Stephen Doughty Portrait

Stephen Doughty

Labour (Co-op) - Cardiff South and Penarth

Shadow Minister (Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs and International Development)

(since September 2020)
Shadow Minister (Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs)
10th Apr 2020 - 2nd Sep 2020
Shadow Minister (International Development)
10th Apr 2020 - 2nd Sep 2020
Home Affairs Committee
2nd Mar 2020 - 11th May 2020
Home Affairs Committee
11th Sep 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Committees on Arms Export Controls
10th Feb 2016 - 3rd May 2017
International Development Sub-Committee on the Work of the Independent Commission for Aid Impact
28th Jun 2016 - 3rd May 2017
Committees on Arms Export Controls (formerly Quadripartite Committee)
10th Feb 2016 - 3rd May 2017
International Development Committee
8th Feb 2016 - 3rd May 2017
Shadow Minister (Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs)
28th Oct 2015 - 6th Jan 2016
Shadow Minister (Business, Innovation and Skills)
18th Sep 2015 - 28th Oct 2015
Opposition Whip (Commons)
7th Oct 2013 - 18th Sep 2015
Welsh Affairs Committee
26th Nov 2012 - 30th Mar 2015


There are no upcoming events identified
Division Votes
Wednesday 9th June 2021
Protecting the Public and Justice for Victims
voted Aye - in line with the party majority
One of 193 Labour Aye votes vs 0 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 223 Noes - 0
Speeches
Monday 14th June 2021
Ethiopia

I thank the hon. Member for Tewkesbury (Mr Robertson) for his strong words, and the Minister for his frank response. …

Written Answers
Tuesday 15th June 2021
Africa: Bilaterial Aid
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how much bilateral Official Development Assistance has been …
Early Day Motions
Wednesday 11th March 2020
War widows pensions
That this House honours and recognises the sacrifices that our veterans and their families make; notes the particular sacrifices that …
Bills
None available
MP Financial Interests
Monday 26th April 2021
1. Employment and earnings
On 15 April 2021, attested into the British Army as a part-time Reservist. Payments will be received from the Army …
EDM signed
Wednesday 17th February 2021
The death of Mohamud Mohammed Hassan
That this House mourns the death of Mohamud Mohammed Hassan following his release without charge from police custody in Cardiff …
Supported Legislation
Tuesday 2nd April 2019
European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2019
A Bill to make provision in connection with the period for negotiations for withdrawing from the European Union.

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Stephen Doughty has voted in 247 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Stephen Doughty Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Matt Hancock (Conservative)
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
(25 debate interactions)
Jacob Rees-Mogg (Conservative)
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
(16 debate interactions)
Dominic Raab (Conservative)
Foreign Secretary and First Secretary of State
(15 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Home Office
(24 debate contributions)
Department of Health and Social Care
(24 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Stephen Doughty's debates

Cardiff South and Penarth Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petitions with highest Cardiff South and Penarth signature proportion
Petitions with most Cardiff South and Penarth signatures
Petition Debates Contributed

I would like the Government to:
• make running conversion therapy in the UK a criminal offence
• forcing people to attend said conversion therapies a criminal offence
• sending people abroad in order to try to convert them a criminal offence
• protect individuals from conversion therapy

Being the first to close and still no clue as to when we can open, this seasonal industry is losing its summer profits that allows them to get through the first quarter of next year.

Even if we are allowed to open in December, 1 months profit won't be enough to keep us open in 2021. We need help

The UK hospitality industry. Responsible for around 3m jobs, generating £130bn in activity, resulting in £38bn in taxation. Yet, unlike the Arts or Sports, we do not have a dedicated Minister.

We are asking that a Minister for Hospitality be created for the current, and successive governments.

Advice from the JCVI on the priority groups for a Covid-19 vaccine does not include school/childcare workers. This petition calls for these workers, who cannot distance or use PPE, to be kept safe at work by being put on the vaccine priority list when such a list is adopted into government policy.

The Government should explore using the new sanctions regime that allows individuals and entities that violate human rights around the world to be targeted, to impose sanctions on members of the Nigerian government and police force involved in any human rights abuses by the Nigerian police.


Latest EDMs signed by Stephen Doughty

12th January 2021
Stephen Doughty signed this EDM on Wednesday 17th February 2021

The death of Mohamud Mohammed Hassan

Tabled by: Liz Saville Roberts (Plaid Cymru - Dwyfor Meirionnydd)
That this House mourns the death of Mohamud Mohammed Hassan following his release without charge from police custody in Cardiff on 9 January 2020; offers its deepest condolences to Mr Hassan’s family and friends; notes that South Wales Police has, as is standard practice following a death after police contact, …
20 signatures
(Most recent: 11 Mar 2021)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 9
Scottish National Party: 4
Plaid Cymru: 3
Independent: 1
Green Party: 1
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
Liberal Democrat: 1
14th January 2021
Stephen Doughty signed this EDM on Monday 18th January 2021

Godfrey Colin Cameron

Tabled by: Chris Stephens (Scottish National Party - Glasgow South West)
That this House is deeply saddened by news of the death of Godfrey Colin Cameron, a hardworking member of Parliamentary security staff and member of the PCS trade union who passed away aged just 55 after contracting covid-19; extends our sincere condolences to his devoted wife Hyacinth, children Leon and …
139 signatures
(Most recent: 8 Feb 2021)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 117
Scottish National Party: 15
Plaid Cymru: 3
Independent: 2
Alba Party: 1
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
View All Stephen Doughty's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Stephen Doughty, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Stephen Doughty has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Stephen Doughty has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

Stephen Doughty has not introduced any legislation before Parliament


301 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
1 Other Department Questions
11th Feb 2021
To ask the President of COP26, what formal (a) consultation he has had with and (b) representation he has established for the UK Overseas Territories and Crown Dependencies in relation to the COP26 processes.

The UK Government represents the interests of UK Crown Dependencies and Overseas Territories in the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), including in negotiations at the annual Conference of the Parties (COP).

Whilst the Overseas Territories (OTs) are not part of the formal COP negotiating framework, as small island developing states (SIDS), they are also impacted by climate change. COP26 also provides an opportunity for the OTs to showcase their unique biodiversity, environments and marine protected areas and to highlight the importance of adaptation. The UK Government is working with all OTs to ensure that their unique perspectives are accurately represented and is designing a specific package to support Territory Governments in the run up to COP26 and beyond. I have asked my Regional Ambassador for Latin America and the Caribbean, for COP26, to also act as a liaison point for the OTs.

My officials are also engaging with the Crown Dependencies on preparations for COP26.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
26th May 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, which representatives of individual African countries or the African Union will be taking part in discussions at the upcoming G7 meeting in Cornwall either physically or virtually.

President Cyril Ramaphosa of the Republic of South Africa will be attending the upcoming G7 Summit in Carbis Bay.

Penny Mordaunt
Paymaster General
7th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how much UK-produced steel reinforcing bar was procured for Government-funded infrastructure projects in each of the last three years.

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) collates and publishes annually information on how much steel is purchased for the Government’s major infrastructure projects in the previous financial year, including what proportion is produced in the UK. This year’s data was published on 19 May and can be found at: www.gov.uk/government/publications/steel-public-procurement-2021.

The reported value of UK steel procured in 2019/20 for major public projects was £108m, a 33% increase on the previous year. BEIS will start collating data for 2020/21 in due course.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
27th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 26 January 2021 to Question 141474, how many additional vaccine doses per month the expanded Vaccine Manufacturing Innovation Centre facility can produce as a result of the investment outlined in that Answer; and of which types of vaccine.

When fully operationally in 2022, the Vaccines Manufacturing and Innovation Centre (VMIC) will have several Good Manufacturing Process suites that will be able to accommodate a range of production scale capabilities. For pandemic response, the VMIC will be able to make up to 70 million doses of a vaccine within a 6-month timeframe. This is a significant increase to the VMIC’s originally anticipated capacity.

The VMIC has been designed to be a flexible manufacturing facility and will be able to manufacture a range of vaccine types, such as messenger RNA, viral vector, or protein sub-unit.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when the expansion of the VMIC facility is planned to be completed.

The Vaccines Manufacturing and Innovation Centre (VMIC) should be partially open in summer 2021, with the facility fully operational in 2022. The VMIC is working towards having fill-finish capability at the end of 2021. The objective remains to accelerate the readiness of the VMIC by a year and it is on track to achieve this, but it is also important to remember this is a complex project being delivered in unprecedented times.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether the (a) design, (b) bio-engineering and (c) manufacture of vaccines capable of responding to the 501 and 484 variants of covid-19 has commenced.

The Government is currently undertaking its own laboratory work as a priority to better understand the impact of the new Covid-19 variants on the vaccines currently in deployment, in particular the risk of vaccine resistance. We maintain close contact with vaccine developers to understand their own studies as to the efficacy of their vaccines on variants and the impact on current supply chain arrangements for their manufacture.

We continue to take a portfolio-based approach that monitors the landscape of Covid-19 vaccine development and we remain confident that the three vaccines (Pfizer/BioNTech, Oxford University/AstraZeneca, and Moderna) that we have purchased, which have been authorised by the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA), will continue to be effective against the virus.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when vaccines capable of responding to the 501 and 484 variants of covid-19 will be available for use in the general population.

The Government is currently undertaking its own laboratory work as a priority to better understand the impact of the new Covid-19 variants on the vaccines currently in deployment, in particular the risk of vaccine resistance. We maintain close contact with vaccine developers to understand their own studies as to the efficacy of their vaccines on variants and the impact on current supply chain arrangements for their manufacture.

We continue to take a portfolio-based approach that monitors the landscape of Covid-19 vaccine development and we remain confident that the three vaccines (Pfizer/BioNTech, Oxford University/AstraZeneca, and Moderna) that we have purchased, which have been authorised by the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA), will continue to be effective against the virus.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
22nd Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many UK based manufacturing facilities are capable of re-engineering and manufacturing (a) mRNA, (b) viral vector, (c) whole virus and (d) protein subunit vaccines to address emerging variants of the covid-19 virus.

The Government has made several strategic investments in UK vaccine manufacturing capabilities to increase its capacity, ensuring we are able to manufacture across different vaccine technologies and embed resilience. This includes:

  • The acceleration and expansion of flexible vaccine manufacturing capabilities at the UK’s first Vaccine Manufacturing and Innovation Centre (VMIC) in Harwell.
  • Collaborating with the Cell and Gene Therapy Catapult to fund a state-of-the-art Manufacturing Innovation Centre in Braintree.
  • Expansion of the Valneva factory in Livingston, Scotland, which is capable of whole virus manufacture.

Both the VMIC and Braintree sites are flexible to vaccine types, including messenger RNA (mRNA), viral vector, and protein sub-unit. These sites could have a role in providing capability to manufacture vaccines to address the emerging variants of the COVID-19 virus.

The Government has also invested through UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) to support the creation of a new Centre of Excellence in mRNA vaccine manufacture at the Centre for Process Innovation (CPI), with equipment that can manufacture mRNA for vaccines. This funding has upgraded CPI’s National Biologics Manufacturing Centre at Darlington to obtain good manufacturing practice certification for the manufacture of RNA products including mRNA for clinical trials. A key advantage of RNA vaccines is how quickly they can be developed compared with other platforms.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
21st Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answers of 19 January 2021 to Questions 137942 and 137941, if he will provide a breakdown of the £300 million invested in securing and scaling up UK manufacturing capacity by (a) type of capacity, (b) geographical location and (c) the date that investment was delivered.

The Government invested over £300 million in 2020 to secure and scale-up the UK’s manufacturing capabilities to respond to this pandemic, including:

- £127 million towards the Cell and Gene Therapy Catapult Braintree in Essex;

- £93 million to accelerate the completion and expanded role of the Vaccine Manufacturing Innovation Centre in Oxfordshire;

- £4.7 million for skills training through the Advanced Therapies Skills Training Network, which will be delivered through both virtual and physical centres;

- £8.75 million for the set-up of the rapid deployment facility at Oxford Biomedica in Oxfordshire; and

- £65.5 million for the manufacture of the University of Oxford / AstraZeneca vaccine.

In addition to the above, we have also funded the fill and finish of vaccines through a contract with Wockhardt in Wrexham, North Wales, as well as the expansion of the Valneva factory in Livingston, Scotland. However, we are not able to give further details on these two developments owing to commercial confidentiality.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
21st Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to secure UK covid-19 vaccine manufacturing capacity and protect those manufacturing establishments from flood, fire, malfunction and other security threats.

The Government takes security extremely seriously and is ensuring all necessary steps are taken.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
18th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether the decision by Pfizer to make changes to manufacturing processes of its covid-19 vaccine to boost production will affect the distribution of that vaccine to the UK from late January to early February 2021.

Vaccines are a precious resource and are in very high demand across the world; therefore, for security reasons it is not possible to provide detail about the size of our supplies or give exact detail about future deliveries.

We have been monitoring the requirements across the supply chain from supplier through to patients for some time. All vaccine candidates’ supply and onward deployment have clear supply chain plans across the value chain, including materials, manufacturing, transportation, storage, and distribution.

As of 18 January 2021, over 4.6 million people in the UK had been vaccinated with the first dose of the vaccine. We are in the process of understanding the implications of Pfizer’s announcement on 15 January regarding upgrades to its manufacturing capacity. We continue to work to meet our target of vaccinating all four priority groups, as advised by the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation, by the middle of February.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
14th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many bio-reactors used in vaccine production there are in the UK; and how many of those bio-reactors are being used for covid-19 vaccine production.

We have been monitoring the requirements across the supply chain from supplier through to patients for some time. All vaccine candidates’ supply and onward deployment have clear supply chain plans across the value chain, including materials, manufacturing, transportation, storage, and distribution.

Three of the UK's seven COVID-19 vaccines are being manufactured in the UK. The Government has worked closely with the manufacturers to ensure that we have sufficient capacity secured.

The Government has also invested over £300 million in securing and scaling up the UK’s manufacturing capabilities to be able to respond to this pandemic.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
14th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many vaccine manufacturing facilities (a) for the production of raw materials, active ingredients, coupling and formulation and (b) for fill and finish there are in the UK; and how many of those facilities are being used for covid-19 vaccine production.

We have been monitoring the requirements across the supply chain from supplier through to patients for some time. All vaccine candidates’ supply and onward deployment have clear supply chain plans across the value chain, including materials, manufacturing, transportation, storage, and distribution.

Three of the UK's seven COVID-19 vaccines are being manufactured in the UK. The Government has worked closely with the manufacturers to ensure that we have sufficient capacity secured.

The Government has also invested over £300 million in securing and scaling up the UK’s manufacturing capabilities to be able to respond to this pandemic.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
27th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department is taking to support the steel recycling sector during the covid-19 outbreak.

The Department has been in close contact with the metals recycling sector during this challenging period. The sector has seen a reduction to material flows throughout the economy, which is impacting their output.

The metals recycling sector has made use of the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme and we have also promoted the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme, alongside other business support schemes.

The Government is mindful of the important role that the metals recycling sector plays in keeping our economy moving and we continue to be receptive to their concerns.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
27th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how the £750 million in funding for charities, voluntary sector organisations and the social enterprise sector is being disbursed; and what steps he is taking to ensure that funding is allocated equitably across the UK.

Of the £750 million, £360m will be allocated by central government to charities in England. This will include up to £200m support for hospices, with the rest going to organisations including St Johns’ Ambulance and the Citizens Advice Bureau as well as charities supporting vulnerable children and victims of domestic abuse. Government Departments have made bids identifying which charities will require their support. The bids are currently being assessed with departments, No 10 and the Treasury.

A further £370m will support smaller, local charities working with vulnerable people. In England, £310m of this will be provided through the National Lottery Community Fund. To ensure funding is distributed equitably, £60m of this amount will be allocated through the Barnett formula so the devolved administrations are funded to provide similar support in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

Finally, the remainder of the amount is Government match funding of the money raised during the BBC’s Big Night in. The first £20m of this will go to the National Emergencies Trust and the remainder will go through the BBC charities who will be administering this funding.

John Whittingdale
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
4th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether the training being provided for schools to help them implement statutory Relationships and Sex Education will be fully LGBT-inclusive.

The new subjects of relationships education (for primary age pupils), relationships and sex education (for secondary age pupils) and health education (for all pupils in state-funded schools) will become compulsory in September 2020. Many schools are already teaching aspects of these subjects as part of their sex and relationship education provision or personal, social, health and economic education programme. These subjects are designed to foster respect for others and for difference, educating pupils about healthy relationships.

The Department is investing in a central programme of support for the new subjects, which is planned to be available to all teachers from spring 2020.

This support will be accessed through a new online service and will include an implementation guide, which will accompany the statutory guidance, case studies from early adopter schools, and innovative materials to support staff training. The online training modules will also support teachers in developing inclusive teaching, including LGBT-inclusive approaches. The Department is working with a wide range of schools, teachers and expert organisations, including Stonewall, the NSPCC and teaching unions, to develop this support. There will also be training available for teachers through regional networks, offering opportunities to improve subject knowledge and build confidence.

The Department has also been working closely with over 1,600 schools who are acting on a voluntary basis as early adopters of the new subjects, so that we can support their journey, learn lessons and share good practice amongst all schools.

