies of the report of the all-party group on air pollution entitled, Air Quality Strategy to Reduce Coronavirus Infection, published on 29 May 2020.

Outdoor air quality and road traffic restrictions are the responsibility of local authorities. Where there are concerns about air quality the local authority must prepare an air quality action plan.

We are not aware of any recommendations to the Department on the impact of the School Streets Initiative on healthier educational environments. The Department published guidance (Building Bulletin 101) on achieving good indoor air quality in new and refurbished schools in 2019.

As my right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education, made clear when he spoke at the daily press briefing on 19 June, the Department is working towards bringing all children and young people back to school in September. We have published further information and guidance to help schools prepare for September. The guidance is available here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/actions-for-schools-during-the-coronavirus-outbreak/guidance-for-full-opening-schools.

19th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether he will take steps to give powers to the London Assembly to regulate Non-Road Mobile Machinery, in response to the findings of the London Assembly Environment Committee’s recent Clean Air for All Londoners report.

The Greater London Authority (GLA) already runs a successful scheme for reducing emissions from construction equipment within London. We continue to consider ways to reduce pollutant emissions from the construction sector, whilst ensuring we are able to build the homes, hospitals, schools and infrastructure the country needs.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
19th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will require developers of construction sites to conduct detailed air quality monitoring to assess compliance with legal and safe levels of (a) air pollution, (b) NOX, (c) PM10, and (d) PM2.5, in response to the findings of the London Assembly Environment Committee’s recent Clean Air for All Londoners report.

Defra currently supports a network of over 500 monitoring sites covering the whole of the UK, measuring concentrations of 13 air pollutants.

In addition to the national UK Air Quality monitoring networks, local authorities, businesses and academics carry out monitoring and modelling of air quality which may pick up more localised air pollution. We have no plans to require construction sites to monitor air quality. However, we continue to encourage all industries to consider improving their practices around air quality.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
19th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether he will take steps to give powers to London Authorities to tackle domestic wood burning in the capital, in response to the findings of the London Assembly Environment Committee’s recent Clean Air for All Londoners report.

The Mayor of London is responsible for air quality in the capital and already has a number of powers including:

- Oversight of London borough air quality action plans and to issue guidance to which London boroughs must have regard when carrying out their air quality duties under the Environment Act 1995.

- To issue directions to require London boroughs to take action to address local air pollution as set out in section 85 of the Environment Act 1995.

Local authorities, including in London, already have the power to declare Smoke Control Areas, in which smoke from a chimney may not be emitted, unless an authorised fuel is burned, or an exempt appliance is used (under the Clean Air Act 1993).

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
31st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what estimate he has made of the real change in emissions resulting from the burning of biomass in the manufacturing and construction sectors between 2010 and 2020; what assessment he has made of the reasons for the increase in the burning of biomass between 2010 and 2020; and what steps he has taken to tackle that matter.

The National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory (NAEI) includes estimates of pollutant emissions from the combustion of biomass in manufacturing and construction sectors. For fine particulate matter, estimated emissions from this source have risen from 1.9 kilotons in 2010 to 11.6 kilotons in 2020. For oxides of nitrogen, estimated emissions have risen from 3.5 kilotons in 2010 to 9.8 kilotons in 2020. These estimates include all emissions occurring from the burning of biomass to generate energy for industrial use. Estimates on emissions of other pollutants are also available in the NAEI.

These increases are largely a result of the increased role for biomass as part of the transition from fossil fuels to low carbon and renewable energy generation.

All Large Combustion Plant burning biomass must comply with strict emission limits (including for particulate matter) and cannot operate unless issued with a permit by the Environment Agency. The implementation of the 2018 regulations on Medium Combustion Plant (MCP) ensures permits and emission limits will also be in place for all biomass combustion plant with a thermal input between 1 and 50 megawatts.

Defra is considering setting tighter emissions standards for Medium Combustion Plant, and working with Innovate UK to stimulate research into technical solutions for particulate abatement from smaller scale combustion plant.

The Government will publish a Biomass Strategy in 2022 that will set out how biomass can best contribute towards net zero across the economy, while protecting air quality and human health.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
31st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 13 January 2022 to Question 93692, on Wood-burning Stoves, what discussions he has had with representatives of the Climate Change Committee on the (a) inclusion of wood burners with low-carbon heat targets or renewables targets and (b) phasing out of those burners and (c) air quality.

Defra officials engage regularly with the Climate Change Committee on interactions between air quality and climate change.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
31st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, for what reason data on particulate matter, PM2.5 and PM10, from the Automatic Urban and Rural Network was not available on his Department's UK-Air website for the Marylebone Road monitoring station during the days up to and including an air pollution episode that peaked on Friday 14 January 2022; and if he will publish details of any other areas with which there were issues with monitoring.

The data issues at Marylebone Road during the pollution episode that peaked on Friday 14 January were caused by the replacement of older equipment where a data communication error occurred that was not immediately identified. This error was preventing data flowing from the new instruments onto UK-air. This error was identified on 17 January and remedied on the same day. Data for PM2.5 and PM10 at the site can be viewed at: Data Selector Tool - Defra, UK

UK-Air has been improved within the last 12 months to show data communications from Environment Agency managed contractors. This data now shows ‘live site code’ where live reasons for downtime are now available on the interactive map:

Interactive monitoring networks map - Defra, UK

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
31st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what estimate he has made of the proportion of total PM2.5 primary emissions from domestic combustion in the UK in 2020 that came from (a) open fireplaces, (b) wood burning stoves, (c) other solid fuel burning stoves, (d) bonfires, (e) firepits and (f) pizza ovens.

Emissions of key air pollutants are compiled and reported by Defra on an annual basis through the National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory (NAEI). The data for 2020 is publicly available and was reported on 14 February 2022, via:

https://naei.beis.gov.uk/data/.

Following recent improvement work, estimates of emissions from bonfires, chimeneas and fire pits are now included in the inventory as part of the ‘small-scale waste burning’ category. Details of the methodology used to estimate these emissions can be accessed in our Informative Inventory Report, via:

https://naei.beis.gov.uk/reports/reports?report_id=1071

Emissions specifically from pizza ovens are not estimated in the inventory.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
31st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to Emissions of air pollutants in the UK - Particulate matter (PM10 and PM2.5), what sources of emissions are included in his 2020 estimates of (a) 15 per cent of PM10 and (b) 25 per cent of PM2.5 from domestic consumption.

Emissions of key air pollutants are compiled and reported by Defra on an annual basis through the National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory (NAEI). The data for 2020 is publicly available and was reported on 14 February 2022, via:

https://naei.beis.gov.uk/data/.

Emission estimates for domestic combustion in 2020 include emissions from the following fuels burned in domestic appliances; Anthracite, Burning oil, Charcoal, Coal, Gas oil, LPG (Liquid Petroleum Gas), Natural gas, Peat, Petroleum coke, SSF (Solid Smokeless Fuels) and Wood.

Details of the methodology used to estimate these emissions can be accessed in our Informative Inventory Report, via:

https://naei.beis.gov.uk/reports/reports?report_id=1071

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
31st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps he took to ensure continuity in the real-time publication of monitoring data for particulate matter, PM2.5 and PM10, from the Automatic Urban and Rural Monitoring Network when changes were made to a service provider in 2021.

The awarding of Automatic Urban and Rural Network (AURN) monitoring contracts are undertaken by the Environment Agency on behalf of Defra. The technical specifications which formed part of the invitation to tender for the AURN Central Management and Coordination Unit contracts were designed to ensure that any successful service provider had the required experience of data collection, data management and data dissemination to operate the networks.

To specifically ensure that any interruption in real-time data publication (which included PM10 and PM2.5) was kept to an absolute minimum in the event of a new service provider taking over operations, specific requirements were included in the contract’s ‘Critical Handover Requirements’ on real time data dissemination. For example, for the AURN there was a requirement for the service provider to demonstrate that they were able to successfully collect and disseminate 90% of the live data for the network sites they were awarded during the handover period prior to contract start. The handover period started 3 months prior to the start of the contract on the 01/10/21.

The main contract service provider for the AURN did not change, however the subsection of AURN sites in London did change service provider and no significant impact on real-time data publication of PM2.5 and PM10 occurred.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
31st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what percentage contribution did (a) pollen, (b) sea spray and (c) other naturally occurring sources make to average concentrations of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) in the UK in 2020.

Assessment of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is undertaken on an annual basis to understand the key sources and contributions to PM2.5 in the UK.

Analysis is ongoing and results for 2020 are yet to be published. Results for 2019 are available here:

https://uk-air.defra.gov.uk/assets/documents/reports/cat09/2102111100_2019_PCM_technical_report.pdf

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
30th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 20 January 2022 to Question 102540 on Air Pollution, what plans he has to publish the results of the holistic review of the way his Department communicates air quality information and advice; and what his timetable is for that publication.

I refer to my response to PQ 102540. The steering group is developing the work programme and milestones will be clarified in due course.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
30th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what changes have been made to his Department’s contractual arrangements for monitoring particulate matter, PM2.5 and PM10, on the Automatic Urban and Rural Monitoring Network since 1 January 2021; and on what dates those changes were made.

The awarding of Automatic Urban and Rural Network (AURN) monitoring contracts are undertaken by the Environment Agency on behalf of Defra. Both PM10 and PM2.5 measurements form part of the AURN and the Automatic London Network. These contracts were competitively retendered, together with the ‘Central Management and Co-Ordination Unit’ and ‘Quality Assurance and Quality Control roles’ as a single tender and awarded as separate lots on 01/10/2021 for three years.

Details of the organisations awarded are provided below and can be obtained from the Government’s Contracts Finder at Search results - Contracts Finder.

  1. Lot 1 Bureau Veritas UK Ltd - Automatic Urban and Rural Network Management (Central Management and Co-Ordination Unit (CMCU)) – Management of National AURN sites (Lot 1)
  2. Lot 2 - Ricardo AEA Ltd - Automatic Urban and Rural Network Management (AURN) Lot 2 Quality Assurance and Quality Control of National AURN sites (QAQC of LOT 1 sites)
  3. Lot 3 - Bureau Veritas UK Ltd - Automatic London Network (ALN) Central Management and Co-Ordination Unit (CMCU) for London and South East affiliated sites (Lot 3)
  4. Lot 4 - National Physical Laboratory - Automatic Urban and Rural Network Management (Lot 4 - AURN - Quality Assurance and Quality Control of 16 ALN sites (QAQC of LOT 3 sites)
  5. Lot 5 - Ricardo AEA Ltd - Lot 5 Ozone Audits only (6 monthly audit work)
Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
30th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what estimate he has made of the impact of the agreements reached in October 2021 and January 2022 between CF Industries or its subsidiaries and major CO2 users on the amount of primary emissions of ammonia in the UK, in tonnes.

I refer the hon. Member to my answer of 18 March 2022, PQ UIN 137953.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
30th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what action he is taking to reduce emissions of non-methane volatile organic compounds from the food and beverage industry.

Pollution from large food, drink and milk manufacturers in England and Wales is controlled through the Environmental Permitting Regulations 2016, which requires operators to have an environmental permit and use best available techniques (BAT) to reduce emissions to air, water, and land. In England, the Environment Agency performs regular audits to ensure compliance with emission requirements set in the permit.

The Food, Drink and Milk BAT Conclusions set out the abatement technologies and methods operators should put in place, as well as emissions limits. They were reviewed in December 2019 to set stricter emissions standards. Existing permits are currently being reviewed to ensure compliance with the new standards.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
30th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to page 58 of his Clean Air Strategy 2019, what recent estimate he has made of the emissions in g/MWh of fine particulate matter in homes from (a) solid fuel open fires, (b) non-Defra exempt stoves, (c) Defra exempt or Ecodesign stoves, (d) pellet-fired boilers, (e) oil-fired boilers, (f) gas-fired boilers and (g) electric heating.

The emission levels presented in the infographic on page 58 of the Clean Air Strategy were derived from emission factors in the EMEP 2016 Guidebook. The EMEP Guidebook was updated in 2019 and can be accessed via:

https://www.eea.europa.eu/publications/emep-eea-guidebook-2019

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
30th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the October 2021 Which? survey on wood-burning stoves.

We have not made an assessment of the October 2021 Which? survey on wood burning stoves.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
30th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the 35 breaches by his Department of the Code of Practice for Statistics between January 2009 and July 2021.

There have been 35 breaches of the Code of Practice for Official Statistics by Defra (24) and associated bodies (11) since January 2009. The most common reasons for breaches of the Code have been timing (i.e. publications not released at 9.30am) and pre-release access (i.e. publication shared with ineligible individuals before publication).

The Head of Profession for Statistics is responsible for the release and content of statistics in the Department. All breaches are individually reviewed and reported to the UK Statistics Authority, including the impact of the breach and corrective actions to prevent re-occurrence. Details of Defra group breaches can be found at:

Defra group breaches of the Code of Practice for Official Statistics - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

Number of breaches

2009

1

2010

1

2011

1

2012

1

2013

5

2014

4

2015

3

2016

4

2017

3

2018

4

2019

3

2020

2

2021

3

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
30th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to Defra group breaches of the Code of Practice for Official Statistics between January 2009 and February 2018, what steps he is taking to avoid future breaches of that code.

There have been 35 breaches of the Code of Practice for Official Statistics by Defra (24) and associated bodies (11) since January 2009. The most common reasons for breaches of the Code have been timing (i.e. publications not released at 9.30am) and pre-release access (i.e. publication shared with ineligible individuals before publication).

The Head of Profession for Statistics is responsible for the release and content of statistics in the Department. All breaches are individually reviewed and reported to the UK Statistics Authority, including the impact of the breach and corrective actions to prevent re-occurrence. Details of Defra group breaches can be found at:

Defra group breaches of the Code of Practice for Official Statistics - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

Number of breaches

2009

1

2010

1

2011

1

2012

1

2013

5

2014

4

2015

3

2016

4

2017

3

2018

4

2019

3

2020

2

2021

3

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
30th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what percentage contribution did (a) pollen, (b) sea spray and (c) other naturally occurring sources make to average concentrations of PM10 in the UK in 2020.

Assessment of fine particulate matter (PM10) is undertaken on an annual basis to understand the key sources and contributions to PM10 in the UK.

Analysis is ongoing and results for 2020 are yet to be published. Results for 2019 are available here:

https://uk-air.defra.gov.uk/assets/documents/reports/cat09/2102111100_2019_PCM_technical_report.pdf

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
30th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what legal maintenance requirements apply to (a) wood-burning stoves, (b) open fireplaces, (c) gas appliances, and (d) chimneys on domestic premises.

Defra does not set legal maintenance requirements for solid fuel appliances; however, we do encourage homeowners/occupiers to carry out regular maintenance of wood-burning stoves and open fireplaces. We also encourage those that use solid fuel appliances to have their chimneys swept on a regular basis, our recommendation is at least once a year.

The Gas Safety (Installation and Use) Regulations 1998 impose a legal requirement on landlords of domestic premises to maintain all gas appliances provided for use by tenants in a safe condition. This legislation falls within the regulatory remit of the Health and Safety Executive. There are no legal maintenance requirements for gas appliances in owner-occupied domestic premises, but it is strongly advised that all gas appliances are regularly maintained and serviced at least annually by a Gas Safe registered engineer.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
23rd Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when his Department last sent a media release to the national media to warn the public about an air pollution episode.

Information on both the current and forecast air pollution levels is disseminated to the public in near real-time (https://uk-air.defra.gov.uk/). This includes summary forecasts, measurements and health advice. When the forecast shows high air pollution, information is actively shared via social media and cascaded through a network of stakeholders including the UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA) and health charities. Defra’s communications and media teams routinely engage with national and local media outlets to convey information on air pollution episodes and actions the public may take.

Defra, UKHSA and the Department of Health and Social Care have launched a comprehensive review into the way that we communicate air quality information.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
23rd Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what plans he has to communicate forecasts of high and very high air pollution in the UK to the public; and in what form those communications will be.

Information on both the current and forecast air pollution levels is disseminated to the public in near real-time (https://uk-air.defra.gov.uk/). This includes summary forecasts, measurements and health advice. When the forecast shows high air pollution, information is actively shared via social media and cascaded through a network of stakeholders including the UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA) and health charities. Defra’s communications and media teams routinely engage with national and local media outlets to convey information on air pollution episodes and actions the public may take.

Defra, UKHSA and the Department of Health and Social Care have launched a comprehensive review into the way that we communicate air quality information.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
23rd Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will (a) publish a media release to warn the public of high and very high air pollution forecast for the UK this week and (b) actively circulate that release to the main media outlets.

Information on both the current and forecast air pollution levels is disseminated to the public in near real-time (https://uk-air.defra.gov.uk/). This includes summary forecasts, measurements and health advice. When the forecast shows high air pollution, information is actively shared via social media and cascaded through a network of stakeholders including the UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA) and health charities. Defra’s communications and media teams routinely engage with national and local media outlets to convey information on air pollution episodes and actions the public may take.

Defra, UKHSA and the Department of Health and Social Care have launched a comprehensive review into the way that we communicate air quality information.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
23rd Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether a licence is required to release gamebirds into the wild within an Avian Influenza disease control zone in the event that those birds are still considered livestock as a result of being significantly dependent on the provision of food, water or shelter for their survival.

Following confirmation of notifiable avian influenza in poultry or other captive birds, disease control zones are put in place surrounding the infected premises. Within these disease control zones, a range of controls are in place to prevent the spread of disease, including restrictions on the movement of poultry and other captive birds (including kept gamebirds), carcases, eggs, used poultry litter and manure. Definitive requirements are set out in the declaration published on GOV.UK for each disease control zone. Keepers can check where disease control zones are located in GB and if they are in zone on the Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA) interactive map.

The release of gamebirds in avian influenza disease control zones is prohibited, no licenses permitting this activity can be granted.

Guidance for gamebird keepers on avian influenza has been prepared by game shooting, research and game conservation bodies and is endorsed by Defra, Scottish Government, Welsh Government and DAERA in Northern Ireland and is available via the Game Farmers Association website.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
14th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps he is taking to reduce (a) herd sizes and (b) fertiliser spreading in the UK to reduce ammonia emissions.

We set out our plans to reduce ammonia emissions, including from the agricultural sector, in the Clean Air Strategy published in 2019.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
14th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how the new National Air Quality Strategy will differ from the (a) Clean Air Strategy 2019 and (b) National Air Quality Strategy 2007.

