Emma Lewell-Buck Portrait

Emma Lewell-Buck

Labour - South Shields

First elected: 2nd May 2013


Committees on Arms Export Controls
6th Jul 2020 - 16th Jan 2024
Levelling-up and Regeneration Bill
15th Jun 2022 - 20th Oct 2022
National Insurance Contributions Bill
16th Jun 2021 - 22nd Jun 2021
Shadow Minister (Education) (Children and Families)
9th Oct 2016 - 14th Mar 2019
Shadow Minister (Communities and Local Government)
6th Jan 2016 - 29th Jun 2016
Work and Pensions Committee
8th Jul 2015 - 1st Feb 2016
Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Committee
10th Jun 2013 - 30th Mar 2015
Draft Protection of Charities Bill (Joint Committee)
6th Nov 2014 - 3rd Feb 2015


Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Emma Lewell-Buck has voted in 693 divisions, and 5 times against the majority of their Party.

25 Mar 2021 - Coronavirus - View Vote Context
Emma Lewell-Buck voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 21 Labour No votes vs 176 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 484 Noes - 76
20 Dec 2019 - European Union (Withdrawal Agreement) Bill - View Vote Context
Emma Lewell-Buck voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 6 Labour Aye votes vs 162 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 358 Noes - 234
20 Dec 2019 - European Union (Withdrawal Agreement) Bill - View Vote Context
Emma Lewell-Buck voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 1 Labour Aye votes vs 173 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 353 Noes - 243
14 Dec 2021 - Public Health - View Vote Context
Emma Lewell-Buck voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 8 Labour No votes vs 142 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 369 Noes - 126
14 Dec 2021 - Public Health - View Vote Context
Emma Lewell-Buck voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 22 Labour No votes vs 124 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 385 Noes - 100
View All Emma Lewell-Buck Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Matt Hancock (Independent)
(26 debate interactions)
Johnny Mercer (Conservative)
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister for Veterans' Affairs)
(24 debate interactions)
Jacob Rees-Mogg (Conservative)
(24 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Cabinet Office
(77 debate contributions)
Department for Education
(37 debate contributions)
Department of Health and Social Care
(35 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Emma Lewell-Buck's debates

South Shields Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Emma Lewell-Buck has not participated in any petition debates

Latest EDMs signed by Emma Lewell-Buck

15th April 2024
Emma Lewell-Buck signed this EDM on Monday 15th April 2024

Trapped podcast on IPP sentences

Tabled by: John McDonnell (Labour - Hayes and Harlington)
That this House praises the tireless work by campaigners fighting against the injustice of Imprisonment for Public Protection (IPP) sentences, which were abolished in 2012 but not retrospectively, and commends the Trapped podcast for shining a powerful spotlight on the ongoing scandal of these indefinite and potentially never-ending sentences; agrees …
24 signatures
(Most recent: 17 Apr 2024)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 12
Plaid Cymru: 3
Independent: 3
Scottish National Party: 3
Liberal Democrat: 1
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
Alba Party: 1
4th March 2024
Emma Lewell-Buck signed this EDM on Wednesday 13th March 2024

Ronnie Campbell

Tabled by: Ian Lavery (Labour - Wansbeck)
That this House notes with great sadness the passing of Ronnie Campbell, who represented the constituency of Blyth Valley between 1987 and 2019; notes Ronnie’s great public service to the people of his constituency and his tireless advocacy for Blyth Valley which has resulted in so many good quality jobs …
30 signatures
(Most recent: 26 Mar 2024)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 24
Independent: 3
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
Workers Party of Britain: 1
Scottish National Party: 1
View All Emma Lewell-Buck's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Emma Lewell-Buck, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Emma Lewell-Buck has not been granted any Urgent Questions

4 Adjournment Debates led by Emma Lewell-Buck

Tuesday 17th October 2023
Wednesday 27th October 2021

5 Bills introduced by Emma Lewell-Buck


Parallel Parliament Note:

The proposals laid down in this bill were subsequently incorporated into the Family Resources Survey. See here for more information.

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to require the Government to monitor and report on food insecurity; to make provision for official statistics on food insecurity; and for connected purposes

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 29th November 2017
(Read Debate)

A Bill to amend the Licensing Act 2003 so that licensing hours Orders can be made by negative resolution statutory instrument.

Commons - 60%

Last Event - Committee Stage
Wednesday 21st February 2024
(Read Debate)
Next Event - Report Stage
Friday 17th May 2024
Order Paper number: 4
(Possibly be Debated)

A Bill to require the Secretary of State to ensure that families eligible for the Healthy Start scheme are registered to receive it; to confer certain powers on government departments and agencies and public bodies for that purpose; to provide for an opt-out where the family wishes; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading
Wednesday 14th June 2023
(Read Debate)

A Bill to require schools to provide breakfast club facilities; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading
Tuesday 13th October 2020
(Read Debate)

A Bill to require the Secretary of State to undertake a review of funeral affordability and costs; to require the providers of funeral services to offer a Simple Funeral Service; to require the Secretary of State to make certain arrangements relating to Funeral Payments; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 9th December 2014

Latest 50 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
3 Other Department Questions
25th Jan 2023
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, whether she has had recent discussions with Cabinet colleagues on support for disabled people with rising energy, food and fuel costs.