The Department will ensure that the central programme and materials supporting implementation of the new subjects are inclusive. We recognise fully the need to disseminate the good practice in teaching about LGBT relationships that is seen in large numbers of our schools.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
4th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether the implementation guidance being produced by his Department to support the implementation of statutory Relationships and Sex Education will be fully LGBT-inclusive.

The new subjects of relationships education (for primary age pupils), relationships and sex education (for secondary age pupils) and health education (for all pupils in state-funded schools) will become compulsory in September 2020. Many schools are already teaching aspects of these subjects as part of their sex and relationship education provision or personal, social, health and economic education programme. These subjects are designed to foster respect for others and for difference, educating pupils about healthy relationships.

The Department is investing in a central programme of support for the new subjects, which is planned to be available to all teachers from spring 2020.

This support will be accessed through a new online service and will include an implementation guide, which will accompany the statutory guidance, case studies from early adopter schools, and innovative materials to support staff training. The online training modules will also support teachers in developing inclusive teaching, including LGBT-inclusive approaches. The Department is working with a wide range of schools, teachers and expert organisations, including Stonewall, the NSPCC and teaching unions, to develop this support. There will also be training available for teachers through regional networks, offering opportunities to improve subject knowledge and build confidence.

The Department has also been working closely with over 1,600 schools who are acting on a voluntary basis as early adopters of the new subjects, so that we can support their journey, learn lessons and share good practice amongst all schools.

The Department will ensure that the central programme and materials supporting implementation of the new subjects are inclusive. We recognise fully the need to disseminate the good practice in teaching about LGBT relationships that is seen in large numbers of our schools.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
27th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many tonnes of (a) residential and (b) commercial waste were transported to Wales, from England, for incineration in (i) 2019 and (ii) 2020.

This level of detailed information is not routinely collated and cannot be readily compiled from information held by Defra for residential or commercial waste originating in England. Waste is a devolved matter and the data on waste treated in Wales by incineration would be held by the Welsh Government.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
26th Nov 2020
What assessment he has made of recent trends in the volume of (a) residential and (b) commercial waste transported from other parts of the UK to Wales for incineration.

Waste is a devolved matter. The data on waste treated in Wales by incineration would be held by the Welsh Government. No such assessment has been made by this Department.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
20th Dec 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many licences for (a) domestic (b) commercial and (c) industrial waste incineration were (i) granted and (ii) refused in each of the last five years; and for what reasons those licences were refused.

This is a devolved matter and the information provided therefore relates to England only. Regulation of incinerators in England is split between the Environment Agency (EA) and local authorities. The EA regulates incinerators with a capacity of greater than 3 tonnes per hour for non-hazardous waste and 10 tonnes per day for hazardous waste. Incinerators below this size are regulated by local authorities.

Since the start of 2015 the EA has granted 27 permits for new incinerators which may take in waste arising from domestic, commercial and industrial sources and which can be classed under the following waste types for each year:

Principle waste type

Number of permits issued

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

Mixed municipal waste

2

2

2

1

2

Waste wood

2

2

5

2

-

Refuse-derived fuel

1

1

-

2

1

Solid recovered fuel

1

-

-

-

-

Non-recyclable waste plastics

-

-

-

-

1

The EA also refused one permit in 2016 for a mixed municipal waste incinerator because the operator had failed to demonstrate that the height of its chimney was satisfactory.

While the EA has only refused one incinerator permit application in the last five years, other potentially unsuitable plants have been prevented during that time due to challenges from the EA, either as part of discussions before a formal application was made, or during the assessment process leading to the operator withdrawing their application. However, the EA does not keep records of such events.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
23rd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, whether she has suspended any UK Official Development Assistance bilateral funding programmes in (a) Zimbabwe, (b) Zambia and (c) Tanzania since 1 March 2020; and what the value and purposes of those programmes was.

No UK Official Development Assistance bilateral programmes have been suspended since 1 March 2020 in Zimbabwe, Zambia or Tanzania.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
23rd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what arrangements have been made to amend the (a) shareholding in, (b) ministerial oversight of and (c) parliamentary scrutiny of the Commonwealth Development Corporation since the Prime Minister's announcement on 16 June 2020; when those arrangements will come into force; and whether legislative change will be required.

The PM has launched a government-wide review of the UK’s foreign, defence, security and development policy. As the UK’s Development Finance institution, wholly owned by the Crown, CDC will be part and parcel of this integrated review. The Crown’s shareholding in CDC is not expected to change. Ministerial oversight of CDC will continue to be exercised by the Secretary of State for International Development until September, at which time Ministerial oversight of CDC will pass to the Foreign Secretary as the Secretary of State responsible for the new Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office. There will continue to be parliamentary scrutiny of CDC. It is not anticipated that the creation of the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office will require any legislative changes in relation to CDC.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
23rd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, how many UK programmes eligible for official development assistance support have been suspended in Africa since 1 March 2020.

One DFID programme in Africa has been suspended since 1 March 2020. This is the ‘Promoting Learning in Agribusiness using New Technology Programme’ in Nigeria. More information about this programme can be found on the DFID DevTracker website https://devtracker.dfid.gov.uk/projects/GB-GOV-1-300779

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, whether (a) she or (b) the Home Secretary will have final sign off on spending proposed by the Home Office Director of Official Development Assistance.

Official Development Assistance is subject to the same rules as all public expenditure. In line with HMT’s Managing Public Money guidance, the Home Secretary and her accounting officer hold financial responsibility and accountability to Parliament and UK taxpayers for their ODA spend.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
20th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, which Government Departments employ (a) a Head of, (b) a Director of or (c) a Director-General of Official Development Assistance; and what the (i) salary ranges and (ii) responsibilities of these positions were when the initial appointments were made.

In addition to those in the Department for International Development, there are several roles across Government for which oversight of Official Development Assistance (ODA) is part of responsibilities. These are important roles to ensure government departments are able to spend ODA as effectively as possible; some are listed here.

HM Treasury, the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO), and Home Office employ Heads of ODA at Grade 7 with salary ranges of £47,044 - £64,498. Responsibilities include international development policy; setting, overseeing and managing risks around UK ODA; and ensuring ODA is effectively spent and aligned with wider foreign policy objectives.

FCO’s Strategic Programmes Coordinator (salary range £90,000 - £94,999) leads on ODA policy for the FCO, and the Head of Portfolio Management Office (salary range £70,000 - £117,800) leads on ensuring all ODA programmes deliver value for money.

The Office for National Statistics employ a Head of International Development at Grade 6 (salary range £57,721 to £71,259) responsible for designing and managing ODA projects using ONS expertise.

The Department for International Trade and Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) employ Deputy Directors of Development or ODA with responsibility for the development of ODA policy and strategy, and the governance and delivery of ODA spend.

The Departments for Health and Social Care and Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy employ Deputy Directors whose roles include responsibility for managing their departments’ main ODA spending programmes. The salary range of these Deputy Director roles is £68,000 to £117,800.

The Home Office has recently advertised for a Director of ODA (salary range £92,000 - £110,000), and Defra is currently recruiting for an additional Deputy Director who will be focused on Defra-wide ODA management.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
19th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what the total invested by the Commonwealth Development Corporation in (a) Shan Orchard, (b) Frontiir Co. Ltd, (c) Solar Home Pte Ltd, (d) MC Easy Microfinance Co. Ltd, (e) Alliance for Microfinance in Myanmar Ltd, (f) Advans Myanmar and (g) Irrawaddy Green Tower Project in Myanmar was in each of the last five years.

As stated in Written Question 46671, CDC has invested a total of $78,795,576 into the above companies over the last five years (2015-19). A $50,000,000 direct debt investment was made in Irrawaddy Green Tower Project in 2016. A $20,000,000 direct equity investment was made in Frontiir Co. Ltd in 2019. The remainder has been invested through 4 investment funds. These are Anthem Asia Myanmar SME Venture Fund, Insitor Impact Asia Fund Private Ltd, Myanmar Opportunities Fund II and Advans S.A. These funds have made six investments over the last five years in Shan Orchard, Solar Home Pte Ltd, MC Easy Microfinance Co. Ltd, Alliance for Microfinance in Myanmar Ltd, Advans Myanmar and Frontiir Co Ltd.

CDC discloses on its website the amount it invests into companies, projects and investment funds. The amount invested by those funds into underlying investments is not disclosed as this information is commercially sensitive

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
19th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, if she will publish the (a) Environmental and Social Due Diligence and (b) assessment against the Commonwealth Development Corporation Code of Responsible Investing for the investments in companies (a) Shan Orchard, (b) Frontiir Co. Ltd, (c) Solar Home Pte Ltd, (d) MC Easy Microfinance Co. Ltd, (e) Alliance for Microfinance in Myanmar Ltd, (f) Advans Myanmar and (g) Irrawaddy Green Tower Project in Myanmar.

CDC’s rigorous due diligence process involves assessing a wide range of Environmental and Social, as well as Business Integrity risks and involves the production of multiple separate documents and reports. Ordinarily, CDC does not publish the suite of documents related to the due diligence it undertakes in the course of making investments because these documents contain commercially confidential or sensitive information about the business being reviewed.

On that basis, DFID does not intend to publish the documents related to the due diligence of investments listed above.

CDC does publish an overview of expected development impact, including key elements related to Environmental and Social issues, for new investments into companies and funds. The next update of CDC’s database will be available from July when CDC publishes its Annual Review.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
18th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what assessment her Department has made of the effect of the (a) covid-19 pandemic and (b) ongoing locust infestation in the Horn of Africa on the humanitarian situation in Eritrea.

We are deeply concerned about COVID-19 and the desert locust outbreak compounding high humanitarian need already caused by residual effects of war and climate change induced disasters in Eritrea. Limited health infrastructure, limited diagnostic capacity, low levels of sanitation coverage and high pre-existing levels of malnutrition and morbidity, raise the Eritrean population’s vulnerability. The locust outbreak is destroying crops, livelihoods and essential food supplies. The impact of COVID-19 on domestic market supply chains and household food and income sources could also be significant.

Existing humanitarian and development programmes in Eritrea are being adapted to address current food security challenges. The UK has funded life-saving activity in Eritrea for several years, including providing £4 million to UNICEF in 2019-20 to help treat malnutrition in under-fives and provide access to safe hygiene and sanitation services. The UK has provided £7 million to the UN Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) Regional Emergency Appeal for the locust outbreak, which includes Eritrea. With the UK’s support, the FAO is spraying pesticides on the ground and by air to prevent further damage to crops and livelihoods.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
18th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what assessment her Department has made of the humanitarian situation of (a) Eritrean asylum seekers and (b) unaccompanied children who are being turned away from the Ethiopian border.

Recent changes in the Government of Ethiopia’s (GoE) asylum policies, alongside the impact of COVID-19, are affecting the ability of Eritreans to acquire refugee status in Ethiopia. The policy changes have seen a reduction in the numbers of Eritreans registering with the GoE and the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. Humanitarian agencies are now concerned that many Eritreans, including unaccompanied children, arrive in Ethiopia but do not complete the formal registration processes that facilitate access to lifesaving protection and other forms of assistance. This makes it challenging to assess their humanitarian needs.

We are not aware that unaccompanied children are being turned away at the Ethiopian border. However, in an effort to limit transmission of COVID-19 GoE asylum personnel are no longer deployed at border crossings, which complicates registration processes for newly arrived asylum seekers. Despite these complications we are encouraged that recent COVID-19 planning documents shared by the GoE stress Ethiopia’s commitment to uphold the right to asylum.

In Ethiopia, the UK has allocated £22.2 million to COVID-19 activities with urgent support now reaching refugees and other communities across the country. Ongoing UK funded programmes are also being adapted to meet COVID-19 needs, which refugees are also benefitting from.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
13th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what due diligence was carried out by CDC on the company Frontiir, operating in Myanmar, prior to their investment in that company.

In addition to a financial and development impact assessment, when making an investment CDC evaluates a wide range of Environmental and Social (E&S), as well as Business Integrity, risks through a rigorous due diligence process. All of CDC’s investments follow its Code of Responsible Investing.

In the case of CDC’s investment into Frontiir, this included a stand-alone E&S due diligence with the terms of reference explicitly aligned to the CDC Code of Responsible Investing. The methodology included a site visit to Frontiir’s operations and a review of relevant documentation. The scope of the due diligence placed a focus on contextual factors including implications for any disadvantaged or vulnerable groups, indigenous peoples, alignment with the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights, forced labour/child labour, occupational health and safety and understanding how data security and privacy are handled, including censorship and government disclosure.

CDC provides further guidance on due diligence in its ESG Toolkit.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
13th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, how much CDC has invested in companies operating in Myanmar in each of the last five years; and what the names are of those companies.

The amount CDC invested into companies in Myanmar in the each of the last five years is:

2015

Nil

2016

$50,965,888

2017

$5,534,404

2018

$2,021,605

2019

$20,273,679

The names of companies that received investment in this period are: Shan Orchard, Frontiir Co. Ltd, Solar Home Pte Ltd, MC Easy Microfinance Co. Ltd, Alliance for Microfinance in Myanmar Ltd, Advans Myanmar, Irrawaddy Green Tower Project.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
13th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, whether her Department routinely assesses CDC investments against her Department's partnership principles; and what assessment her Department has made of CDC's recent investment in Frontiir in Myanmar against those principles.

The Partnership Principles play an important role in the UK Government’s decision-making process, helping to inform the extent to which we work directly with partner governments in countries where we have a bilateral aid programme.

CDC invests in private companies to achieve development impact. It does not lend to governments or invest in state owned enterprises. The Partnership Principles do not readily apply when making investments in private companies, however CDC nonetheless ensures that all its investee companies meet high environmental, social and governance standards through their Code of Responsible Investing.

CDC’s investment into Frontiir followed their Code of Responsible Investing.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
27th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, when her Department's Partnership Principles were last updated.

DFID’s Partnership Principles underpin our development relationships with partner country governments. The last major update to the Principles was made in 2015.

The Principles continue to reflect core UK values on human rights and good governance and are an essential tool in providing a balanced judgement of a partner government’s shared commitment to those values.

They allow UK Ministers to make informed choices on our aid relationships on a case by case basis, and they improve the effectiveness of our aid, ultimately supporting countries receiving it to become self-sufficient.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
24th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, when she or ministers in her Department last met Peter Sands, Executive Director of the Global Fund for HIV, TB and Malaria; and what steps she is taking to ensure continued support for the Global Fund's work.

The most recent meeting between Peter Sands and UK Ministers was with the Secretary of State for International Development’s predecessor at the Global Fund Sixth Replenishment Conference in Lyon on 10 October 2019. The UK is a strong supporter of the Global Fund and the second largest donor to the Sixth Replenishment.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
24th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what steps the Commonwealth Development Corporation is taking to adapt its global investments to respond to the health and economic effects of the covid-19 pandemic.

CDC remains a long-term investor and is open for business. CDC and the Department for International Development are working together to deliver a targeted response that preserves, strengthens and helps rebuild economies across Africa and South Asia in response to the impact of COVID-19.

Firstly, CDC is supporting its existing portfolio of companies. CDC is assessing where it can provide additional capital to help firms and their workers weather the crisis. CDC has also launched an Emergency Technical Assistance Facility and published advice on its website (https://www.cdcgroup.com/covid-19) on measures that companies should take to protect the health and safety of employees and customers and protect jobs.

Secondly, CDC is focused on strengthening the response to the wider economic and health challenges created by the COVID-19 crisis. CDC is actively looking to make new investments that can provide more systemic liquidity to companies, especially Small Medium Enterprises, and at investments that can directly mitigate some of the adverse health impacts of COVID-19.

Finally, CDC will be there to support countries rebuild and will continue to invest for long-term sustainable development in its geographies.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
24th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what assessment she has made of the use of expired anti-retroviral (ARV) HIV medication in (a) Zimbabwe and (b) other African countries; and what steps her Department is taking to ensure that flows of in-date ARVs are maintained to tackle HIV during the covid-19 pandemic.

DFID Zimbabwe does not bilaterally fund the procurement of ARVs in Zimbabwe. The Global Fund – to which the UK is the second largest donor – does however provide support for the procurement of ARVs in Zimbabwe. In June 2019, concerns were raised over the distribution of expired ARVs, procured through the Global Fund. At the time of procurement, the ARVs expiry date was approaching but ARVS were urgently needed as there was a risk of stocks in country. Assurances were provided by the Manufacturer and the Medical Council Association of Zimbabwe (MCAZ) that the medicines were safe and effective before they were distributed.

DFID’s central teams work closely with the Global Fund to ensure they are actively monitoring supply chain issues at a global level and engage closely with partners. Global Fund Partners are supported in implementing good practices including safeguarding against purchase and use of expired drugs.

The COVID-19 outbreak presents a risk to the ongoing supply and distribution of ARVs. The majority of ARV procurement and distribution in Zimbabwe is funded by PEPFAR and USAID have taken several steps to ensure that patients continue to receive their prescriptions such as providing monthly rather than weekly prescriptions, so patients do not have to visit clinics so frequently. The Global Fund is also flexing to cope with the crisis. It has created up to $1 billion of flexible funding opportunities for countries to re-programme existing grants and apply for additional funding, including in Zimbabwe. This will support countries with their direct COVID-19 response, address critical gaps in health systems, and to adapt their HIV, TB, and malaria programmes, including if needed to reinforce in-country ARV supply chain management.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
24th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, with reference to the Conflict, Stability and Security Fund, what (a) changes to existing and (b) new programmes she has made or established in response to the covid-19 global pandemic.