The Government's Clean Air Strategy and National Air Quality Strategy are complementary. The Clean Air Strategy sets out national measures for reducing emissions of five key pollutants to meet statutory emissions ceilings. The Air Quality Strategy 2007 sets out policies with respect to the assessment or management of air quality and which includes standards and objectives for local air quality. Together these strategies aim to tackle air pollution to protect people's health and reduce harmful effects on the environment

In line with commitments in the Environment Act 2021, Government is reviewing the National Air Quality Strategy and will publish a revised Strategy in 2023. A key objective will be improving local authority capability to target action to reduce health disparities from air pollution and its disproportionate impact on vulnerable groups. The revised Strategy will take our new air quality targets, to be set under the Environment Act 2021, into account.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
14th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, in which months he plans to consult on the (a) National Air Quality Strategy, (b) National Air Pollution Control Programme, (c) air quality targets set by the Environment Act 2021 and (d) changes to Local Air Quality Management.

We are currently aiming for public consultations to take place a) for the National Air Quality Strategy in Autumn 2022, b) for the revised National Air Pollution Control Programme in Spring-Summer 2022 and d) for the changes to the Local Air Quality Management framework in Spring-Summer 2022. The consultation related to the air quality targets set under the Environment Act 2021 has already been published.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
11th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the impact of the covid-19 outbreak on fine particulate matters emissions between 2019 and 2020.

At the beginning of the COVID-19 lockdown, Defra reacted promptly to the emerging situation by working with the Air Quality Expert Group on a rapid call for evidence leading to a report assessing the impact of the first lockdown on air pollutant emissions and concentrations in the UK. The report is available at https://uk-air.defra.gov.uk/library/reports.php?report_id=1005.

The emissions data for 2020 and historic years going back to 1970 were published on 14th February 2022.

Defra also published projections on 15th March 2021 which estimated the impact of Covid-19 on emissions. The data and assumptions used in this modelling can be found in the Informative Inventory Report (IIR), published at https://naei.beis.gov.uk/reports/reports?report_id=1024.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
11th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the impact of the covid-19 outbreak on ammonia emissions between 2019 and 2020.

At the beginning of the COVID-19 lockdown, Defra reacted promptly to the emerging situation by working with the Air Quality Expert Group on a rapid call for evidence leading to a report assessing the impact of the first lockdown on air pollutant emissions and concentrations in the UK. The report is available at https://uk-air.defra.gov.uk/library/reports.php?report_id=1005.

The emissions data for 2020 and historic years going back to 1970 were published on 14th February 2022.

Defra also published projections on 15th March 2021 which estimated the impact of Covid-19 on emissions. The data and assumptions used in this modelling can be found in the Informative Inventory Report (IIR), published at https://naei.beis.gov.uk/reports/reports?report_id=1024.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
10th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what proportion of total mass concentrations of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) in the UK in 2020 was directly attributable to primary emissions of PM2.5 as reported in the National Statistics release published on 14 February 2022.

Assessment of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is undertaken on an annual basis to understand the key sources and contributions to PM2.5 in the UK, as well as to assess compliance with legally binding air quality standards.

Compliance in 2020 was detailed in the Air Pollution in the UK report (2020) published in Sept 2021 (available here: https://uk-air.defra.gov.uk/library/annualreport/). Further analysis is ongoing and a follow up technical modelling report, detailing the source apportionment undertaken for 2020, will be published on our UK Air website in the coming weeks.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
10th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what the average proportion of total exposure to concentrations of fine particles (PM2.5) in 2020 was for people in each of (a) England (b) Northern Ireland (c) Wales and (d) Scotland from anthropogenic sources in the UK.

Assessment of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is undertaken on an annual basis to understand the key sources and contributions to PM2.5 in the UK, as well as to assess compliance with legally binding air quality standards.

Compliance in 2020 was detailed in the Air Pollution in the UK report (2020) published in Sept 2021 (available here: https://uk-air.defra.gov.uk/library/annualreport/). Further analysis is ongoing and a follow up technical modelling report, detailing the source apportionment undertaken for 2020, will be published on our UK Air website in the coming weeks.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
10th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what the average proportion of total exposure to concentrations of fine particles (PM2.5) was in 2020 for people in each of (a) England (b) Northern Ireland (c) Wales and (d) Scotland that was transported to the UK from other European countries.

Assessment of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is undertaken on an annual basis to understand the key sources and contributions to PM2.5 in the UK, as well as to assess compliance with legally binding air quality standards.

Compliance in 2020 was detailed in the Air Pollution in the UK report (2020) published in Sept 2021 (available here: https://uk-air.defra.gov.uk/library/annualreport/). Further analysis is ongoing and a follow up technical modelling report, detailing the source apportionment undertaken for 2020, will be published on our UK Air website in the coming weeks.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
10th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what the average proportion was of total exposure to concentrations of fine particles (PM2.5) in 2020 for people in each of (a) England (b) Northern Ireland (c) Wales and (d) Scotland from naturally occurring sources such as pollen and sea spray.

Assessment of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is undertaken on an annual basis to understand the key sources and contributions to PM2.5 in the UK, as well as to assess compliance with legally binding air quality standards.

Compliance in 2020 was detailed in the Air Pollution in the UK report (2020) published in Sept 2021 (available here: https://uk-air.defra.gov.uk/library/annualreport/). Further analysis is ongoing and a follow up technical modelling report, detailing the source apportionment undertaken for 2020, will be published on our UK Air website in the coming weeks.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
10th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what proportion of the urban background mass PM2.5 in central and southern UK in 2020 was transported from mainland Europe.

Assessment of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is undertaken on an annual basis to understand the key sources and contributions to PM2.5 in the UK, as well as to assess compliance with legally binding air quality standards.

Compliance in 2020 was detailed in the Air Pollution in the UK report (2020) published in Sept 2021 (available here: https://uk-air.defra.gov.uk/library/annualreport/). Further analysis is ongoing and a follow up technical modelling report, detailing the source apportionment undertaken for 2020, will be published on our UK Air website in the coming weeks.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
10th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what proportion of the urban background mass PM2.5 in (a) central and (b) southern UK was made up of secondary particles in 2020.

Assessment of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is undertaken on an annual basis to understand the key sources and contributions to PM2.5 in the UK, as well as to assess compliance with legally binding air quality standards.

Compliance in 2020 was detailed in the Air Pollution in the UK report (2020) published in Sept 2021 (available here: https://uk-air.defra.gov.uk/library/annualreport/). Further analysis is ongoing and a follow up technical modelling report, detailing the source apportionment undertaken for 2020, will be published on our UK Air website in the coming weeks.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
10th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what proportion of of regional background concentrations of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) in England in 2020 were from (a) ammonium nitrate, (b) ammonium sulphate and (c) organic particles.

Assessment of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is undertaken on an annual basis to understand the key sources and contributions to PM2.5 in the UK, as well as to assess compliance with legally binding air quality standards.

Compliance in 2020 was detailed in the Air Pollution in the UK report (2020) published in Sept 2021 (available here: https://uk-air.defra.gov.uk/library/annualreport/). Further analysis is ongoing and a follow up technical modelling report, detailing the source apportionment undertaken for 2020, will be published on our UK Air website in the coming weeks.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
10th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what proportion of the overall mass of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) in the major urban areas of southern England in 2020 was rural background concentrations.

Assessment of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is undertaken on an annual basis to understand the key sources and contributions to PM2.5 in the UK, as well as to assess compliance with legally binding air quality standards.

Compliance in 2020 was detailed in the Air Pollution in the UK report (2020) published in Sept 2021 (available here: https://uk-air.defra.gov.uk/library/annualreport/). Further analysis is ongoing and a follow up technical modelling report, detailing the source apportionment undertaken for 2020, will be published on our UK Air website in the coming weeks.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
10th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps he plans to take to reverse the annual increase in particulate emissions from residential burning (domestic consumption).

We have introduced legislation encouraging householders to switch to less polluting fuels used for domestic burning, and, as of January 2022, only Ecodesign compliant solid fuel stoves are able to enter the market for sale across the UK.

Through our landmark Environment Act 2021 we have amended the Clean Air Act 1993 in England to create a simpler mechanism for local authorities to tackle smoke emissions. From May 2022 smoke emissions in a Smoke Control Area will be subject to a civil rather than criminal regime, enforced with a financial penalty, making it easier for local authorities to tackle illegal domestic solid fuel burning.

The Environment Act 2021 also ensures more substantive action can be taken by enabling local authorities to prosecute when smoke is repeatedly emitted from private dwellings under the statutory nuisance regime.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
10th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps he is taking to reduce emissions from the domestic use of solvents in household products including cleaning products, aerosols and cosmetics.

As stated in the Clean Air strategy, we will explore a number of options to reduce NMVOC emissions from household products, including cleaning products. As a first step, we are building the evidence base to ensure any future interventions in this space are appropriately targeted and effective. That is why Defra’s Air Quality Expert Group, with support from members of the Committee on the Medical Effects of Air Pollution, are producing a report on indoor air quality, focusing on fine particulate matter and volatile organic compounds as the air pollutants which are prevalent in indoor environments. This report will be published later this year.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
10th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what the formal process is for an adjustment application and adjustments to be applied for the UK to become compliant with the 2020 emission ceiling for ammonia under each of (a) the National Emission Ceilings Regulations 2018 and (b) the Gothenburg Protocol.

For the purposes of our international obligation, the circumstances in which an adjustment to the emission inventory can be made are set out in Convention on Long Range Transboundary Air Pollution (CLRTAP) Executive Body decision 2012/3. The formal process for an adjustment application is set out in CLRTAP Executive Body decision 2012/12. Both decisions can be found at https://unece.org/decisions.

Regulation 4 of the National Emission Ceilings Regulations sets out that the Secretary of State may prepare an adjusted inventory of emissions if the conditions for applying an adjustment, set out in the Regulations, are met.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
10th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the effect on tonnage of primary emissions of ammonia in the UK in 2022 of the agreements reached in October 2021 and January 2022 between CF Industries or its subsidiaries and major CO2 users.

No such assessment has been made. Industrial installations in England must comply with strict emission limits, and cannot operate unless issued with an environmental permit. The Environment Agency performs regular inspections and audits to ensure installations are complying with the requirements of the permit.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
10th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the effect on tonnage of primary emissions of ammonia in the UK in (a) 2020 and (b) 2021 of the interim agreement reached with CF Industries or its subsidiaries in September 2021 to restart one or more of its ammonia plants in the UK.

No such assessment has been made. Industrial installations in England must comply with strict emission limits, and cannot operate unless issued with an environmental permit. The Environment Agency performs regular inspections and audits to ensure installations are complying with the requirements of the permit.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
10th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when he will publish the 17th UK Informative Inventory Report (1990 to 2020).

The 1990 to 2020 Informative Inventory Report will be published on 15 March 2022.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
10th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how much in tonnes (a) herd sizes and (b) farming practices each contributed to the UK primary emissions of ammonia (NH3) in 2020.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
7th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what monitoring will be taking place to assess the impact of the approved use of thiamethoxam on sugar beet to the wider environment, including on soils, freshwaters, aphid predators, and wild pollinators.

Ministers considered scientific evidence on human health and environmental risks and received advice from the Health and Safety Executive, the UK Expert Committee on Pesticides and Defra’s Chief Scientific Adviser. This advice is available publicly. This advice has informed the overall decision and shaped the strict controls attached to the authorisation which have been put in place to mitigate risks to pollinators and other species.


Industry will be carrying out monitoring activity of aphids, their resistance and infectivity at up to 15 sites in each of the four factory areas. This will provide advice on future control strategies. As a condition of the authorisation, industry will also monitor neonicotinoid-treated sugar beet fields in 2022 to determine any neonicotinoid seed treatment residue levels in soil and plants. The Government will continue to monitor water quality at a number of sites through our Catchment Sensitive Farming programme, with over 30 samples a month across the network tested for presence of all neonicotinoids along with another 350 pesticides.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
7th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the recommendations of The University of Manchester’s Building Utopia publication, what assessment his Department has made of the potential impact of increasing green spaces on air quality in (a) general and (b) the worst affected communities in urban areas.

Defra's evidence shows that well-designed green spaces including healthy, well-chosen, and well-placed trees in urban areas are known to have a large range of benefits for people and the economy. While vegetation can help filter and reduce some air pollution, it is also crucial to reduce emissions at their source. Furthermore, the design of urban vegetation architecture is important, to ensure it doesn’t contribute to poorer air quality in some locations.

Government will publish a revised National Air Quality Strategy in 2023 with a key focus on identifying and addressing air pollution inequalities, targeting action to support vulnerable groups and communities that are worst affected.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
7th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the recommendations of The University of Manchester’s Building Utopia publication, whether his Department has plans to make an assessment of the potential merits of increasing green spaces and the role of communities in urban greening as part of the secondary legislation for the Environment Act 2021.

This Government has a world leading target to halt nature’s decline by 2030 and we know that will require action to recover biodiversity across the country including in our urban areas. To support that work, Natural England is working with Defra and other partners and stakeholders to develop a Green Infrastructure Framework. This will include a menu of green infrastructure standards that will help local planning authorities and developers meet requirements in the National Planning Policy Framework to consider green infrastructure in local plans and in new development.

The Green Infrastructure Framework will be fully available later this year. The aim will be to embed the Framework in national planning guidance and policy, which will be important to ensure that good green infrastructure is secured for all communities through the planning system.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
3rd Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how much his Department spent in total on social media advertising in (a) 2019, (b) 2020, (c) 2021 and (d) 2022 as of 28 February 2022; and on which platforms that money was spent.

Details of social media advertising spend are recorded in our publicly available transparency data which is published at:

https://data.gov.uk/dataset/91072f06-093a-41a2-b8b5-6f120ceafd62/spend-over-25-000-in-the-department-for-environment-food-and-rural-affairs

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
23rd Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether he has had recent discussions with Cabinet colleagues on the potential merits of regulating outdoor burning for the purpose of lowering PM2.5 emissions.

I have not had recent discussions along these lines.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
23rd Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether he has had recent discussions with Cabinet colleagues on reducing the amount of fur sold in the UK.

The Secretary of State has regular discussions with Cabinet colleagues on a range of issues. Now we have left the EU, the Government is able to explore potential action in relation to animal fur, in line with the Government’s commitment to improving animal welfare standards as set out in the Action Plan for Animal Welfare.

We are reviewing the evidence gathered both from our Call for Evidence and wider engagement with the fur trade and stakeholders, and a summary of responses will be published soon.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
23rd Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether he has made an assessment of the implications for his policies on air pollution of the finding of the study, The Contribution of Domestic Outdoor Burning to UK Particulate Emissions by Dr Josh Cottam and Dr Edward Mitchell, and in particular how to reduce outdoor burning in order to reduce overall PM2.5 emissions.

We have not made a formal assessment of the report at this stage. We continue to undertake regular monitoring of new evidence and emission sources of air pollutants to inform future policy.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the recommendations of the Climate Change Committee’s UK Health Expert Advisory Group’s report, Sustainable Health Equity: Achieving a Net Zero UK, published 6 November 2020, what assessment his Department has made of the implications for its policies of (a) the recommendation to set a target date to eliminate home installations of wood burning and gas stoves, prioritising elimination in urban areas and (b) the other recommendations on regulatory interventions to tackle outdoor air pollution.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave him on 20 January 2022 to PQ UIN 102535.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether his Department has carried out a cost and benefit analysis of changes to the identification and control of Substances of Very High Concern.

Last year the EU’s Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) legislation was brought into UK law, retaining the fundamental approach and key principles of EU REACH and ensuring a high level of protection of human health and the environment.

Within UK REACH, the Candidate List is a list of substances of very high concern (SVHCs) that can be prioritised for inclusion on the Authorisation List. Once a substance is added to the Authorisation List, it may not be used after the specified ‘sunset date’ unless the Secretary of State has granted a business-specific authorisation for that use.

The substances on the EU REACH candidate list were automatically carried forward to UK REACH. In future, substances will be added to the list on the basis of the best UK scientific advice, taking into account our own risk assessments.

Defra, the Welsh and Scottish governments have agreed an interim approach to adding new SVHCs to the list (published on gov.uk: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/uk-reach-approach-to-including-substances-of-very-high-concern-on-the-candidate-list). This is based on expert advice from the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) and the Environment Agency (EA), as well as feedback from a range of stakeholders.

We believe that focussing the Candidate List on identifying substances that are genuine candidates for authorisation – the statutory purpose of the list – will more effectively enable substitution away from the most hazardous substances. The regulatory pressure from inclusion on the Candidate List can be diluted if there is little realistic chance of added substances being made subject to authorisation.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will publish all the research studies that the Government has commissioned in the last five years to estimate the contribution of domestic wood burning to primary emissions of fine particulate matter.

Within the last five years the Government has commissioned and published the following research studies to investigate the contribution of wood burning to PM2.5 concentrations:

Additionally, we have commissioned research to analyse data from the Black Carbon Network. However, findings from these studies do not inform estimates of the contribution of wood burning to PM2.5 concentrations. The following reports are in preparation for publication:

  • Further assessment of PM from wood burning UK-wide

  • Wood burning during the UK COVID-19 lockdowns

Most recently we commissioned a £1.6 million research project to investigate the emissions associated with different solids fuels. This research will begin to deliver results in 2023.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to Climate Change Committee’s UK Health Expert Advisory Group’s report entitled Sustainable Health Equity: Achieving a Net Zero UK, published on 6 November 2020, what assessment his Department has made of the implications for its policies of the (a) recommendation to set a target date to eliminate home installations of wood burning and gas stoves, prioritising elimination in urban areas and (b) other recommendations in that report.

The Government Response to the Committee on Climate Change’s 2020 ‘Progress Report to Parliament' sets out the further action we are taking across all sectors of the economy to reduce emissions and deliver net zero.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the effect of financial support through the Countryside Stewardship and Countryside Productivity schemes in enabling and promoting investment in the farm infrastructure and equipment on ammonia emissions; and what estimate his Department has made of the expected reduction in kilotonnes of ammonia emissions achieved as a result of that support in calendar years (a) 2019, (b) 2020 and (c) 2021.

Under the Countryside Productivity scheme, an estimated £4.6 million of funds were approved for projects which addressed nutrient management, for example, low-emission slurry application equipment or mild acidification of slurry, both of which reduce ammonia emissions.