At the Autumn Statement the Chancellor announced further Cost of Living payments in 2023/24 – as part of a package worth twenty-six billion pounds – this included additional support for disabled people.

I am delighted to be the Minister bringing forward this vital legislation to support people most in need.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
15th Jun 2022
To ask the President of COP26, what discussions he has had with Cabinet colleagues on facilitating the UK’s climate objectives and COP26 commitments through trade deals.

Last month my Right Honourable Friend, the Secretary of State for International Trade set out the UK’s priorities for green trade and how free and fair trade can play a critical role in driving the global green transition.


Our free trade agreements are one lever to removing barriers to green trade, strengthening bilateral cooperation on climate change and the environment and supporting the delivery of the environmental commitments secured through the UK’s COP26 Presidency.


For example, both the Australia and New Zealand Free Trade Agreements have included affirmations of each party’s commitments to address climate change, including the Paris Agreement, and recognise the importance of achieving our respective goals.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Jul 2021
To ask the President of COP26, whether developing countries affected by loss and damage incurred by extreme weather and climate-linked disasters will receive additional finance, separate from the £100 billion climate finance goal commitment.

The UK Presidency is clear about the importance of developed countries meeting and surpassing the commitment to jointly mobilise $100bn of climate finance a year through to 2025, from a range of public and private sources.

At COP25, countries highlighted that existing sources of funds from a wide variety of sources, including disaster reduction and response funds respond to loss and damage. It also urged donors and these other funds to scale up support relevant to averting, minimising and addressing loss and damage in the most vulnerable countries. At COP26 and in the run up we will push for progress on these actions and to renew calls for coherent action using climate, development and disaster preparedness and response finance.

Through the COP26 Presidency we are also calling for greater quantity, quality and access to finance and for responses to be joined up. The Taskforce on Access to Finance aims to align support behind the national climate action plans of developing countries to improve access to climate finance. The outcomes will be to agree a new approach to access, marshalling coherent, programmatic support for countries’ own, nationally-determined climate priorities, alongside specific, implementable recommendations to address the system of climate finance as a whole which includes enabling them to better prepare, build resilience and respond to disasters – averting, minimising and addressing loss and damage.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
8th Dec 2020
To ask the Attorney General, how many prosecutions for causing or inciting sexual exploitation of a child there have been under the Sexual Offences Act 2003 in each year since its enactment.

The Sexual Offences Act 2003 provides offences relating to the sexual exploitation of children, under Sections 10, 14 and 47 – 50.

  • Section 10 makes it an offence for a person aged 18 or over intentionally to cause or incite a child aged under 16 to engage in sexual activity.
  • Section 14 makes it an offence for a person intentionally to arrange or facilitate any action which will involve an offence under any of sections 9 - 13 being committed against a child.
  • Section 47 – 50 provides a number of child exploitation offences including paying for the sexual services of a child and controlling a child in relation to sexual exploitation.

The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) maintains a central record of the number of offences in which a prosecution commenced, including the offences charged by way of the Sexual Offences Act 2003.

Since the Act came into force, and up to the end of March 2020, the number of child exploitation offences charged by way of the Sexual Offences Act 2003 is as follows:

Sexual Offences Act 2003 { 10 }

Sexual Offences Act 2003 { 14 }

Sexual Offences Act 2003 { 47 }

Sexual Offences Act 2003 { 48 }

Sexual Offences Act 2003 { 49 }

Sexual Offences Act 2003 { 50 }

2004-2005

62

6

0

1

0

0

2005-2006

327

29

15

26

1

2

2006-2007

528

57

18

21

8

0

2007-2008

507

48

19

22

3

1

2008-2009

589

41

37

32

2

2

2009-2010

732

59

15

33

7

7

2010-2011

1001

92

12

51

4

8

2011-2012

949

83

18

57

3

17

2012-2013

943

78

26

90

8

10

2013-2014

995

81

36

89

9

39

2014-2015

1310

132

49

198

3

31

2015-2016

1556

163

79

277

11

11

2016-2017

2020

190

38

263

15

67

2017-2018

1978

184

57

191

7

28

2018-2019

1240

100

48

160

7

7

2019-2020

977

277

33

72

0

4

Data Source: CPS Case Management Information System

There is no indication of the number of individual defendants prosecuted for these offences or the final outcome of the prosecution proceeding or if the charged offence was the substantive charge at the time of finalisation. It is often the case that defendants will be prosecuted for more than one offence in the same set of proceedings.

It is not possible to separately report the nature of, or type of sexual exploitation carried out on victims of child sexual offences other than by manually examining case files at disproportionate cost.