The Conflict, Stability and Security Fund (CSSF) is a cross-government fund managed by the Joint Funds Unit (JFU). The JFU are taking steps to ensure existing programmes consider the implications of COVID-19 and are currently assigning 25% of discretionary spending to new programming on COVID-19 response. Activities funded to date include supplying specialist medical equipment, hygiene kits and pharmaceuticals in the Middle East and North Africa, and funding healthcare systems in the UK’s Overseas Territories. An ongoing CSSF re-prioritisation exercise will determine how existing and new programmes respond to COVID-19. This exercise will ensure that CSSF funding complements departmental efforts to coordinate the international health response and support vulnerable countries to meet future challenges to security and stability linked to the pandemic.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
24th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what Official Development Assistance qualifying spending over £1 million she has (a) authorised, (b) suspended and (c) transferred to other Government Departments since 15 January 2020.

Dev Tracker (https://devtracker.dfid.gov.uk/) publishes all our approved programming and disbursements, all of which flow from Secretary of State (or via her delegated approval). Ministers have made no decisions yet on suspension of activities. It is too early to catch changes to our planned spending for 2020/21 on our management information systems.

Pursuant to my answer on 16 March, the Department will provide details of all budget transfers to other Government Departments in our Memorandum to the International Development Committee on the publication of the department’s Main Supply Estimate.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
22nd Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, when (a) she and (b) her Ministers last met Dr John Nkengasong, Director of the African Union CDC, to discuss tackling the covid-19 pandemic.

We are supporting the Africa Centres for Disease Control (Africa CDC) COVID-19 response by deploying a UK Public Health Rapid Support Team and £2 million of research and response capacity-building funding alongside the Wellcome Trust from our Joint Initiative on Research for Epidemic Preparedness Programme. We also have a Public Health England expert on long term secondment to Africa CDC with whom I have spoken.

Members of the Government and UK officials are in regular contact with senior Africa CDC representatives. I spoke with the African Union Commissioner for Social Affairs, H.E. Amira El Fadil and Dr Benjamin Djoudalbaye, Head of the Division of Policy, Health Diplomacy and Communication on Tuesday 21 April to discuss the work of Africa CDC and the UK’s on-going support. UK officials have also spoken with Dr John Nkengasong and his team and are due to do so again this week.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
11th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, with reference to footnote 1 on page 28 and footnote 2 on page 29 of the Budget 2020 Red Book on Capital DEL and Resource DEL, if she will publish the detailed proposals for transfers of spending to the Foreign and Commonwealth Office and other Government Departments for 2020-21.

My Department will provide details of all budget transfers to the Foreign and Commonwealth Office and other Government Departments in our Memorandum to the International Development Committee on the publication of the department’s Main Supply Estimate.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
20th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what (a) financial and (b) other support his Department has provided in the last three months to enable parliamentary elections in Somaliland to take place.

The UK is leading high level political engagement for the international community on Somaliland’s overdue parliamentary elections calling on all political actors to ensure they are held well before the end of 2020. Over the last three months, we have continued diplomatic efforts in addition to work through the Conflict Security and Stability Fund to provide ongoing support to mediation efforts, technical expertise for the National Electoral Commission secretariat and the engagement of marginalised groups, including women and minorities, in the electoral process.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
11th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what plans she has to bring forward legislative proposals to amend Section 15 of the Taxation (Cross Border Trade) Act 2018.

Budget announced that the government will legislate to amend section 15 of the Taxation (Cross-border Trade) Act 2018 via the Finance Bill.

19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent discussions he has had with representatives of Transport for Wales on the ability of inter-city services to use the planned St Mellons Parkway station in the east of Cardiff when completed.

We welcome this private sector led proposal for an additional station serving the South Wales area and look forward to receiving the full business case for the scheme.

We will work with the Welsh Government and Transport for Wales under the Welsh devolution arrangements on this scheme as it progresses.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
8th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what criteria the Government used to determine why (a) Ethiopia, (b) Kenya, and (c) Nigeria are not included in the red list for travel for hotel quarantine.

The criteria used to place travel bans on particular countries is based on the latest scientific and medical data, which show an increased risk to UK public health and an increased risk of community transmission of new COVID-19 variants identified. These are temporary measures and the government keeps data for countries and territories under constant review.

The government has made it consistently clear that it will take decisive action if the public health risk of people returning from a particular country without self-isolating becomes too high.

This list of countries with a travel ban remains under review, and the government will not hesitate to impose additional restrictions if the scientific and medical data from countries and territories change.

Robert Courts
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
8th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps he is taking to taken to ensure the biosecurity of aircraft crews that may have been in a country on the red list during the covid-19 pandemic in the last 14 days.

The Government has put in place robust border measures to prevent people travelling into the UK if they have Covid-19, including the requirement to present a negative Covid-19 test before departure. An entry ban is currently in place for the 33 countries identified as high risk (otherwise known as the ‘red list’), as well as direct flight ban for 7 of these countries.

The Government has worked with the travel industry to put in place safer travel guidance for both operators and passengers.

This guidance is clear that robust social distancing, regular cleaning, and good hand and respiratory hygiene are the best ways of protecting against the transmission of coronavirus.

Where this may not be possible - such as on board an aircraft - airlines are advised to carry out a risk assessment and implement appropriate risk controls. For example, wearing a face covering can play a role in helping to protect passengers and crew, which is now mandatory.

Robert Courts
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
8th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many general aviation flights originating in countries on the red list during the covid-19 pandemic operated (a) directly and (b) indirectly into UK airports in each of the last three months.

Information on the number of commercially operated flights is collected by the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA), and is currently complete up to November 2020. The list of ‘red list’ countries was last updated on 29 January 2021, therefore the ‘red list’ designation did not apply at the time that the flights operated.

The data shows that in November 2020, flights operated into UK airports from countries which are now currently identified as ‘red list’ were as follows:

  • 709 direct commercial passenger flights, and
  • 146 direct commercial cargo-only flights.

Complete data for December 2020 and January 2021 will be made available to the Department later in 2021.

The CAA does not collect data on General Aviation flights at UK airports by country of origin. Further timely information on overall volumes of flights directly performed to and from the UK across all types of flight operations (inclusive of passenger, cargo-only, military and general aviation flights) are made publicly available by Eurocontrol on their website, however breakdowns by country of origin and flight type are not routinely made available.

The Department does not hold statistics on indirect flights operating into UK airports.

Robert Courts
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
8th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many (a) direct commercial, (b) indirect commercial and (c) cargo flights operated into UK airports from countries on the red list during the covid-19 pandemic in each of the last three months.

Information on the number of commercially operated flights is collected by the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA), and is currently complete up to November 2020. The list of ‘red list’ countries was last updated on 29 January 2021, therefore the ‘red list’ designation did not apply at the time that the flights operated.

The data shows that in November 2020, flights operated into UK airports from countries which are now currently identified as ‘red list’ were as follows:

  • 709 direct commercial passenger flights, and
  • 146 direct commercial cargo-only flights.

Complete data for December 2020 and January 2021 will be made available to the Department later in 2021.

The CAA does not collect data on General Aviation flights at UK airports by country of origin. Further timely information on overall volumes of flights directly performed to and from the UK across all types of flight operations (inclusive of passenger, cargo-only, military and general aviation flights) are made publicly available by Eurocontrol on their website, however breakdowns by country of origin and flight type are not routinely made available.

The Department does not hold statistics on indirect flights operating into UK airports.

Robert Courts
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
19th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many times the (a) Captain and (b) First Officer of a scheduled flight into the UK (i) radioed and (ii) communicated ahead to (A) Airport Arrivals and (B) Air Traffic Control at each airport with a request in relation to a suspected case of covid-19 on their flight in each of the last five months.

The information requested is not held centrally. The information may be available from individual airports and air traffic control providers, which operate in the private sector.

Carriers have been requested to report on the health of passengers through General Aircraft Declarations (GAD) prior to disembarkation. This information is held by Public Health England.

27th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what financial and other support he is providing to the operator of the Great Western Railway franchise to ensure the continuance of services on the Great Western mainline.

To bring stability and certainty to the industry during this turbulent time, all DfT-franchised train operating companies (excluding LNER and Northern Trains) have seen a temporary suspension of their existing franchise agreements financial mechanisms, and all revenue and cost risk has been transferred to the Government. These arrangements allow us to ensure that trains operate for those who cannot work from home, and essential travel can continue. We continue to manage rail services with close scrutiny of costs, to ensure efficiency and good value for the taxpayer.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
8th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what advice his Department has provided to (a) UK civilian airlines and (b) airlines operating in and out of UK airports on flying over (i) Iran, (ii) Iraq, (iii) the United Arab Emirates, (iv) Quatar, (v) Kuwait, (vi) Oman, (vii) Lebanon, (viii) Israel, (ix) Turkey and (x) Egypt.

We are closely monitoring the developing situation in the region and have been keeping our advice to UK carriers under constant review. Both UK and foreign carriers continue to make their own routing decisions based on Notices to Airmen (NOTAMs) and internal risk assessments.

Last week, the Department for Transport issued NOTAMs requesting that UK carriers avoid operating in Iranian and Iraqi airspace. This is in line with similar advice provided by international partners including the US, Canada, France and Germany.

10th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if she will publish the total amount paid out to members of the Financial Assistance Scheme in Wales in each of the last five years.

The table below provides details of the total amount paid out to members of the Financial Assistance Scheme in each of the last five years for Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

Year

Great Britain

Northern Ireland

Total

2016-2017

£189,739,599

£4,968,275

£194,707,874

2017-2018

£211,930,501

£5,474,513

£217,405,014

2018-2019

£211,614,050

£5,499,935

£217,113,985

2019-2020

£212,227,970

£5,693,023

£217,920,993

2020-2021

£218,793,879

£6,149,583

£224,943,462

Total

£1,044,305,999

£27,785,329

£1,072,091,328

The Department does not breakdown information for Wales.

Source of information: Department for Work and Pensions Annual Report and Accounts. Northern Ireland Department for Communities Annual Report and Accounts

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
10th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what estimate she has made of the total amount paid out to members of the Financial Assistance Scheme for pensions in each of the last five years.

The table below provides details of the total amount paid out to members of the Financial Assistance Scheme in each of the last five years for Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

Year

Great Britain

Northern Ireland

Total

2016-2017

£189,739,599

£4,968,275

£194,707,874

2017-2018

£211,930,501

£5,474,513

£217,405,014

2018-2019

£211,614,050

£5,499,935

£217,113,985

2019-2020

£212,227,970

£5,693,023

£217,920,993

2020-2021

£218,793,879

£6,149,583

£224,943,462

Total

£1,044,305,999

£27,785,329

£1,072,091,328

The Department does not breakdown information for Wales.

Source of information: Department for Work and Pensions Annual Report and Accounts. Northern Ireland Department for Communities Annual Report and Accounts

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
13th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many new applications for universal credit have been processed in (a) Cardiff and (b) Vale of Glamorgan in each month since 1 January 2020.

Statistics on Universal Credit claims can be found on Stat-Xplore:

https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/.

Guidance on how to extract the information required can be found at:

https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/webapi/online-help/Getting-Started.html

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
8th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many complaints her Department received in relation to processing claims for (a) universal credit and (b) personal independence payments in Wales in the last six months.

The customer’s address is not a mandatory field when registering complaints on the Department’s complaints system. From the available data, the Department has received a total of 13 Universal Credit and 22 Personal Independence Payment complaints in relation to processing claims for Wales during the period July to December 2019.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
25th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how data on HIV is being taken into account in the new QCOVID population risk assessment tool following concerns raised by people living with HIV who have been asked to shield for the first time.

The COVID-19 population risk assessment, based on QCovid, uses a range of factors including age, sex registered at birth, ethnicity, postcode as an indicator of deprivation and body mass index alongside medical conditions to calculate a risk assessment score for each individual. Owing to small numbers, HIV has been included within the model in a broader group of conditions which includes other immunosuppressive disorders, such as sickle cell and immunodeficiency, to offer a representative level of potential risk. This is in keeping with emerging research evidence that suggests people living with HIV may be at increased risk from COVID-19.

If an individual living with HIV has received a letter advising them to shield, this will not be based solely on their HIV status, but on a wide range of factors. Any person living with HIV who is concerned can seek further advice from their general practitioner or specialist clinician.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
9th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish the (a) epidemiological data and (b) formula used by the Government to determine the designation of (a) Tanzania, (b) South Africa and (c) Malawi on the red list for mandatory hotel quarantine on arrival at the UK border; and if he will publish the (a) data and (b) formula used by the Government to determine the non-designation of (i) Kenya, (ii) Ethiopia and (iii) Nigeria on that list.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before prorogation.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
9th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish the (a) epidemiological data and (b) formula used by the Government to determine which countries are placed on the red list for mandatory hotel quarantine on arrival at the UK border.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before prorogation.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
22nd Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many additional cold chain storage refrigerators capable of safely storing the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine have been (a) ordered, (b) delivered and (c) deployed by the Government in each month since 1 September 2020.

Public Health England (PHE) secured 58 ultra-low temperature (ULT) freezers which provide sufficient storage for approximately five million doses of potential COVID-19 vaccines which require ULT storage. These ULT freezers were in place, commissioned and ready to receive vaccine prior to the commencement of the programme at the beginning of December 2020. The ULT freezers are for PHE to manage the national storage of COVID-19 vaccines which require storage at -70°C. The National Health Service has secured its own ULT freezers to support local storage.

PQ141991

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
21st Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many cases have been recorded in the UK of the variants of covid-19 that originated in (a) South Africa and (b) Brazil since 1 December 2020.

As of 20 January 2021, there were 71 cases of the COVID-19 variant that originated in South Africa and 10 cases of the COVID-19 variant that originated in Brazil recorded in the United Kingdom.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
18th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what partnerships and support the Government is providing to genomic sequencing centres (a) in Africa and (b) globally to help identify variants of the covid-19 virus.

Public Health England’s (PHE’s) International Health Regulation (IHR) Strengthening Project and the United Kingdom Public Health Rapid Support Team (UK-PHRST) have provided genome sequencing support to Nigeria to independently sequence the virus. The IHR and UK-PHRST continue to provide support, remotely or through in person deployment, to a number of countries around the world.

In addition, PHE IHR and UK-PHRST are exploring opportunities to support Africa Centres for Disease Control’s sequencing strategies. PHE is also providing genome sequencing support to Gibraltar, Bermuda and the Cayman Islands.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
18th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what formula is being used for the allocation of covid-19 vaccine supplies to the devolved Administrations.

To ensure vaccines are shared equitably across the United Kingdom, the Barnett formula is used to calculate vaccine supply allocations to the devolved Administrations.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
8th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how people living with HIV will access the covid-19 vaccine in their priority grouping if they have not disclosed their HIV status to their local GP but are known at their HIV clinic.

The new guidance means that people living with HIV in England can now choose to arrange their COVID-19 vaccine through specialist clinics, without notifying their general practitioner (GP).

We encourage everyone living with HIV to make their GP aware of their HIV diagnosis. Where that is not possible, HIV clinics should identify those who have not given permission to disclose their HIV status to their GP and refer individuals into local vaccination hubs.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
18th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many and what proportion of UK ports of entry have had (a) Public Health England, (b) Public Health Wales, (c) Public Health Scotland and (d) Public Health Northern Ireland staff permanently located at those ports alongside UK Border Force since 1 January 2020; and how many staff from those organisations were located at each of those ports.

Public Health England (PHE) has staff permanently located at London Heathrow. Exact numbers vary with demand. PHE’s Heathrow based Health Control Unit provides all English ports with 24 hours a day, seven days a week public health support, risk assessments and advice. PHE also works with local National Health Services and other first responders to provide local health support when needed.

Public health is a devolved issue and it is up to Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland to decided how, what and where resources are deployed at ports of entry, which will vary depending on demand.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
5th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish the data his Department holds on the (a) prevalence rate, (b) R rate and (c) total number of infections assessed by the UK Government to be present in (i) France, (ii) Italy, (iii) Spain, (iv) Iran, (v) USA, (vi) China, (vii) Belgium (viii) Paris, (ix) Milan, (x) Brussels, (xi) Madrid, (xii) Tehran, (xiii) Wuhan, (xiv) Shanghai, (xv) Beijing, (xvii) New York City and (xvii) Brussels on (A) 1 January, (B) 1 February, (C) 1 March and (D) 1 April 2020.

Public Health England does not hold prevalence rates or R rates for international countries.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
4th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health & Social Care, whether he plans to take steps to ensure that the publicly funded research and development costs of (a) a vaccine for covid-19 and (b) drugs to treat that disease are (i) published and (ii) provided to (A) other governments and (B) the WHO's Global Observatory on Health Research and Development.

The United Kingdom Government has committed £24.6 million for COVID-19 research through a joint Rapid Response Research Call and is providing over £45 million in funding to two UK vaccine candidates. Details of the projects funded through the joint Rapid Response call, including the amount of funding granted are publicly available on the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) and UK Research and Innovation-Medical Research Council websites.

