Liam Byrne

Labour - Birmingham Hodge Hill and Solihull North

First elected: 15th July 2004


Liaison Sub-Committee on National Policy Statements
18th Oct 2023 - 30th May 2024
Liaison Sub-Committee on Scrutiny of Strategic Thinking in Government
19th Dec 2023 - 30th May 2024
National Security Strategy (Joint Committee)
15th Jan 2024 - 30th May 2024
Business and Trade Sub-Committee on National Security and Investment
18th Oct 2023 - 30th May 2024
Liaison Committee (Commons)
18th Oct 2023 - 30th May 2024
Business and Trade Committee
18th Oct 2023 - 30th May 2024
Strategic Litigation Against Public Participation Bill
1st May 2024 - 8th May 2024
Foreign Affairs Committee
5th Jan 2022 - 28th Nov 2023
Economic Crime and Corporate Transparency Bill
19th Oct 2022 - 29th Nov 2022
Committees on Arms Export Controls
25th Jan 2022 - 27th Nov 2022
Shadow Minister (Digital, Culture, Media and Sport) (Digital Economy)
17th Jul 2017 - 10th Apr 2020
International Trade Committee
31st Oct 2016 - 3rd May 2017
Shadow Minister (Business, Innovation and Skills)
7th Oct 2013 - 12th Sep 2015
Shadow Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
20th Jan 2011 - 7th Oct 2013
Shadow Minister (Cabinet Office)
8th Oct 2010 - 20th Jan 2011
Shadow Chief Secretary to the Treasury
12th May 2010 - 8th Oct 2010
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
6th Jun 2009 - 6th May 2010
Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
3rd Oct 2008 - 5th Jun 2009
Minister of State (Regional Affairs) (West Midlands)
29th Jun 2007 - 6th Oct 2008
Minister of State (Home Office) (Borders and Immigration)
28th Jun 2007 - 3rd Oct 2008
Minister of State (HM Treasury) (also in the Home Office)
25th Jan 2008 - 3rd Oct 2008
Minister of State (Home Office) (Immigration and Asylum)
9th May 2007 - 28th Jun 2007
Minister of State (Home Office) (Immigration, Citizenship and Nationality)
22nd May 2006 - 8th May 2007
Minister of State (Home Office)
5th May 2006 - 22nd May 2006
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health) (Care Services)
10th May 2005 - 5th May 2006
European Scrutiny Committee
22nd Feb 2005 - 11th Apr 2005


Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Liam Byrne has voted in 688 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
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Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Kevin Hollinrake (Conservative)
Shadow Secretary of State for Business and Trade
(96 debate interactions)
Margaret Hodge (Labour)
(24 debate interactions)
Andrew Mitchell (Conservative)
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office) (Minister for Development)
(22 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Department for Business and Trade
(53 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(43 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Liam Byrne's debates

Latest EDMs signed by Liam Byrne

16th November 2023
Liam Byrne signed this EDM on Monday 19th February 2024

Council budgets and audits

Tabled by: Helen Morgan (Liberal Democrat - North Shropshire)
That this House notes with concern the increase in the number of councils struggling to meet the costs of temporary accommodation, Special Educational Needs and Disability services and social care; recognises the importance of local councils’ services in providing essential support for vulnerable individuals and their families; notes with concern …
17 signatures
(Most recent: 19 Feb 2024)
Signatures by party:
Liberal Democrat: 7
Labour: 7
Independent: 2
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
8th January 2024
Liam Byrne signed this EDM on Wednesday 10th January 2024

Sub-postmasters

Tabled by: Kate Osborne (Labour - Jarrow and Gateshead East)
That this House notes the increased awareness of the life-changing injustices experienced by sub-postmasters throughout the Horizon scandal; further notes it is now known as the most widespread miscarriage of justice in British history; notes with concern that sub-postmasters have served custodial sentences, suffered bankruptcy for offences they did not …
89 signatures
(Most recent: 6 Feb 2024)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 42
Scottish National Party: 16
Liberal Democrat: 12
Independent: 8
Democratic Unionist Party: 4
Plaid Cymru: 3
Social Democratic & Labour Party: 2
Alliance: 1
Alba Party: 1
Conservative: 1
Green Party: 1
View All Liam Byrne's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Liam Byrne, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Liam Byrne has not been granted any Urgent Questions