8th Dec 2020
To ask the Attorney General, how many prosecutions for controlling a child in relation to sexual exploitation there have been under Section 49 of the Sexual Offences Act 2003 in each year since its enactment.

The Sexual Offences Act 2003 provides offences relating to the sexual exploitation of children, under Sections 10, 14 and 47 – 50.

  • Section 10 makes it an offence for a person aged 18 or over intentionally to cause or incite a child aged under 16 to engage in sexual activity.
  • Section 14 makes it an offence for a person intentionally to arrange or facilitate any action which will involve an offence under any of sections 9 - 13 being committed against a child.
  • Section 47 – 50 provides a number of child exploitation offences including paying for the sexual services of a child and controlling a child in relation to sexual exploitation.

The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) maintains a central record of the number of offences in which a prosecution commenced, including the offences charged by way of the Sexual Offences Act 2003.

Since the Act came into force, and up to the end of March 2020, the number of child exploitation offences charged by way of the Sexual Offences Act 2003 is as follows:

Sexual Offences Act 2003 { 10 }

Sexual Offences Act 2003 { 14 }

Sexual Offences Act 2003 { 47 }

Sexual Offences Act 2003 { 48 }

Sexual Offences Act 2003 { 49 }

Sexual Offences Act 2003 { 50 }

2004-2005

62

6

0

1

0

0

2005-2006

327

29

15

26

1

2

2006-2007

528

57

18

21

8

0

2007-2008

507

48

19

22

3

1

2008-2009

589

41

37

32

2

2

2009-2010

732

59

15

33

7

7

2010-2011

1001

92

12

51

4

8

2011-2012

949

83

18

57

3

17

2012-2013

943

78

26

90

8

10

2013-2014

995

81

36

89

9

39

2014-2015

1310

132

49

198

3

31

2015-2016

1556

163

79

277

11

11

2016-2017

2020

190

38

263

15

67

2017-2018

1978

184

57

191

7

28

2018-2019

1240

100

48

160

7

7

2019-2020

977

277

33

72

0

4

Data Source: CPS Case Management Information System

There is no indication of the number of individual defendants prosecuted for these offences or the final outcome of the prosecution proceeding or if the charged offence was the substantive charge at the time of finalisation. It is often the case that defendants will be prosecuted for more than one offence in the same set of proceedings.

It is not possible to separately report the nature of, or type of sexual exploitation carried out on victims of child sexual offences other than by manually examining case files at disproportionate cost.

8th Dec 2020
To ask the Attorney General, how many prosecutions for arranging or facilitating exploitation of a child there have been under the Sexual Offences Act 2003 in each year since its enactment.

The Sexual Offences Act 2003 provides offences relating to the sexual exploitation of children, under Sections 10, 14 and 47 – 50.

  • Section 10 makes it an offence for a person aged 18 or over intentionally to cause or incite a child aged under 16 to engage in sexual activity.
  • Section 14 makes it an offence for a person intentionally to arrange or facilitate any action which will involve an offence under any of sections 9 - 13 being committed against a child.
  • Section 47 – 50 provides a number of child exploitation offences including paying for the sexual services of a child and controlling a child in relation to sexual exploitation.

The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) maintains a central record of the number of offences in which a prosecution commenced, including the offences charged by way of the Sexual Offences Act 2003.

Since the Act came into force, and up to the end of March 2020, the number of child exploitation offences charged by way of the Sexual Offences Act 2003 is as follows:

Sexual Offences Act 2003 { 10 }

Sexual Offences Act 2003 { 14 }

Sexual Offences Act 2003 { 47 }

Sexual Offences Act 2003 { 48 }

Sexual Offences Act 2003 { 49 }

Sexual Offences Act 2003 { 50 }

2004-2005

62

6

0

1

0

0

2005-2006

327

29

15

26

1

2

2006-2007

528

57

18

21

8

0

2007-2008

507

48

19

22

3

1

2008-2009

589

41

37

32

2

2

2009-2010

732

59

15

33

7

7

2010-2011

1001

92

12

51

4

8

2011-2012

949

83

18

57

3

17

2012-2013

943

78

26

90

8

10

2013-2014

995

81

36

89

9

39

2014-2015

1310

132

49

198

3

31

2015-2016

1556

163

79

277

11

11

2016-2017

2020

190

38

263

15

67

2017-2018

1978

184

57

191

7

28

2018-2019

1240

100

48

160

7

7

2019-2020

977

277

33

72

0

4

Data Source: CPS Case Management Information System

There is no indication of the number of individual defendants prosecuted for these offences or the final outcome of the prosecution proceeding or if the charged offence was the substantive charge at the time of finalisation. It is often the case that defendants will be prosecuted for more than one offence in the same set of proceedings.

It is not possible to separately report the nature of, or type of sexual exploitation carried out on victims of child sexual offences other than by manually examining case files at disproportionate cost.