We have just closed the first round of the Farming Equipment and Technology Fund, the successor to Countryside Productivity small grants, which includes grants towards nutrient analysis, low emission spreading and separation equipment. Later this year, we will open applications for further rounds of large infrastructure grants, including for slurry acidification and slurry stores, under the Farming Transformation Fund, which will help further reduce ammonia emissions.

The Countryside Stewardship scheme provides financial incentives for farmers to look after and improve the environment. In 2021, the scheme allocated over £0.5 million to activities that reduce on-farm ammonia emissions including funding for slurry store covers, slurry scrapers and low emission flooring for livestock housing.

The data collected for evaluation does not allow for an assessment of the direct contribution to expected ammonia emission reductions achieved through this funding. This depends on a number of factors such as how the equipment is used on farm and the volumes of slurry involved.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, which sectors in the farming industry apply Best Available Techniques developed by the Environment Agency.

This is a devolved matter and the information provided therefore relates to England only.

An Environmental Permit requires operators to farm using Best Available Techniques (BAT). The Environment Agency is responsible for regulating Environmental Permits in England.

Environmental Permitting applies to many industrial sectors, including large intensive pigs and poultry farms. The Clean Air Strategy sets out the Government's commitment to extend the environmental permitting regime in England to dairy and intensive beef farms by 2025.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of his Department's work to build consumer understanding of the Ecodesign and other requirements for the use of wood burning appliances including in Smoke Control Areas.

The Ecodesign requirements came into force on 1 January 2022. No assessment has been made at this stage.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, which measures he has implemented from the National Air Pollution Control Programme dated March 2019 and published on 1 April 2019, to reduce emissions of fine particulate matter.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave him on 10 January 2022 to PQ UIN 98195.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will hold a public consultation on proposals for his Department to communicate air quality information and advice to ensure the public is provided with timely and relevant information about (a) air pollution, (b) actions people can take to limit their personal exposure, (c) the impact of air pollution on their health, and (d) their own influence on air quality.

The Government is committed to making sure that the best possible advice on pollution is available to the public to enable them to make informed choices to protect their health. Defra makes air pollution information available through a range of channels, such as the UK-Air website and more recently working with Global Action Plan to deliver the Clean Air Hub.

Alongside this, we are conducting a holistic review of the way we communicate air quality information and advice.

This is an iterative review process guided by a steering group comprised of specialists in the fields of air quality science, public health, behavioural science and digital communications, along with representatives from vulnerable communities, the general public and central and local Government.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will publish the regulations on the purchase and use of wood burning appliances in one place on his Department’s website to increase accessibility of that information for consumers.

We will consider the accessibility of this information as part of our review of Defra’s UK-AIR website.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps he is taking to ensure consistently high standards in (a) approval processes and (b) testing for appliances or ranges of appliances before they can receive an exemption to burn unauthorised fuel in Smoke Control Areas.

The testing of exempt appliances for use in Smoke Control Areas is carried out by an external contractor. Defra requires regular progress reports and reviews the mechanism and monitors the contractor’s performance to ensure standards are maintained.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many journalists or media organisations contacted his Department in December 2021 to enquire about the implementation of the new Ecodesign Regulations relating to wood or solid fuel burning appliances in domestic premises from 1 January 2022.

The Defra press office did not receive any such enquiries from journalists or media organisations in December 2021.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will make an assessment of the reduction in ammonia emissions in kilotonnes expected to be achieved in each of the calendar years (a) 2019,(b) 2020 and (c) 2021 following the publication in 2018 of a Code of Good Agricultural Practice (COGAP) for reducing ammonia emissions and the steps being taken by the farming industry.

Statistics on national emissions of key air pollutants are published annually on gov.uk. Ammonia emission figures for 2019 and projections of emissions for 2020 and 2021 have been published in the informative inventory report and data for 2020 is due for publication in February 2022.

The Code of Good Agricultural Practice published in 2018 recommends a number of actions that farmers can take to reduce ammonia emissions. It is not possible to assess the specific contribution of this publication to reported emissions reductions.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 10 December 2021 to Question 88607, if he will publish the terms of reference for the £1.6 million research project to investigate the emissions associated with different solid fuels.

The contract for the research project to measure emissions factors of domestic solid fuels is published on the Government Contract Finder website:

https://www.contractsfinder.service.gov.uk/Notice/Attachment/69d7d635-5624-43d9-98a8-b49296681c5b

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
5th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the National Air Pollution Control Programme published in March 2019, which measures that were considered in order to comply with emission reduction commitments for ammonia have been implemented as of 5 January 2022.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave him on 5 January 2022 to PQ 93691.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
5th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether he has made an assessment of the (a) effectiveness of the Blue Angel certification standard in Germany, which aims to reduce air pollution from wood burning stoves and (b) impact introducing a similar standard in the UK would have on emissions from wood burning stoves.

We have not made an assessment of this certification standard, which has a much wider remit than air pollution and wood burning stoves.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
5th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of Denmark’s best practices for the controlling of emissions from wood burning stoves as part of developing guidelines for the UK.

At this stage, we have not made such an assessment as part of developing guidelines for the UK.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
5th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when he will publish the Government’s response to the consultation on reducing ammonia emissions from solid urea fertilisers.

Defra will provide an official Government response to the consultation on reducing ammonia emissions from solid urea fertilisers early this year.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
5th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of the finding of the Annual Danish Informative Inventory Report to UNECE, number 435, page 114, that new ecodesign-compliant wood burning stoves emit nearly twice as much black carbon as older wood burning stoves.

We have commissioned a £1.6 million research project to systematically estimate the emissions, including black carbon, associated with different solids fuels, and appliances, used in the UK.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
5th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what the timeframe is for the research and measurement study being carried out to improve emission estimates for domestic combustion.

The Emissions Factors for Domestic Solid Fuels research and measurement programme will begin to deliver results by the end of the 2022/23 financial year.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
5th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies on (a) testing and (b) certification of wood burning stoves for ecodesign of the World Health Organisation’s new Good practice statements for black carbon and ultrafine particles compliance.

We are already taking steps to reduce emissions from domestic burning. In 2020, we introduced the Domestic Solid Fuels Regulations, which will phase out of the sale of the most polluting domestic solid fuels. As of January 2022, all stoves placed on the market in the UK must be Eco-design compliant.

We have commissioned a £1.6 million research project to systematically estimate the emissions associated with different solids fuels and appliances. We are commissioning an evaluation of the impact of the Domestic Solid Fuels Regulations 2020 and updating our understanding of trends in domestic burning practices, including within smoke control areas.

Additionally, the Government is expanding the PM2.5 monitoring network to enhance measurement of this pollutant nationally.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
5th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how Ecodesign regulations for wood burning appliances that came into force on 1 January 2022 will complement and interact with the requirements of the Clean Air Act 1993.

Ecodesign regulations are now in force and the Clean Air Act 1993 requirements in smoke control areas will remain, as the two regulate different things. The Ecodesign regulations will raise emission and efficiency standards for stoves across the whole of the UK whilst allowing additional smoke emission assessment to remain in place for smoke control areas under the Clean Air Act.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
5th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies on (a) testing and (b) certification of wood burning stoves outside Smoke Control Areas of the World Health Organisation’s new Good practice statements for black carbon and ultrafine particles.

We are already taking steps to reduce emissions from domestic burning. In 2020, we introduced the Domestic Solid Fuels Regulations, which will phase out of the sale of the most polluting domestic solid fuels. As of January 2022, all stoves placed on the market in the UK must be Eco-design compliant.

We have commissioned a £1.6 million research project to systematically estimate the emissions associated with different solids fuels and appliances. We are commissioning an evaluation of the impact of the Domestic Solid Fuels Regulations 2020 and updating our understanding of trends in domestic burning practices, including within smoke control areas.

Additionally, the Government is expanding the PM2.5 monitoring network to enhance measurement of this pollutant nationally.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
5th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of amending the emission limits for appliance exemptions for wood burning stoves after the implementation of the Ecodesign regulations on 1 January 2022.

Ecodesign regulations are now in force and the Clean Air Act 1993 requirements in smoke control areas will remain, as the two regulate different things. The Ecodesign regulations will raise emission and efficiency standards for stoves across the whole of the UK whilst allowing additional smoke emission assessment to remain in place for smoke control areas under the Clean Air Act.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
5th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies on (a) testing and (b) certification of wood burning stoves in Smoke Control Areas of the World Health Organisation’s new Good practice statements for black carbon and ultrafine particles.

We are already taking steps to reduce emissions from domestic burning. In 2020, we introduced the Domestic Solid Fuels Regulations, which will phase out of the sale of the most polluting domestic solid fuels. As of January 2022, all stoves placed on the market in the UK must be Eco-design compliant.

We have commissioned a £1.6 million research project to systematically estimate the emissions associated with different solids fuels and appliances. We are commissioning an evaluation of the impact of the Domestic Solid Fuels Regulations 2020 and updating our understanding of trends in domestic burning practices, including within smoke control areas.

Additionally, the Government is expanding the PM2.5 monitoring network to enhance measurement of this pollutant nationally.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
5th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, which measures in the National Air Pollution Control Programme, published March 2019, relating to the emission reduction commitments for fine particulate matter (PM2.5) have been implemented.

The National Air Pollution Control Programme (NAPCP), published in March 2019, refers to legislation to prohibit the sale of the most polluting fuels used in domestic burning. The Air Quality (Domestic Solid Fuels Standards) (England) Regulations 2020 were made on 7 October 2020, and most measures came into force on 1 May 2021.

The NAPCP also refers to reducing PM2.5 levels. The Environment Act, which gained Royal Assent on 9 November 2021, establishes a duty to set a target on PM2.5.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
5th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what discussions he has had with stakeholders on updating the Daily Air Quality Index to align it more closely with the new World Health Organisation air quality guidelines published in September 2022.

We are conducting a holistic review of the way we communicate air quality information and advice. The Daily Air Quality Index is included in the scope of this review.

A steering group comprised of specialists in the fields of air quality science, public health, behavioural science and digital communications, along with representatives from vulnerable communities, the general public and central and local Government has been appointed to advise on the scope and nature of the review.

The steering group met for the first time in December 2021.

We will shortly be setting targets to improve air quality under the Environment Act which will be tailored to our domestic context.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
5th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what his latest estimate is for domestic wood burning as a proportion of primary emissions of fine particulate matter, PM2.5, based on his Department’s contributions to the Digest of UK Energy Statistics for the UK in 2020 published in July 2021.

Emissions of key air pollutants are compiled and reported by Defra on an annual basis through the National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory at https://naei.beis.gov.uk/data. Emissions data for 2020 will be published on 15 February 2022.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
5th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether he will continue to allow new applications for the exemption of a solid fuel burning appliance or appliances under the Clean Air Act 1993 after the Ecodesign regulations enter into force on 1 January 2022.

Applications for the exemption of solid fuel burning appliances under the Clean Air Act 1993 will continue.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of banning (a) the sale and (b) the use of domestic wood burning appliances in urban areas to help reduce air pollution.

We have no current plans to introduce a ban on the sale or use of wood burning appliances in urban areas. We have already taken action to ensure that wood burning appliances on the market adhere to high air quality standards.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether estimates of emissions from bonfires, fire pits and pizza ovens are included in the National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory.

Estimates of emissions from bonfires, fire pits and pizza ovens are not included in the National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will publish a list of the research studies the Government has commissioned in the last five years to estimate the contribution of domestic wood burning to primary emissions of fine particulate matter.

Defra has no plans to publish such a list of research.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether it remains his policy to implement the ecodesign regulations for solid fuel heating appliances on 1 January 2022.

The Ecodesign regulations for solid fuel heating appliances came into force on 1 January 2022.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps he has taken to promote consumer awareness of the new Ecodesign Regulations for solid fuel heating appliances that are due to be implemented on 1 January 2022.

Defra has worked with industry supporting the Ecodesign-ready scheme since 2017. A communication campaign initiative was launched in 2020 to encourage solid fuel users to use better quality fuels, get their chimney swept or upgrade their appliances.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether his latest estimate of the proportion of domestic wood burning in total emissions of fine particulate matter is closer to 10 or 40 per cent.

Emissions data for PM2.5 are publicly available through the following URL: https://naei.beis.gov.uk/data/. Data for 2019 were reported on 15 February 2021.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, which measures he has implemented from the National Air Pollution Control Programme, dated March 2019 and published on 1 April 2019, to reduce ammonia emissions.

The measures to reduce ammonia emissions from agriculture implemented to date include:

  • Publication of a Code of Good Agricultural Practice (COGAP) for reducing ammonia emissions, 2018, in collaboration with the farming industry.

  • Delivery of financial support through Countryside Stewardship and Countryside Productivity schemes to enable and encourage investment in the farm infrastructure and equipment.

  • Delivery of a programme of advice, demonstration and case-studies on reducing ammonia emissions through the Catchment Sensitive Farming partnership.

  • A Consultation on policy options to reduce ammonia emissions from urea fertilisers. A Government response will be published shortly.

  • The Environment Agency is working with the farming industry to develop Best Available Techniques that will underpin an extension of Environmental Permitting to the dairy and intensive beef sectors.
Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether he has prepared a National Air Pollution Control Programme to ensure that the UK's national emission reduction commitments will be met in accordance with Regulation 9(1) of the National Emission Ceilings Regulations 2018.

We published a National Air Pollution Control Programme (NAPCP) for the UK on 1 April 2019. We are currently preparing a revised NAPCP, which we will consult on in 2022.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what estimate he has made of the level of reduction the new Ecodesign Regulations for solid fuel burning appliances in domestic premises will have on (a) regulated air pollutants and (b) greenhouse gases.

The new Ecodesign Regulations for solid fuel burning appliances will ensure that the worst-performing and most polluting products are phased out of the market. Therefore, the Regulations will have a positive effect on the average energy efficiency of these appliances on the UK market now that they have come into force.

At the time the new Ecodesign Regulations were agreed, the EU calculated that by 2030 they, along with the associated Energy Labelling Regulations for solid fuel appliances, would result in an estimated reduction in greenhouse gas emissions equivalent to 400,000 tonnes of CO2, which corresponds to 50,000 tonnes of CO2 when scaled to the UK only.

In addition to this the National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory published in March 2021 accounts for the projected impact of the Ecodesign Regulations on regulated air pollutants, specifically PM2.5. These projections only partially account for the regulations as the emissions factor data at the time of publishing was limited.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of the new Ecodesign regulations on reducing exceedances of the new World Health Organisation air quality guidelines for fine particulate matter, PM2.5.

Eco-design stoves will be considered as part of the work being undertaken to support the setting of PM 2.5 targets through the Environment Act 2021. Evidence will be published alongside a consultation on proposed targets in early 2022 and further analysis will be undertaken to inform the development of Environmental Improvement Plans once targets are set.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of the new Ecodesign regulations on reducing emissions from wood burning appliances.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave him on 15 December 2022 to PQ 93679.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
10th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to page 59 of the Clean Air Strategy published in January 2019, what progress he has made on working with industry sectors and test houses to review different methods for testing stove emissions to determine what test methods are most reliable for wood burning stoves in the context of the EU Ecodesign regulations 2022.

Defra is continuing to work with relevant industry bodies to consider the effectiveness of the Ecodesign Regulations and has recently commissioned a study to measure emissions of pollutants from solid fuel appliances using a range of test methodologies.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
9th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether his Department has made a comparative assessment of (a) laboratory test standards and (b) real world conditions for assessment of wood burning stoves in the context of the EU Ecodesign regulations 2022.

Defra has not made such an assessment. Defra recently commissioned a study to measure pollutant emissions from burning solid fuels in a range of domestic appliances under real-world conditions. The results will be available from Autumn 2022.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
8th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will take steps to reduce the scope for flexibility in appliance emissions testing procedures for particulate matter from wood burning stoves.

In Smoke Control Areas an appliance needs to be exempt to burn unauthorised fuels, based on a standardised protocol.

From January 2022, only Ecodesign-compliant stoves will be able to enter the market for sale across the country. The UK is working with industry to consider the effectiveness of testing procedures under Ecodesign.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
8th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will publish the latest estimate of the proportion of UK primary emissions of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) in 2019 from each of the following sources in domestic premises: (a) burning wood in open fires; (b) burning coal in open fires; (c) burning wood in closed stoves; and (d) burning coal in closed stoves.

Emissions of key air pollutants are compiled and reported by Defra on an annual basis through the National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory (NAEI). The data for 2019 is publicly available and was reported on 15 February 2021, via: https://naei.beis.gov.uk/data/

Emissions specifically from bonfires, fire pits and pizza ovens are not estimated in the inventory.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
8th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will publish the latest estimate of the tonnage of UK primary emissions of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) in 2019 from (a) wood burning in closed stoves in domestic premises, (b) wood burning in open fires in domestic premises, (c) coal burning in domestic premises, (d) bonfires, (e) fire pits, (f) incinerators, (g) wildfires, (h) pizza ovens, (i) commercial waste burning, and (j) other forms of combustion.

Emissions of key air pollutants are compiled and reported by Defra on an annual basis through the National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory (NAEI). The data for 2019 is publicly available and was reported on 15 February 2021, via: https://naei.beis.gov.uk/data/

Emissions specifically from bonfires, fire pits and pizza ovens are not estimated in the inventory.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
8th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will publish his Department's latest estimate of the total tonnage of UK primary emissions of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) in 2019.

Emissions of key air pollutants, including PM 2.5, are compiled and reported by Defra on an annual basis through the National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory (NAEI), which can be found here: https://naei.beis.gov.uk/data/

The next update to the inventory, including emissions estimates for 2020 and updates to the historic time series, will be published in February 2022.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
8th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will publish the latest estimate of the total tonnage of UK primary emissions of fine particulate matter, PM2.5, in 2020.

Emissions of key air pollutants, including PM 2.5, are compiled and reported by Defra on an annual basis through the National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory (NAEI), which can be found here: https://naei.beis.gov.uk/data/

The next update to the inventory, including emissions estimates for 2020 and updates to the historic time series, will be published in February 2022.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
8th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of banning (a) some or (b) all wood burning in urban areas on (i) reducing air pollution and (ii) meeting climate change targets.