2 Adjournment Debates led by Liam Byrne

Monday 26th June 2023
Tuesday 25th January 2022

1 Bill introduced by Liam Byrne


A Bill to require the Secretary of State to publish proposals for increasing the on-lending of UK Special Drawing Rights via the IMF, for transferring the capital returned to the UK by the European Investment Bank to the World Bank, and for increasing the UK’s support for the African Development Bank, for the purpose of reducing debt burdens and the cost of capital and contributing to the implementation of the Paris Agreement on climate change.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading
Wednesday 28th June 2023
(Read Debate)

Latest 50 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
28th Feb 2022
To ask the Attorney General, if she will (a) list the spending programmes her Department devolves for administration to local government in England and other local spending bodies and (b) specify the value for each programme for every year for which budgets are agreed.

The Attorney General’s Office does not have individual spending programmes which are devolved to local government or other local spending bodies.

11th Dec 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the G7 Japan 2023 Foreign Ministers’ Communiqué, published on 18 April 2023, whether the Government plans to take steps to align the UK's investment screening regime with that of the US as set out in the Presidential Executive Order of 15 September 2022 on Ensuring Robust Consideration of Evolving National Security Risks by the Committee on Foreign Investment.

The Government is committed to ensuring that the UK’s National Security and Investment (NSI) regime stays up to date with the evolving global security context. We have recently launched a Call for Evidence, seeking views on how the NSI system can be even more business friendly while maintaining and refining essential national security protections.

The UK works closely with a range of international partners in this area, including members of the G7. However, decisions made under the NSI Act are based on UK national security considerations, and the scope of the Act itself is carefully tailored to the needs of the UK.

28th Feb 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will (a) list the spending programmes his Department devolves for administration to local government in England and other local spending bodies and (b) specify the value for each programme for every year for which budgets are agreed.

The Cabinet Office did not devolve any spending programmes for administration to local government in England and other local spending bodies in financial year 2021/22.

13th Dec 2021
To ask the Prime Minister, which Minister leads on the Government's anti-corruption strategy.

I refer the Rt. Hon. Member to the written statement issued today by my Rt Hon Friend, The Minister of State for Security and Borders.

18th May 2021
To ask the Prime Minister, what his priorities are for the 2021 G7 summit in Cornwall.

As the most prominent grouping of democratic countries, the G7 has long been the catalyst for decisive international action to tackle the greatest challenges we face.


June's G7 Summit in Cornwall will mark the first face to face meeting of world leaders in almost two years and offers us a unique opportunity to agree concrete action to improve global health, tackle climate change and make the world fairer and more prosperous.


I look forward to meeting with my fellow leaders to discuss these issues as we all act to fight and defeat Covid and revive the global economy from its devastating impact.

1st Jun 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the public statement of 25 May 2020 by Dominic Cummings, whether funding from the public purse was expended on drafting that statement.

I refer the Hon. member to the answer given to PQs 52214 and 52215 on 4 June 2020.

25th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, with reference to Table 2.4 of the UK strategic export controls annual report 2022, published on 19 July 2023, HC1681, what the (a) destination country and (b) type of goods to be exported were for each Standard Individual Export Licence and Standard Individual Trade Control Licence revoked under Criterion 1.

As part of our commitment to transparency, HM Government publishes data on export licensing decisions on a quarterly basis in the Official Statistics, including data on outcome, end user destination, overall value, type (e.g. military, other) and a summary of the items covered by these licences. This data is available at: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/strategic-export-controls-licensing-data.

25th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, with reference to Table 2.4 of the UK strategic export controls annual report 2022, published on 19 July 2023, HC1681, what the (a) destination country and (b) type of goods to be exported were for each Standard Individual Export Licence and Standard Individual Trade Control Licence revoked under Criterion 2.

As part of our commitment to transparency, HM Government publishes data on export licensing decisions on a quarterly basis in the Official Statistics, including data on outcome, end user destination, overall value, type (e.g. military, other) and a summary of the items covered by these licences. This data is available at: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/strategic-export-controls-licensing-data.

25th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, how many export licence applications were escalated to the dispute resolution mechanism or complex cases mechanism in each year since 2010; and what the destination country was in each such case.

Export licence applications are assessed on a case-by-case basis against announced policies and the Strategic Export Licensing Criteria (SELC). Decisions are routinely taken by the Export Control Joint Unit (ECJU), on behalf of the Secretary of State for Business and Trade. These decisions are taken in consultation with officials from other government departments, principally the Foreign Commonwealth and Development Office and the Ministry of Defence but occasionally other Departments are also consulted depending on the nature of the case.