30th Oct 2020
To ask the Attorney General, how many prosecutions for offences against children there have been for human trafficking under the Modern Slavery Act 2015 in each year since its enactment.

The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) maintains a central record of the number of offences in which a prosecution commenced, including offences charged by way of the Modern Slavery Act 2015. This data may be further disaggregated by the child abuse case monitoring flag. The CPS definition of child abuse covers any case where the victim was under 18 years of age at the time of the offence and includes allegations or crimes perpetrated by both adults and under 18s.

Since the Act came into force and up to the end of March 2020, the number of Modern Slavery Act offences flagged as child abuse is as follows:

2015-2016

2016-2017

2017-2018

2018-2019

2019-2020

Modern Slavery Act 2015 { 1 }

0

0

0

3

0

Modern Slavery Act 2015 { 2 }

1

21

26

5

30

Data Source: CPS Management Information System

There is no indication of the number of individual defendants prosecuted for these offences or the final outcome of the prosecution proceeding or if the charged offence was the substantive charge at the time of finalisation. It is often the case that defendants will be prosecuted for more than one offence in the same set of proceedings.

It is not possible to separately report the nature of, or type of exploitation carried out on victims of modern slavery or trafficking offences other than by manually examining case files at disproportionate cost.

30th Oct 2020
To ask the Attorney General, how many prosecutions for offences against children there have been for the offence of slavery, servitude and forced or compulsory labour under the Modern Slavery Act 2015 in each year since its enactment.

The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) maintains a central record of the number of offences in which a prosecution commenced, including offences charged by way of the Modern Slavery Act 2015. This data may be further disaggregated by the child abuse case monitoring flag. The CPS definition of child abuse covers any case where the victim was under 18 years of age at the time of the offence and includes allegations or crimes perpetrated by both adults and under 18s.

Since the Act came into force and up to the end of March 2020, the number of Modern Slavery Act offences flagged as child abuse is as follows:

2015-2016

2016-2017

2017-2018

2018-2019

2019-2020

Modern Slavery Act 2015 { 1 }

0

0

0

3

0

Modern Slavery Act 2015 { 2 }

1

21

26

5

30

Data Source: CPS Management Information System

There is no indication of the number of individual defendants prosecuted for these offences or the final outcome of the prosecution proceeding or if the charged offence was the substantive charge at the time of finalisation. It is often the case that defendants will be prosecuted for more than one offence in the same set of proceedings.

It is not possible to separately report the nature of, or type of exploitation carried out on victims of modern slavery or trafficking offences other than by manually examining case files at disproportionate cost.

23rd May 2023
To ask the Prime Minister, with reference to his oral contribution of 26 October 2022, Official Report, column 297, what the evidential basis was for his statement that a record number of new homes had been built in the previous year.

I refer the hon. Member to my answer of 11 November 2022, Official Report, PQ77552. The latest figures show that 2.3 million more homes have been delivered across England since 2010.

Rishi Sunak
Prime Minister, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, and Minister for the Union
23rd May 2023
To ask the Prime Minister, with reference to his oral contribution of 2 November 2022, Official Report ,column 861, what the evidential basis was for his statement that Labour was committed to abolishing the armed forces, scrapping the nuclear deterrent, withdrawing from NATO. and befriending Hamas and Hezbollah.

I have been asked to reply.

To assist the hon. Member, I have placed in the Library of the House documentation kindly provided by the Conservative Research Department, which outlines the evidential basis for this statement about the right hon. Member for Islington North’s (Jeremy Corbyn MP) security agenda.

22nd Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many times the National Space Council has met; and which Secretaries of State have attended each meeting.

It is a long-established precedent that information about the discussions that have taken place in Cabinet and its Committees, and how often they have met, is not normally shared publicly.

GOV.UK is updated regularly with the terms of reference and membership of Cabinet Committees, including the National Space Council.

22nd Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many staff across Whitehall (a) were working on and (b) are working on the relocation of Afghan nationals (i) prior to and (b) after the fall of Kabul.

A significant cross Government effort is underway to ensure the thousands of Afghans who were evacuated to the UK receive the support they need to rebuild their lives, find work, pursue education, and integrate into local communities. Hundreds of staff across Government have been working tirelessly to bring as many British nationals and eligible Afghans as possible back to the UK.

8th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, in pursuant to the Answer of 17 December to Written Question 128992, what number of meetings occurred; and which Cabinet members attended at each such meeting.

As stated in the answer to PQ 105615, in line with the practice of successive administrations, details of the discussions that have taken place in Cabinet and its Committees, how often they have met, and who attended is not normally disclosed.

Membership of the National Security Council is publicly available on GOV.UK.

Penny Mordaunt
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
30th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, on how many death certificates has covid-19 been recorded as (a) the primary cause and (b) a contributory factor since the start of the covid-19 outbreak.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have therefore asked the Authority to respond.