Defra has no current plans to introduce a ban on wood burning in urban areas. We continue to undertake regular monitoring of emission sources of air pollutants and greenhouse gases to inform future policy.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
7th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what discussions he has had with the Climate Change Committee on its UK Health Expert Advisory Group report entitled Sustainable Health Equity: Achieving a Net Zero UK before publication of the Sixth Carbon Budget in December 2020.

We are grateful to the Climate Change Committee for the wide range of advice it provides the Government, which is discussed on an ongoing basis. The published impact assessment for the sixth carbon budget considered a wide range of relevant evidence including the advice of the Climate Change Committee, providing a solid basis for the Government’s decision on what level to set carbon budget 6 at.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
7th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will publish the latest estimate of the proportion of the UK's primary emissions of fine particulate matter that came from burning wood and coal in domestic open fires and solid fuel stoves in 2019.

Emissions of key air pollutants are compiled and reported by Defra on an annual basis through the National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory (NAEI). The latest data for 2019 can be found at https://naei.beis.gov.uk/data/.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
7th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what research the Government has commissioned in the last five years to estimate the percentage domestic wood burning contributes to primary emissions of fine particulate matter.

Current estimates of the contribution of domestic burning to PM 2.5 emissions are documented in the National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory, including the contribution of domestic wood burning.

Within the last five years, the Government has commissioned several research studies to investigate the contribution of wood burning to PM 2. 5 concentrations. We have also commissioned studies to analyse data from our air quality monitoring networks (https://uk-air.defra.gov.uk/library/reports?report_id=953).

In 2018, we commissioned a large-scale survey to monitor trends in domestic burning and to better understand the types and quantities of fuels being used (https://uk-air.defra.gov.uk/library/reports?report_id=1014). This data has helped inform our estimates of solid fuel use in the UK.

Most recently we have commissioned a £1.6 million research project to investigate the emissions associated with different solids fuels. This will lead to improved estimates of the contribution that domestic burning makes to PM 2.5 emissions. We also published last week an invitation to tender to assess the impact of the Domestic Solid Fuels Regulations 2020 and investigate trends in domestic burning practices

All this work provides vital evidence needed to inform policies on domestic burning and to meet the commitments set out in the Clean Air Strategy.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
7th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether the Environment Act 2021 amends the emission limits for appliance exemptions in the wood stove industry.

The Environment Act does not amend the emission limits for appliance exemptions in wood burning stoves.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
7th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of the conclusions of the HETAS report, A review of the impact of domestic combustion on UK air quality, published in September 2019.

Domestic burning was identified as a major source of particulate matter (PM2.5) emissions in 2018 in the National Statistics on Emissions of air pollutants in the UK. We have taken steps to cut air pollution from this source by introducing legislation which restricts the sale of the most polluting solid fuels, such as wet wood and traditional house coal, and encouraging the use of cleaner fuels in the home.

While we know that it is very difficult to accurately estimate the extent and nature of domestic burning, we are constantly working to improve our data. We published a research report (‘Burning in UK Homes and Gardens’) in December 2020. This involved extensive qualitative and quantitative research to gather further data on people's burning behaviours. A research and measurement study is currently being carried out to improve our emission estimates for domestic combustion.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
7th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether his Department has reviewed audits of application fees for the exemption of an appliance or appliances under the Clean Air Act 1993 in each of the last three years.

A fee is applicable to all exemption applications and these fees, which are published online, are reviewed annually by the appointed contractor. Application fees have not been amended in the last three years.

There have been no formal annual audits of fees and charges. The contractor is required to provide the Department with a quarterly breakdown of the charges to and payments received from manufacturers and applicants, including explanation of how charges have been determined, and these are scrutinised on receipt.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
7th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he provide details of when Defra has agreed revisions to application fees for the exemption of an appliance or appliances under the Clean Air Act 1993 in each of the last three years.

A fee is applicable to all exemption applications and these fees, which are published online, are reviewed annually by the appointed contractor. Application fees have not been amended in the last three years.

There have been no formal annual audits of fees and charges. The contractor is required to provide the Department with a quarterly breakdown of the charges to and payments received from manufacturers and applicants, including explanation of how charges have been determined, and these are scrutinised on receipt.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
7th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether there are limits on (a) individual pollutants and (b) emissions from appliances that can be granted exemptions under the Clean Air Act 1993.

Testing appliances for exemption focuses on smoke emissions when different fuels are burnt. Exempt appliances are accompanied by a list of suitable fuels for use. For each fuel, the appliance must not exceed emissions of 5 grams of smoke per hour (5g/h).

The British Standard PD6434:1969 is used to assess whether appliances can be granted an exemption under the Clean Air Act 1993. This standard sets the protocols and methods for the testing for assessment of smoke emission.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
7th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether consistency with British Standard PD6434:1969, Recommendations for the design and testing of smoke reducing solid fuel burning domestic appliances is considered in assessments of applications for appliance exemptions under the Clean Air Act 1993.

Testing appliances for exemption focuses on smoke emissions when different fuels are burnt. Exempt appliances are accompanied by a list of suitable fuels for use. For each fuel, the appliance must not exceed emissions of 5 grams of smoke per hour (5g/h).

The British Standard PD6434:1969 is used to assess whether appliances can be granted an exemption under the Clean Air Act 1993. This standard sets the protocols and methods for the testing for assessment of smoke emission.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
7th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps he has taken to inform consumers of new requirements for wood burning appliances under the Ecodesign Regulations that will enter into force from 1 January 2022.

Defra has worked with industry supporting the Ecodesign Ready scheme since 2017. This has enabled consumers to choose Ecodesign-ready stoves ahead of the legislation coming into force in 2022. From January 2022 only Ecodesign-compliant stoves will be able to enter the UK market. The implementation of Ecodesign 2022 will raise standards throughout the country, alongside existing requirements in Smoke Control Areas.

A communication campaign initiative was launched in 2020 to encourage solid fuel users to use better quality fuels, get their chimney swept or upgrade their appliances.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
7th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps he will take to ensure that only the cleanest wood-burning stoves will be available for sale by 2022.

Defra has worked with industry supporting the Ecodesign Ready scheme since 2017. This has enabled consumers to choose Ecodesign-ready stoves ahead of the legislation coming into force in 2022. From January 2022 only Ecodesign-compliant stoves will be able to enter the UK market. The implementation of Ecodesign 2022 will raise standards throughout the country, alongside existing requirements in Smoke Control Areas.

A communication campaign initiative was launched in 2020 to encourage solid fuel users to use better quality fuels, get their chimney swept or upgrade their appliances.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
7th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference page 43 of the Digest of UK Energy Statistics Annual Data for the UK, 2020, Chapters 1 to 7, published by the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy on 29 July 2021, where his Department published the study on domestic wood consumption referred to in Note 7 on page 43.

The study of domestic wood combustion can be found on our UK-AIR website, accessible through the following URL:

https://uk-air.defra.gov.uk/library/reports?report_id=1014

This research allowed Defra to update estimates of the quantity of solid fuels burned in people’s homes and gardens in the UK. These estimates were then used to inform the Digest of UK Energy Statistics for the UK in 2020.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
7th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps are taken to test solid fuel appliances under the Ecodesign Regulations.

Ecodesign requirements for domestic solid fuel appliances are set out in Annex II of the Ecodesign Regulations which can be found at Commission Regulation (EU) 2015/1185 of 24 April 2015 implementing Directive 2009/125/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council with regard to ecodesign requirements for solid fuel local space heaters (Text with EEA relevance) (legislation.gov.uk).

The verification procedure to ensure compliance with these requirements is set out in Annex IV.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
7th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps his Department has taken protect (a) consumers and (b) public health by standards set by certification bodies in the wood stove industry.

Defra has set requirements for burning solid fuels in Smoke Control Areas. Households can either burn authorised solid fuels or use an exempt appliance using only fuels specified by the manufacturer.

The introduction of the Air Quality (Domestic Solid Fuels Standards) (England) Regulations 2020 phases out the supply of more polluting fuels, in particular wet wood and coal, and introduces emission limits for all manufactured solid fuels. As air quality is a devolved matter this legislation applies in England only.

As of the 1 January 2022, only Eco design-compliant stoves can be placed on the UK market.

We are aware that, outside of the appointed certification bodies, there are industry-led certification schemes for domestic stoves which are intended to encourage manufacturers to achieve higher than minimum standards.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
7th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether his Department holds a register of conflicts of interest declared by certification bodies in the wood stove industry.

Defra does not hold such a register.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
6th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when he plans to make a decision on the application from British Sugar for emergency authorisation for the use of neonicotinoid thiamethoxam on sugar beet.

We are considering the emergency authorisation application made by British Sugar for the use of Cruiser SB (containing thiamethoxam) on sugar beet and the related evidence. A decision is expected to be announced in the coming weeks.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
25th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what discussions he has had with relevant stakeholders on (a) implementing a place-based, community-centred approach to air pollution and (b) using that approach to protect low income communities who may experience higher exposure to air pollutants.

The improvement of air quality remains a priority for the Government. We are taking a range of actions to reduce air pollution, including through the landmark Environment Act 2021.

In line with commitments in the Act, we are currently reviewing the National Air Quality Strategy and will be publishing a revised Strategy in 2023. We aim to develop a strong support and capability-building framework to ensure local authorities have the necessary tools to take local action and to clarify the available powers and levers. The revised Strategy will also support greater local action to identify and address air pollution inequalities and reduce the impacts on vulnerable groups and communities disproportionately impacted by air pollution. Engagement with a wide range of stakeholders will be undertaken in coming months.

Through the Environment Act we are improving the Local Air Quality Management Framework, for example by broadening the range of bodies required to collaborate with local authorities in developing local Air Quality Action Plans. We are developing revised Local Air Quality Management statutory guidance in which we propose to include more emphasis on community engagement to increase public awareness of air quality issues, and additional information to support the consideration of air quality inequalities in local Air Quality Action Plans. We are engaging with a range of stakeholders, and especially local government as we develop and implement policies and guidance to support local action on air quality.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
25th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what plans he has to update the Daily Air Quality Index to align it more closely with the new World Health Organisation air quality guidelines published on 22 September 2021.

We are conducting a holistic review of the way we communicate air quality information and advice. This will ensure the public is provided with timely and relevant information about air pollution, the actions people can take to limit their personal exposure, the impacts of air pollution on their health, and their own influence on air quality. The Daily Air Quality Index is included in the scope of this review.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
25th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether additional resources have been allocated to (a) Animal and Plant Health Agency and (b) other bodies to tackle the ongoing avian influenza outbreak.

The Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA) has tried and tested contingency and outbreak response plans and these are currently working well in the face of the current outbreak. The plans include being able to draw on the support of culling and disposal contractors from contingency framework contracts and being able to deploy additional vets from the veterinary delivery partnership. APHA is also working closely with other agencies from within the Defra group to provide additional surge capacity as needed. The resourcing situation is kept under review during outbreaks.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
22nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the approval of the use of Cruiser SB on sugar beet in 2020, whether he plans to grant approval in 2021; and what steps he is taking to help ensure that no harm will be caused to (a) pollinators and (b) other wildlife as a result of its use.

Emergency authorisations for the limited and controlled use of pesticides are only granted where the legal requirements are met, including that use of the pesticide appears necessary because of danger which cannot be contained by any other reasonable means. When considering emergency authorisations, the Government always takes account of the potential risks to people, animals and the environment (including risks to pollinators and other wildlife).

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
19th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps the Government will take to ensure effective collaboration on air quality between councils and other relevant public bodies as laid out in the Environment Bill.

The Environment Act strengthens the Local Air Quality Management Framework in England to enable a more collaborative approach to improving air quality where a local air quality objective is not being met. The Act strengthens requirements for all tiers of local Government to work together to improve air quality and requires neighbouring local authorities to co-operate where this is necessary to ensure local air quality objectives are met.

The Act also provides for a new power for the Secretary of State to designate, after formal consultation, “Relevant Public Authorities”. Designated Relevant Public Authorities will be required to collaborate with local authorities where a pollution source in their area of influence contributes to a failure to meet a local air quality objective. We will consult on designating the first Relevant Public Authority – National Highways - early in the new year. This will ensure all highways authorities collaborate where necessary. We are working to identify which further public authorities should be designated.

We will also consult early in the new year on revised Local Air Quality Management statutory guidance which will set out the steps local authorities should take to engage their air quality partners.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
18th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy on coordinating the Government's net zero strategy and the provisions of the Environment Bill in respect of pollutant reduction.

The Secretary of State has regular, productive conversations with the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy about net zero and the environment.

The Net Zero Strategy enforces the government’s commitment to leave the environment in a better state than we found it. As climate change and air pollution have many of the same emission sources, delivering the measures set out in the Net Zero Strategy will significantly benefit air quality and contribute to meeting the targets that will be established under the Environment Act.

We are working closely with the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy to ensure those benefits to air quality are delivered and any potential impacts managed. We are considering the impact of the net zero policy pathway on air quality as part of our work to set these targets.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
18th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether his Department plans to update the Clean Air Strategy in light of the (a) Environment Act, (b) Net Zero Strategy and (c) Transport Decarbonisation Strategy.

We do not at present plan to update the Clean Air Strategy. The Environment Act 2021 will deliver key parts of the Clean Air Strategy and we continue to work across Government to strengthen our collective action on air quality, including through the measures set out in the Net Zero Strategy and the Transport Decarbonisation strategy. The air quality co-benefits of meeting the sixth Carbon Budget and the Net Zero Strategy are estimated at about £35 billion over 2020-2050.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
18th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what discussions he has had with Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, on the additional powers and funding local authorities will need to help tackle air pollution as set out in the Environment Act.

The Environment Act will improve the local air quality management framework to enable greater local action on air pollution by ensuring that responsibility for addressing air pollution is shared across a wider range of partners. It also ensures local authorities have simple to use powers to tackle emissions from domestic burning, a key source of harmful fine particulate pollution.

Defra’s Air Quality Grant programme also provides funding to local authorities for projects in local communities to tackle air pollution. The Government has awarded nearly £70 million in funding since the air quality grant started in 1997.

Further, in line with commitments in the Environment Act 2021, we are currently reviewing the National Air Quality Strategy and will be publishing a revised Strategy in 2023. A key objective of this review will be to develop a strong support and capability-building framework to ensure local authorities have the necessary tools to take local action. We are working across government on this Strategy, including with officials at the Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
18th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps his Department is taking to help ensure that access to accurate air quality monitoring data is provided across local communities.

Defra’s UK-Air website displays near real time measurements from monitoring sites across the UK for a range of pollutants (https://uk-air.defra.gov.uk). The largest of these networks, the UK Automatic Urban and Rural Network, is comprised of 171 monitoring sites and provides data to measure compliance with the Air Quality Standards Regulations (2010). The number and location of these sites have been carefully selected to minimise uncertainty and to be representative of the whole of the UK. Data from automatic monitoring sites managed by local authorities is also available from UK-Air.

The department is currently undertaking a detailed review of data services on UK-Air, building on the recent user needs work published in June this year (http://sciencesearch.defra.gov.uk/Document.aspx?Document=15133_DefraAirQualityUserNeeds-finalreport.pdf), to maximise the benefits this high-quality monitoring information can provide our local communities and decision makers at all levels.

Through the statutory Local Air Quality Management framework, local authorities are required to assess air quality in their area and provide a summary of their assessment in an Annual Status Report. Local authorities are required to make these reports available to the public and local stakeholders through their websites.

In addition, Defra’s Air Quality Grant scheme provides funding to local authorities and supports schemes which help councils develop and implement measures to improve air quality in local communities. We have increased the funding pot available to local authorities in this year’s Air Quality Grant by £6 million. A significant proportion of this additional funding will be dedicated to projects to improve public awareness in local communities about the risks of air pollution.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
18th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether he has plans to communicate to the public the (a) dangers of air pollution in rural and urban areas from indoor and outdoor sources and (b) steps that can be taken to mitigate the health impact of air pollution from those sources.

Defra provides a wide range of air quality data and information to the public through the UK-AIR website. This includes a five-day air pollution forecast; these forecasts are communicated using the Daily Air Quality Index (DAQI). The DAQI informs the public about levels of air pollution in their area and provides health advice in the form of recommended actions that could be taken according to the level of air pollution.

Alongside the information we already provide to the public, we are conducting a holistic review of the way we communicate air quality information and advice to ensure the public is provided with timely and relevant information about air pollution, actions people can take to limit their personal exposure, the impact of air pollution on their health, and their own influence on air quality.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment his Department had made of the impact of the £2.7 billion per annum cost of reforms to extended producer responsibility (a) for food and drink businesses and (b) on food prices.

Under our proposals the cost of managing and recycling packaging waste will transfer from local taxpayers and others who deal with waste to the businesses who make and use packaging. Our initial analysis indicates that this will not result in significant increases in consumer prices (including food prices). However, it will be for the businesses in question to decide if they will increase prices, or improve and reduce their packaging.

The final impact assessment, which will be published next year, will include assessment on this point.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment his Department has made of the impact that the £2.7 billion per annum cost that the reforms to extended producer responsibility will have on (a) food and drink businesses and (b) food prices.

Under our proposals the cost of managing and recycling packaging waste will transfer from local taxpayers and others who deal with waste to the businesses who make and use packaging. Our initial analysis indicates that this will not result in significant increases in consumer prices (including food prices). However, it will be for the businesses in question to decide if they will increase prices, or improve and reduce their packaging.

The final impact assessment, which will be published next year, will include assessment on this point.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the Food and Drink Federation's report entitled Eating into household budgets: the Government’s recipe for food price inflation, published on 20 July 2021, what assessment his Department has made of the analysis in that report on the cost of government regulation for families and the cost of food over the next three years.

No analysis has been made of the Food and Drink Federation’s report. All Government regulations are subject to an impact assessment that compares the costs and benefits of the change proposed. This allows the Government to take a balanced view on the benefit of implementing that regulation for the overall good of society.

The Government is wholly committed to supporting people on lower incomes and consistently supporting the lowest-paid families including through increasing the living wage and by spending over £111 billion on welfare support for people of working age in 2021/22.

Regulation does not necessarily translate into price rises for consumers including families. Defra modelling shows that consumer food prices depend on a range of factors including agri-food import prices, domestic agricultural prices, domestic labour & manufacturing costs and Sterling exchange rates. Defra monitors food prices on a monthly and annual basis using the ONS Consumer Price Index with Housing costs.