There is no single ‘dispute resolution mechanism’ which is regularly or consistently enacted. There have been various occasions since 2010 where different procedures have been set up to enable wider consultation and scrutiny of export licensing cases with Ministers across Government. These were in reaction to specific concerns or strategic priorities at the time. They can involve different attendees and terms of reference depending on the situation. We do not maintain data on how often this sort of procedure has been used over multiple years.

There is no specific ‘complex case mechanism’. ECJU receives a high volume of ‘complex cases’ and the vast majority are decided upon by consensus. However, if ECJU officials are unable to come to a consensus about a case they could refer it to MOD and FCDO Ministers, and ultimately to the Secretary of State for Business and Trade who has the responsibility for making the final decision. This happens extremely rarely in practice and therefore we do not maintain data on its occurrence over multiple years.

25th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, how many extant strategic export licences were referred to Ministers in (a) her Department, (b) the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office and (c) the Ministry of Defence in each year since 2010; and what the destination countries were in each such case.

Export licence applications are assessed on a case-by-case basis against announced policies and the Strategic Export Licensing Criteria (SELC). Given the high volume of decisions taken every week, the vast majority of licensing applications are decided upon by officials within the Export Control Joint Unit acting on behalf of the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, using the framework provided by the SELC. These decisions are taken in consultation with officials from other government departments including the Foreign Commonwealth and Development Office and the Ministry of Defence.

In practice a very small proportion of export licensing decisions are escalated to Ministers. For example, this happens when a decision is finely balanced or when Ministers have asked for certain types of cases to be referred to them for decision. As with any part of Government, ECJU officials would consult Ministers from the three Departments in the normal course of their work, including on some export control applications, as and when necessary. We do not maintain a central record of how many times this has happened in the last 14 years.

Ministers are always consulted on any decisions related to revoking or suspending licences. We report on the volume of revoked and suspended licences in our Quarterly Statistics and Annual Report. These can be accessed here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/strategic-export-controls-licensing-data

25th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, what role the National Cyber Security Centre plays in facilitating export controls to prevent the proliferation of sensitive technology in the areas of (a) artificial intelligence, (b) quantum computing, (c) biometric tools and data and (d) intangible technology transfers.

The National Cyber Security Centre is HM Government’s national technical authority for information security and advises the Export Control Joint Unit, in the Department for Business and Trade, on export licence applications for goods involving sensitive communications or computer technology.

25th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, with reference to Table 2.4 of the UK strategic export controls annual report 2022, published on 19 July 2023, HC1681, for what reasons the number of (a) Standard Individual Export Licences and (b) Standard Individual Trade Control Licences revoked under Criterion 1 increased in 2022.

Following Russia’s invasion of Ukraine the Government expanded the scope and scale of its sanctions measures against Russia. This resulted in an increase in export licences needing to be revoked because they were not consistent with new sanctions. Consequently, these licences were revoked under Criterion 1.

25th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, how many strategic export licence applications were escalated to Ministers in (a) her Department, (b) the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office and (c) the Ministry of Defence in each year since 2010; and what the destination countries were in each such case.

Export licence applications are assessed on a case-by-case basis against announced policies and the Strategic Export Licensing Criteria (SELC). Given the high volume of decisions taken every week, the vast majority of licensing applications are decided upon by officials within the Export Control Joint Unit acting on behalf of the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, using the framework provided by the SELC. These decisions are taken in consultation with officials from other government departments including the Foreign Commonwealth and Development Office and the Ministry of Defence.

In practice a very small proportion of export licensing decisions are escalated to Ministers. For example, this happens when a decision is finely balanced or when Ministers have asked for certain types of cases to be referred to them for decision. As with any part of Government, ECJU officials would consult Ministers from the three Departments in the normal course of their work, including on some export control applications, as and when necessary. We do not maintain a central record of how many times this has happened in the last 14 years.