2nd Jun 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 29 May 2020 to Question 45531 on Mortuaries: Coronavirus, how many of the of the procured temporary mortuary spaces have (a) been built and (b) are in use.

Further to the answer given to PQ 45531 on 29 May 2020, additional mortuary capacity has been procured by a range of organisations in the private and public sectors, including central government, to ensure that the deceased are treated with dignity and respect. Cabinet Office does not hold complete data on specific utilisation of additional storage units.

Penny Mordaunt
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
11th May 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many temporary mortuaries (a) have been built and (b) are in use as a result of the covid-19 outbreak; and what the capacity is of each of those facilities.

Additional mortuary capacity has been procured by a range of organisations in the public and private sectors as part of the response to the Covid-19 pandemic, including central government departments, NHS trusts, local authorities and funeral directors, to ensure that the deceased are treated with dignity and respect. We do not hold detailed information on the capacity or utilisation rate of unlicensed private sector sites maintained by the estimated 5,000 or so funeral directors in England.

The Cabinet Office has procured units to provide up to 30,000 additional temporary mortuary spaces across the UK, as part of the government’s responsible contingency planning for a reasonable worst case scenario.

The Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government is working closely with local partners to support them in their preparations. The Ministry of Justice are working to support the sector, and are working with DWP to ensure the bereaved are supported, including speeding up the processing time for Funeral Expense Payments.

Penny Mordaunt
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
6th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, how much money South Tyneside Council returned to the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy from grants in December 2022.

This information is not held centrally and can only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Kevin Hollinrake
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
12th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, with reference to paragraph 21 of the report entitled A pro-innovation approach to AI regulation: Government response, CP 1019, published on 6 February 2024, whether the (a) lead AI Ministers and (b) new Inter-Ministerial Group to drive effective coordination across government on AI issues have met.

It is a long-established precedent that information about the discussions that have taken place in Cabinet and its Committees, and how often they have met, is not normally shared publicly.

Saqib Bhatti
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
6th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, with reference to paragraph 21 of the report entitled A pro-innovation approach to AI regulation: Government response, published on 6 February 2024, when the lead AI Ministers have met; and how frequently they plan to meet in 2024.

It is a long-established precedent that information about the discussions that have taken place in Cabinet and its Committees, and how often they have met, is not normally shared publicly.

Saqib Bhatti
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
22nd May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, if she will make a comparative assessment of the affordability of mobile phone contracts based on the (a) Retail Price Index and (b) Consumer Price Index.

We recognise that this is a difficult time for families across the country who are struggling with their bills due to the rise in the cost of living.

A number of operators choose to link their annual price rises to either the Consumer Prices Index (CPI) and Retail Price Index (RPI). Due to the differences in the way they are calculated, RPI is traditionally higher than CPI. Whether CPI or RPI-linked, it is important that clauses within mobile contracts - such as price rises - are clear and transparent so consumers know what they are signing up to.

Ofcom, as the independent regulator, has a statutory duty to monitor ongoing household affordability in the sector, and Part C of their General Conditions require telecoms companies to provide clear information about their services.

On 9 February 2023, Ofcom announced a review into the transparency of in-contract price rises including those linked to CPI and RPI. Ofcom expects their review to conclude by the end of the year. We look forward to reading their findings.

9th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, how much grant money was returned to her Department by South Tyneside Council in the last two years.

In regards to the Broadband Programmes (Building Digital UK), no grant money was returned to DCMS by South Tyneside Council in the last two years.

30th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 24 January 2023 to Question 127774, on Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy: South Tyneside, where his Department records information on grant money returned from Councils.

BEIS policy relates to each grant scheme being run by its own Senior Responsible Owner who will manage reconciliations and money returned by local authorities to BEIS.

Kevin Hollinrake
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
19th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how much money have South Tyneside Council returned to his Department from grants allocated over the last two years as of 19 January 2023.

This information is not held centrally and can only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Kevin Hollinrake
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
9th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how much of the money allocated for Covid Business Grants have South Tyneside Council returned to his Department; and for what reasons this money was returned.

Across the COVID-19 business grant schemes South Tyneside Council was allocated £59.8 million. Of this £51.5 million was reported as disbursed to eligible businesses with £8.3 million due to be returned to BEIS at the end of scheme reconciliation.

Initial funding allocations were based on estimates of the eligible local business population, with local authorities required to return unallocated funding to BEIS. Further allocation and spend data for each scheme, including guidance on the methodologies of the initial allocations, can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-grant-funding-local-authority-payments-to-small-and-medium-businesses.

Kevin Hollinrake
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
22nd Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans he has to bring forward legislative proposals to prevent businesses using fire and rehire tactics.

Using threats to ‘fire and rehire’ as a tactic to pressure workers during negotiations is unacceptable. Employers should refer to Acas’ guidance, which sets out that dismissal and re-engagement should only be considered an option of last resort.

16th Nov 2021
What plans he has to extend employment rights to (a) workers in the gig economy and (b) all workers.