Later this year the Government will publish the UK Food Security Report which will bring together reported and publicly available data on food security, including at a household level. As part of the forthcoming Government Food Strategy, Defra is working closely with other relevant departments across Whitehall to set out a plan to ensure the food system is sustainable and affordable, supporting people and families to live healthy lives, while protecting animal health and welfare.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
22nd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, (a) what recent discussions the Government has had with the Environment Agency on tightening standards under the BAT Conclusions for Waste Incineration issued by the European Commission in 2019; (b) how many permits of existing facilities have been revised in particular for Nitrogen Oxide pollution; and (c) and whether all permits for new facilities reflect these updated limit values and require the use of selective catalytic reduction to abate Nitrogen Oxide pollution.

(a) Defra meets regularly with the Environment Agency to discuss the implementation of Best Available Techniques (BAT) at regulated facilities. One such meeting was held in July 2021 when the UK Interpretation guidance for the Waste Incineration BAT Conclusions was agreed, including tightening of relevant emission limits.

(b) The Environment Agency has not yet revised any permits for existing facilities in respect of emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx). All permits will be revised by the legally required implementation date for the BAT Conclusions for existing plants which is 3 December 2023.

(c) All new permits issued by the Environment Agency since 3 December 2019 reflect the updated limit values for NOx for new plants, but not all of them require the use of selective catalytic reduction.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
22nd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 21 June 2021 to Question 15996 on Transport: Refrigeration, if he will publish the industry and sector experts, or their companies, involved in the research project aimed to improve the evidence base on emissions from non-road mobile machinery, including transport refrigeration units.

Defra's recently completed research project aimed to improve the evidence base on emissions from non-road mobile machinery (NRMM), including transport refrigeration units, specifically by improving our understanding of the UK NRMM emissions fleet. This involved working with a number of industry and sector experts. It was important that parties contributing to the research project were able to share their ideas and data with Defra in confidence should they wish to. Therefore, we do not intend to publish a list of contributors to the research project.

We are now considering next steps on NRMM and are undertaking further work to address some remaining evidence gaps. We will consult with further stakeholders in due course as appropriate.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
22nd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent discussions he has had with Cabinet colleagues on ensuring targets for waste incineration help progress on the (a) Government's net zero emissions target and (b) circular economy.

There have been no recent discussions with Cabinet colleagues specifically on targets for waste incineration. However, powers being adopted via the Environment Bill will require the Government to set long-term, legally binding environmental targets, with at least one within the area of Resource Efficiency and Waste Reduction. My department is exploring how targets can help to reduce the amount of 'residual' waste we generate.

Officials are currently gathering evidence to enable Ministerial decisions on the targets, which will be consulted on in the new year.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
7th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether he plans to publish a draft UK Chemicals Strategy and consult on it; and when he plans to publish a final Strategy.

The Government’s 25 Year Environment Plan commits to publishing a Chemicals Strategy to tackle chemicals of concern and help ensure the levels of harmful chemicals entering the environment are significantly reduced. Work on the Chemicals Strategy is underway and we will set out our next steps in due course.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
6th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the objective set out in the Government's Clean Air Strategy 2019 on ensuring that consumers are armed with reliable information enabling them to make informed choices to protect themselves, what steps his Department plans to take to meet that objective.

The Government is committed to making sure that the best possible advice on pollution is available to the public to enable them to make informed choices to protect their health.

Defra makes air pollution information available through a range of channels, such as the UK-Air website and more recently working with Global Action Plan to deliver the Clean Air Hub.

We also provide information to a network of charities when air pollution levels are forecast to be elevated to ensure information reaches the most vulnerable.

A fundamental component of communicating air quality information is the Daily Air Quality Index (DAQI), which gives advice, based on the level of pollution that is in the forecast and being measured. Defra, Public Health England and DHSC are working with the chairs of the Air Quality Expert Group (AQEG) and the Committee on Medical Effects of Air Pollutants (COMEAP) to establish an expert group update the DAQI and system for providing air quality information in the light of accumulated new evidence and experience.

Defra is also undertaking a fundamental review of the UK-AIR website to improve the functionality and user experience. This project will identify a structure for disseminating information on air quality that reflects the needs and preferences of the key user groups and stakeholders that use the site.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
6th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps his Department plans to take to meet commitments under the 25 Year Environment Plan and Clean Air Strategy on tackling air pollution indoors.

We are working with the Department of Health and Social Care who have overall oversight of indoor air quality policy.

We have made significant progress in delivering our commitments in the Clean Air Strategy to reduce emissions of particulate matter from domestic solid fuel burning, which contribute to indoor air pollution. On 1 May 2021 new legislation came into force that restricts the sale of the most polluting fuels used in domestic burning. In addition, new emission standards for solid fuel appliances will also come into force from January 2022, ensuring only the cleanest new stoves are available to enter the market for sale.

These measures are supported by an information campaign aimed at educating people about burning better and reducing harmful emissions, with campaign materials found at Burn better: Making changes for cleaner air - Defra, UK. We are also aware that new fuels, such as coffee and olive logs, are entering the market and while the government wants to encourage innovation, customers need to be certain that these products are safe. That is why we will be reviewing these fuels with a view to setting any relevant standards.

We are also working on building our evidence base to support DHSC and ensure that any further future interventions are appropriately targeted and effective. Defra’s Air Quality Expert Group, with support from members of DHSC’s Committee on the Medical Effects of Air Pollution, are producing a report on indoor air quality, focusing on fine particulate matter and volatile organic compounds as the air pollutants which are prevalent in indoor environments.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
18th Aug 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the report on emissions from non-road mobile machinery (NRMM) engines published by Ricardo Energy and Environment, what discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Transport on (a) banning or (b) limiting the use of NRMM engines, including those used in the transportation of food.

Neither the Secretary of State nor I have had any discussions with the Secretary of State for Transport on this subject to date.

In January 2017, new legislation came into force with more stringent emission limits for major air pollutants from engines used in NRMM. It extends the scope of existing legislation to cover all sizes of petrol and diesel engines used in NRMM and it improves the legal framework. As of January 2019, new emission standards are mandatory for new engines being sold, for the first tranche of categories.

The Government also announced that it will remove the entitlement to use red diesel from April 2022 for many sectors, which will have benefits for air quality as red diesel is currently a cheaper fuel option for use in NRMM, whether for power lawnmowers, refrigerated lorries or excavators. This change will incentivise diesel fuel users to improve the energy efficiency of their machinery, invest in cleaner alternatives, or just use less fuel. The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy has also recently launched a Red Diesel Replacement competition, to support the development and production of innovative clean energy technologies that affected businesses can switch to.

In addition, following recent work to improve the evidence base about different NRMM and their emissions, which involved working with industry and sector experts, we are now considering next steps. As set out in the Clean Air Strategy, the Government is considering the options to reduce emissions from non-road mobile machinery, and this research will help ensure that we have a robust and accurate evidence base from which to consider policy options.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
21st Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 16 June 2021 to Question 14143 on Chemicals: Health Hazards, if he will take steps to (a) introduce hazard-based protection measures for reducing exposures to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) that are set out in the EU’s Chemicals Strategy for Sustainability, (b) update regulatory information requirements to allow the identification of endocrine disruptors under REACH and other relevant legislation, (c) amend REACH Article 57 to add EDCs to the list of substances of very high concern and (d) phase out EDCs from consumer products.

The UK Government's goal is to enhance protections to human health and the environment, while enabling economic growth through the safe management, production and disposal of chemicals.

The identification of intrinsic chemical hazards is already a principal requirement of the classification, labelling and packaging regulation (CLP). The hazard classes in CLP classify physical, health and environmental hazards. Endocrine disrupting properties are not captured by a specific CLP hazard class, however human health endocrine disrupting properties are closely linked to existing CMR (carcinogenic, mutagenic, toxic to reproduction) hazard classes.


Under Article 57 of REACH, endocrine disrupting properties can already be used to demonstrate that the substance is of 'equivalent level of concern' to be identified as a Substance of Very High Concern (SVHC). SVHC identification is the first step in making a substance subject to authorisation - controls that limit the use of the most hazardous substances.

The Government is committed to protecting consumers from unsafe products. Legislation is in place to require that manufacturers only place safe products on the market and take action where they identify a safety issue with products already on the market.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of levels of pollution (a) caused by diesel non-road mobile machinery (NRMM) engines fitted to transport refrigeration equipment and (b) in areas with temperature controlled warehouses where NRMM are used and make frequent deliveries.

Tailpipe emissions from vehicles which power transport refrigeration units are recorded as road traffic emissions in the National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory. The data for road transport emission is published annually and has been reported since 1990 onwards. The Government has not historically estimated emissions from transport refrigeration unit auxiliary engines as the available data is limited.

Defra has recently completed a research project which involved working with industry and sector experts and aimed to improve the evidence base on emissions from non-road mobile machinery, including transport refrigeration units, and we are considering next steps. As set out in the Clean Air Strategy, the Government is considering the options to reduce emissions from non-road mobile machinery, and this research will help ensure that we have a robust and accurate evidence base to consider policy options from.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
11th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether he had discussions with the Prime Minister on the impact of private modes of transport including private jets on (a) air pollution and (b) biodiversity before the G7 meeting in Cornwall.

The Government considered this issue and took steps to ensure a sustainable event. We appointed engineering, design and consultancy firm Arup, to help the event achieve ISO 20121 sustainability certification and to deliver a carbon-neutral event by developing a Carbon Management Plan. This included offsetting for G7 and guest leader and staff travel.

The Government is committed to improving the environmental sustainability of its own estates and operations through the Greening Government Commitments (GGCs). As part of these, central Government departments are currently required to report on and reduce the number of domestic flights they take. The latest annual report showed the Government as a whole had reduced the number of domestic flights it took by 28% in 2018-19 compared with the 2009-10 baseline. The Government Fleet Commitment also commits central Government departments to have 25% of their fleet as ultra-low emissions vehicles by 2022 and 100% by 2030. Progress against the fleet commitment will be reported on for the first time in the forthcoming 2019-20 GGC annual report.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
26th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what provisions on indoor air quality will be included the Environment Bill; and how those provisions will be enforced.

We recognise the importance of national leadership on the issue of indoor air quality, and we are working across Government with the Chief Medical Officer and the Government Chief Scientific Advisor to coordinate further action, as well as with the Department of Health and Social Care and Public Health England who are taking the lead on this area.

Our Clean Air Strategy also includes measures to reduce emissions from key sources which contribute to indoor air pollution, including measures to reduce emissions of fine particulate matter from domestic solid fuel burning, which are in part delivered through the Environment Bill.

However, we consider that building our evidence base is a key first step to ensure that any future interventions are appropriately targeted and effective and that is what we are now focusing on. For example, our Air Quality Expert Group, with support from members of the Committee on the Medical Effects of Air Pollution, will be producing a report on indoor air quality, focusing on fine particulate matter and volatile organic compounds as the air pollutants which are prevalent in indoor environments.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
26th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether he plans to bring forward legislative proposals in the Environment Bill in response to the recommendations of the coroner's report following the inquest into the death of Ella Kissi-Debrah.

Our thoughts continue to be with Ella’s family and friends. We will carefully consider the recommendations in the Prevention of Future Deaths report and respond in due course.

We know that air pollution is the single greatest environmental risk to human health, and although air pollution has reduced significantly over the last decade, there is more to do. This is why the Government is continuing to take urgent action to curb the impact air pollution has on communities across England through the world-leading Clean Air Strategy, the landmark Environment Bill, and the delivery of the £3.8 billion plan to clean up transport and tackle nitrogen dioxide pollution at the roadside.

We know there is a strong case for taking ambitious action on PM2.5 as it is the pollutant that has the most significant impact on health. That is why we are introducing a duty to set a PM2.5 target – alongside at least one additional long-term air quality target - in the Environment Bill. We have always been clear that we will consider the World Health Organization’s guidelines for PM2.5 at part of this process.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
26th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the coroner's Report to prevent future deaths following the inquest into the death of Ella Kiss--Debrah, what steps he is taking to help ensure that there are enough air quality sensors in local communities.

Our thoughts continue to be with Ella’s family and friends. We will carefully consider the recommendations in the Prevention of Future Deaths report and respond in due course.

Local authorities have statutory duties to review and assess local air quality. Local authorities decide what local monitoring is undertaken in line with national and local priorities, funded by their grant in aid settlement. Over £1 million additional funds from Defra’s 2018/19 Air Quality Grant was awarded for local authorities to pilot and evaluate low cost sensors.

In addition, Defra’s national monitoring network is published on the UK Air Information Resource (UK AIR). This is updated in real time to provide a live representation of the national monitoring network.

We have invested over £2 million in the last two years into the research and development of emerging sensor and satellite technologies and practical, on the ground trials in order to bring forward new monitoring advancements.

Information on sites managed by local authorities and those that make up national networks managed by Defra can be found on UK AIR (https://uk-air.defra.gov.uk/networks/find-sites and https://uk-air.defra.gov.uk/interactive-map).

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
26th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the coroner's Report to prevent future deaths following the inquest into the death of Ella Kissi-Debrah, what estimate he has made of the effect of reducing national limits for Particulate Matter in line with the World Health Organisation's guidelines on the number of deaths from air pollution in the UK.

Our thoughts continue to be with Ella's family and friends. We will carefully consider the recommendations in the Prevention of Future Deaths report and respond in due course.

We know there is a strong case for taking ambitious action on PM2.5 as it is the pollutant that has the most significant impact on health. That is why we are introducing a duty to set a PM2.5 target - alongside at least one additional long-term air quality target - in the Environment Bill.

The costs, benefits and distributional impacts of any measures to meet air quality targets on businesses and wider society will be assessed as part of our development of targets under the Environment Bill Framework. They will be included in an Impact Assessment which will accompany a public consultation on environmental targets in early 2022. To inform this analysis, we have asked the Committee on the Medical Effects of Air Pollutants for expert advice to ensure we are taking account of the latest health evidence. World Health Organization guidelines will also be considered to inform target development.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
22nd Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps he is taking to reduce levels of particulate air pollution to within the limit set in the World Health Organisation's recommendations in the Prevention of Future Deaths report, published on 21 April 2021.

Our thoughts continue to be with Ella’s family and friends. We will carefully consider the recommendations in the Prevention of Future Deaths report and respond in due course.

We know that air pollution is the single greatest environmental risk to human health, and although air pollution has reduced significantly over the last decade, there is more to do. The World Health Organization has praised our Clean Air Strategy as “an example for the rest of the world to follow”. We know there is a strong case for taking ambitious action on PM2.5 as it is the pollutant that has the most significant impact on health. We have already taken action on a major source of PM2.5 by legislating to phase out the sale of house coal, small volumes of wet wood and high sulphur manufactured solid fuels for domestic burning, but further action is needed. This is why we are introducing a duty to set a PM2.5 target – alongside at least one additional long-term air quality target - in the Environment Bill. We have always been clear that we will consider the World Health Organization’s guidelines for PM2.5 as part of this process.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
2nd Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps he has taken to enforce the restrictions on the market of C9-C14 PFCAs, their salts and related substances, agreed by ECHA by the end of the transition period; and whether those restrictions will be transposed into UK REACH by 1 January 2021.

At the end of the transition period, only those restrictions that are in force in EU REACH will be automatically carried over into UK REACH. The restriction proposals on C9-C14 PFCAs and on PFHxS are not yet agreed under EU REACH and are not likely to be in force at the end of the transition period, so will not be automatically carried over into UK law.

After the end of the transition period we will make independent decisions on future REACH restrictions, taking into account any analysis already carried out, including in the EU, consultations, and our own independent scientific advice.

Defra and the Environment Agency are working closely with other regulators to investigate sources, pathways and risks associated with PFAS chemicals in the environment in order to facilitate decisions on future risk management options.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
2nd Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether the restriction proposal on manufacture, use and placing on the market of PFHxS, its salts and related substances agreed by ECHA will be transposed into UK REACH at the end of the transition period.

At the end of the transition period, only those restrictions that are in force in EU REACH will be automatically carried over into UK REACH. The restriction proposals on C9-C14 PFCAs and on PFHxS are not yet agreed under EU REACH and are not likely to be in force at the end of the transition period, so will not be automatically carried over into UK law.

After the end of the transition period we will make independent decisions on future REACH restrictions, taking into account any analysis already carried out, including in the EU, consultations, and our own independent scientific advice.

Defra and the Environment Agency are working closely with other regulators to investigate sources, pathways and risks associated with PFAS chemicals in the environment in order to facilitate decisions on future risk management options.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
2nd Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the (a) Swedish Chemicals Agency's substance evaluation for flame retardant bis(2-ethylhexyl) tetrabromophthalate and (b) potential merits of the Health and Safety Executive classifying the flame retardant bis(2-ethylhexyl) tetrabromophthalate as a substance of very high concern.

The substance evaluation recently completed by KEMI, the Swedish Environment Agency, recommended further follow-up regulatory action at EU level, although the process required under EU REACH to identify the substance as a “substance of very high concern” (SVHC) has not yet started.

After the end of the transition period, the UK will establish its own independent chemicals regulatory framework for Great Britain, UK REACH. All substances on the EU REACH candidate list of SVHCs for authorisation at that point will be listed on the UK REACH candidate list. We will make independent decisions on future identification of substances as SVHC, taking into account existing evidence, and consultation.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps his Department is taking (a) to support research into indoor air pollution to help build the evidence base and (b) to work with other Departments to facilitate a cross-government approach to improving indoor air quality.

Defra is supporting work on indoor air quality by gathering evidence needed to inform effective policies. Our Air Quality Expert Group, with input from members of the Department of Health and Social Care’s (DHSC) Committee on the Medical Effects of Air Pollutants, will be publishing a paper on indoor air quality in the new year. This will focus on fine particulate matter and volatile organic compounds as the air pollutants which are prevalent in indoor environments. We have also engaged actively with the research community through the Clean Air Programme, which is part of UK Research and Innovation’s Strategic Priorities Fund. Wave 2 of this programme is focused on the indoor/outdoor air quality interface.

Earlier this year, Defra attended a cross-Government roundtable on indoor air quality hosted by the Chief Medical Officer and Government Chief Scientific Advisor. Given the health drivers for action, DHSC and Public Health England will be taking the lead on indoor air quality and Defra will continue to support them, alongside other Government departments.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
16th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether the draft National Action Plan on the Sustainable Use of Pesticides will include a commitment to phase out local authority use of pesticides in urban areas.