Ministers are always consulted on any decisions related to revoking or suspending licences. We report on the volume of revoked and suspended licences in our Quarterly Statistics and Annual Report. These can be accessed here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/strategic-export-controls-licensing-data

25th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, with reference to Table 2.3 of the UK strategic export controls annual report 2022, published on 19 July 2023, HC1681, how many (a) Standard Individual Export Licence and (b) Standard Individual Trade Control Licence export applications were refused under Criterion 2 of the Strategic Export Licensing Criteria due to (i) a clear risk that the items might be used to commit or facilitate internal repression, (ii) established serious violations of human rights in the destination country and (iii) a clear risk that the items might be used to commit or facilitate a serious violation of international humanitarian law.

As part of our commitment to transparency, HM Government publishes data on export licensing decisions on a quarterly basis in the Official Statistics, including data on outcome, end user destination, overall value, type (e.g. military, other) and a summary of the items covered by these licences. This data is available at: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/strategic-export-controls-licensing-data.

25th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, what assessment she has made of the effectiveness of UK export controls in controlling the proliferation of sensitive technology in the areas of (a) artificial intelligence, (b) quantum, (c) biometric tools and (d) intangible technology transfers.

The Government has been reviewing export controls and their application to sensitive emerging technologies across a range of sectors.

We are looking shortly to publish the results of that review and launch a public consultation on the process for ensuring the controls evolve to meet the challenge of new and emerging technologies.

25th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, with reference to Table 2.3 of the UK strategic export controls annual report 2022, published on 19 July 2023, HC1681, what the destination countries were for refused (a) Standard Individual Export Licence and (b) Standard Individual Trade Control Licence export applications broken down by each Criterion.

As part of our commitment to transparency, HM Government publishes data on export licensing decisions on a quarterly basis in the Official Statistics, including data on outcome, end user destination, overall value, type (e.g. military, other) and a summary of the items covered by these licences. This data is available at: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/strategic-export-controls-licensing-data.

25th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, on how many occasions the Change in Circumstances Review assessment process in the Export Controls Joint Unit has led to extant export licences being suspended in each year since 2010; and what the destination country was in each case.

The Export Control Joint Unit (ECJU) has in place an established process for responding at pace to changing conditions in a country where the UK has previously granted export licences, and where those licences remain extant.

The FCDO advises DBT on the situation in country and the risks this poses with respect to the UK’s export control responsibilities. The MOD advises DBT on the risks of diversion of exported goods and national security risks arising from hostile state activity. The Department of Business and Trade, with DBT Secretary of State as the decision-making authority, decides whether to amend, suspend or revoke any relevant licences.

We publish comprehensive Official Statistics every quarter about the decisions we make on licence applications, including any decisions to suspend or revoke licences. This data is available at: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/strategic-export-controls-licensing-data.

25th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, on how many occasions the Change in Circumstances Review assessment process in the Export Controls Joint Unit has led to extant export licences being revoked in each year since 2010; and what the destination country was in each case.

The Export Control Joint Unit (ECJU) has in place an established process for responding at pace to changing conditions in a country where the UK has previously granted export licences, and where those licences remain extant.

The FCDO advises DBT on the situation in country and the risks this poses with respect to the UK’s export control responsibilities. The MOD advises DBT on the risks of diversion of exported goods and national security risks arising from hostile state activity. The Department of Business and Trade, with DBT Secretary of State as the decision-making authority, decides whether to amend, suspend or revoke any relevant licences.

We publish comprehensive Official Statistics every quarter about the decisions we make on licence applications, including any decisions to suspend or revoke licences. This data is available at: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/strategic-export-controls-licensing-data.

25th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, what criteria are used to decide to initiate the Change in Circumstances Review process in the Export Controls Joint Unit.

All licences are kept under careful and continual review as standard. We are able to amend, suspend or revoke extant licences and refuse new licence applications as circumstances require.

The Government can and does respond quickly and flexibly to changing or fluid international circumstances. ECJU has in place an established process for responding at pace to changing conditions in a country where the UK has previously granted export licences, and where those licences remain extant.

The criteria for initiating this process can include, but are not limited to, protests, coup d’etats, changes to sanctions, or conflict with a neighbouring country.

25th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, how many Change in Circumstances Reviews were undertaken in the Export Controls Joint Unit in each year since 2010; and which countries were subject to each such review.

The Export Control Joint Unit (ECJU) has in place an established process for responding at pace to changing conditions in a country where the UK has previously granted export licences, and where those licences remain extant.