The UK Government is a signatory of the 2013 Helsinki declaration which states that research studies must be registered on an internationally recognised trial registry. The International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number Register is the internationally recognised registry of choice for primary research in the UK and feeds into the World Health Organization’s own systems. All NIHR-funded primary research studies are required to register in an appropriate registry.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
1st May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that the results of clinical trials from publicly funded research on covid-19 are (a) provided to the WHO primary clinical trial registry and (b) uploaded to clinicaltrials.gov.

The United Kingdom Government is a signatory of the 2013 Helsinki declaration which states that research studies must be registered on an internationally recognised trial registry. The International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number Register (ISRCTN) is the internationally recognised registry of choice for primary research in the UK and feeds into the World Health Organization’s own systems. Other internationally recognised registries may be appropriate or required for the primary registry; e.g. where there is a regulatory requirement.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
1st May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 30 April 2020 to Question 38926, how much funding the Pan-African Network for Rapid Research, Response, Relief and Preparedness for Infectious Disease Epidemics has received from Official Development Assistance (ODA) funding through his Department’s ODA-funded global health research portfolio in each of the last five years.

The 5 million euros funding from the Department to the European and Developing Countries Clinical Trials Partnership (EDCTP) in support of the four-year March 2018 to February 2022 project the Pan-African Network for Rapid Research, Response, Relief and Preparedness for Infectious Disease Epidemics (PANDORA-ID-NET) was made in December 2017 as part of the Department‘s contribution to EDCTP’s 2016 workplan. To date EDCTP has disbursed 2.8 million euros in 2018 and 546,000 euros in 2020 to the PANDORA-ID-NET project, a total of 3,346,000 euros in the Department’s Official Development Assistance funding.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
22nd Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what support his Department is providing to the African Coalition for Epidemic Research Response (ALERRT) initiative.

The African Coalition for Epidemic Research Response has received United Kingdom’s Official Development Assistance (ODA) funding through the Department’s ODA-funded global health research portfolio.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
22nd Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what support his Department is providing to the Pan-African Network For Rapid Research, Response, Relief and Preparedness for Infectious Disease Epidemics (PANDORA-ID-NET) project.

The Pan-African Network for Rapid Research, Response, Relief and Preparedness for Infectious Disease Epidemics (PANDORA-ID-NET) has received United Kingdom Official Development Assistance (ODA) funding through the Department’s ODA-funded global health research portfolio.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
8th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what progress has been made on rolling out the routine commissioning of PrEP from April 2020; and if he will make a statement.

The Department is continuing to work closely with NHS England and NHS Improvement, Public Health England and local government to plan for routine commissioning of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) from April 2020. We will set out how commissioners will be supported shortly.

Routine commissioning of PrEP is expected to accommodate all individuals at risk of acquiring HIV based on clinical risk assessment. These assessments will be informed by current clinical guidelines produced by the British HIV Association and British Association for Sexual Health and HIV in relation to assessment of individuals at risk of HIV. These state that ‘PrEP is indicated for those at greater risk of HIV acquisition and therefore comprehensive history taking and risk assessment, including both sexual and drug taking histories, are required to identify those most likely to benefit’.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
8th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether routine commissioning of PrEP will accommodate all communities that could benefit from that trial including (a) women, (b) people who identify as Trans or non-binary, (c) BAME communities and (d) gay and bisexual men.

The Department is continuing to work closely with NHS England and NHS Improvement, Public Health England and local government to plan for routine commissioning of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) from April 2020. We will set out how commissioners will be supported shortly.

Routine commissioning of PrEP is expected to accommodate all individuals at risk of acquiring HIV based on clinical risk assessment. These assessments will be informed by current clinical guidelines produced by the British HIV Association and British Association for Sexual Health and HIV in relation to assessment of individuals at risk of HIV. These state that ‘PrEP is indicated for those at greater risk of HIV acquisition and therefore comprehensive history taking and risk assessment, including both sexual and drug taking histories, are required to identify those most likely to benefit’.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
20th Dec 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what support his Department is providing to the Fast Track Cities Initiative for HIV/AIDS.

Public Health England (PHE) is supporting cities in England that are working towards or have joined the HIV Fast Track Cities (FTCs) network and the International Association of providers of AIDS Care (IAPAC). Further information on the FTC programme is available at the following link:

http://www.fast-trackcities.org/cities

This support has included providing specialist public health advice to identify needs across the range of care. For example, improving access to HIV testing, tackling stigma and providing bespoke data analysis to better understand the local need.

PHE also works collaboratively with the initiative to provide methodologies and data to IAPAC, sharing learning and expertise with other FTCs and helping secure funding for work regionally.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
10th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how much bilateral Official Development Assistance has been allocated to (a) Ethiopia, (b) Djibouti, (c) Eritrea, (d) Rwanda and (e) Uganda in the 2021-22 financial year.

Full budgets per country and a final audited spend for 2021/22 will be published in due course, including in our regular Statistics on International Development and in the FCDO Annual Report and Accounts.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
10th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how much bilateral overseas development assistance has been allocated to (a) Chad, (b) Niger, (c) Nigeria, (d) Sao Tome and Principe and (e) Cabo Verde in 2021-22.

Full budgets per country and a final audited spend for 2021/22 will be published in due course, including in our regular Statistics on International Development and in the FCDO Annual Report and Accounts.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
10th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how much bilateral Official Development Assistance has been allocated to (a) Mauritania, (b) Sierra Leone, (c) Togo, (d) Guinea and (e) Guinea-Bissau in 2021-22.

Full budgets per country and a final audited spend for 2021/22 will be published in due course, including in our regular Statistics on International Development and in the FCDO Annual Report and Accounts.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
9th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how much bilateral Overseas Development Assistance has been allocated to (a) Kenya, (b) Tanzania, (c) Sudan, (d) South Sudan and (e) Somalia in 2021-22.

Full budgets per country and a final audited spend for 2021/22 will be published in due course, including in our regular Statistics on International Development and in the FCDO Annual Report and Accounts.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
9th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how much bilateral overseas development assistance has been allocated to (a) Cote D’Ivoire, (b) South Africa, (c) Malawi, (d) Zambia and (e) Mozambique in the 2021-22 financial year.

Full budgets per country and a final audited spend for 2021/22 will be published in due course, including in our regular Statistics on International Development and in the FCDO Annual Report and Accounts.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
9th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how much bilateral ODA his Department has allocated to (a) Algeria, (b) Angola, (c) Benin, (d) Botswana and (e) Burkina Faso in 2021-22.

Full budgets per country and a final audited spend for 2021/22 will be published in due course, including in our regular Statistics on International Development and in the FCDO Annual Report and Accounts.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
9th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how much bilateral overseas development assistance has been allocated to (a) Gambia, (b) Cameroon, (c) Mali, (d) the Central African Republic and (e) Senegal in 2021/22.

Full budgets per country and a final audited spend for 2021/22 will be published in due course, including in our regular Statistics on International Development and in the FCDO Annual Report and Accounts.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
7th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of recent Parliamentary and Local Government elections in Somaliland; and what support the Government provided for those elections.

The UK commends the people and Government of Somaliland on the successful conduct of parliamentary and local council elections on 31 May. The transparent and peaceful nature of the balloting process is a testament to Somaliland's commitment to democratisation, security and stability. The election of minority clan and youth candidates is a welcome development. However the decreased number of women in elected office is a matter of concern and we call on the Somaliland Government, political parties and civil society organisations to take urgent steps to address the future representation of women in elected and non-elected public office. The UK has played a lead role as the largest donor to the election process, contributing £1.97 million to support core election costs and also funding a Limited International Election Observer Mission.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
7th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of the local, regional and international security threats posed by extremist terrorist groups in (a) Burkina Faso, (b) Mali, (c) Nigeria and (d) Mozambique; and what assistance the UK is providing to tackle those groups.

We are concerned about the security situations in the Sahel (including Burkina Faso and Mali), North East Nigeria and the wider Lake Chad Basin, and in the province of Cabo Delgado in Mozambique. Insecurity continues to have a tragic impact on people living in these regions. We regularly discuss issues of insecurity with our counterparts in each region. In January, I met Burkinabe President Roch Marc Christian Kaboré to discuss the security challenges in the Sahel and their impact on the people of Burkina Faso. In March and April I visited Cameroon and Nigeria respectively, where I discussed issues of insecurity with the Foreign Ministers of both countries. Lord Ahmad reaffirmed UK support to help Mozambique fight terrorism when he spoke to the Mozambican Foreign Minister in March, and I also raised Cabo Delgado when I spoke to the Foreign Minister in February.

The UK Government is providing security assistance to regions affected by insecurity. This includes through our recent deployment to the UN peacekeeping mission in Mali (MINUSMA), our support to the Multinational Joint Task Force, a regional force coordinating military efforts and security in the Lake Chad Basin, and in Mozambique under the framework of a Defence Memorandum of Understanding. We also support those worst affected by conflict through our humanitarian assistance. For example, in North East Nigeria, our lifesaving support will reach more than 1.5 million people over five years (2017-2022).

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
7th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what recent assessment he has made of the availability of telecommunications and internet access to (a) civilians, (b) media organisations and (c) humanitarian organisations in the Tigray region of Ethiopia.

We are concerned about limitations to access to telecommunications in Tigray. Some humanitarian agencies have reported a recent improvement in the numbers of satellite phones and radios they have been allowed to import into Ethiopia. However, this is not across the board and non-governmental organisations (NGOs) in particular note ongoing challenges. Internet access remains very problematic with NGOs, for example, reliant on services provided by the UN.

We continue to call for improved access to communications in Tigray as vital for an effective humanitarian response and in shining a light on the grave human rights atrocities that continue to be committed there.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
27th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what recent representations he has made to the Government of Ghana on repression of the LGBT+ community in that country.

The UK stands firm with the LGBT community globally to affirm our commitment to the principle of non-discrimination on all grounds, including on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity. We want to see an end to violence and discrimination against LGBT people. In June 2022 the UK will host its first global LGBT conference to tackle inequality around the world and urge countries to take action. On 16 May the Prime Minister appointed a new Special Envoy on LGBT rights, Lord Herbert, the Special Envoy will bring together the UK Government's domestic and international work to advance LGBT equality.

We make regular representations about LGBT rights, including to the Government of Ghana. We work through our High Commission, as well as international organisations, to promote non-discrimination towards LGBT people, and to address discriminatory laws. We are deeply concerned by the recent arrest of 21 LGBT activists in Ho in May and we are seeking further details from the government about the arrest.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
27th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, which maritime boundary or rights disputes the UK and its Overseas Territories have engaged in directly or indirectly in the last five years; and what the status is of each of those disputes.

The Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
27th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, when the rescheduled Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting in Rwanda will take place; and what plans there are for virtual meetings to take place in the interim.

It is for Rwanda (as Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting (CHOGM) host), with the Commonwealth Secretariat, to propose a new date for Member states' agreement, taking into account the international calendar and pandemic-related developments. The UK looks forward to a new date being fixed for the next CHOGM as soon as practicable.  The timing and arrangements for planned Commonwealth Ministerial meetings, including the annual meeting of Commonwealth Foreign Affairs Ministers, will be communicated when they have been fixed.

The UK will remain as Chair-in-Office until CHOGM is held, and will continue to work closely with the Commonwealth Secretariat, Rwanda and the other member states to take forward Commonwealth business.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
27th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what proportion of UK Overseas Territory residents have received a (a) first dose and (b) both doses of a covid-19 vaccine, by territory.

The UK Government has committed to supply COVID-19 vaccines for the people of the Overseas Territories. The Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO) have been arranging deliveries and vaccines have now been delivered to all 12 permanently inhabited Territories, most recently the Pitcairn Islands and Tristan da Cunha, but also to South Georgia. Further deliveries are anticipated to complete the programmes over the coming weeks. The table below represents the percentage of the adult population in each to receive first and second doses of the vaccines.

Overseas Territory

1ST DOSES As a % of adult population (as of 3 June)

2ND DOSES As a % of adult population

Anguilla

83%

51%

Ascension

98%

90%

Bermuda

71%

64%

BVI

47%

22%

Cayman Islands

82%

70%

Falklands

95%

93%

Gibraltar*

>90%

>90%

Montserrat

39%

34%

Pitcairn

82%

0%

St Helena

98%

92%

South Georgia

100%

0%

TCI

64%

50%

Tristan da Cunha

90%

0%

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
27th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of the presence of Eritrean regular or irregular forces in Ethiopia.

We continue to closely monitor the situation and are clear that the withdrawal of Eritrean forces must be swift, unconditional and verifiable. However, despite Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy's commitment that Eritrean troops would withdraw from Tigray we are yet to see any evidence that this is happening. There are numerous shocking reports of atrocities committed by Eritrean forces in Tigray, and their continued presence is fuelling insecurity. These forces must leave Ethiopia immediately. We continue to press hard for this commitment to be delivered. I made this clear on my call to the Eritrean Ambassador on 16 March.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
27th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how much CDC has invested in the acquisition of the Ethiopia telecoms license with Vodafone and other consortium members; whether Ministerial approval was sought on that acquisition; and on what date such approval was sought.

The Global Partnership for Ethiopia was created specifically to bring about transformational economic and social impact through the provision of affordable mobile and internet services in Ethiopia.

The investment is expected to:

  • Open access for the first time for c.24 million Ethiopians to digital health, agriculture, education and skills services by 2032.
  • Cut prices by up to 75% for mobile internet services by 2032.
  • Significantly boost the economy of Ethiopia, including by enabling productivity improvements for over one million small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) and micro-entrepreneurs.

CDC expects to make a total investment commitment of circa $200 million as part of the Global Partnership for Ethiopia consortium.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
26th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what humanitarian and other assistance he is providing to people affected by the recent volcanic eruption in Goma in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

The UK is one of the largest humanitarian donors in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). In response to the recent eruption of Mount Nyiragongo, UK-funded partners are already on the ground providing emergency support. The International Federation of the Red Cross Disaster Relief Emergency Fund is providing first aid, water, sanitation, hygiene, shelter and psychological support and working to restore family units. The International Committee of the Red Cross is providing support for unaccompanied children and the UN Humanitarian Air Service is providing vital reconnaissance flights in the area. We are working closely with the UN peacekeeping mission (MONUSCO), the UN Office for the Coordination for Humanitarian Affairs and our humanitarian partners to monitor the situation, assess the impact, and deliver further assistance if required.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
26th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, if he will publish the amount of Official Development Assistance provided for (a) security sector reform, (b) justice sector reform, (c) strengthening human rights and (d) support to refugees and internally displaced people, either directly or indirectly to the Government of Ethiopia in each of the last five years.

The former Department for International Development spent £1.489 billion of Official Development Assistance (ODA) in Ethiopia in the financial years from 2016/17 to 2020/21. This budget covers those categories (with the exception of Security Sector Reform, where no ODA funds were used). The FCDO publishes all ODA spending, including in Tigray, on devtracker.

The FCDO made the decision in November 2020 to pause financial aid payments to the Government of Ethiopia destined for Tigray. However £22 million has been allocated to the humanitarian response in Tigray to support those in need, working through other implementing partners. UK-funded partners such as the Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), UN Children's Fund (UNICEF), World Food Programme (WFP) and International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) are providing food, shelter, water and healthcare in challenging circumstances. The FCDO is in the process of allocating budgets for programmes this financial year. Both the Tigray conflict and the nature of UK support will be kept under close review.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
26th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, with reference to reports in the Daily Telegraph on 24 May 2021 of the use of white phosphorous on civilians in Tigray, what independent assessment he is undertaking in response to those reports.

We are aware of reports alleging that civilians in Tigray have suffered burns that may be consistent with the weaponised use of white phosphorus. The Government of Ethiopia has strongly refuted allegations that such weapons are being used against civilians. The UK strongly condemns direct or indiscriminate attacks against civilians no matter what weapon is used.

The UK Government is working to establish the facts. Access to the affected areas, and to verified information, remains difficult. We have called for communications to be restored and for unfettered humanitarian access. We have also consistently called for access for independent human rights investigators. We will continue to do so and support the efforts of the joint investigation between the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights and the Ethiopian Human Rights Commission.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
26th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what support he is providing to help tackle the persecution of non-religious people globally.

Protecting freedom of religion or belief for all faiths, and none, remains a priority for the UK Government. Members of non-religious communities continue to be victims of harassment and persecution, despite progress over recent years with the promotion of freedom of religion or belief for all. The UK Government remains deeply concerned about the severity and scale of violations and abuses of freedom of religion or belief (FoRB) for all in many parts of the world. As the Minister of State responsible for Human Rights, Lord (Tariq) Ahmad of Wimbledon underlined these points at the All-Party Parliamentary Humanist Group Annual General Meeting on 24 May.

Lord Ahmad works closely with the Prime Minister's Special Envoy for FoRB, Fiona Bruce MP. In addition to championing FoRB, Mrs Bruce represents the UK at meetings of the International Religious Freedom or Belief Alliance to advocate for the rights of individuals being discriminated against or persecuted on the basis of their faith or belief, including members of non-religious communities.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
25th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what recent assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of reports on the detention and repression of opposition activists, civil society actors and journalists in Zimbabwe.