The United Kingdom has one of the best records on workers’ rights in the world - going further than the EU in many areas – and we believe the UK’s current three-tiered employment status framework strikes the right balance between the flexibility our economy needs and protections for workers.

9th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what progress he has made on the publication of a timetable for the delivery of the national space strategy.

This Government is committed to making the UK a global science and technology superpower and a meaningful actor in space. This will be achieved through the UK’s first comprehensive national space strategy that unleashes growth and innovation in the UK space sector. The strategy is progressing and will be published in due course.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department has plans to import the plant-based covid-19 vaccine produced by Medicago in Canada; and whether his Department has plans to make a vegan-friendly covid-19 vaccine available in the UK.

The Government continues to take a portfolio-based approach to Covid-19 vaccine procurement, which monitors the landscape of vaccines in development in the UK and internationally. Although we continue to investigate further potential vaccine candidates worldwide, we are currently not able to give any further information on these candidates owing to commercial sensitivity. If we enter into further agreements, we will publish details of those in the usual manner.

24th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how much has been allocated to local authorities through the Additional Restrictions Grant; how much of that funding has (a) been spent and (b) remains unspent to date; and what the timeframe is for local authorities to be allocated that grant funding.

The Additional Restrictions Grant (ARG) is a discretionary scheme aimed at supporting businesses, including those that have not been mandated to close but have had their trade adversely affected by the nationalised restrictions. Local Authorities have been allocated a further £500m in discretionary funding via the ARG, in addition to £1.1bn already allocated in November 2020. Local Authorities can use the ARG to support businesses in their local area, as they see fit. We expect Local Authorities to use this additional resource quickly to support businesses in their area. Local Authorities are able to use the Additional Restrictions Grant until the end of the financial year 2021/2022.

This data relates to allocations and grant payments made by Local Authorities to businesses up to 17 January 2021:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-grant-funding-local-authority-payments-to-small-and-medium-businesses.

7th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department is taking to support deployment of infrastructure at ports to facilitate an increase in offshore wind capacity.

My Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Minister recently announced on £160 million of new funding towards investment to upgrade ports and infrastructure, to ensure UK ports have the necessary facilities and capabilities to meet the future needs of offshore wind developers.

The expected rapid deployment of offshore wind across the UK, Europe and globally over the next decade, together with the increasing size of turbines, means that there is a need for a major expansion in manufacturing capacity in the coming years.

The ‘Offshore wind manufacturing investment support scheme’ aims to accelerate the development of large-scale manufacturing portside hubs, which could see financial support to strengthen the UK’s offshore wind manufacturing capability, creating employment and investment in both coastal communities and the wider supply chain.

Following the Request for Information in October 2020, the Department has now launched a formal competitive process on a single large coastal manufacturing site for the offshore wind industry. This would generate manufacturing clusters where several large-scale producers can co-locate.

27th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the planned timescale is for seafarers to receive the National Minimum Wage, announced on 1 October 2020.

The National Minimum Wage (Offshore Employment) (Amendment) Order 2020 came into force on 1 October 2020. It extended the National Minimum Wage (NMW) to all seafarers working domestically in the UK territorial waters. Changes apply regardless of where the vessel is registered or the nationality of the seafarers, provided they are working domestically in the UK territorial waters.

If seafarers believe they are not being paid the NMW, they should contact HMRC who will consider every complaint they receive, call the ACAS helpline (0300 123 1100), or use the online helpline tool for free, confidential advice about their rights and entitlements.

9th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the timescale is for the introduction of the Government's proposed social housing decarbonisation programme.

On 8 July 2020, my Rt. Hon. Friend Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer’s Summer Economic Update announced the £50m UK-wide Social Housing Decarbonisation Fund Demonstrator (SHDF Demonstrator) to start the decarbonisation of social housing over 2020/21, and to support green jobs as part of the COVID-19 Economic Recovery Plan. The £50m project is a down payment towards the £3.8 billion Social Housing Decarbonisation Fund in our Manifesto, allocations for which will be determined in due course. This is a 10-year scheme, running to 2030, beginning with the Demonstrator phase in 2020. This will mean warmer and more energy efficient homes and could reduce annual energy bills by hundreds of pounds for some of the poorest households in society, as well as lowering carbon emissions.

9th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if the Government will make an assessment of the potential merits of implementing a fuel poverty debt relief programme for winter 2020-21.

The Department is working with Ofgem to assess the level and impact of domestic consumer energy debt this winter and we will continue to review options to support energy customers in debt, including those in or at risk of fuel poverty.

Ofgem rules require energy suppliers to offer customers at risk of, or in debt, the facility to repay their debt in instalments. Suppliers are also required to take all reasonable steps to take into account a customers ability to pay when calculating this. Ofgem issued an open letter in June, stating they would “not tolerate sharp practice or aggressive debt collection and suppliers could face enforcement action where this is the case”.