The FCDO advises DBT on the situation in country and the risks this poses with respect to the UK’s export control responsibilities. The MOD advises DBT on the risks of diversion of exported goods and national security risks arising from hostile state activity. The Department of Business and Trade, with DBT Secretary of State as the decision-making authority, decides whether to amend, suspend or revoke any relevant licences.    We publish comprehensive Official Statistics every quarter about the decisions we make on licence applications. This data is available at: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/strategic-export-controls-licensing-data.

Given its diplomatic sensitivity, the Government is unable to disclose the specific number and destination countries of Change in Circumstances Reviews.

25th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, whether she is taking steps to implement the Export Controls and Human Rights Initiative Code of Conduct.

The UK is a subscribing state to the 'Code of Conduct for Enhancing Export Controls of Goods and Technology that could be Misused and Lead to Serious Violations or Abuses of Human Rights'. The UK has committed to applying export controls to ensure that relevant goods and technologies are used in compliance with international human rights law.

25th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, with reference to the Export Controls and Human Rights Initiative Code of Conduct, what recent discussions she has had with (a) the private sector, (b) academics and (c) civil society representatives on human rights and the implementation of export control measures.

The Export Control Joint Unit has a regular and ongoing dialogue with the private sector, academics and civil society representatives about all aspects of export control policy and implementation, including human rights.

19th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, whether she plans to include an analysis of the work of the Office for Trade Sanctions Implementation in future strategic export controls annual reports.

The UK Strategic Export Controls Annual Report 2023, which is due to be published later this year, will include an update on the creation of the Office of Trade Sanctions Implementation (OTSI) and plans to transition certain functions from the Export Control Joint Unit to OTSI. Once OTSI has been established, we expect it to produce an annual report covering the breadth of OTSI’s activity.

19th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, whether the Open General Export Licence for exports in support of joint strike fighter: F-35 Lightning II has been reviewed since October 2023.

The Government continues to monitor closely the situation in Israel and Gaza.

The Government can and does respond quickly and flexibly to changing international circumstances. All export licences, including Open General Export Licences, are kept under careful and continual review as standard. We are able to amend, suspend or revoke extant licences and refuse new licence applications as circumstances require.

Any changes to Open General Export Licences would be communicated through a Notice to Exporters which would be published on GOV.UK.

19th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, what reviews have been conducted for the terms of each Open General Export Licence that lists Israel as a permitted destination since October 2023.

The Government continues to monitor closely the situation in Israel and Gaza.

The Government can and does respond quickly and flexibly to changing international circumstances. All export licences, including Open General Export Licences, are kept under careful and continual review as standard. We are able to amend, suspend or revoke extant licences and refuse new licence applications as circumstances require.

Any changes to Open General Export Licences would be communicated through a Notice to Exporters which would be published on GOV.UK.

19th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, how many export licences have been granted to assist in the provision of humanitarian aid to Gaza since 1 October 2023; and what items have been licensed.

HM Government publishes data on export licensing decisions on a quarterly basis in the Official Statistics, including data on outcome, end user destination, overall value, type (e.g. military, other) and a summary of the items covered by these licences. This data is available at: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/strategic-export-controls-licensing-data.

The most recent Official Statistics cover the period 1 April - 30 June 2023.

Information regarding export licensing decisions made between 1 October – 31 December 2023 will be published after April 2024 and information regarding export licensing decisions made between 1 January – 31 March 2024 will be published later this year.

19th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, what assessment she has made of the potential (a) risk and (b) prevalence of (i) re-export and (ii) diversion of UK exports to Hamas.

The Department for Business and Trade works alongside other government departments to regularly assess UK export licences. This includes working with the Ministry of Defence on risks of diversion of exported goods and national security risks arising from hostile state activity.

The Export Control Joint Unit will not issue an export licence to any destination where to do so would be inconsistent with the UK’s Strategic Export Licensing Criteria, including where there is a clear risk that the items might be used to commit or facilitate a serious violation of International Humanitarian Law. HMG can and does refuse applications where there is a planned re-export that is inconsistent with the Criteria, or where we assess that the goods may be diverted to an undesirable destination.

14th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 11 March 2024 to Question 16678 on Department for Business and Trade: Supply Estimates, for what reason she has not provided the explanatory memorandum on her Department's supplementary estimates to the Business and Trade Committee; and when she plans to do so.

The Department for Business and Trade’s Supplementary Estimates Explanatory Memorandum was sent to the chair of the Business and Trade Committee on Friday 15th March 2024.

14th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, how much and what proportion of the funding for Post Office redress schemes has been allocated to fund the Group Litigation Order scheme.