The UK has been clear that meaningful political and economic reform, and respect for human rights and the rule of law, are prerequisites for Zimbabwe's reengagement with the international community. We are therefore concerned by the unacceptable pattern of arrests of prominent opposition, civil society figures and journalists. I have regularly raised concerns about the treatment of political opponents. I wrote to the Zimbabwean Minister of Home Affairs on the case of Joanna Mamombe, Cecilia Chimbiri and Netsai Marova on 10 May 2021 urging for them to be treated in line with the constitution.

We continue to prioritise support for human rights, including political and media freedoms, in our programming, supporting civil society to monitor human rights violations and support survivors. The UK Government will continue to speak out, both privately and in public, where we have concerns and we will work alongside the international community to support a better future for all Zimbabweans.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
25th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what discussions he has had with his counterpart in the US Administration on the use of targeted sanctions and restrictions for those accused of human rights abuses and atrocities against civilians in the Tigray region of Ethiopia.

We are deeply concerned at human rights violations, and atrocities against civilians in Ethiopia's Tigray region. Since the conflict started, the UK, alongside international partners including the US, have consistently called for an end to fighting, and for all parties to the conflict to prioritise the protection of civilians.

The Foreign Secretary discussed concerns about the situation in Tigray with Secretary of State Blinken on 3 May. We continue to closely engage US counterparts on the full range of human rights issues in Washington DC, Addis Ababa and in capital to capital discussions, including with the US envoy for the Horn of Africa, Jeffrey Feltman. We will continue to work closely with the US on this issue.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
25th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of the (a) political and (b) security situation in Mali; and whether he has plans to (a) reduce or (b) maintain ODA spending in that country in 2021-22.

I condemned the recent detention of the President, Prime Minister and other members of the government in Mali. Any attempt to impose a change of leadership by force, including through forced resignations, is unacceptable.

We are monitoring the political and security situation in Mali closely. We are ready to support ECOWAS efforts to monitor progress towards democratic, constitutional rule within the agreed timeframe, and with full respect for the conditions set out by ECOWAS.

The UK remains committed to supporting stability and development in Mali, and will continue to provide aid to those most in need. The final figures for UK spending in the Sahel will be published in due course, but we will remain a significant donor to the region.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
21st Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, when he last raised LGBT+ rights with his counterparts in (a) Uganda, (b) Ghana, (c) Namibia and (d) Nigeria.

The UK plays an active role across the world in support of LGBT rights. We want to see an end to violence and discrimination against LGBT people. I made this clear when I spoke at the launch of the Global Interfaith Commission on LGBT+ Lives in December 2020.

We are very concerned about the criminalisation of homosexuality, and recognise that there is a long way to go before all LGBT people are able to live free and equal lives, including in some parts of Africa. We make regular representations to governments around the world on this issue including in Uganda, Ghana, Namibia and Nigeria. We work through our Embassies and High Commissions, as well as international organisations, including the UN, Council of Europe, Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) and the Commonwealth, to promote non-discrimination towards LGBT people, and to address discriminatory laws. We directly challenge governments that criminalise homosexuality at the highest political levels.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
21st Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what progress he has made on securing access for Falkland Islands fisheries to the EU single market.

The UK Government is fully committed to supporting the Overseas Territories, and we will continue to do all we can to protect their interests. During negotiations of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement, we made clear to the EU from the outset that we were negotiating on behalf of the Overseas Territories. However, the European Commission refused to negotiate a future relationship that included the Overseas Territories.

We sought to change the Commission's position, but it declined to engage. As a result, tariffs now apply on exports from the Overseas Territories to the EU, particularly exports from the Falkland Islands. We are working with the Falkland Islands Government to agree the appropriate actions to mitigate against the impact of tariffs on their exports to the EU.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
21st Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether any projects involving the production of palm oil have been funded by Official Development Assistance from (a) his Department and (b) the Commonwealth Development Corporation in any of the last three years.

FCDO supports trade in sustainable palm oil and efforts to tackle deforestation associated with palm oil through a combination of diplomatic engagement, policy measures and development assistance. FCDO, jointly with BEIS, fund the Partnerships for Forests programme which works with the Government of Indonesia to strengthen Indonesia's palm oil sustainability standards. FCDO also provides funds to the Tropical Forest Alliance which brings together over 180 companies, governments and civil society organisations to tackle deforestation associated with palm oil and other commodities. The Government also supports the UK Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil initiative, which works towards a commitment to source 100% of palm oil from sustainable sources, and through the Amsterdam Declarations Partnership we continue to collaborate with other European countries to implement similar commitments.

In the past three years CDC has supported one business involved in the primary production of palm oil - Feronia Inc. CDC's investment into the company, based in a remote area of DRC, was aimed at providing economic opportunities for local people as well as improvements to healthcare, education, clean water and infrastructure provision.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
21st Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how many personnel his Department has posted to each High Commission, Embassy or Office in (a) Nigeria, (b) Somalia, (c) Ethiopia, (d) Kenya, (e) South Africa, (f) Ghana and (g) Mozambique in each of the last five years.

We have interpreted the question to mean how many UK Based staff were posted by the then Foreign and Commonwealth Office and Department for International Development and currently Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office to all posts in Nigeria, Somalia, Ethiopia, Kenya, South Africa, Ghana and Mozambique in each of the financial years, 2016-17, 2017-18, 2018-19, 2019-20 and 2020-21. The figures shown are based on the headcount as at 31 March in each financial year.

FCDO

Legacy FCO and DFID

Headcount 31/03/2021

Headcount 31/03/2020

Headcount 31/03/2019

Headcount 31/03/2018

Headcount 31/03/2017

Nigeria

60-69

70-79

60-69

60-69

50-59

Somalia

10-19

10-19

10-19

10-19

10-19

Ethiopia

40-49

40-49

40-49

40-49

40-49

Kenya

60-69

70-79

70-79

60-69

50-59

South Africa

30-39

30-39

20-29

20-29

30-39

Ghana

20-29

10-19

10-19

10-19

10-19

Mozambique

10-19

10-19

10-19

10-19

10-19

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
21st Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, if he will publish the Official Development Assistance spend on (a) security sector reform, (b) conflict prevention, (c) preventing violence against women and girls in each of the Sahel region countries in each of the last five years.

In the Sahel, Official Development Assistance (ODA) for security sector reform, conflict prevention, and preventing violence against women and girls has principally been delivered through the Conflict Stability and Security Fund (CSSF). This is a cross government fund which focuses on tackling instability and preventing conflicts that threaten UK interests.

A breakdown of CSSF ODA spend across the five Sahelian countries (Burkina Faso, Chad, Mali, Mauritania and Niger) can be found in table A4f of the 'Additional tables: Statistics on International Development Final UK Aid Spend' under 'Statistics on International Development' which are published annually here: www.gov.uk/government/collections/statistics-on-international-development. Figures for 2019 are published separately here: www.gov.uk/government/statistics/statistics-on-international-development-final-uk-aid-spend-2019. Figures for 2020 will be published in due course on the gov.uk website here: www.gov.uk/government/collections/statistics-on-international-development.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
20th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what recent steps he has taken to help ensure the safety and security of UK citizens in Chad in response to the deterioration in the security situation in that country.

Our Travel Advice is clear that British Nationals should leave Chad as soon as possible. We are in touch with British Nationals in Chad to provide support and to set out available options for them to leave. A large proportion have already left. We continue to work closely with authorities and airlines to ensure British Nationals are able to leave Chad as soon as possible. This includes work to secure the exemptions that may be required for people leaving Chad in urgent circumstances.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
20th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what discussions he has had with the President of Tanzania on that country's response to the covid-19 pandemic; and what support the Government is providing to that country on that matter.

Tanzania's new President Samia Suluhu Hassan gave a speech on 6 April announcing a task force of experts to assess the domestic situation with regards to COVID-19 in order to advise the Government on how to handle COVID-19 in Tanzania. The UK welcomes these indications of a change in approach. We look forward to discussions with the new Government on where we may be able to offer assistance, as the UK has been concerned that the Government of Tanzania has not released any information on the numbers of COVID-19 cases and deaths since 29 April 2020. The British High Commission continues to work with international and local partners to encourage a positive response to COVID-19 from the Government of Tanzania, including encouraging them to join COVAX.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
20th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what the UK Government's priorities are at the UN Human Rights Council over the next six months.

As set out in the Integrated Review, the UK will continue to play a leading international role in multilateral governance and use our diplomacy at the UN to defend universal human rights and promote women's economic empowerment. As such our priorities at the Human Rights Council are to continue to hold states that violate human rights to account, to promote girls' education and work to end violence against women and girls, defend freedom of religion or belief, support democratic values, and protect media freedom.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
20th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what the total spending of his Department was on health and disease related research in each of the last five years.

The total spend on centrally commissioned health and disease related research by the Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office over the last five financial years is as follows:

2016/17 - £84.65 million

2017/18 - £122.08 million

2018/19 - £132.33 million

2019/20 - £155.41 million

2020/21 - Final and audited spend for 2020/21 will be published in our annual report later this year.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
20th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what recent assessment he has made of the effect on regional security of the conflict in Chad.

We are concerned by the situation in Chad, condemn any effort to seize power by force, and are urging that violence is swiftly brought to an end. The Foreign Secretary and I have called for stability to be restored and a peaceful, inclusive transition to civilian and constitutional rule.

Instability in Chad could have negative implications for the wider region. Chad plays an important role in regional stability and security, for example through its contributions to the UN Peacekeeping Mission in Mali (MINUSMA), and the Multinational Joint Task Force, which is combatting the Boko Haram insurgency in the Lake Chad Basin.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
19th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what recent assessment he has made of the (a) environmental sustainability, (b) security risks and (c) geopolitical effect of the proposed East African Crude Oil Pipeline; and whether the Government has provided any support to that project.

The UK is not directly involved in the East African Crude Oil Pipeline (EACOP) project. The UK has previously engaged with the Governments of Uganda and Tanzania in support of the project and provided assistance to UK companies bidding for commercial contracts related to the EACOP, but this ceased when the announcement of our fossil fuel policy change was made in 2020.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
19th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what support the Government is providing for covid-19 prevention and treatment in the Horn of Africa.

The UK has committed £548 million to the COVAX Advance Market Commitment (AMC) - the international initiative to support global equitable access to vaccines, of which the UK is one of the largest bilateral donors. In the Horn of Africa, more than 2.5 million vaccine doses have been received by Ethiopia, Somalia, and Djibouti through the COVAX AMC, to date. At national level, bilateral programming in the Horn has been adapted to respond to COVID-19, and through the regional Tackling Deadly Diseases in Africa Programme, the UK has contributed £20 million to the African Union's continental response to COVID-19.

As well as relationships with national governments, the FCDO has also strengthened its engagement with regional bodies, such as the African Centre for Disease Control and the World Health Organisation (WHO) Africa Regional Office. The FCDO is tracking assessments of country preparedness and working at national and regional levels to support efforts to build country capacity to deliver vaccines and monitor vaccine roll-out, ensuring high risk groups are prioritised.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
19th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of the security and humanitarian situation in north east Nigeria following recent attacks and the displacement of population in the Damasak area.

We are deeply concerned by the security and humanitarian situation in North East Nigeria where terrorist groups, including Boko Haram and Islamic State West Africa, continue to conduct attacks on local communities. Recent attacks on Damasak in Borno State, in which civilians, humanitarian workers and facilities were targeted, have led to a worsening humanitarian situation, and the displacement of local residents and internally displaced people to Niger or other areas of North East Nigeria. The British High Commissioner in Abuja has publicly condemned the attacks. As the UK Government has repeatedly made clear, humanitarian workers should never be a target.

We are committed to helping Nigeria tackle the threat posed by the terrorist groups in North East Nigeria. We are providing significant humanitarian and stabilisation assistance to support affected communities, including those who have been displaced.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
19th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what recent assessment he has made of the (a) presence and (b) reported actions of (i) regular and (ii) irregular Eritrean troops in Ethiopia.

We remain concerned about the impact of the continued fighting in Tigray on the wider stability in Ethiopia and the Horn of Africa. As I made clear to the Eritrean Ambassador on 16 March, and through joint statements at the Human Rights Council and by the G7 on 2 April, Eritrea's role in the Ethiopian conflict is particularly concerning. There are numerous reports of atrocities involving Eritrean forces, and the presence of Eritrean forces is fuelling insecurity. These forces must leave Ethiopia immediately, in line with the commitment made by Prime Minister Abiy in his announcement on 26 March. We are closely monitoring the situation and are clear that their withdrawal must be swift, unconditional and verifiable. We have yet to see any evidence that Eritrean forces are leaving Tigray and will continue pressing for this commitment to be delivered.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
19th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what representations the UK High Commissioner has made to the Government of Uganda on alleged disappearances of and attacks on opposition activists and journalists in that country.

The UK Government is very concerned about the treatment of opposition candidates and their supporters in the run-up to and since the Ugandan elections. We are particularly disturbed by continued reports of people who are missing or arbitrarily detained. This does not provide for an open political landscape within which democracy can flourish and Uganda can prosper.

Our High Commissioner in Kampala has repeatedly raised concerns about opposition supporters going missing or being arbitrarily detained directly with the Ugandan authorities. I [Minister Duddridge] also raised this in my call with the Ugandan Foreign Minister, Sam Kutsea, on 21 April. We have pressed publicly and privately for information on missing persons to be released and due process to be followed. We welcome the Minister for Internal Affairs' recent update to Parliament regarding those currently in detention, but now need to see all those in detention released or charged. As a long-standing partner to Uganda, the UK will continue to press for the rights of all Ugandans to be upheld.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
24th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what recent assessment he has made of the proportion of Tigray, Ethiopia that is accessible to humanitarian assistance and humanitarian organisations.

The UK has been consistent in calling for free and unfettered humanitarian access to the 4.5 million people in Tigray in need, with estimates that 80% of the Tigray region has been inaccessible to relief agencies. The fluidity of the context makes it extremely challenging to determine precisely but humanitarian organisations report that huge numbers of people across the region are located in inaccessible locations. The Foreign Secretary raised the need for humanitarian access to Tigray with Prime Minister Abiy during his visit to Ethiopia and pressed for a political dialogue to bring lasting peace to the region. I [Minister Duddridge] re-enforced the urgency of the need for humanitarian access when I [Minister Duddridge] spoke with the Ethiopian Ambassador on 24 February. The presence of Eritrean troops in Tigray is one the main barriers to humanitarian access and they should leave Ethiopia immediately. Humanitarian providers must be protected to ensure they can help those in need.

We continue to work with the UN to promote and monitor access and the delivery of humanitarian support to all those who need it, including to civilians in contested areas. UK-funded aid agencies in Tigray are delivering support in challenging circumstances, including food, shelter, water and healthcare. A joint humanitarian and political team from the British Embassy in Addis Ababa visited Mekelle on 5 March. They met with the provisional administration of Tigray, Mayor of Mekelle, humanitarian agencies and people displaced by the violence. The Embassy team heard harrowing accounts of human rights violations, the challenges of aid delivery and how some of the £15.4m of UK Aid is helping to support those affected by the Tigray conflict. The Government of Ethiopia must act now to protect its people.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
24th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what recent discussions he has had with the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights on allegations of serious human rights abuses and atrocities in the Tigray region of Ethiopia.

We are deeply concerned at the mounting evidence of human rights abuses and violations in Ethiopia's Tigray region. Since the conflict started, the UK alongside international partners, have consistently called for an end to fighting, and for all parties to the conflict to prioritise the protection of civilians. We welcome Prime Minister Abiy's statement on 23 March that the perpetrators of human rights atrocities should face justice - whoever they are. We need to see action now to stop further atrocities and to allow for the independent investigation of those that have occurred.

In a joint statement on Ethiopia with 41 other countries at the 46th Session of the UN Human Rights Council (UNHRC), we condemned in the strongest terms the reported killings of civilians. Eritrea's role in the conflict is particularly concerning; there are numerous reports of atrocities involving Eritrean forces, and the presence of Eritrean forces is fuelling insecurity. We welcome the announcement, on 26 March, of their withdrawal and call for this to be immediate and unconditional. We continue to call for independent, international investigations into atrocities reported in Tigray in the multilateral fora, including at the UNHRC, and for the Government of Ethiopia to ensure full access for human rights organisations.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
24th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how many Chagossians have been supported through funding from the UK Government Chagossian Support Package in each year since 2016.

The number of Chagossians supported through funding from the Support Package since 2016 are:

Year

Total

2017

28

2018

33

2019

134

2020

60

2021 (Jan to March)

116

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
24th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what funding was allocated for the UK Government Chagossian Support Package since 2016.

A Written Ministerial Statement issued on 16 November 2016 (www.parliament.uk/business/publications/written-questions-answers-statements/written-statement/Commons/2016-11-16/HCWS260/) announced a support package of approximately £40 million over a ten year period. Of this £732,879.49 has been spent to date.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
24th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, which geographical areas by (a) Council or (b) Devolved Administration have received funding for projects from the UK Government Chagossian Support Package since 2016.

Projects within the geographical areas of Crawley Borough Council and Manchester City Council have received funding from the support package since 2016.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
12th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what steps he is taking to (a) promote cooperation between and (b) draw on the expertise of NHS and other clinical and academic expertise on global health issues in pursuit of the UN Sustainable Development Goals.