The revised National Action Plan for the Sustainable use of Pesticides (NAP) will be published for public consultation later this year and is applicable to all pesticide users including local authorities. The consultation document recognises action being taken by some local authorities to encourage phase out of pesticide usage and commits to encouraging an approach where non-essential use of pesticides is avoided.

The NAP consultation puts Integrated Pest Management (IPM) at the heart of our approach to minimise the use of pesticides across all sectors and support the uptake of non-chemical alternatives. Steps are being taken to integrate support for IPM approaches within future agri-environment schemes, for example through Environmental Land Management.

Through the NAP, we aim to minimise the risks and impacts of pesticides to human health and the environment, while ensuring pests and pesticide resistance are managed effectively. We are improving UK indicators of pesticide usage and toxicity in order to track progress against this aim. This work includes the development of a pesticide load indicator, building on the Danish model and tailoring it our domestic circumstances. We have been assessing the role of targets to support the ambitions of the NAP. The first step is to establish a robust baseline through improved indicators to ensure that goals are meaningful and drive the greatest benefit. We are aware of the difficulties experienced by France in meeting reduction targets they have set. Despite an ambitious reduction target, their overall pesticide usage has actually increased. The revision of the NAP provides an opportunity to assess the experiences of the EU and other countries, and set our domestic ambitions for the sustainable use of pesticides.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
16th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps he has taken to ensure that additional support for UK farmers to undertake integrated pest management will be included in National Action Plan.

The revised National Action Plan for the Sustainable use of Pesticides (NAP) will be published for public consultation later this year and is applicable to all pesticide users including local authorities. The consultation document recognises action being taken by some local authorities to encourage phase out of pesticide usage and commits to encouraging an approach where non-essential use of pesticides is avoided.

The NAP consultation puts Integrated Pest Management (IPM) at the heart of our approach to minimise the use of pesticides across all sectors and support the uptake of non-chemical alternatives. Steps are being taken to integrate support for IPM approaches within future agri-environment schemes, for example through Environmental Land Management.

Through the NAP, we aim to minimise the risks and impacts of pesticides to human health and the environment, while ensuring pests and pesticide resistance are managed effectively. We are improving UK indicators of pesticide usage and toxicity in order to track progress against this aim. This work includes the development of a pesticide load indicator, building on the Danish model and tailoring it our domestic circumstances. We have been assessing the role of targets to support the ambitions of the NAP. The first step is to establish a robust baseline through improved indicators to ensure that goals are meaningful and drive the greatest benefit. We are aware of the difficulties experienced by France in meeting reduction targets they have set. Despite an ambitious reduction target, their overall pesticide usage has actually increased. The revision of the NAP provides an opportunity to assess the experiences of the EU and other countries, and set our domestic ambitions for the sustainable use of pesticides.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
16th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of (a) the EU biodiversity strategy and farm to fork strategy which commit to a 50 per cent reduction in both the amount and toxicity of pesticides by 2030 and (b) similar targets set by Denmark and France; and what steps he is taking to use the EU's implementation of its strategy to inform UK policy in this area.

The revised National Action Plan for the Sustainable use of Pesticides (NAP) will be published for public consultation later this year and is applicable to all pesticide users including local authorities. The consultation document recognises action being taken by some local authorities to encourage phase out of pesticide usage and commits to encouraging an approach where non-essential use of pesticides is avoided.

The NAP consultation puts Integrated Pest Management (IPM) at the heart of our approach to minimise the use of pesticides across all sectors and support the uptake of non-chemical alternatives. Steps are being taken to integrate support for IPM approaches within future agri-environment schemes, for example through Environmental Land Management.

Through the NAP, we aim to minimise the risks and impacts of pesticides to human health and the environment, while ensuring pests and pesticide resistance are managed effectively. We are improving UK indicators of pesticide usage and toxicity in order to track progress against this aim. This work includes the development of a pesticide load indicator, building on the Danish model and tailoring it our domestic circumstances. We have been assessing the role of targets to support the ambitions of the NAP. The first step is to establish a robust baseline through improved indicators to ensure that goals are meaningful and drive the greatest benefit. We are aware of the difficulties experienced by France in meeting reduction targets they have set. Despite an ambitious reduction target, their overall pesticide usage has actually increased. The revision of the NAP provides an opportunity to assess the experiences of the EU and other countries, and set our domestic ambitions for the sustainable use of pesticides.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the London School of Economics report, Vulnerabilities of Supply Chains Post-Brexit, published in September 2020, if he will make an assessment of the implications for his policies of the recommendation in that report which advocates full recognition by the EU and the UK at customs borders of their respective agreed food safety systems and veterinary certifications to minimise frictions in supply chains for UK food and dairy producers.

I welcome the London School of Economics report. It is important that we are able to minimise friction in our supply chains.

We have been clear any future agreement will be made in respect of the decision-making autonomy of the European Union and with respect for British sovereignty.

The UK must retain the ability to set its own laws and regulations, and so in the ongoing negotiations with the EU, we will always look to agree the best deal for British producers and businesses.

From 1 January 2021 the UK will have the autonomy to introduce its own approach to goods imported to Great Britain from the EU. However, we recognise the impact Covid-19 has had on businesses and therefore we have taken the decision to introduce border controls in three stages up until 1 July 2021. This flexible and pragmatic approach will give industry extra time to make necessary arrangements.

We remain committed to engaging closely with businesses to ensure that delivery of any new administrative requirements works for everyone. This included a warning already given to stakeholders that they need to prepare to trade on different terms once the UK has left the Single Market.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the London School of Economics report, Vulnerabilities of Supply Chains Post-Brexit, published in September 2020,what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of the estimate in that report that predicts a 55 per cent increase on the price of 99 per cent of dairy product imports after the end of the transition period in the event that no deal is agreed.

The Government has been clear that it seeks a free trade agreement with the EU, based on friendly cooperation and maintaining tariff and quota free access. The UK is a significant importer of food and other goods, and avoiding tariffs should be beneficial to both sides, given our shared commitment to high regulatory standards.

However, in the event that we have a trading relationship with the EU along the same lines as Australia, without a free trade agreement, and the UK Global Tariff applies, we have a highly resilient food supply chain. Consumers in the UK have access to a range of sources of food, including countless domestic food producers. This will continue to be the case after December 2020. As part of the UK Global Tariff, the Government has sought a balance between the interests of consumers and producers to benefit the UK economy as a whole.

There are many factors that impact the cost of food, including commodity prices, exchange rates and oil prices. This will not change at the end of the Transition Period. The UK Government does not directly control these factors but we work closely with industry to promote transparency for consumers and internationally to promote open global markets.

Moreover, the UK's new independent trade policy enables us to take control of more levers to facilitate competitive trade and to forge new trading relationships around the world in the interests of UK agri-food businesses and consumers.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of increased cost of health problems caused by air pollution as a proportion of GDP since the start of the covid-19 outbreak; and what steps he is taking to reduce air pollution.

We have not assessed the increased cost of health problems caused by air pollution as a proportion of GDP since the start of the covid-19 outbreak. However, in 2018 Public Health England reported that the cumulative costs to the health and social care service from air pollution will be £5.3 billion by 2035, and their evidence shows that a reduction of 1 µg/m 3 of PM 2.5 in England in a single year would prevent 9,000 cases of asthma, 50,000 cases of coronary heart disease, 4000 lung cancers and 15,000 strokes in the period until 2035.

We are committed to tackling air pollution in order to improve public health and the environment. This is stated in our Clean Air Strategy of 2019, which the World Health Organization lauded as world leading. Our landmark Environment Bill is currently going through Parliament, and in it we are committing to an ambitious new air quality target on PM 2.5, the pollutant of greatest harm to human health.

We have also put in place a £3.5 billion plan to tackle roadside nitrogen dioxide concentrations.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent discussions he has had with the Secretary State of Health on the correlation between air quality indoors and outdoors in terms of public health.

The Secretary of State regularly meets with cabinet colleagues to discuss a range of issues, including air quality. Whilst there haven’t been specific discussions regarding the correlation between air quality indoors and outdoors in terms of public health, Defra is working with Public Health England and DHSC to develop a better understanding of this complex issue. For example, Defra's Air Quality Expert Group, with support from members of the Committee on the Medical Effects of Air Pollutants, managed by PHE, will be producing a dedicated report on indoor air quality. This report will focus on fine particulate matter and volatile organic compounds as the pollutants which are most prevalent in indoor environments. In addition, Defra participated in a roundtable organised by the Chief Medical Officer and Government Chief Scientific Advisor on the issue of indoor air quality earlier this year.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
10th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the effect of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances in food packaging on the environment.

A number of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are already banned or highly restricted. The UK is a Party to the Stockholm Convention, which has already agreed restrictions on the use of certain PFAS. There are also restrictions in place under the REACH (Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals) regulations.

At the end of the Transition Period the UK will put in place its own domestic chemicals regulatory framework. Existing restrictions under REACH will be brought into UK law. Our commitments under the Stockholm Convention will continue to apply. Future UK decisions to control the environmental and human health impacts of substances will be taken under our independent regime and will be based on rigorous assessment of the scientific evidence, including looking at approaches taken by chemical regimes across the world.

We are working to improve our understanding of the emissions and risks of PFAS in the UK, and how we manage these chemicals will be considered in our forthcoming Chemicals Strategy. The Food Standards Agency also regularly reviews new information on PFAS and will be considering the upcoming review by the Committee on Toxicity of Chemicals in Food, Consumer Products and the Environment of the European Food Safety Authority’s latest scientific opinion on PFAS in food.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
10th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether he plans to include in the UK chemical strategy a ban within 12 months on the non-essential use of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances.

A number of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are already banned or highly restricted. The UK is a Party to the Stockholm Convention, which has already agreed restrictions on the use of certain PFAS. There are also restrictions in place under the REACH (Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals) regulations.

At the end of the Transition Period the UK will put in place its own domestic chemicals regulatory framework. Existing restrictions under REACH will be brought into UK law. Our commitments under the Stockholm Convention will continue to apply. Future UK decisions to control the environmental and human health impacts of substances will be taken under our independent regime and will be based on rigorous assessment of the scientific evidence, including looking at approaches taken by chemical regimes across the world.

We are working to improve our understanding of the emissions and risks of PFAS in the UK, and how we manage these chemicals will be considered in our forthcoming Chemicals Strategy. The Food Standards Agency also regularly reviews new information on PFAS and will be considering the upcoming review by the Committee on Toxicity of Chemicals in Food, Consumer Products and the Environment of the European Food Safety Authority’s latest scientific opinion on PFAS in food.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
30th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what discussions he has had with the Chancellor of the Exchequer on using taxation to improve air quality.

Air pollution poses the biggest environmental threat to public health and improving air quality remains a top priority for the government. In delivering against our stretching air quality commitments, we regularly hold discussions with Ministers and officials across Government departments, including the Chancellor of the Exchequer and HMT.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
30th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to transport refrigeration units emissions, (a) how the Government is measuring levels of those emissions, (b) how often data on those emissions is published and (c) for how long that data been collected.

Tailpipe emissions from vehicles which power transport refrigeration units are recorded as road traffic emissions in the National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory. The data for road transport emissions is published annually and has been reported since 1990 onwards. The Government does not estimate emissions from transport refrigeration unit auxiliary engines as the available data are limited.

Defra has commissioned research and is working with industry and sector experts to improve the evidence base on emissions from non-road mobile machinery emissions, including transport refrigeration units. As set out in the Clean Air Strategy, the Government is considering the options to reduce emissions from non-road mobile machinery.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
30th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when the Expert Committee on Pesticide Residues in Food will publish its 2019 annual report.

The 2019 Annual Report of the UK Expert Committee on Pesticide Residues in Food will be published on 4 November 2020 on GOV.UK.

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/expert-committee-on-pesticide-residues-in-food-prif-annual-report.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
23rd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps the Government is taking to reduce the level of carbon emissions embedded in goods imported to the UK.

The latest figures show carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions associated with imported goods fell by 1% between 2016 and 2017, and by 16% between 2007 (when they peaked) and 2017.

The latest figures published are at: www.gov.uk/government/statistics/uks-carbon-footprint but they focus on greenhouse gas emissions rather than just CO2 emissions. Consumption emissions are officially categorised as “experimental statistics” due to inherent uncertainties in the estimates produced. The UK’s GHG emissions statistics used for the purposes of measuring progress against the net zero target are calculated in line with the standard international accounting approach for measuring emissions as established by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change.

The Government's Resources and Waste Strategy for England sets out its ambition to move from a make, take, use, throw linear economic model to a more circular economy which will reduce our carbon footprint from imported emissions through increasing repair, reuse, remanufacture and other waste prevention activities.

The Environment Bill includes measures that will help consumers to make purchasing decisions that support the market for more sustainable products. It contains powers to introduce clear product labelling, which will enable consumers to identify products that are more durable, reparable and recyclable and will inform them on how to dispose of used products.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
21st Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment the Government has made of the effect of air pollution on (a) BAME communities and (b) women.

As part of the UK Plan for tackling roadside nitrogen dioxide (NO2), the Government reviewed evidence investigating the inequalities in the distributional impact of poor air quality. The published technical report references research conducted by Fecht et al (2015) that demonstrates that higher concentrations of NO2 and coarse particulate matter (PM10) have been observed in ethnically diverse neighbourhoods.

Additionally, in 2020 the Office for National Statistics published a report on Coronavirus mortality rates and air quality. Data analysis highlighted that ethnicity is strongly correlated with pollution exposure, with ethnic minorities more likely to live in polluted areas. To date, the Government has not investigated whether there are air pollution inequalities between women and men. Such analysis would be particularly challenging due to the fixed nature of the Government's air quality monitoring stations; the monitoring network limits our ability to make robust inferences about air pollution exposure at places of work, within households or at an individual level.

The Government is taking a proactive approach to tackling air pollution concentrations through the NO2 plan and Clean Air Strategy, both of which will improve air quality across the UK. Furthermore, those actions that focus on reducing the highest concentrations of harmful pollutants will disproportionately benefit ethnically diverse communities that are located in areas of poor air quality.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
20th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps he has taken to ensure that flame retardant chemicals from end-life sofas and mattresses are prevented from polluting (a) the air, (b) rivers and (c) oceans.

The Stockholm Convention bans or restricts the use of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) that are toxic, persist in the environment, bio-accumulate in humans and animals, and have long-ranging properties. The Convention has banned some chemicals that have historically been used as flame retardants in sofas and mattresses and the UK supported this action. Those bans are in force in the UK.

To prevent POPs entering the environment, the waste industry has a legal requirement to destroy POPs where they are present in waste articles above a threshold limit. We have recently completed a study to better understand the use of two of the most commonly used flame retardants in soft furnishings before they were banned, decabromodiphenyl ether (decaBDE) and hexabromocyclododecane (HBCDD). We will now use this information as a basis on which to work with the waste industry to review management of soft furnishings. This will ensure that articles most likely to contain POPs are destroyed at the end of their life, preventing pollution.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
14th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps he has taken to ensure compliance with the Stockholm Convention by ensuring disposal of furniture containing flame retardant chemicals safely at end-life.

The Stockholm Convention bans or restricts the use of persistent organic pollutant chemicals (POPs) that are toxic, persist in the environment, bio-accumulate in humans and animals and have long-ranging properties. The Convention has banned some chemicals that have historically been used as flame retardants in soft furnishings and the UK has supported this action.

The waste industry has a legal requirement to destroy POPs that are in articles such as soft furnishings and this is achieved if they are incinerated at the correct temperature. We have recently completed a study to better understand the use of Decabromodiphenyl ether (decaBDE) and Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCDD), which were the most commonly used flame retardants in soft furnishings before they were banned. We will now work with the waste industry to use this information to recognise where soft furnishings are likely to contain POPs, thereby ensuring disposal processes destroy the banned flame retardants.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
13th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment his Department has made of the existing evidence base for deflagration as an alternative to the high-order detonation method mandated by existing Marine Management Organisation licensing for ordnance clearance ahead of the construction of offshore wind farms.

The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) has not undertaken a formal assessment of the evidence base for deflagration. The Marine Management Organisation sits on the steering group for a research project on deflagration commissioned by the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, and Defra receives regular updates on progress.

A recent project report is available on the UK Offshore Energy Strategic Environmental Assessment pages of the gov.uk website.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
13th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answers of 13 March 2020 to Questions 26130 and 26131 on Seabed: Bomb Disposal, how much funding has been allocated for the sea trials of deflagration planned for 2020, and what the planned timeframe is for that trial.

The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) has not undertaken a formal assessment of the evidence base for deflagration. The Marine Management Organisation sits on the steering group for a research project on deflagration commissioned by the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, and Defra receives regular updates on progress.

A recent project report is available on the UK Offshore Energy Strategic Environmental Assessment pages of the gov.uk website.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
13th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of trends in the level of air pollution caused by the incineration of recyclable waste during the covid-19 lockdown.

This is a devolved matter and the information provided therefore relates to England only.

Energy from waste plants are regulated by the Environment Agency (EA) and must comply with the strict emission limits set down in legislation. Permit conditions are set based on a range and mix of waste arisings and plants are designed with abatement technologies that enable them to handle and treat a range of wastes. It is currently understood that no operators have reported issues with meeting emission limits due to any change in recyclable waste input during the Covid-19 lockdown.

With our Air Quality Expert Group (AQEG), we ran a rapid Call for Evidence to ensure we can more fully understand the impact that COVID-19 is having on air pollutant emissions, concentrations and human exposure. This report was published on 1 July. Improving air quality remains a top priority for the Government and, especially during these unprecedented times, we will continue to take robust and comprehensive action to improve air quality in the UK and minimise public health impacts.

Defra has worked with local government, other Government departments and the waste industry to produce and publish guidance to help local authorities manage their waste collection services and household waste recycling centres (HWRCs) during the Covid-19 outbreak. The guidance on reopening HWRCs was developed in conjunction with Public Health England and the Home Office and sets out how to operate HWRCs in a way that protects human health while?maintaining safe systems of working. The HWRC guidance is available at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-advice-to-local-authorities-on-prioritising-waste-collections/managing-household-waste-and-recycling-centres-hwrcs-in-england-during-the-coronavirus-covid-19-pandemic

Since publication of our guidance nearly all local authorities are now able to offer a HWRC service and local householders can make trips to these sites as needed.?Weekly surveys indicate that, due to the hard work of those in the sector, nearly all English authorities are operating household waste collections as normal, with only a small percentage reporting minor disruption.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
13th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what the cost of air pollution is to the economy.