There is no fixed allocation of funding for Horizon scandal redress payments. Each redress claim is considered on its merits and the Government is committed to ensuring all necessary funding is available to pay all claims as soon as they are agreed.

Kevin Hollinrake
Shadow Secretary of State for Business and Trade
4th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, if she will publish an explanatory memorandum in relation to her Department’s supplementary estimates for 2023-24.

Yes, the Secretary of State for Business and Trade will publish an explanatory memorandum in relation to the Department’s Supplementary Estimates for 2023-24.

4th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, with reference to the Supplementary Estimates, published on 27 February 2024, HC 500, how she plans to spend the additional £1.09 billion requested by her Department for the Post Office; and whether this sum includes the £123 million already settled with sub-postmasters by the Post Office.

The £1.09 billion requested by the Department for Post Office related matters as part of Supplementary Estimates for 23/24 is split by £338.4 million Resource Departmental Expenditure Limit (RDEL), and £752.4 million non-cash Annually Managed Expenditure (AME).

The £338.4 million RDEL includes funding for redress to postmasters, investment costs to replace the Horizon IT system, delivery of the Horizon IT Inquiry and compensation schemes, Post Office’s corporation tax liabilities and the Group Litigation Order redress scheme.

The increase of £752.4 million AME budget is due to the expected increase in the provision for likely future costs relating to Post Office redress schemes. The forecast for the outstanding estimated liability is updated and agreed with HM Treasury on an annual basis.

This detail is shortly to be published in the Explanatory Memorandum for the Department.

Funding drawn down by the Department at the Supplementary Estimate relates only to value of expected redress settlements within this Financial Year, as well as other payments outlined above, and not to total amounts paid out to postmasters to date.

Kevin Hollinrake
Shadow Secretary of State for Business and Trade
2nd Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, when she plans to bring forward legislative proposals for overturning the convictions of subpostmasters.

We will introduce primary legislation within a few weeks to quash convictions arising from the Horizon scandal.

Kevin Hollinrake
Shadow Secretary of State for Business and Trade
2nd Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, what budgetary provision her Department has allocated for payments of redress to victims of the Post Office Horizon scandal in each financial year in which payments are estimated to be made.

The final cost of Horizon compensation will depend on the circumstances set out in individual claims. We are promising fair and equal treatment of postmasters, not a set amount of money. The amount we spend will depend on how many people come forward and the claims which are submitted.

The Government has to date committed a maximum of just over £1bn to ensure postmasters are compensated fairly. That is not a forecast: it is an estimate of the maximum Government funding which could be needed for compensation, which we have made in response to our obligation to make subsidies transparent.

Kevin Hollinrake
Shadow Secretary of State for Business and Trade
2nd Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, what her Departments budget was for internal resource allocation, broken down by year, for each year in which projections are available.

The Department for Business and Trade’s resource allocation budget following the Supplementary Estimate for 2023/24 is:

Control Total

Full Yr Budget (£m)

Resource DEL Admin

513.1

Resource DEL Programme

1,454.1

11th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, which firms (a) based in China and (b) based outside China and with Chinese owners have been subject to restrictions on trade and investment under the (i) Import of Goods (Control) Order 1954, (ii) Export Control Act 2002, (iii) Export Control Order 2008, (iv) Procurement Act 2023, (v) Telecommunications (Security) Act 2021 and (vi) National Security and Investment Act 2021.

i. The Import of Goods (Control) Order 1954, together with licences made under it, do not make Chinese-origin firms the subject of any restrictions on trade and investment.

ii. Export controls apply to anyone exporting controlled items from the UK, regardless of country of origin. The Government assesses all export licence applications against the Strategic Export Licensing Criteria. We will not licence the export of equipment where to do so would be inconsistent with these Criteria.

iii. None. The Procurement Act is not due for commencement until Autumn 2024.

iv. Huawei

v. Eight final orders (which imposed conditions on, or blocked or unwound deals) issued involved acquirers linked to China. All notices of final orders are available on gov.uk.

11th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, what proportion of exports by (a) number of exporters and (b) value of exports used the tariff rates agreed in the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership during the last period for which data is available.

We do not have this information as the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) has not yet entered into force.

The Accession Protocol for the UK’s entry into the CPTPP was signed on 16 July 2023. Entry into force will take place once the UK and the requisite number of CPTPP Parties have finished their legal procedures. We expect this to happen in the second half of 2024.