The UK is a leader in global health and the NHS is a key part of our international offer, as one of the first Universal Health Coverage initiatives in the world. The UK draws on the full breadth of expertise in the UK health sector to help strengthen health systems in partner countries, to end preventable deaths and to respond to COVID-19.

In response to the pandemic, the UK has offered its world leading genomics expertise to countries around the world through a New Variant Assessment Platform, led by Public Health England, to identify new variants of the COVID-19 virus. In terms of broader global health security, the UK also works through the Department of Health and Social Care's (DHSC's) International Health Regulations Strengthening Project and the UK Public Health Rapid Support team, to support partner countries to better prevent, detect and respond to public health emergencies. The UK's clinical and academic expertise is a key part of these efforts. DHSC's Commonwealth Partnership for Antimicrobial Stewardship programme has also created partnerships between NHS volunteers and their counterparts in Ghana, Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia, to work to address antimicrobial resistance.

We are also drawing on NHS expertise to strengthen health systems through the FCDO's Global Better Health Programme, working with the NHS and Healthcare UK on non-communicable diseases in South East Asia, Latin America and South Africa. In addition, the UK Partnerships for Health Systems programme funds health partnerships between UK NHS and health institutions and their counterparts in lower and middle income countries to improve health workforce and service performance.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
12th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what (a) security and (b) Official Development assistance the UK provided to Mozambique in each of the last three years.

(a) The Ministry of Defence, with other government departments, provides support to Mozambique under the UK-Mozambique Defence Memorandum of Understanding agreed in 2019. This includes defence cooperation and is intended to assist the Government of Mozambique in addressing terrorism and promoting respect for human rights. The UK also co-leads, with Ireland, the International Community Crisis Response Taskforce, endorsed by the Government of Mozambique, which provides an important platform for high-level political dialogue and coordination relating to the security situation in Cabo Delgado.

(b) Official Development Assistance (ODA) in Mozambique supports activities in a number of sectors including humanitarian, health, education, water and sanitation, better governance and economic development. Data for the last three years which is available is below. This information is taken from the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office's National Statistics publication 'Statistics on International Development'. The next report, published in Autumn 2021, will provide a full breakdown of the UK's ODA spend for 2020.

£ Thousands

2017

2018

2019

Total UK Bilateral ODA

57,526

70,895

103,583

Imputed UK share of Multilateral Net ODA

54,070

65,706

75,296

Total

111,596

136,600

178,880

Source: Statistics on International Development, 2019 - tinyurl.com/yh5vl9fz

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
12th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of the change in the level of total Official Development Assistance to eligible Commonwealth member states in the last reporting year.

For the last reporting year available (2019), the UK's bilateral Official Development Assistance to Commonwealth countries was approximately £1.888 billion. This was an increase of over 8% on the previous year. Detail on UK Official Development Assistance (ODA) spending in 2020 is not yet available.   In the autumn, FCDO will publish "Statistics on International Development: Final UK Aid Spend 2020". This publication will contain detailed breakdowns including UK bilateral ODA to Commonwealth countries.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
12th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what discussions the UK Representative to the UN Human Rights Council has had with relevant stakeholders on the alleged human rights abuses in (a) Uganda, (b) Ethiopia, (c) Eritrea, (d) Tanzania and (e) Nigeria in the last three months.

The UK Permanent Representative to the UN in Geneva, Julian Braithwaite, and the UK's International Ambassador for Human Rights and Deputy Permanent Representative to the UN, Rita French, regularly hold discussions with relevant stakeholders on ongoing and emerging human rights situations of concern, including with representatives of other governments, international organisations, human rights defenders and other members of civil society.

In addition to discussions with stakeholders, the UK also speaks out publicly against human rights violations and abuses through the Human Rights Council, including during its current (46th) regular session which began on 22 February. On 24 February at an Interactive Dialogue with the UN Special Rapporteur on Eritrea, Ambassador French delivered the UK's statement expressing concern at the involvement of Eritrean forces in Tigray and at reports of human rights violations and abuses by all those involved in the conflict. The statement called for independent, international investigations into allegations of human rights abuses and violations, to ensure that perpetrators of proven allegations are held to account. On 26 February, in our Item 2 General Debate statement, we called on the Nigerian authorities to ensure those responsible for alleged human rights violations during the #EndSARs protests were held to account. The UK also joined a joint statement on Ethiopia with 41 other countries in which we condemned in the strongest terms the reported killings of civilians in Tigray, called on Ethiopia to grant full access to the region for unhindered humanitarian access and assistance and to protect the human rights of all people in the conflict-afflicted zone, and also called for the withdrawal of all Eritrean troops from Ethiopia.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
12th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of the change in the level of total Official Development Assistance to eligible Commonwealth member states in Sub-Saharan Africa in the last reporting year.

For the last reporting year available (2019), the UK's bilateral Official Development Assistance to Commonwealth countries in Sub-Sahara Africa was approximately £1.173 billion. This was an increase of around 7 per cent on the previous year.

Detail on UK Official Development Assistance (ODA) spending in 2020 is not yet available.   In the autumn, FCDO will publish "Statistics on International Development: Final UK Aid Spend 2020". This publication will contain detailed breakdowns including UK bilateral ODA to Commonwealth countries in Sub-Saharan Africa.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
9th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what support he has provided to the Government of Equatorial Guinea following the recent explosions linked to a munitions depot.

On 8 March I [Minister Duddridge] publicly expressed the UK's sorrow and passed on condolences to the people of Equatorial Guinea following the tragic explosions in Bata. FCDO officials are in close contact with UK-funded partners including the Red Cross and the UN who are assessing the situation and providing support to those affected. We continue to monitor the situation closely.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
9th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what conflict risk assessment he has undertaken in relation to proposed UK cuts to aid in (a) Nigeria, (b) South Sudan, (c) Somalia and (d) the Sahel region.

As announced last year, the impact of the global pandemic on the UK economy has forced us to take the tough but necessary decision to temporarily reduce how much we spend on Official Development Assistance (ODA).

The Foreign Secretary has set out seven core priorities for the UK's aid budget, including resolving conflict. We are now working through the implications of these changes for individual programmes. No decisions have yet been made on individual budget allocations.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
9th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of the effect of proposed UK aid reductions on the ability of multilateral agencies to respond to famine risk in Sub-Saharan Africa in the next twelve months.

The Foreign Secretary has clearly reiterated our commitment to global humanitarian leadership, including in statements to the House of Commons in February.

The majority of our humanitarian spend goes through UN agencies. Working through and with multilateral agencies such as the UN is particularly important for access in conflict affected countries where many of the most vulnerable and at risk live.

The most protracted, severe food insecure crises are caused by conflict at their root. We need to couple available resources with humanitarian diplomacy, as exemplified by the UK's Famine Call to Action and the appointment of Nick Dyer as the UK's first Special Envoy for Famine Prevention and Humanitarian Affairs ensuring humanitarian access to affected populations and protection of civilians in conflict. If we achieve these two things we will go a long way to averting famine and the worst of human suffering in crisis.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
9th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of the number of people at risk of famine or severe food insecurity in sub-Saharan Africa in the next 12 months.

The combined impact of the coronavirus pandemic, conflict, locust swarms and climate change have left millions of people worldwide facing extreme hunger over the past year. In sub-Saharan Africa 95.5 million people are projected to reach crisis levels of food insecurity by the middle of 2021. The risk of famine is real. Famine is likely already occurring in western Pibor, South Sudan whilst Burkina Faso and north-east Nigeria also face a credible threat of famine.

The UK has responded to this threat by launching our Famine Initiative, pledging £180 million dedicated to tackling food insecurity and to provide aid to more than 7 million vulnerable people in some of the world’s most dangerous places. The first Special Envoy for Famine Prevention has been appointed to drive UK efforts to prevent the immediate risk of famine and address mounting acute food insecurity through mobilising the international community to take strong, concerted and urgent action.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
9th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what discussions he has had with the Commonwealth Secretariat on proposed UK aid reductions to Commonwealth countries in Africa in advance of the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting in Kigali later in 2021.

Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO) Ministers are currently working with department officials to finalise ODA budget allocations for the next financial year, guided by the seven strategic priorities. Final decisions have not yet been made, including on individual programmes.

The FCDO is in frequent contact with the Commonwealth Secretariat on the full breadth of issues of relevance to Commonwealth member states.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
23rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether (a) he and (b) officials in his Department have (i) met virtually, by phone or in person and (ii) exchanged correspondence with any of the parties, or legal counsel to the parties, of the arbitration proceedings at the International Tribunal on the Law of the Sea, in each of the last 24 months.

Neither the Foreign Secretary nor any FCDO officials have met with or exchanged correspondence with legal counsel to the parties in relation to the arbitration proceedings at the International Tribunal on the Law of the Sea (ITLOS), in each of the last 24 months. FCDO officials and Ministers have regularly engaged with their Mauritian and Maldivian counterparts in diplomatic activity.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
23rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 22 February 2021 to Question 153250 on British Indian Ocean Territory: Legal Opinion, if he will publish the costs broken down by (a) Government Legal Department costs, as well as counsel fees, in respect of the arbitral proceedings brought by Mauritius under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea, (b) the advisory proceedings before the International Court of Justice, (c) relevant domestic litigation and (d) the UK's contribution to the cost of the tribunal established for the arbitral proceedings brought by Mauritius.

According to the available records, the FCDO has spent £5,841,662 on external legal services relating to disputes concerning the British Indian Ocean Territory.

This cost is broken down as follows:

(a) £681,220 in Counsel fees in respect of the arbitral proceedings brought by Mauritius under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea;

(b) £311,942.31 in Counsel fees and £15,173.69 in Government Legal Department (GLD) costs in respect of the advisory proceedings before the International Court of Justice;

(c) £4,008,826 in GLD costs, including Counsel fees, in respect of relevant domestic litigation; and

(d) £824,500 as the UK's contribution to the cost of the tribunal established for the arbitral proceedings brought by Mauritius.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how many officials in his Department are (a) seconded to and (b) working jointly for the Department for International Trade.

The Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office are currently operating on legacy systems, which captures staff data using different criteria. Therefore this information is not held centrally for all staff.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what recent estimate he has made of the number of people facing serious food insecurity in Ethiopia.

The UN estimates that up to 1.3 million people affected by the conflict need humanitarian assistance, though the lack of free and sustained access makes it extremely challenging to determine the actual impact of the conflict on civilians - an estimated 80% of Tigray region remains beyond the reach of relief agencies.

This is on top of an existing humanitarian caseload of 1 million people in the region. The Foreign Secretary raised the need for humanitarian access to Tigray with Prime Minister Abiy during his recent visit to Ethiopia and pressed for a political dialogue to bring lasting peace to the region. The UK is working closely with humanitarian and development agencies, including the Ethiopian Red Cross, to make sure aid reaches civilians affected by the fighting. UK-funded aid agencies in Tigray are working hard to deliver support in challenging circumstances, including food, shelter, water and healthcare. The Foreign Secretary visited Gondar, the site of a humanitarian hub in the neighbouring Amhara region on 22 January. He heard how £11.4m of UK Aid is supporting the World Food Programme and NGOs to ensure the delivery of aid to those affected by the conflict.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of reports of (a) attacks and killing of Christians in the Tigray region of Ethiopia, including at the Church of Mariam of Zion in Aksum, and (b) desecration of religious sites.

We are deeply concerned at the mounting evidence of human rights abuses and violations, including allegations of massacres of civilians, attacks on places of worship as well as damage to cultural monuments and artefacts. An ongoing lack of access to the Tigray region and conflicting reporting means that it remains difficult to confirm these reports, but we will continue to work with partners to seek further information. All parties to the conflict must respect human rights and avoid civilian loss of life at all costs. We have raised our concerns with Ethiopian Ministers, making clear the overriding need to protect civilians and adhere to international law and international human rights law. We continue to call for independent, international, investigations into allegations of human right abuses and violations, and unfettered access to Tigray - points the Foreign Secretary discussed with Prime Minister Abiy in Addis Ababa on 22 January. We also continue to call for the perpetrators of those incidents to be held to account, whoever they may be.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how many officials in his Department that are (a) based in and (b) travelling to and from countries in sub-Saharan Africa that are on the red list have been vaccinated against covid-19.

FCDO and MOD are working together to deliver supplies of Covid-19 vaccine to posts in Africa and elsewhere in the world from the end of February. This distribution will be aligned to the UK national programme for staff and dependants for whom HMG has duty of care. FCDO staff based in the UK have access to the NHS vaccination programme in the same way as everyone else.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
11th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what total cost to the public purse is of (a) direct and (b) indirect expenditure by his on external legal advice on disputes over the Chagos Islands.

According to the available records, the FCDO has spent £5,841,662 million on external legal services relating to disputes concerning the British Indian Ocean Territory. This includes Government Legal Department costs, as well as counsel fees, in respect of the arbitral proceedings brought by Mauritius under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea, the advisory proceedings before the International Court of Justice, as well as relevant domestic litigation. It also includes the UK's contribution to the cost of the tribunal established for the arbitral proceedings brought by Mauritius.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
11th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether (a) he and (b) officials in his Department have (i) met and (ii) exchanged correspondence with external legal counsel to the Government of the Maldives in each of the last 24 months.

Neither the Foreign Secretary nor any FCDO officials have met with or exchanged correspondence with the external legal team for the Maldives in relation to their International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea (ITLOS) proceedings in the past 24 months.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
8th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of the level of access to humanitarian aid for civilians in (a) the Tigray and (b) neighbouring regions of Ethiopia.

The Foreign Secretary raised the need for untrammelled humanitarian access to Tigray with President Abiy during his recent visit to Ethiopia. We judge that there are still restrictions to access to around 85% of the Tigray region. In this context we welcome the recent visits to Ethiopia by senior UN officials and hope that they will deliver a sustained step-change in humanitarian access.

We remain concerned about the impact of the continued fighting in Tigray on the humanitarian situation in Ethiopia and beyond. The UK is working closely with humanitarian organisations to make sure aid reaches civilians affected by the fighting. UK-funded aid agencies in Tigray are working hard to deliver support in challenging circumstances, including shelter, water and healthcare. The Foreign Secretary announced £11.4m of humanitarian funding to support those affected by the conflict during his visit to Ethiopia where he saw first-hand how UK Aid is supporting the World Food Programme and NGOs to ensure the delivery of aid to those affected by the conflict.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
5th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what (a) financial and (b) technical support the Government has provided to the government of the Maldives in each of the last five years.

No bilateral financial support has been provided to the Government of Maldives by the UK in the last five years. In addition to supporting civil society, UK funding - including through the Conflict, Stability and Security Fund (CSSF) - has provided technical assistance to the Maldivian police and Maldivian Government since 2019. This has included work to increase capabilities on risk and disaster management, to counter extremism, and to improve the security of tourist accommodation. The CSSF has also provided technical support to the media sector and the independent Presidential Commission on Deaths and Disappearances.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
5th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how many times ministers in his Department (a) met and (b) held discussions with representatives of the government of the Maldives in each of the last five years; and when each of those (i) meetings and (ii) discussions took place.

Ministers from the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office regularly engage with their counterparts in the Government of Maldives. The most recent discussions between the Minister for South Asia, Lord (Tariq) Ahmad of Wimbledon, and the Maldivian Foreign Minister, Abdulla Shahid, took place on 4 February 2021, 18 November 2020 and 23 July 2020. Lord (Tariq) Ahmad of Wimbledon also regularly engages with the Maldivian High Commissioner to the UK.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
5th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether he has (a) suspended or (b) cancelled any funding programmes in Uganda in the last 12 months.

Following the disproportionate response by the Ugandan security services to the protests at the end of November 2020, we took the decision to pause funding of three projects totalling £40,909 which were working directly with the Ugandan security services. These projects include: one delivering human rights training to the Uganda Police Force, a second delivering human rights training to the Uganda Prison Service and a third project, providing training materials to the UPDF to document and investigate conflict-related sexual violence. In addition to the wider UK Overseas Development Assistance review, we are currently reviewing UKAid spend in Uganda, including the permanent status of the above projects.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
5th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether he plans to review or suspend CDC investments in Myanmar as a result of the military coup in that country.

CDC has no investments in military or state-owned companies in Myanmar and does not directly work with or partner with the government. Over the past two years, CDC has tightened its due diligence process to mitigate the risk of UK funds going to military owned companies.

CDC is reviewing the impact of the 1st February Myanmar coup on its investments in the country.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
28th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what progress he has made on negotiations on access for Falkand Islands fisheries to EU markets.

UK negotiations with the EU have now concluded. During the negotiations, the UK Government made clear to the EU from the outset that our mandate included the UK's Overseas Territories, but the EU maintained it had no mandate to negotiate a future relationship with the Overseas Territories. As a result, tariffs now apply on exports from the Overseas Territories to the EU. The Government is fully committed to working with the Falkland Islands Government to mitigate against the impact of tariffs, as well as taking up the benefits of the UK's independent trade policy.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
28th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what (a) support, (b) training and (c) funding the Government has provided to the Government of Uganda's (i) armed forces, (ii) security forces, (iii) police and (iv) judicial system in each of the last five years, either in Uganda or the UK.