The Department secured an agreement with energy companies on 19th March 2020 to support their customers impacted by Covid-19, that, based on the circumstances could include reassessing, reducing or pausing debt repayments for households in financial distress. Companies have also agreed to refer customers who are struggling to pay their bills to third party debt advisors.

9th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the timescale is for the introduction of the Government's proposed Home Upgrade Grants.

Under the £2 billion Green Homes Grant funding announced by my Rt. Hon. Friend Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer on 8th July to save households money, cut carbon and create green jobs, £500 million has been earmarked for Local Authority delivery in England to improve the energy efficiency of low-income households.

The first phase of this funding, launched on 4th August, will see up to £200 million available to Local Authorities directly through a bidding process. The remaining £300 million will be allocated to the five regional Local Energy Hubs later this year to procure services that support upgrading eligible homes.

This funding represents a significant and accelerated down payment on decarbonising buildings to help stimulate the economic recovery and create green jobs.

24th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what employment protections are in place for kidney organ donors.

The Government is fully supportive of all types of donation whether by living donors or not.

Most employees are entitled to employment protection such as statutory sick leave, protection from unfair dismissal and protection from unlawful discrimination. We would generally expect employers to be sympathetic when, for example considering requests for extra leave, which may be needed in these circumstances.

NHS England will also reimburse living donor patients in order to ensure that the financial impact on the donor is cost neutral. Through this scheme, living donors can receive a refund for loss of earnings and some other costs such as travel.

The policy on reimbursement was revised in 2018 in collaboration with NHS Blood and Transplant and is published on the NHS England website - https://www.england.nhs.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/comm-pol-reimbursement-expenses-living-donors-v2.pdf

23rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department is taking to regulate pricing of stock in small newsagents to prevent fluctuations on essential items during the covid-19 outbreak.

The Government condemns exploitative pricing practices in the light of the Covid-19 outbreak. The Competition and Markets Authority has created a Covid-19 taskforce to address concerns that some businesses are exploiting consumers through their pricing practices. The taskforce has already been in contact with traders about excessive hand sanitiser prices. Enforcement authorities will take action against companies that have broken competition or consumer protection law, and the Government continues to monitor these practices closely.

11th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if she will make an assessment of the potential merits of giving workers on zero-hours contracts the right to a contract with guaranteed minimum hours.

We are committed to making the UK the best place in the world to work and grow a business. As announced in the Queen’s Speech we will be bringing forward an Employment Rights Bill to deliver the greatest reform of workers’ rights in over 20 years.

These reforms include taking firm action to tackle what Matthew Taylor termed one-sided flexibility, where some businesses have transferred too much business risk to the individual, sometimes at the detriment of their financial security and personal well-being.

We will also give all workers the right to request a more stable contract, which aims to encourage conversations between employers and businesses.

21st Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, when her Department will publish a response to the Technical consultation on a Community Wealth Fund in England, which closed on 19 October 2023.

The government is grateful to all those who took the time to respond to the technical consultation. Officials from the Department for Culture, Media and Sport and the Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities are carefully considering all of the responses received. The government response will be published in due course.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
19th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many people over 75 years of age (a) have been (i) fined, (ii) arrested, (iii) imprisoned and (b) are subject to legal action for non payment of their television licence.

Responsibility for collecting and enforcing the Licence Fee is the responsibility of the BBC. The BBC has confirmed that no enforcement action has been taken against over-75s for TV licence evasion at this stage.

The Secretary of State has been clear that the BBC must ensure that it supports those affected by its decision on the over-75s concession and we expect them to do so with the utmost sensitivity.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
26th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, pursuant to the Answer of 25 February 2021 to Question 155057, on Gaming: Coronavirus, for what reason licensed betting offices with gaming machines are a greater social and economic priority than adult gaming centres with those machines.

The Government has designed the roadmap for reopening premises following careful consideration of the evidence and scientific advice. The roadmap strikes a balance between mitigating the social, health and economic impacts of closures and the need to avoid a resurgence of COVID-19 infections. It also takes account of the cumulative impact of easing restrictions and the need to assess the impact at each step. Under the current roadmap, all non-essential retail will open at Step 2, not before 12 April. Indoor entertainment and indoor leisure will open at Step 3, not before 17 May.

As the business of Adult Gaming Centres consists entirely of customers playing machines within the premises, they are considered to be entertainment and will open at Step 3. The customers of Licensed Betting Offices (LBOs) may enter the premises, place a bet and leave with a betting slip, a transaction more similar to purchasing goods in a shop. While LBOs will be permitted to open at Step 2, they will be subject to a number of additional restrictions as set out in the previous Tier 3 guidance. These include showing no live sport or racing and having no chairs, as well as early closure. Under normal circumstances LBOs are limited to offering a maximum of four gaming machines and only two may be made available under these restrictions.

In recognition of the impact of requiring some businesses to remain closed for a longer period, the Chancellor announced an enhanced package of support at the Budget, including Restart Grants of up to £18,000 per premises, specifically for those which must remain closed beyond Step 2.