Air pollution can affect economic output through several channels. These include:

  • Affecting the size of the working population;
  • Reducing the amount of hours worked per worker, if they are sick and cannot work (or have to attend for a sick relative);
  • Reducing workers’ productivity when at work;
  • Increasing cost for health care resources that could be used elsewhere; and
  • Affecting the quality of natural capital, reducing yields in agriculture.

Public Health England found that costs to the NHS and social care in England due to diseases related to air pollution could amount to as much as £5.5 billion for the 2017-2025 period, unless action is taken.

An analysis commissioned by Defra estimates that particulate matter, nitrogen dioxide and ozone reduces GDP by 0.11% through labour productivity losses. It also shows that greater vulnerability of children to poor air quality also affects their productivity in the long term.

The OECD estimates that an increase in concentration of particulate matter by 1µg/m3 - equivalent to a 13% rise in the UK - would cause a 0.8% reduction in GDP on average in European countries.

Improving air quality remains a top priority for the government and, especially during these unprecedented times, we will continue to take robust and comprehensive action to improve air quality in the UK and minimise its impacts on both public health and the economy.

We estimate that actions set out in our Clean Air Strategy could cut the costs of air pollution to society by £1.7 billion every year from now, rising to £5.3bn from 2030. These estimates are based on Defra damage costs, which provide impact values for a range of outcomes beyond economic impacts, in particular public health and ecosystem impacts.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
13th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what plans he has to plant protective hedges around schools to reduce air pollution in schools.

To support local authorities in their work to tackle air pollution hotspots, this Government has given a great deal of thought to the role that vegetation might play in improving air quality. The Air Quality Expert Group published a report named Impacts of Vegetation on Urban Air Pollution which is available to read here:

https://uk-air.defra.gov.uk/assets/documents/reports/cat09/1807251306_180509_Effects_of_vegetation_on_urban_air_pollution_v12_final.pdf

The key conclusion is that while vegetation might bring some highly localised benefits to air quality, it will not be a solution at a city scale. In the context of a school perimeter, there is little evidence to support vegetation reducing nitrogen oxides from exhausts and while significant amounts of foliage might provide a localised barrier effect to reduce particulate levels from the roadside, the effectiveness of these measures is unclear.

This is why the emphasis of our Clean Air Strategy is to tackle the sources of pollution levels as the most effective way to improve air quality for all.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
13th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether he has made an assessment of the implications for his policies of the report of the all-party Parliamentary group on air pollution entitled, Air Quality Strategy to Reduce Coronavirus Infection, published on 29 May 2020.

The Secretary of State welcomes the all-party group’s report and has noted its recommendations with interest. Improving air quality is a top priority for this Government and, especially during these unprecedented times, we will continue to take robust and comprehensive action to improve air quality in the UK and minimise public health impacts.

Defra’s commitment and the need for cross-Whitehall work on this was recognised in the meeting between the hon Member and myself on 6 July. We recently published the findings from a rapid Call for Evidence to understand more fully the impact that coronavirus is having on changes in air pollution emissions, concentrations and exposure and Defra’s Air Quality Expert Group (AQEG).

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
13th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for International Trade to ensure that (a) chlorpyrifos, (b) neonicotinoids and (c) other pesticides banned in the UK are not imported on products as the result of trade negotiations.

We will maintain our high food and environmental standards when operating our own independent pesticides regulatory regime after the Transition Period. The statutory requirements of the EU regime on standards of protection will be carried across unchanged into domestic law. Food imports into the UK will need to continue to comply with the rules on the maximum residue levels of pesticides. Existing maximum residue levels will all remain in place at the end of the Transition Period.

The Government will stand firm in trade negotiations to ensure any future trade deals live up to the values of farmers and consumers across the UK. We will not lower our standards nor put the UK’s biosecurity at risk as we negotiate new trade deals.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
13th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps he has taken to ensure the hazard-based approach to pesticide regulation is maintained in the event that the UK agrees trade deals with the US and Australia.

We will maintain our high food and environmental standards when operating our own independent pesticides regulatory regime after the Transition Period. The statutory requirements of the EU regime on standards of protection will be carried across unchanged into domestic law. Food imports into the UK will need to continue to comply with the rules on the maximum residue levels of pesticides. Existing maximum residue levels will all remain in place at the end of the Transition Period.

The Government will stand firm in trade negotiations to ensure any future trade deals live up to the values of farmers and consumers across the UK. We will not lower our standards nor put the UK’s biosecurity at risk as we negotiate new trade deals.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
13th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps he has taken to ensure a diversity of trees and plants in local parks and green spaces to reduce the incidence of allergic reactions linked to asthma and other respiratory conditions.

The Government recognises the importance of a resilient, healthy, and genetically diverse treescape in the urban environment, which is ready for our future climate and relies on saplings grown in the UK.

Although allergen-free green spaces are not possible, a range of measures can be employed to reduce allergen risk through good design. We are working to ensure that trees for urban planting, such as in parks and streets, have a varying flowering and pollen regime to reduce the overall pollen burden to the urban landscape and lower allergenic threshold.

The Forestry Commission has also produced the Urban Tree Manual which provides advice on selecting and procuring the right tree for the right place in urban areas, including managing pollen.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
24th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether he has made an assessment of the implications for his policies of the report of the all-party group on air pollution entitled, Air Quality Strategy to Reduce Coronavirus Infection, published on 29 May 2020.

The Secretary of State welcomes the all-party group’s report and has noted its recommendations with interest. Improving air quality is a top priority for the government and, especially during these unprecedented times, we will continue to take robust and comprehensive action to improve air quality in the UK and minimise public health impacts. We recently launched a rapid Call for Evidence to understand more fully the impact that coronavirus is having on changes in air pollution emissions, concentrations and exposure and Defra’s Air Quality Expert Group is currently analysing the responses.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 17 February 2020 to Question 13972 on Chemicals, what discussions he has had with his international counterparts as part of the Stockholm process on the management of per- and polyfluorinated alkyl substances (PFAS) as a group of chemicals; and whether he has made representations to his international counterparts on (a) listing and (b) managing PFAS as a group of chemicals as part of that process.

The Stockholm Convention lists persistent organic pollutant chemicals (POPs) that are toxic, persist in the environment, bioaccumulate in humans and animals and have long-ranging properties.

International awareness is growing of the adverse effects of PFAS as a group. The Stockholm Convention has banned some of the most harmful chemicals in the PFAS family and the UK has fully supported this action.

The Government is working with international counterparts on new PFAS assessments and lifecycle approaches and will continue work to develop these. Defra officials have been attending the POP review committee and inputting into the evidence base. The department is also financing PFAS evidence projects through the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development and remains an active member.

We will continue to develop our position on the rest of the PFAS group, based on evidence, and will engage with our international partners to support the ban on any PFAS substances that fulfil the POPs criteria.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will take steps to restrict all non-essential uses of per- and polyfluorinated alkyl substances (PFASs).

Per- and polyfluorinated alkyl substances (PFAS) constitute a group of thousands of chemicals that are widely used in consumer and industrial products. There are existing restrictions on the use of certain PFAS under the Stockholm Convention, to which the UK is a signatory, and under the REACH regulation (Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and restriction of Chemicals).

Defra is working with regulators to improve the understanding of the emissions and risks of PFAS in the UK, and how we manage these chemicals will be considered in our forthcoming Chemicals Strategy.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
9th Jan 2020
What recent assessment he has made of the potential effect of the length of the transition period on the outcome of negotiations with the EU on the future relationship between the UK and the EU.

As set out in the Political Declaration, both the UK and EU have committed to reaching an agreement on our future relationship by the end of 2020. This is in everyone’s interests.

As set out in the Withdrawal Agreement Bill, we will not be extending the Implementation Period beyond 2020.



29th Apr 2020
What steps she is taking to help ensure that UK trade agreements promote (a) fair trade and (b) the provision of affordable medicines.

The UK is both a champion of free trade and a friend to developing countries. Now that we have left the EU, the UK will work for trade deals that are free and fair for developing countries. We are seeking to continue and even enhance our previous trade agreements with African, Caribbean and Pacific countries. Access to medicines is vital, so we are continuing our commitment to the Doha Declaration on Public Health to help developing countries get the supplies they need.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Minister for Europe)
3rd Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how much her Department spent in total on social media advertising in (a) 2019, (b) 2020, (c) 2021 and (d) 2022 as of 28 February 2022; and on which platforms that money was spent.

Publicly available transparency data on departmental spend over £25,000 is published on a monthly basis and can be accessed here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/dit-spending-over-25000-january-2021.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
19th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what her policy is on (a) the prioritisation of (i) economic growth and (ii) environmental protections and (b) conceding environmental safeguards in the event that the other country demands it when negotiating trade agreements.

HM Government is clear that more trade doesn’t have to come at the expense of the environment. Future trade agreements must work for UK consumers and businesses while maintaining our high environmental standards – and we will not compromise on this.

Therefore, we have agreed ambitious environmental chapters with both Australia, and now New Zealand, which preserve our right to regulate to meet net zero, affirm our shared commitment to the Paris Agreement and seek to cooperate on a range of environmental issues.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what recent discussions she has had with UK trade partners on maintaining environmental protection standards in trade agreements.

HM Government is clear that more trade does not have to come at the expense of the environment and we are committed to meeting our ambitious environmental objectives in our future trade policy.

Of course, Britain has long supported the promotion of our values globally, and we will continue now that we have left the EU. The precise details of any British free trade agreement are a matter for formal?negotiations?and we would not seek to pre-empt these discussions, but we are exploring all options in the design of future trade and investment agreements including possible environment provisions, to make sure that future trade is sustainable and upholds Britain’s high environmental standards.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what recent discussions she has had with UK trade partners on maintaining International Labour Organisation standards in future trade agreements.

HM Government shares the high regard of the British people for worker protections and has made clear that we will not compromise on these.

Whilst the precise details of any British free trade agreement are a matter for formal?negotiations?and we would not seek to pre-empt these discussions, we are exploring all options in the design of future trade and investment agreements, including possible labour provisions, to make sure that future trade upholds Britain’s own high standards and our international obligations.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what assessment she has made of the carbon footprint of the Mozambique gas project funded by UKEF; and whether that carbon footprint meets the the UK"s commitments under the 2015 Paris Climate Commitment and the UN's Sustainable Development Goals.

The Project’s Environmental and Social Impact Assessment estimated the annual Scope 1 and 2 greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for the Mozambique LNG Project to be approximately 6 MtCO2eq. per annum. This equates to around 6 - 10% of Mozambique’s national GHG emissions, which are historically very low (just over 1/20th of the UK per capita level). GHG emissions were estimated in accordance with the GHG Emissions Protocol: Corporate Accounting & Reporting Standard developed by the World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD) and the World Resources Institute (WRI).

The Paris Agreement (Article 4.1) recognises that the peaking of greenhouse gases will take longer for developing countries, such as Mozambique, and the LNG Project sits within Mozambique’s longer-term plans to establish strong social and economic stability.

The Project’s Scope 3 emissions are produced predominantly by the use of the Project’s LNG. Calculating LNG Scope 3 emissions is highly complex and requires details of when, where, how and how much of the Project’s gas volumes will be used. UKEF made some reasonable assumptions about Scope 3 emissions, that it then took into account in its review of the Project.

UKEF also considered the likelihood of the Project’s gas being used to replace or displace more polluting hydrocarbon sources, such as oil and coal. This would result in lower net emissions when used as energy sources.

UKEF has not specifically considered alignment of the MOZ LNG Project in relation to the SDGs. As a UK government department delivering support to UK exporters, UKEF actively contributes to the UK’s progress towards, and achievement of goal 8 (decent work and economic growth), goal 16 (peace justice and strong institutions) and goal 17 (partnership for the goals). UKEF’s role in unlocking finance for delivery of projects has ancillary contributions to other SDGs in destination countries.

The UK Government keeps its support for the fossil fuels industry under review to ensure the UK reaches its net zero target by 2050.

21st Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what discussions she has had with (a) Cabinet colleagues and (b) her international counterparts on the UK signing the proposed Agreement on Climate Change, Trade and Sustainability.

Having left the EU, the UK has a unique opportunity to design a set of policies to tackle climate change and environmental improvement tailored to the needs and high ambition of the country. We are exploring trade policy options to support ambitious action on climate change, including the policy options set out as part of the Agreement on Climate Change, Trade and Sustainability (ACCTS) negotiations.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
21st Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what steps she is taking to ensure that her policies protect biodiversity.

HM Government is clear that more trade does not have to come at the expense of the environment. We are committed to supporting the UK’s climate and environmental objectives, including the protection of biodiversity.

HM Government has underscored the environment as one of the three priorities for UK leadership in the World Trade Organisation (WTO) and we are exploring all options in the design of future trade and investment agreements to ensure we uphold the UK’s high environmental standards.

We are also working to build a coalition of countries committed to sustainable trade to help limit deforestation, as part of the UK’s COP26 Presidency, and to consider other measures to support biodiversity and sustainable supply chains, particularly for forest-risk commodities.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
21st Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, if she will publish the next meeting date of the Strategic Trade Advisory Group.

The Strategic Trade Advisory Group (STAG) is currently under review, ahead of a new 24 month term of appointment. My Department will make the dates and times of meetings, the agendas and a high-level summary of the discussion available following each meeting of the STAG.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
21st Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what discussions she has had with Cabinet colleagues on support for the development and export of tidal technology.

The Secretary of State has had no discussions with other Cabinet colleagues on this matter.

21st Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what recent discussions she has had with her US counterpart on reforms to the World Trade Organisation disputes resolution process.

The Secretary of State engages regularly with the US Trade Representative on World Trade Organisation (WTO) reform, amongst other trade interests.

The United Kingdom is committed to supporting the multilateral trading system. A two-stage, impartial, binding and compulsory dispute settlement system is crucial in ensuring that we can enforce the rules we have negotiated.

We have listened carefully to the concerns raised about the Appellate Body and stand ready to engage in further discussions on potential solutions, including reforms to the

system, with our US counterparts and other international partners.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
13th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what steps the Government is taking to ensure that the UK will not accept imports (a) with higher Maximum Residue Levels than currently allowed and (b) with pesticide residues currently banned in the UK from countries with pesticide standards lower than the UK's, after the transition period.

The approach of HM Government to food standards in trade deals is clear. We remain firmly committed to upholding Britain’s high environmental, food safety and animal welfare standards.

As we take back control of our laws from the EU, we will decide how we set and maintain our own laws, standards and regulations. When the Transition Period ends, we will be a global leader in environmental protection and animal welfare standards, maintaining the high-quality of our produce for consumers at home and overseas.

Our current high standards, including on import requirements, will continue to apply after the end of the Transition Period. The 2018 Withdrawal Act will transfer all existing food safety provisions, including existing import requirements, onto the United Kingdom’s statute book.

Our food standards, for both domestic production and imports, are overseen by the Food Standards Agency and Food Standards Scotland. These agencies provide independent advice to HM Government and the devolved administration in Scotland respectively. They will continue to do so, in order to make sure that all food imports – from any country – comply with the United Kingdom’s high standards.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
24th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what the Government's timetable is for holding (a) discussions, (b) meetings and (b) negotiations with the Australian Government on a potential UK - Australia free trade agreement.

The Government is committed to negotiating and securing an ambitious free trade deal with Australia as soon as is practical. During these unprecedented times we are working with our negotiation partners to consider options for conducting negotiations in a way that reflects the current situation and respects public health.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
24th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what her Department's (a) objectives and (b) planned timetable are for agreeing a trade deal with Australia.

The Government is committed to negotiating and securing an ambitious free trade deal with Australia as soon as it is practical in a way which respects public health at this current time. We will jointly decide with Australia on how and when to proceed with the negotiations as the developing situation with COVID-19 becomes clearer.

The UK Government will publish its negotiating objectives for a UK-Australia Free Trade Agreement, before negotiations start. This will be accompanied by a scoping assessment which will set out the potential economic impacts of any agreement.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
24th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what bilateral free trade agreements her Department is discussing; and on what dates she plans to publish the negotiating objectives for those free trade agreements that do not relate to the US or EU.

The Government is committed to the international free trade agenda. During these unprecedented times we are looking at options to conduct negotiations in a way that reflects the current situation and respects public health. Negotiating objectives will be published before the launch of negotiations.

Conor Burns
Minister of State (Northern Ireland Office)
24th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what assessment she has made of the potential (a) environmental and (b) social impacts on the UK of a UK trade deal with Australia.

At the start of free trade agreement negotiations with Australia, the Government will publish its Outline Approach which will include our negotiating objectives. This will be accompanied by a scoping assessment which will set out the potential economic impacts of any agreement.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
24th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether she plans to prohibit imports from (a) New Zealand, (b) Australia and (c) other future trading partners of food produced under systems banned in the UK.

It is vital that we explore new trading opportunities, but that should not mean a dilution of the standards for which British food is world renowned. Without exception, imports into the UK will meet our stringent standards and any future deals must work for UK consumers, farmers and companies.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
24th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what assessment she has made of the level of regulatory divergence on goods between the UK and Australia; and what steps she is taking to ensure that goods produced under systems with lower levels of environmental regulation are not imported into the UK.

We continue to consider Australian regulations and engage with our Australian counterparts to build a shared understanding of our countries’ approaches and ambitions for our future bilateral trade relationship. In line with our international obligations, the Government will continue to ensure a high level of protection of the environment in new trade agreements. The Government shares the public’s high regard for the UK’s environmental protections and has made clear that we will not compromise on these.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
24th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what assessment she has made of the potential effectiveness of alternative investor protection provisions in relation to a free trade agreement between the UK and Australia.

This Government is keen to ensure that UK investors overseas benefit from strong protections against discriminatory or unfair treatment from a host state. The precise details of any future UK Free Trade Agreement with Australia are a matter for formal negotiations, and we would not seek to pre-empt these discussions.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
24th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what assessment she has made of the implications for (a) her policy on investor-state dispute settlement in a future UK-Australia trade agreement and (b) the Government's climate change objectives of the recent use of that dispute settlement by energy companies overseas.