Regarding assistance to the police and prison service, since 2018, the UK has provided civil society organizations with £55,450, through UK Official Development Assistance, to train the Uganda Police Force and Uganda Prison Service in taking a human rights based approach when working with minority groups. Police officers work through domestic and international human rights legislation, the implications for their work, understanding the right of individual vulnerable groups and understanding their role in promoting human rights. Frontline prison workers are taught about the rights and needs of vulnerable prisoners and helps to change attitudes and practices towards vulnerable persons in detention. To date, over 2000 police and prison staff have been trained under this initiative.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
28th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what recent assessment he has made of the accuracy of reports of attacks on civilians and serious human rights violations in the Tigray region of Ethiopia, by any party to the conflict, whether internal or external.

We are deeply concerned at the mounting evidence of human rights abuses and violations. All parties to the conflict must respect human rights and avoid civilian loss of life at all costs. We have raised our concerns with Ethiopian Ministers, making clear the overriding need to protect civilians and adhere to international law and international human rights law. We continue to call for independent, international, investigations into allegations of human right abuses and violations, and unfettered access to Tigray - points the Foreign Secretary raised with Prime Minister Abiy in Addis Ababa on 22 January. We also continue to call for the perpetrators of those incidents that are proven to be held to account, whoever they may be.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
28th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what support the Government is providing to the Government of Mozambique to help tackle serious insecurity and attacks by ISIS-affiliated groups in the north of that country.

The UK is deeply concerned by the deteriorating security situation in northern Mozambique, and the increasing attacks by groups with links to Islamic extremism. We are working with the Government of Mozambique to address the root drivers of conflict and instability, including through engagement with the Government of Mozambique's regional development authority in Cabo Delgado, and by providing targeted technical assistance under the framework of a Defence Memorandum of Understanding. To date, the UK has provided £19m of humanitarian and development support to internally displaced people in northeast Mozambique through UN agencies, ensuring displaced people have access to food, shelter and basic healthcare.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
27th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what support the Government has provided to the Government of Malawi on (a) testing, (b) surveillance, (c) medical supplies, (d) oxygen plant capacity, (e) vaccines and (f) other steps necessary to help it respond to the covid-19 pandemic.

The UK has provided £7.8 million to support the Government of Malawi's Covid-19 response. The UK's support commenced in March 2020, before Malawi's first reported Covid-19 case. This funding has been instrumental in supporting both preparedness and response. Early UK funding helped to establish initial testing capacity and has continued to supply essential resources to the central laboratory. Through UNICEF we have provided support to district teams for contact tracing, isolation monitoring and better data management. By training more than 5,000 health workers, this improved both testing and surveillance capacity. UK funding also helped increase treatment capacity through supporting the establishment of eight emergency treatment units as well as the procurement of medical and laboratory supplies. We helped establish a new oxygen plant at Malawi's national referral hospital in Lilongwe, with a capacity of 800 litres per minute, and we enabled the provision of 174 portable oxygen concentrators for distribution to more remote areas.

The Malawian Government applied to the COVAX facility (which is co-led by the World Health Organisation, The Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations, and Gavi) in December for vaccines for up to 20% of the population, targeted towards health and social care workers, vulnerable people with comorbidities, and those over 60 years of age.

UK support has also extended beyond the health sector, including the provision of PPE to keep border staff safe and technical support to allow the fast-tracking of essential goods at Malawi's key border posts. Our support to public communications has helped to reach more than 10 million Malawians, increasing their awareness and understanding of Covid-19, and dispelling myths, rumours and stigma.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
27th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of the spread of the (a) B.1.351 and (b) 501Y.V2 variants of covid-19 across (i) southern Africa and (ii) the rest of Sub-Saharan Africa.

The emergence of new genetic variants of concern highlight the critical importance of a coordinated global response to COVID-19. We are aware that B.1.351 / 501Y.V2 variant has been identified in 31 countries, including many countries across southern Africa and Sub-Saharan Africa. Variant B.1.351 may spread more easily than previous variants, making it harder to control. Investigations are ongoing into the potential of variant B.1.351 for re-infection and vaccine or therapeutics efficacy. Limited genetic sequencing capacity in many countries in Africa limits our ability to fully understand the epidemiology and changes in the virus within the region.

The UK will offer its world leading expertise in genomics to identify new variants of coronavirus to countries who do not have the resources to do so. Countries will be offered UK capacity to analyse new strains of the virus through the launch of the New Variant Assessment Platform which will be led by Public Health England working with NHS Test and Trace and academic partners as well as the World Health Organization's SARS-CoV-2 Global Laboratory Working Group.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
27th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, which Official Development Assistance programmes and funding streams have been paused or cancelled in (a) Malawi, (b) Ethiopia and (c) Nigeria since 1 November 2020.

Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office's (FCDO) National Statistics publication - 'Statistics on International Development' will provide a full breakdown of UK Official Development Assistance spend for the previous calendar year. The Statistics for International Development published in Autumn 2021 will provide a full breakdown of the UK's ODA spend for 2020.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
25th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of the (a) security and (b) humanitarian situation in the Central African Republic; and what support the UK is providing to that country.

The UK Government is concerned about the security and humanitarian situation in the Central African Republic (CAR) in the wake of presidential and legislative elections. The CAR Government has implemented a 15 day state of emergency in response to violence throughout the electoral period, and we have updated UK travel advice for CAR to advise against all travel across the country. Continued clashes between armed groups and the CAR Government are exacerbating an already serious humanitarian situation leading to loss of life, increased population displacement and greater levels of food insecurity. We have repeatedly called on all parties to cease violence and engage in peaceful and constructive dialogue. I [Mr Duddridge] reiterated this in my [Mr Duddridge] tweet of 21 January and expressed our sadness at the deaths of civilians and UN peacekeepers.

The UK contributes approximately £40 million annually to the UN peacekeeping mission (MINUSCA) which continues to provide security and patrol areas across the country. The UK is also contributing £21.5 million towards the humanitarian effort in 2020/2021, delivering emergency health, nutrition, food security and livelihoods support to a million Central Africans.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
25th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what support he is providing to the Government of Malawi to help it respond to the covid-19 pandemic.

The UK was the first donor to support the Government of Malawi's Covid-19 response in March 2020, and we have provided a total of £7.8 million. That funding has helped to improve testing, screening and health services at points of entry to the country. It increased treatment capacity through supporting the establishment of eight emergency treatment units as well as the procurement of medical and laboratory supplies. That includes PPE which, combined with training for health workers, ensured safe and continuous delivery of other essential health services. Our funding also assisted with the establishment of a new oxygen plant at Malawi's national referral hospital in Lilongwe, and the provision of 174 portable oxygen concentrators for distribution to remoter areas. The oxygen plant was opened in December 2020 and has a peak capacity of 800 litres per minute.

The UK has also facilitated PPE provision and technical support at Malawi's border posts, which is helping to keep border staff safe and allowing the fast-tracking of essential goods. Our support to public health communications has helped to reach more than 10 million Malawians, increasing their awareness and understanding of Covid-19, and dispelling myths, rumours and stigma.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
22nd Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether HM Ambassador in Kampala has (a) visited Robert Kyagulanyi and his family and (b) made representations regarding his house detention directly to the Government of Uganda.

I [Minister Duddridge] welcome the High Court of Uganda's decision of 25 January that the detention of Robert Kyagulanyi was unconstitutional and unlawful and their order for security personnel to vacate his premises. This is a positive step towards removing the restrictions on political freedoms of Kyagulanyi. When Kyagulanyi was under de facto house arrest, external visitors were not permitted to visit him or his family. However, I [Minister Duddridge] tweeted on 19 January about this unacceptable treatment and our High Commissioner in Kampala pressed the Ugandan authorities to end these unacceptable restrictions on Robert Kyagulanyi's liberty. The High Commissioner continues to meet political actors from all parties and has offered a meeting to Robert Kyagulanyi at the earliest opportunity.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
21st Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what representations he has made to the Government of Uganda to secure the release from house arrest of Robert Kyagulanyi and his family.

I welcome the High Court of Uganda's decision of 25 January that the detention of Robert Kyagulanyi was unconstitutional and unlawful and their order for security personnel to vacate his premises. The treatment of Robert Kyagulanyi has been unacceptable and I expressed my concerns about this in a tweet on 19 January. The British High Commission Kampala continues to press the Ugandan authorities to end all of these unacceptable restrictions on Robert Kyagulanyi's liberty.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
19th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of the response of the Government of Tanzania to the covid-19 pandemic; and what support the Government is providing to that country.

We are concerned that the Government of Tanzania has not released any information on the numbers of COVID-19 cases and deaths since 29 April 2020. The British High Commission in Dar es Salaam continues to engage with the Government of Tanzania to encourage greater transparency. We are supporting measures to reduce the spread of COVID-19 and to protect those living in and visiting Tanzania. This has included using radio stations to put out messages on hand-washing and social distancing, through our sanitation and hygiene campaign managed by the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine.

The FCDO continues to advise against non-essential travel to Tanzania as part of our global travel advisory during the pandemic. All travel advice is under constant review, in consultation with Public Health England, the National Travel Health Network and Centre and our overseas Posts.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
19th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what his priorities are for (a) ocean conservation, (b) the promotion of marine biodiversity, and (c) the role of sustainable oceans policy in relation to climate change, ahead of COP26.

The Government recognises that a healthy ocean is vital to life and livelihoods on Earth. Ocean conservation and protection of marine biodiversity is particularly important for building resilience and adapting to the impacts of climate change, as well as supporting mitigation.

That is why we are leading efforts to secure international agreement to protect at least 30% of the global ocean by 2030 (30by30) as part of the new Global Biodiversity Framework. The framework is due to be agreed at the next meeting of the Conference of Parties of the Convention on Biological Diversity in 2021.

To support this ambition the UK has set up and leads the Global Ocean Alliance and has joined the High Ambition Coalition as Ocean Co-Chair. The UK is also pushing for other ambitious and transformative targets as part of the new post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework. Marine biodiversity priorities include targets on ecosystem restoration, pollution reduction, sustainable use of biodiversity, reform and elimination of harmful subsidies and nature-based solutions.

We are also playing a leading role in negotiations for a new agreement on the conservation and sustainable use of marine biological diversity in areas beyond national jurisdiction (the BBNJ Agreement). This would enable, in particular, the designation of Marine Protected Areas in the high seas - essential to implementing the 30 by 30 target. The final round of negotiations is planned for August and the UK wants to see an ambitious agreement concluded this year.

We have committed to establishing a new £500 million Blue Planet Fund using ODA to support developing countries protect the marine environment and reduce poverty. This will contribute to the UK's commitment to spend at least £3 billion of international climate finance to protect and restore nature and biodiversity over the next 5 years.

Through the £25 million Blue Belt programme, we have protected over 4 million square kilometres of ocean around our Overseas Territories, ranging from the Southern Ocean to the tropics.

Tackling climate change itself is vital for ocean health. As COP26 Presidency we are pushing for ambitious and accelerated action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to achieve the goals of the Paris Agreement.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
19th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what (a) logistical and (b) financial support the Government is providing to medical research programmes to enable the surveillance of covid-19 variants in (i) Sub-Saharan Africa and (ii) globally.

The UK Government takes the global emergence of new variants of Sars-COV-2, the virus causing COVID-19, extremely seriously. While the FCDO is not funding stand-alone surveillance programmes on the new variants, our core support to existing research programmes is helping to provide critical new knowledge on the new variants. This includes additional funding of £23 million, right from the start of the pandemic, to the Foundation for Innovative New Diagnostics (FIND) which included work on the development of a sequencing assay for surveillance. FIND are also testing whether new mutations are of concern for routine diagnostics.

Through our support to the Joint Initiative on Research for Epidemic Preparedness of up to £30 million, in collaboration with the Wellcome Trust, the FCDO is supporting the Africa Centre for Disease Control for diagnostics support and training for countries, which includes sequencing. The FCDO is also providing up to £20 million to the African Union COVID-19 response through the Tackling Deadly Diseases in Africa Programme, which includes support to genomic surveillance, including sequencing reagents, and machines. The FCDO also provides core support of £8.3 million to the World Health Organisation (WHO) R&D Blueprint Programme which recently convened an international meeting of scientists around the globe to discuss critical knowledge gaps related to the new variants.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
19th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what proportion of investments by the Commonwealth Development Corporation has been redirected since January 2020 to supporting the global response to the covid-19 pandemic.

In response to COVID-19 the Commonwealth Development Corporation (CDC) quickly pivoted all of its investment activities to help tackle the economic and healthcare impacts of the pandemic in Africa and South Asia. Since April 2020 100% of CDC's new investment commitments have been approved under its COVID-19 investment response strategy.

This investment response strategy consists of three pillars. First, to preserve the positive development impact of its current investee businesses affected by the crisis by providing additional finance and technical support. Second, to strengthen economic resilience by providing systemic liquidity to keep economies functioning and making targeted investments to increase access to healthcare and basic services. Third, to help rebuild economies and ensure their recovery is sustainable and inclusive by providing long-term patient capital in a counter-cyclical way.

More information on CDC's response to the COVID-19 pandemic can be found on its website - https://www.cdcgroup.com/en/covid-19-response/.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
19th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether registers of beneficial ownership will form part of the investigations of his Department's Commission of Inquiry into governance in the British Virgin Islands.

The Commission of Inquiry has been established by the Governor of the British Virgin Islands rather than the UK Government. The Governor's decision has the full support of UK Ministers.

The Governor has established the Commission's Terms of Reference as:

  • to establish whether there is information that corruption, abuse of office or other serious dishonesty in relation to officials, whether statutory, elected or public may have taken place in recent years;
  • if there is such information, to consider the conditions which allowed that corruption, abuse of office or other serious dishonesty to take place and whether they may still exist;
  • if appropriate, to make independent recommendations with a view to improving the standards of governance, to give the people of the Virgin Islands confidence that government is working in a fair, transparent and proper manner;
  • if appropriate, to make independent recommendations with a view to improving the operation of the agencies of law enforcement and justice;
  • should the Commissioner at any time consider that a change to these terms of reference would be beneficial to public welfare in achieving the objectives of the Inquiry, to inform the then Governor of the Virgin Islands at the first opportunity; and
  • to prepare and submit a written report to the then Governor of the Virgin Islands within six (6) months from the commencement of the Inquiry, making all such recommendations as seem fit provided that the Governor may extend the period for submission of the report to a period no longer than 9 months from the date of the Inquiry.

It will be for the Commissioner, Sir Gary Hickinbottom, to determine how best to carry out these Terms.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
18th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what steps his Department is taking to support the provision of pharmaceutical cold-chain capacity in Sub-Saharan Africa.

The UK is committed to improving access to safe, effective, quality and affordable medicines, vaccines, diagnostics and other essential health commodities in low- and lower-middle income countries. This includes both strengthening country health systems, and ensuring that new vaccines, therapeutics and diagnostics are appropriate for settings such as rural areas, with limited health services and infrastructure. The UK's £1.65 billion commitment to Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance over five years includes support to strengthen vaccine supply chains and improve cold chain technologies. Our support to public-private partnerships such as the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI) includes developing stable vaccines that can be distributed through immunisation cold chains or without refrigeration.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
18th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of the integrity of recent elections in Uganda.

While voting in Uganda's recent Presidential elections has concluded, significant concerns remain unaddressed including the treatment of opposition candidates in the run-up to and since the elections, as well as the shut-off of the internet during the elections. This does not suggest an open political landscape, within which democracy can flourish. Following the arrest of opposition leader, Robert Kyagulanyi, and subsequent violence in November, I [Minister Duddridge] tweeted my concerns on 20 November and called for the authorities to respect the rights of all Ugandans to express their views in a peaceful manner. I [Minister Duddridge] outlined in my tweet on 13 January the UK view that the elections should be free, fair and transparent, having raised this with the Ugandan High Commission on 12 January. Staff at the British High Commission observed the conduct of the elections and I [Minister Duddridge] would like to also commend the Ugandan media for their reporting on the elections. As I [Minister Duddridge] and the British High Commissioner stated in our tweets on 14 January, we are concerned that the recent internet shutdown in Uganda impacted the transparency of the elections and broader freedom of expression. Following the Presidential election results on 16 January, I [Minister Duddridge] set out in a statement our significant concerns about the overall political climate surrounding the elections and have urged the Government of Uganda to meet its international human rights commitments. The treatment of opposition figures post-election including Robert Kyagulanyi is unacceptable and I [Minister Duddridge] expressed my concerns about this in my tweet on 19 January. Political freedoms are vital for democracy to prevail and the UK will continue to make representations on this issue to the Ugandan authorities.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
18th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of levels of violence, voter intimidation and interference in Uganda's recent elections.