25th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, for what reason the Government's policy is that adult gaming centres are unable to open on 12 April 2021; and what the evidential basis is for that policy.

The Government has designed the roadmap for reopening premises following careful consideration of the evidence and scientific advice. The roadmap strikes a balance between mitigating the social, health and economic impacts of closures and the need to avoid a resurgence of COVID-19 infections. It also takes account of the cumulative impact of easing restrictions and the need to assess the impact at each step. Under the current roadmap, all non-essential retail will open at Step 2, not before 12 April. Indoor entertainment and indoor leisure will open at Step 3, not before 17 May.

As the business of Adult Gaming Centres consists entirely of customers playing machines within the premises, they are considered to be entertainment and will open at Step 3. The customers of Licensed Betting Offices (LBOs) may enter the premises, place a bet and leave with a betting slip, a transaction more similar to purchasing goods in a shop. While LBOs will be permitted to open at Step 2, they will be subject to a number of additional restrictions as set out in the previous Tier 3 guidance. These include showing no live sport or racing and having no chairs, as well as early closure. Under normal circumstances LBOs are limited to offering a maximum of four gaming machines and only two may be made available under these restrictions.

In recognition of the impact of requiring some businesses to remain closed for a longer period, the Chancellor announced an enhanced package of support at the Budget, including Restart Grants of up to £18,000 per premises, specifically for those which must remain closed beyond Step 2.



24th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, when the covid-19 roadmap guidance will be updated to cover fairgrounds and travelling fairgrounds; and whether that guidance will include discretionary guidance for local authorities.

We will re-enable outdoor events such as funfairs and fairgrounds in Step 2 of the roadmap, as referenced here, subject to local authority approval where required. Step 2 will take place at least 5 weeks after Step 1 and no earlier than 12 April, subject to an assessment of the data.

Whilst outdoor events are not currently able to proceed due to the national restrictions, my Department looks forward to working across Government and with Local Authorities, Public Health England and the sector itself to get funfairs running safely and successfully once they are permitted.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
5th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what guidance his Department has provided on the reopening of Adult Gaming Centres.

The government has published guidance to help businesses understand how to make workplaces Covid-secure and help tackle the spread of the virus. When they are open, Adult Gaming Centres should follow the shops and branches guidance in addition to Bacta’s specific guidance for FECs and AGCs to ensure they can operate as safely as possible.

As announced by the Prime Minister, we intend to publish our plan for taking the country out of lockdown in the last week of February. That plan will depend on the continued success of our vaccination programme, and on a sustained reduction in Covid-19 cases and hospitalisations.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
6th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if she will make an estimate of the number and proportion of apprenticeships undertaken in artificial intelligence related positions in the last 12 months.

There were 350 starts on the level 7 Artificial Intelligence Data Specialist standard in the 2022/23 academic year. Data for 2023/24 has not yet been finalised as we are part way through the academic year. Other apprenticeships may also contain elements relating to artificial intelligence.

7th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the oral contribution of the Parliamentary Under-Secretary for Education during the debate on Children in the Care System: Sibling Contact of 4 March 2020, Official Report, column 957, when her Department plans to update the Care Planning, Placement and Case Review (England) Regulations 2010 to include explicit reference to contact with siblings who are not looked after.

Schedule 2 of the Children Act 1989 mandates that local authorities should promote contact between the child and his or her relatives, where this is consistent with the child’s welfare and is reasonably practical. This includes sibling contact.

However, the department agrees that there is an anomaly in the 2010 Care Planning Regulations and recognises that the honourable Member for South Shields has raised this issue in the past.

In Stable Homes, Built on Love’, the department committed to a review of all legislation, regulations and standards of care to ensure all children in care receive what they need. Alongside this, the department will review the 2010 care planning regulations.

David Johnston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
5th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 27 June 2023 to Question 190584 on Apprentices: Taxation, how many students were studying at Level (a) 3 and (b) 4 and above in each of the last five years.

The data showing apprenticeship participation for the last five academic years is shown in the table below.

2017/18

2018/19

2019/20

2020/21

2021/22

Advanced apprenticeship (level 3)

372,430

356,150

338,680

326,380

330,410

Higher apprenticeship (level 4 and above)

84,240

123,950

165,510

207,860

238,820

Notes:

(1) 2017/18 to 2021/22 figures cover full academic years volumes.

(2) Volumes are rounded to the nearest 10.

(3) Participation is the count of learners that participated at any point during the year. Learners undertaking more than one course will appear only once in the grand total.

(4) Participation at intermediate, advanced, and higher levels is a count of learners that participated at those levels at any point during the year. Learners undertaking more than one course will only appear once at each level but can appear in the count at more than one level.


Further apprenticeship statistics can be found in the ‘Apprenticeships and traineeships statistics’ publication, available at: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/apprenticeships-and-traineeships.