The Government is clear that our future investment policy will continue to protect our right to regulate in the public interest, including to meet our climate change and environmental objectives. There is yet to be a successful investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS) claim against the UK, nor has the threat of potential disputes affected the government’s legislative programme.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
3rd Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how much his Department spent on social media advertising in (a) 2019, (b) 2020, (c) 2021 and (d) 2022 up to and including 28 February; and on which platforms that money was spent.

The Department is fully committed to the Government’s transparency agenda and publishes details of expenditure over £25,000 by month. This information can be found via the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/dft-departmental-spending-over-25000

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what plans he has to improve (a) access and (b) incentives for people of all ages to take up riding a powered two or three wheeled vehicle.

Grants are available from the Office for Zero Emission Vehicles towards the purchase cost of a number of zero-emission motorcycles and mopeds, with the grant paying for 20% of the purchase price, up to a maximum of £1,500. Details are available via www.gov.uk/plug-in-car-van-grants/overview .

The Department is running trials of rental e-scooters to assess their safety and wider impacts. This is part of the Government’s Future of Transport regulatory review which will decide whether e-scooters and similar vehicles should be allowed on the road and, if so, what rules should apply to them.

The Government has also taken a number of steps to support the use of e-cargo bikes and other e-bikes. It has provided over £2 million to support the roll-out of e-cargo bikes, with grants covering up to 40% of the total cost of an ecargo bike, up to a maximum of £2,500 for two-wheel models and £4,500 for three-wheel models. Further details of a new national e-cycle support programme will be announced shortly. The Government is also supporting a number of English local authorities with trials of e-cycles in their areas, and e-cycles are also within the scope of the Cycle to Work scheme allowing employees to access them at a discount.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Parliamentary Secretary to the Treasury and Chief Whip
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of supporting the use of powered light vehicles to (a) improve congestion, (b) improve air quality and (c) help consumer select the right vehicle for the right journey.

The Department gathered evidence on the potential benefits of micromobility vehicles in the Future of Transport Regulatory Review Call for Evidence in March 2020. These benefits are also being evaluated as part of our evidence gathering through ongoing national trials of e-scooters.

Early evidence may show that the use of micromobility vehicles such as e-scooters has the potential to ease and improve congestion, mainly as they are smaller than other road-going vehicles. Fewer parking spaces are also needed, allowing parking space to be reallocated.

Micromobility vehicles that use rechargeable electric batteries also offer a greener way to travel than taking a diesel or petrol fueled car which, depending on mode shift, could help reduce emissions and improve air quality in towns and cities.

With regard to helping the consumer select the right vehicle for the right journey, micromobility vehicles give consumers more options when it comes to vehicle type. They may also make public transport accessible to more people who would otherwise have to walk too far to local stations for example.

Trudy Harrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, when the consultation on the phase out of non-zero-emission L-Category vehicles will be published.

The Transport Decarbonisation Plan published in July set out the government’s commitments and the actions needed to decarbonise transport in the UK. This includes consulting this year on a date of 2035, or earlier if a faster transition appears feasible, for ending of sale of new non-zero emission powered two and three wheelers (and other L category vehicles).

Trudy Harrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
5th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps he has taken to ensure that charging infrastructure is suitable for car club use.

This Government is investing £1.3 billion in accelerating the roll out of charging infrastructure over the next four years, targeting support on rapid chargepoints on motorways and major roads, and installing more on-street chargepoints near homes and workplaces. We want to make recharging electric vehicles as easy as refuelling a petrol or diesel car.

We will soon be publishing our Transport Decarbonisation Plan to achieve net zero emissions across all modes of transport which represents the biggest piece of work we have ever done to tackle greenhouse gas emissions from transport. The holistic and cross-modal approach to decarbonising the entire transport system will set out a credible and ambitious pathway to deliver transport’s contribution to carbon budgets and meet net zero by 2050. E-car clubs and shared mobility will be considered within the Transport Decarbonisation Plan.

Later this year we will publish an electric vehicle Infrastructure Strategy to set out the vision and action plan for charging infrastructure rollout needed to achieve the 2030/35 phase out successfully. This will set expected roles for different stakeholders and how Government will intervene to address the gaps between the current market status and our vision.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
5th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs on the impact of car clubs on air pollution; and what steps he is taking to support the growth of car clubs in the UK.

My officials have engaged with car clubs in the past to understand their impact on air quality, and I would be happy to discuss this with them further.

Local authorities are responsible for entering into agreements with car clubs to allow access to vehicles on the roads in their area, and authorities should consider this as part of the actions they are taking to tackle air quality problems.

The Future of Mobility Urban Strategy was published in March 2019 and sets out in its Principles that "mobility innovation must help to reduce congestion through more efficient use of limited road space”. We will soon be publishing our Transport Decarbonisation Plan to achieve net zero emissions across all modes of transport which represents the biggest piece of work we have ever done to tackle greenhouse gas emissions from transport. Car clubs and shared mobility will be considered within the Transport Decarbonisation Plan and we recognise that these measures will also benefit air quality.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
15th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of California's restrictions on non-road mobile machinery as a result of risk to life posed by that machinery.

The Government is aware of a number of pollution reduction initiatives for non-road mobile machinery currently underway in California, but the Department has not undertaken an assessment of the policy implications.

Tougher pollutant emission limits and more comprehensive requirements for non-road mobile machinery engines were introduced in January 2019, and new engines were required to be compliant with these provisions from January 2021 in the UK.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
20th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what discussions he has had with bus operating companies on improving the (a) reliability and (b) journey times of bus routes.

Department of Transport ministers and officials are in regular dialogue with bus operators to discuss various issues facing the sector.


Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
20th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy on bringing forward the ban on new fossil fuel vehicle engines to 2030.

On 4 February, the Prime Minister launched a consultation on bringing forward an end to the sale of new petrol, diesel and hybrid cars and vans from 2040 to 2035, or earlier if a faster transition appears feasible. This consultation ends on the 31 July. The Secretary of State and Minister Maclean have regular discussions with the Business Secretary to discuss the many ways in which the Government is working to achieve net zero by 2050.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
13th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many of the 7,200 additional on-street electric vehicle?charge points announced on 9 May 2020 have been installed.

In January the Government announced a doubling of the value of the On-street Residential Charing Scheme (ORCS) from £5 to £10 million, providing grant funding for as many as 3,600 chargepoints for motorists who do not have access to off-street parking. To ensure more Local Authorities and motorists can benefit from the scheme the Government again doubled the funding available for ORCS in May up to £20 million to assist with the cost of up to 7,200 more chargepoints. To date, the scheme has supported the installation of 555 chargepoints and provided funding for a further 1603 to be installed. Covid-19 has significantly slowed down installation rates and we would expect this number to increase as more Local Authorities are able to procure and install chargepoints as the Covid-19 Lockdown eases.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
13th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many local authorities have made changes to road layouts to give more space to cyclists and pedestrians since the publication of the Department for Transport’s statutory guidance to local authorities under the Traffic Management Act 2004.

It is for local traffic authorities to decide what measures to install to enable social distancing and active travel, and the Department does not maintain a record of local authorities that have implemented such changes. There are measures available to local authorities that can be implemented to widen pavements and that do not require extra powers or approval from the Department. For example, some authorities have used cones or barriers to reallocate part of the road to pedestrians as a temporary measure.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
13th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many individual (a) petrol pumps, (b) diesel pumps and (c) electric vehicle charge points there in each local authority in England.

Data on the number of individual petrol and diesel pumps in England is not available. The number of electric vehicle charging devices publicly available in England at 1 April 2020 was 14,979. The numbers for each local authority are provided in the attached document in an annex to this answer.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
6th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 30 June 2020 to Question 64815 on Department for Transport: Coronavirus, how the £5 billion package for zero emission buses will be invested; and what the timeframe is for the 4,000 new zero emission buses to be in service.

The £5 billion package for buses and cycling is more important than ever as we put a green recovery for transport at the heart of our decision-making. Full details of a zero-emission bus programme, including how the funding will be distributed, are being developed and will be announced in due course.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
25th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether he has made an assessment of the implications for his policies of the report of the all-party group on air pollution entitled, Air Quality Strategy to Reduce Coronavirus Infection.

The Government is committed to making lasting changes to the way people, goods and services travel to help make our country greener and healthier, and to deliver clean economic growth. In line with our clean air and net zero carbon targets, our policies will ensure that emissions continue to fall over time right across the country through a green economic recovery from COVID-19 that has transport at its heart. This includes a £5 billion package of investment in zero emission buses, cycling and walking in line with the recent recommendations of the all-party group on air pollution.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
25th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent assessment he has made of the level of access to public transport in towns and rural communities compared with urban areas.

The Government is committed to levelling up the country to provide equal opportunity for all and recognises the vital importance public transport plays in supporting the economy and bringing society together across rural and urban areas.

The Department currently publishes tables of estimated travel time to key services by different modes in Journey times to key services (JTS01) with different levels of rural/urban areas. This can be found here:

www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/journey-time-statistics-data-tables-jts#journey-times-to-key-services-jts01

In addition to this, the National Travel Survey (NTS) provides a range of measures which include a breakdown by Rural / Urban classification which can be found here: www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/nts99-travel-by-region-and-area-type-of-residence

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
25th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what discussions he has had with Cabinet colleagues on the potential merits of peak-spreading commuter traffic.

As the transport sector is restarted, DfT continues to work closely with Cabinet Office, BEIS, DHSC and others to develop contingency plans and to identify areas where there is increased risk of congestion or crowding.

The Department continues to recommend that the public avoids using public transport if possible and encouraging those travelling by public transport or in cars to avoid travelling in the peak to maximise capacity for key workers and the supply of goods.

The Department is also encouraging employers to continue home working and staggering start times so that demand can be reduced.

Departmental analysis to date shows that demand in the interpeak is currently higher than the traditional morning (and afternoon) peak.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
25th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent discussions he has had with local authorities on (a) repurposing traffic lanes and parking spaces for cycling and wider footways and (b) the issues that those authorities have faced in doing that work.

The Department has regular discussions with local authorities at both Ministerial and official level on a range of transport related matters including cycling and walking. These discussions have informed the development of the Emergency Active Travel Fund, through which the Department is supporting local authorities with the introduction of measures of this sort, and the new network management duty guidance that the Department published on 9 May.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
25th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent assessment he has made of the number and proportion of people using public transport as their primary mode of transport in (a) the UK and (b) comparable countries.

The National Travel Survey (NTS) recorded that public transport was the primary mode of transport used for 9.6% of trips per person, per year in England in 2018.

Around 15% and 5% of people in England reported using the bus and train at least three times a week respectively in 2018 according to the NTS, equating to 8.2m and 2.7m people.

Data is not held for other countries, including other countries in the UK.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
25th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what estimate he has made of the cost to the public purse of increasing public transport service frequency to enable the same number of passengers to travel on that transport while applying the 1 metre rule as travelled on it prior to the covid-19 outbreak.

On 23 May, the Transport Secretary announced a further £283 million to help increase bus and light rail services across England as quickly as possible to help ensure there is enough space for passengers to observe social distancing guidelines, as we begin to re-open our economy.

The Government has approved £2.9bn of additional expenditure during the 2020/21 financial year to ensure that vital rail services continue to operate. This expenditure covers all train operators with franchise agreements with the Department.

To support Transport for London services we have agreed a £1.6 billion funding and financing support package to enable them to continue operating essential services, transporting passengers safely and protecting staff during the pandemic and supporting the capital’s gradual recovery from COVID-19.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
25th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps his Department is taking to ensure the roll-out of electric infrastructure to service (a) boat and (b) ferry transport in rural areas.

In the Clean Maritime Plan, published last year, the UK Government committed to identifying and supporting zero emission shipping clusters. It is Government’s ambition that clusters would combine innovation and infrastructure associated with zero emission propulsion technologies, including electrification, and that a number of clusters would be operational by 2035.

In line with this commitment, Government, in conjunction with a working group of the Clean Maritime Council, is undertaking a study on clusters. This study includes consideration of electric infrastructure for the maritime sector across the UK as a whole.

The results of this study will be fed into national strategic cross-Government work, including the Transport Decarbonisation Plan.

25th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps he has taken to ensure that public transport workers (a) feel safe going to work and (b) are given priority access to covid-19 testing.

The Department is working closely with the wider transport sector, including operators and trade unions, on the implementation of the Safer Transport guidance that aims to help organisations, agencies and others (such as self-employed transport providers) understand how to provide safe workplaces and services (the guidance can be found here https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-safer-transport-guidance-for-operators).

The guidance sets out how employers can advise staff and passengers on maintaining good hand hygiene and on ways to keep their distance from other people as much as possible, including, for example, through using screens, staggering departures and arrival times, and reducing the use of face to face seating if possible.

It also outlines that staff should wear a face covering when they are unable to maintain social distancing in passenger facing roles, while recognising that there will be exceptional circumstances when a staff member cannot wear a face covering, or when their task makes it sensible (based on a risk assessment) for them not to wear a face covering.

The Secretary of State for Transport is committed to ensuring that every transport worker who requires testing has access. The Department is engaging closely with stakeholders and DHSC to ensure that a robust testing process is in place for transport workers, whilst recognising that priority needs to be given to patient care, front-line healthcare staff and social care workers. Everyone in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland with COVID-19 symptoms can get tested. Antigen testing, or testing for current infection, is currently available through home delivery kits, regional test sites, satellite sites and mobile testing centres throughout the country.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Parliamentary Secretary to the Treasury and Chief Whip
25th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps he is taking to accelerate the conversion of bus fleets to (a) electro and (b) hydrogen models.

The Government has supported the use of a range of low carbon bus technologies, including battery-electric technology, through funds including the Low Emission and Ultra Low Emission Bus Schemes. These have focussed not just on electric buses but also included funding for hydrogen buses and supporting infrastructure.

In February, the Government announced a £5 billion funding package for buses and cycling, which includes support for the purchase of at least 4,000 zero-emission buses. The details of these programmes, including technology options and how funding will be distributed, will be announced in due course.

Local Authorities had until 4 June to apply for a £50m package to deliver Britain’s first All-Electric Bus Town. The winner(s) will be announced shortly.

I also know that my Rt Hon Friend the Transport Secretary is exploring options for a hydrogen bus town and a hydrogen hub, looking into how this country can lead the world using green hydrogen as a power source for types of transport, including freight, ships, buses and trains.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
25th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent steps he has taken to promote (a) walking buses and (b) cycling as means of transport to and from school.

The Department for Transport is making £225 million available to local authorities this financial year for urgent measures to make it easier for people to walk and cycle for all short journeys, including to school.

The Department has also provided significant amounts of funding to keep buses running to serve those who rely on them. On 3 April, the Government announced £397 million of support for bus services, and on 23 May the Secretary of State announced a further £254 million to help increase bus services?across England?as we begin to?re-open?our economy.

The Department for Education has produced guidance on implementing protective measures in education and childcare settings. This guidance sets out that schools should ‘ensure parents and young people are aware of recommendations on transport to and from education or childcare settings’ and encourage parents and children and young people ‘to walk or cycle to their education setting where possible’.

A few months ago we announced that Bikeability training for schoolchildren would be expanded to cover all children nationwide.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Parliamentary Secretary to the Treasury and Chief Whip
25th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether his Department has made an assessment of the effect on household income of people using public rather than private transport.

No such assessment has been made. While household income varies across the users of public and private transport, we are not aware of any reason why household income would be affected by people using public rather than private transport.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Parliamentary Secretary to the Treasury and Chief Whip
3rd Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how much her Department spent on social media advertising in (a) 2019, (b) 2020, (c) 2021 and (d) 2022 up to and including 28 February; and on which platforms that money was spent.

Social media advertising spend by the Department for Work and Pensions is included in marketing spend data published on GOV.UK: DWP: departmental spending over £25,000 - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
21st Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment she has made on the impact of not uprating benefits in line with inflation on levels of child poverty in Swansea West constituency.

No such assessment has been made. The Government is up-rating benefits in line with inflation. The Secretary of State undertakes an annual review of benefits and pensions with reference to the Consumer Prices Index (CPI). All benefit up-rating since April 1987 has been based on the increase in the relevant price inflation index in the 12 months to the previous September. The relevant benefits are increasing by 3.1% from April.

The latest statistics on the number and proportion of children who are in low income families by local area, covering the six years, 2014/15 to 2019/20, can be found in the annual publication: Children in low income families: local area statistics 2014 to 2020 - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)(opens in a new tab).

This Government is committed to reducing poverty and supporting low-income families, and believes work is the best route out of poverty. Our approach is based on clear evidence about the importance of parental employment – particularly where it is full-time – in substantially reducing the risks of child poverty and in improving long-term outcomes for families and children.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
21st Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment her Department has made of the impact of not uprating benefits in line with inflation on the incomes of households in receipt of universal credit, in the context of the end of the £20 weekly uplift.

The Secretary of State undertakes an annual review of benefits and pensions based on the Consumer Price Index (CPI), which measures inflation in the year to September. All benefit up-rating since April 1987 has been based on the increase in the relevant price inflation index in the 12 months to the previous September.

The Government is providing £12 billion of support with the cost of living, with help targeted at working families, low-income households and the most vulnerable. A further £9 billion has been announced to protect against the impact of rising global energy prices.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
17th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, If she will publish HSE’s initial assessment of substances added to the EU Substances of Very High Concern Candidate List.

HSE will be publishing the initial assessment of substances added to the EU Substance of Very High Concern (SVHCs) Candidate List in an update to its website within the next two weeks. This is in line with the commitment made in the 2021-2022 UK REACH Work Programme, and guided by the interim principles for the inclusion of SVHCs on the candidate list which have been agreed by Defra and the Welsh and Scottish Governments.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
23rd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment she has made of the implications for his policies of the University of Central Lancashire's report on Minimising firefighters' exposure to toxic fire effluents, published 23 November 2020, that showed exposure to high levels of toxic contaminants in indoor air pollution has increased cancer amongst firefighters.

The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is considering this report together with broader national and international research on occupational health issues. These findings will inform policy decisions on legislation, advice and guidance.

The overarching legal duty for Fire and Rescue Services (FRS) to prevent and control risks to their employees’ health from exposure to hazardous substances remains unchanged. FRS are required to have measures in place to control exposure to contaminants that give rise to a risk to health.

HSE works proactively with the National Fire Chief’s Council (NFCC) to ensure that FRS use such information to identify and control risks to their employees.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)