Joining CPTPP means that over 99% of current UK goods exports to CPTPP will be eligible for tariff-free trade.

7th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, if she will set out (a) the free trade agreements her Department is currently actively negotiating and (b) the number of FTE officials engaged in this work.

This Government is currently in negotiations with eight partners – India, the Gulf Cooperation Council, Canada, Mexico, Israel, Switzerland, Greenland and the Republic of Korea. We also have plans to start negotiations with Turkey and the Maldives.

With the Machine of Government, Trade Negotiation Group increased its responsibility to cover wider trade policy and FTA implementation. In October 2023, DBT had 722 staff in the Trade Policy, Implementation and Negotiations Group.

7th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, what restrictions the Government has imposed on (a) Huawei, (b) ZTE, (c) Hikvision, (d) Hytera, (e) Alibaba, (f) Tencent, (g) Dahua, (h) China Telecom, (i) China Mobile, (j) DJI, (k) ByteDance, (l) Kingsoft, (m) senseTime, (n) Megvil, (o) SMIC, (p) China Unicom and (q) Fujian Jinhua.

This is a matter for the Cabinet Office.

6th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 28 November 2023 to Question 2516 on Foreign Investment in UK and Overseas Trade: China, how many export control licences for (a) products and (b) services destined for China were refused in each of the last five years.

HM Government does not publish data based on products or services, but individual refusals and the items that may have been refused under each one can be reviewed at https://www.gov.uk/guidance/strategic-export-controls-licensing-data via the Annual Reports, or via the Strategic Export Controls: Reports and Statistics website at https://www.exportcontroldb.trade.gov.uk/sdb2/fox/sdb/.

The following number of export licences with China listed as the end user destination were refused in each of the last five years:

Description of refused goods

2018

2019

2020

2021

2022

Goods rated for Military use only

2

2

3

1

13

Goods rated for non-Military use only

71

67

89

112

238

Total

73

69

92

113

251

4th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, what her Department's policy is on investment from UK investors in (a) the production of (i) semiconductors and (ii) microelectronics, (b) quantum information technologies and (c) artificial intelligence sectors in China; and what (A) statutory provisions apply to and (B) guidance her Department has issued on such investment.

As per the Atlantic Declaration, the UK and US have a shared objective in preventing our companies’ capital and expertise from fuelling technological advances that will enhance the military and intelligence capabilities of countries of concern. DBT, alongside other relevant departments, is assessing the potential national security risks to the UK posed by Outward Direct Investment, including within subsets of emerging technology. We have engaged with industry and posted guidance on GOV.UK

The Integrated Review 2023 is clear that the UK government supports a positive trade and investment relationship with China, where it is consistent with our interests, values, and national security.

4th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, whether she has made an assessment of the potential implications for her policies of the US President’s Executive Order on Addressing United States Investments in Certain National Security Technologies and Products in Countries of Concern of 9 August 2023.

We are reviewing the Presidential Executive Order to consider the impact on the UK and UK businesses and consulting with industry during this time. We understand the US policy remains in a consultative phase following the issuance of the Executive Order. As such, it is still under development.

24th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, which spending programmes their Department devolves for administration to (a) local government in England and (b) other local spending bodies; and what the budget is of each such programme for each year for which budgets are agreed.

The Department publishes its support to local government and other bodies as part of the annual report of the application of the Industrial Development Act 1982. This includes details of support to Local Enterprise Partnerships (and relevant Mayoral Combined Authorities) for the delivery of Growth Hubs under sections 11 and 12 of the Act. The budget for 2023/24 is £11.9 million. Future years’ budgets are subject to confirmation under the Department’s normal business planning processes.

24th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, how much funding was made available through the British Business Bank's National Security Strategic Investment Fund in each industrial sector in each year since its establishment.

As of June 2023, the National Security Strategic Investment Fund (NSSIF) has committed £220m to British Business Bank backed funds, of which £92m has been invested in 217 companies across twelve areas of interest. Private sector investors have invested £718m alongside NSSIF. The sectoral breakdown across the twelve areas of interest is as follows: Audio and Visual Processing £1.1m, Biorisk and Medtech £10.8m, Commercial Space, Platforms and Robotics £1.6m, Computational Behavioural Analysis £1.3m, Cyber Security £14.0m, Data Analytics and AI £28.6m, Financial Technologies £21.7m, Identity Technologies £6.8m, IOT and the Evolving Environment £1.0m, Novel Data Transport £0.1m, Quantum Technologies £2.1m, Sensors, Novel Materials and Power Sources £2.9m

Kevin Hollinrake
Shadow Secretary of State for Business and Trade
20th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, whether she has made an assessment of the implications for her Department's policies of (a) the EU's publication entitled European economic security strategy, published on 26 June 2023 and (b) Executive Order 14017 on America's Supply Chains, signed by President Biden on 24 February 2021.

a) The Department for Business and Trade (DBT) and other departments have assessed the high-level strategy published by the EU, which broadly aligns with UK interests. DBT is engaging closely with the EU and Member States across this agenda at ministerial and senior official level, as well as in technical discussions on specific policy areas.

b) Executive Order 14017 instructs heads of US agencies to complete reviews of supply chain resilience. It does not directly impact UK policies. This Government has been proactively working with allies including the US on resilience, including reducing vulnerabilities in critical technologies and on clean energy supply chains through our Atlantic Declaration.

20th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, which Chinese-origin firms have been subject to restrictions on trade and investment under the (a) Import of Goods (Control) Order 1954, (b) (i) Export Control Act 2002 and (ii) Export Control Order 2008, (c) Procurement Act 2023, (d) Telecommunications (Security) Act 2021 and (e) National Security and Investment Act 2021 in the last five years.

(a) The Import of Goods (Control) Order 1954, together with licences made under it, do not make Chinese-origin firms the subject of any restrictions on trade and investment.

(b) Export controls apply to anyone exporting controlled items from the UK, regardless of country of origin. The Government assesses all export licence applications against the Strategic Export Licensing Criteria. We will not licence the export of equipment where to do so would be inconsistent with these Criteria.

(c) None. The Procurement Act is not due for commencement until Autumn 2024.

(d) Huawei

(e) Eight final orders (which imposed conditions on, or blocked or unwound deals) issued involved acquirers linked to China. All notices of final orders are available on gov.uk.

7th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, what recent representations she has received on public procurement guidelines on the purchase of foreign technology from the public purse.

All ministerial meetings with external organisations are published in the quarterly transparency returns.

Steps are being taken by the UK government to protect national security through public procurement including the creation of a permanent National Security Unit for Procurement within the Cabinet Office. As part of the Procurement Act, the Government will introduce new, mandatory debarments for specific types of contracts where the supplier poses an unacceptable risk to national security. The Cabinet Office have committed to publish guidance to assist contracting authorities in assessing national security risk and using their exclusion powers.

7th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, what powers are available to which Ministers to control imports on national security grounds; and if she will publish details of (a) when and (b) how those powers have been used in the last five years.

Ministers for the Department for Business and Trade (DBT) can control imports into the UK through various means, notably the Open General Import Licence. This permits the importation of all goods into the United Kingdom, subject to various exceptions which include goods such as firearms and nuclear materials. These exceptions are granted under the Import of Goods (Control) Order 1954.

DBT does not have policy responsibility for all import controls — The Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office is responsible for Government policy on sanctions, although relevant departments work closely together on this.

The UK’s import controls regime is consistent with its domestic and international obligations. Controls can be used for numerous reasons including national security.

7th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, what her Department's definition of a critical supply chain is; and which supply chains meet that definition.

The government defines a critical supply chain as one that is vital to the UK’s economy, national security, or essential services. This covers a range of supply chains from critical minerals to essential medicines.

The government does not publish details on which supply chains are critical due to the sensitive nature of this information. My department will shortly be publishing a Critical Imports and Supply Chains Strategy, which will outline the steps that the UK has taken and will be taking to enhance critical imports and supply chain resilience.

7th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, what powers are available to her to impose export controls in the interests of national security.

The Export Control Act 2002 provides broad powers to control and licence exports, trade, transfers of technology and technical assistance for military goods and technology.

All export licence applications are assessed on a case-by-case basis against the Strategic Export Licensing Criteria (SELC). These Criteria provide a thorough risk assessment framework, which requires ECJU to think hard about the possible impact of providing equipment, and the capabilities it could support.

HM Government will not grant an export licence if to do so would be inconsistent with these Criteria, including if there is a risk of diversion to a weapon of mass destruction or military programme of concern, or if the export could present a risk to the UK’s national security.