While voting in Uganda's recent Presidential elections has concluded, significant concerns remain unaddressed including the treatment of opposition candidates in the run-up to and since the elections, as well as the shut-off of the internet during the elections. This does not suggest an open political landscape, within which democracy can flourish. Following the arrest of opposition leader, Robert Kyagulanyi, and subsequent violence in November, I [Minister Duddridge] tweeted my concerns on 20 November and called for the authorities to respect the rights of all Ugandans to express their views in a peaceful manner. I [Minister Duddridge] outlined in my tweet on 13 January the UK view that the elections should be free, fair and transparent, having raised this with the Ugandan High Commission on 12 January. Staff at the British High Commission observed the conduct of the elections and I [Minister Duddridge] would like to also commend the Ugandan media for their reporting on the elections. As I [Minister Duddridge] and the British High Commissioner stated in our tweets on 14 January, we are concerned that the recent internet shutdown in Uganda impacted the transparency of the elections and broader freedom of expression. Following the Presidential election results on 16 January, I [Minister Duddridge] set out in a statement our significant concerns about the overall political climate surrounding the elections and have urged the Government of Uganda to meet its international human rights commitments. The treatment of opposition figures post-election including Robert Kyagulanyi is unacceptable and I [Minister Duddridge] expressed my concerns about this in my tweet on 19 January. Political freedoms are vital for democracy to prevail and the UK will continue to make representations on this issue to the Ugandan authorities.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
18th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how much support the UK provided to global disease surveillance in each of the last five years, (a) bilaterally and (b) multilaterally.

Infectious disease surveillance is critical for global health security. The UK supports global efforts to strengthen surveillance through multilateral organisations such as the World Health Organisation (WHO), the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, and the Global Polio Eradication Initiative.

At the country and regional levels, our country-based health system strengthening programmes, the International Health Regulations Strengthening Project, the UK Public Health Rapid Support Team and the Tackling Deadly Diseases in Africa Programme, support improvements in surveillance capacity in the Africa region. This includes working with the African Union's Centres for Disease Control and WHO's Africa Regional Office. The UK also supports low and middle-income countries through the Fleming Fund to improve surveillance of antimicrobial resistance.

The UK reports Official Development Assistance (ODA) spend using standard OECD Development Assistance Committee codes, which do not track how much ODA is spent on disease surveillance specifically.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
18th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how much support the UK provided to disease surveillance in sub-Saharan Africa in each of the last five years (a) bilaterally and (b) multilaterally.

Infectious disease surveillance is critical for global health security. The UK supports global efforts to strengthen surveillance through multilateral organisations such as the World Health Organisation (WHO), the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, and the Global Polio Eradication Initiative.

At the country and regional levels, our country-based health system strengthening programmes, the International Health Regulations Strengthening Project, the UK Public Health Rapid Support Team and the Tackling Deadly Diseases in Africa Programme, support improvements in surveillance capacity in the Africa region. This includes working with the African Union's Centres for Disease Control and WHO's Africa Regional Office. The UK also supports low and middle-income countries through the Fleming Fund to improve surveillance of antimicrobial resistance.

The UK reports Official Development Assistance (ODA) spend using standard OECD Development Assistance Committee codes, which do not track how much ODA is spent on disease surveillance specifically.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
14th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what (a) assessment he has made of and (b) support is he is providing to tackle the risk of famine in (i) parts of Northern Nigeria (ii) Burkina Faso and (iii) South Sudan.

The UK Government is concerned about the growing levels of food insecurity in South Sudan, Burkina Faso and Northern Nigeria. Across six counties in South Sudan there are an estimated 105,000 people in famine-like conditions, and in western Pibor the UN assesses a famine is likely occurring. Across South Sudan as a whole, around 60% of the country is facing acute food insecurity. In Burkina Faso, there is a risk of famine, with over 250,000 people currently in an emergency phase of acute food insecurity. In North-East Nigeria, 1.2 million people are currently experiencing acute food insecurity.

In September, the Foreign Secretary launched a global call to action to tackle the increasing threat of famine. This is a top FCDO priority. Since then, both I (Minister Duddridge) and the UK's Special Envoy for Famine Prevention and Humanitarian Affairs, Nick Dyer, have seen first-hand the challenges facing famine affected communities. We jointly visited South Sudan in October 2020, and Special Envoy Nick Dyer also visited North-East Nigeria in November. Since the call to action, we have pledged a total of £166 million to tackle food insecurity and the threat of famine, including the recent announcement for £47 million in December.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
14th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of the humanitarian situation for refugees and internally displaced people in (a) Ethiopia and (b) neighbouring countries as a result of the conflict in the Tigray region.

It is clear that the conflict in Tigray has had significant consequences and has displaced hundreds of thousands of people, internally and externally, as well as adversely impacting upon those that were already in need of humanitarian assistance. As of 15 January, 57,500 people have sought refuge in Sudan. We are extremely concerned that humanitarian agencies, including the UN High Commission for Refugees (UNHCR), still do not have access to refugee camps in northern Tigray, who have been without aid for many weeks. The UK continues to call for sustained, free and unfettered access to enable the delivery of much needed humanitarian assistance. We are saddened by further reports from Tigray of massacres of civilians, sexual violence, and attacks on humanitarian facilities. Protection of civilians must be a top priority. Independent investigations into allegations of human rights violations are critical.

The UK is working closely with humanitarian organisations to make sure aid reaches civilians affected by the fighting. UK humanitarian staff visited Gondar in neighbouring Amhara region this week to see response coordination. UK-funded aid agencies in Tigray are working hard to deliver support in challenging circumstances, including shelter, water and healthcare.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
14th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what recent representations he has made to the Government of Uganda on the conduct of elections and the upholding of human rights obligations in that country.

During the electoral period in Uganda, the UK had urged that the elections should be free, fair, credible and transparent as I [Minister Duddridge] outlined in my tweet on 13 January, so as to respect the rights of all Ugandans to express their views in a peaceful manner. I [Minister Duddridge] have also raised the importance of transparent elections directly with the Ugandan High Commission on 12 January and will continue to do so. Staff at the British High Commission observed the conduct of the elections and will monitor all events closely. As I [Minister Duddridge] and the British High Commissioner stated in our tweets on 14 January, we are concerned that the recent internet shutdown in Uganda impacted the transparency of the elections and broader freedom of expression. We called for the Government of Uganda to resume services immediately and understand the shutdown has now been lifted as of 18 January. Following the Presidential election results on 16 January, I issued a statement expressing my concerns about the overall political climate in the run up to the elections and during the electoral process as well as urging the Government of Uganda to meet international human rights commitments.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
30th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what recent assessment he has made of the contribution of the UK Overseas Territories to UK climate change commitments.

The UK Overseas Territories are custodians of internationally important habitats and species. As small island and coastal communities, climate change and biodiversity loss will have a profound impact upon them. The UK and Overseas Territories have a proud history of taking ambitious action on the environment, as demonstrated by the world-leading Blue Belt programme. Working with the Overseas Territories, we have successfully protected 60% of UK waters, which includes 4.3 million square kilometres of protection around the Overseas Territories. Building on this success in 2019, the UK launched the Global Ocean Alliance, calling for at least 30% of the global ocean to be protected by 2030.

At the recent Overseas Territories Joint Ministerial Council, territory leaders pledged to work with the UK to secure an ambitious agreement to tackle climate change at COP26. By the time of the Summit, each territory government will have endeavoured to communicate their plan for climate change adaptation and mitigation, which will contribute towards global carbon emission reductions. The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy plans to consult with the territories on the extension of the Paris Agreement and the UK's Nationally Determined Contribution to cover their emissions.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
17th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether he will maintain the UK funding commitments to the UN Global Fund at an equivalent percentage and real-terms value.

In his statement to the House on 26 November 2020, the Foreign Secretary noted that the UK will maintain our position as a world leader, including by investing in the Global Fund to Fight Aids, TB & Malaria. The UK is the second largest donor to the current replenishment of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. Global health is a high priority for the Government. To maximise the Government's strategic focus in the use of ODA this year, the Foreign Secretary will run a short cross-Government process to review, appraise and finalise all of the UK's ODA allocations across all departments. It is the Government's intention to conclude this process as soon as possible, with the outcome communicated to the departments concerned. We will maintain our position as a world leader, investing in the GAVI Vaccine Alliance, COVAX, the Global Fund for Aids, TB and Malaria, and the International Finance Facility for Immunisation.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
17th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what steps he is taking to make the UK is a global leader in the development of new HIV vaccines, diagnostics and treatments.

The UK remains a world leader in efforts to end the AIDS epidemic, including through our investment in the Global Fund to fight AIDS, TB and Malaria.

In 2018 alone the Global Fund provided 18.9 million people with antiretroviral therapy. This investment is complemented by a wider portfolio of programmes and research, including our 20-year agreement with Unitaid. Unitaid's work has enabled great advancements in HIV diagnostics and treatment at affordable costs, such as reducing the price of portable advanced HIV tests to less than $4, and developing long-acting injectable antiretroviral treatments for HIV.

We are also the second largest government supporter of product development research to improve the health of the most vulnerable in the poorest countries. This support includes funding to the International Partnership for Microbicides, which is developing women-initiated HIV prevention methods. One of the most advanced products is a one-month Dapivirine vaginal ring, which has recently received World Health Organisation prequalification.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
17th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how much funding the Government disbursed (a) bilaterally and (b) multilaterally on HIV/AIDS prevention, treatment and research in each of the last five years.

  • a) FCDO bilateral funding on HIV/AIDS prevention, treatment and research over the last five years was as follows:

£23 million in 2015

£17 million in 2016

£13 million in 2017

£11 million in 2018

£9 million in 2019

  • b) FCDO multilateral funding on HIV/AIDS prevention, treatment, research over the last five years was as follows:

£65 million in 2015

£15 million in 2016

£199 million in 2017

£190 million in 2018

£232 million in 2019

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
17th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what additional funding arrangements he has established for the UK Overseas Territories following the end of the transition period on 31 December 2020.

The UK Government is fully committed to supporting the Overseas Territories. The end of the transition period affects each territory in different ways. We will continue to work with the territories to understand funding needs and the right balance of OT and UK spending in support of these needs.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
17th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what the value was of UK disbursements to the UN World Food Programme to each country destination in each of the last 24 months.

The World Food Programme (WFP) remains one of the UK's most important humanitarian partners. We are part of the agency's governance system, the Executive Board, and in 2019 we were the agency's 3rd largest government donor.

Our partnership is particularly important in the context of the FCDO Famine Initiative, given the agency's mandate in food security and food assistance, and increasing global need. The essential work of WFP is more crucial now than ever.

WFP publishes a breakdown of each donor's funding on their website, accessible at https://www.wfp.org/funding.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
17th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how many UK representatives have been elected to UN Human Rights Treaty Bodies and Institutions in each of the last 10 years.

The UK places great importance on the work of UN Human Rights Treaty Monitoring Bodies and institutions. While members of Treaty Monitoring Bodies are nominated by a State Party, they serve on their respective committees as independent experts. In 2010, Patrick Thornberry was elected to the Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination. In 2012, Diane Mulligan was elected to the Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities; Sir Nigel Rodley was elected to the Human Rights Committee; and Sir Malcolm Evans was elected to the Sub-committee on the Prevention of Torture. In 2016, Sir Malcolm Evans was again elected to the Sub-committee on the Prevention of Torture. The UK was elected to the UN Human Rights Council in 2013, 2016 and 2020.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
17th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, if he will list the total Official Development Assistance out-turn to (a) Democratic Republic of Congo, (b) Ethiopia, (c) Burkina Faso, (d) South Sudan, (e) Mozambique, (f) Nigeria, (g) Somalia, (h) Sudan, (i) Malawi, (j) Sierra Leone and (k) Mali in each of the last 24 months.

The Statistics on International Development (SID) National Statistics report, published on the GOV.UK website, provides an overview of all official UK spend on Official Development Assistance (ODA). UK bilateral aid to the countries listed is detailed in a specific SID table - "Table A4a: Total UK Bilateral ODA by country - Africa". UK multilateral aid to the countries listed is detailed in "Table A10: Imputed UK Share of Multilateral Net ODA by Country". Details of multilateral aid by country are currently only available up to the year 2018.

UK ODA figures for 2020 will be published in Autumn 2021, via Statistics on International Development: Final UK Aid Spend 2020.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
17th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how many officials in his Department were assigned to the Stabilisation Unit on a (a) full- time and (b) part-time basis in each of the last five years.

The Stabilisation Unit (SU) is a cross-government unit that provides expertise to build stability, prevent conflict and meet security challenges internationally. The SU was hosted on a DFID platform until September 2020, when it became part of FCDO. Stabilisation Unit staff numbers employed on a full and part time basis from 2015 to 2020 are as follows:

Stabilisation Unit - total

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

Full time staff

104

112

131

161

157

156

Part time staff

FCDO (as of Sept 2020)

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

Full time staff

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

95

Part time staff

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

DFID staff

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

Full time staff

58

59

74

87

100

N/A

Part time staff

less than 5

N/A

*Note:

  • Staff from other Government departments, serving military, police and secondees make up the totality of SU staff numbers.
  • The figures presented are not in the public domain, but are not considered sensitive.
Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
17th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how many ODA-funded projects were assessed according to the OSJA guidance in each of the last 24 months; and how many of those were approved by Ministers.

The Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs does not hold centrally a record of the number of times Offical Development Assistance funded projects have been assessed according to the Overseas Security and Justice Assistance guidance and how many of these have been approved by Ministers.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
17th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how much CDC has allocated to fossil-fuel projects in each of the last five years; and what the value is of planned allocations for the next five years.

CDC has published its complete portfolio of energy investments as held at 31 December 2019, with details including the start date of each investment and the total amount committed - https://assets.cdcgroup.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/11174306/Fossil-Fuels-and-Renewables-portfolio-as-at-31-December-2019-pdf.pdf.

For future investments, CDC has published its fossil fuel policy to align with the Government's new approach.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what the DFID Sierra Leone budget was for 2020-21; and what the reduction is in that budget as a result of his 22 July 2020 announcement of a £2.9 billion reduction in the overall aid budget.

Revised ODA allocations for 2020/21 will be published by HM Treasury at Autumn Budget.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what the DFID Somalia budget was for 2020-21; and what the reduction is in that budget as a result of his 22 July 2020 announcement of a £2.9 billion reduction in the overall aid budget.

Revised ODA allocations for 2020/21 will be published by HM Treasury at Autumn Budget.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what the DFID Uganda budget was for 2020-21; and what the reduction is in that budget as a result of his 22 July 2020 announcement of a £2.9 billion reduction in the overall aid budget.

Revised ODA allocations for 2020/21 will be published by HM Treasury at Autumn Budget.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what the DFID Sahel budget was for 2020-21; and what the reduction is in that budget as a result of his 22 July 2020 announcement of a £2.9 billion reduction in the overall aid budget.

Revised ODA allocations for 2020/21 will be published by HM Treasury at Autumn Budget.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what the DFID Sudan budget was for 2020-21; and what the reduction is in that budget as a result of his 22 July 2020 announcement of a £2.9 billion reduction in the overall aid budget.

Revised ODA allocations for 2020/21 will be published by HM Treasury at Autumn Budget.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what was DFID Zimbabwe budget was for 2020-21; and what the reduction is in that budget as a result of his 22 July 2020 announcement of a £2.9 billion reduction in the overall aid budget.

Revised ODA allocations for 2020/21 will be published by HM Treasury at Autumn Budget.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what the DFID Zambia budget was for 2020-21; and what the reduction is in that budget as a result of his 22 July 2020 announcement of a £2.9 billion reduction in the overall aid budget.

Revised ODA allocations for 2020/21 will be published by HM Treasury at Autumn Budget.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what the DFID Tanzania budget was for 2020-21; and what the reduction is in that budget as a result of his 22 July 2020 announcement of a £2.9 billion reduction in the overall aid budget.

Revised ODA allocations for 2020/21 will be published by HM Treasury at Autumn Budget.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what the DFID South Sudan budget was for 2020-21; and what the reduction is in that budget as a result of his 22 July 2020 announcement of a £2.9 billion reduction in the overall aid budget.

Revised ODA allocations for 2020/21 will be published by HM Treasury at Autumn Budget.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what the DFID Africa regional budget was for 2020-21; and what the reduction is in that budget as a result of his 22 July 2020 announcement of a £2.9 billion reduction in the overall aid budget.

Revised ODA allocations for 2020/21 will be published by HM Treasury at Autumn Budget.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what was the total budget for financial year 2020-21 for DFID Ghana aid programme; and what effect his announcement of 22 July on cuts to aid budgets has had on the proposed spend of the programme.

Revised ODA allocations for 2020/21 will be published by HM Treasury at Autumn Budget.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what was the total budget for financial year 2020-21 for DFID Ethiopia aid programme; and what effect his announcement of 22 July on cuts to aid budgets has had on the proposed spend of the programme.

Revised ODA allocations for 2020/21 will be published by HM Treasury at Autumn Budget.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what was the total budget for financial year 2020-21 for the DFID DRC aid programme; and what estimate has been made of the effect of his announcement on 22 July of cuts to the aid budget of £2.9 billion on the DFID DRC proposed spend.

Revised ODA allocations for 2020/21 will be published by HM Treasury at Autumn Budget.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what the DFID Rwanda budget was for 2020-21; and what the reduction is in that budget as a result of his 22 July 2020 announcement of a £2.9 billion reduction in the overall aid budget.

Revised ODA allocations for 2020/21 will be published by HM Treasury at Autumn Budget.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what was the total budget for financial year 2020-21 for DFID Mozambique aid programme; and what effect his announcement of 22 July on cuts to aid budgets has had on the proposed spend of the programme.

Revised ODA allocations for 2020/21 will be published by HM Treasury at Autumn Budget.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what the DFID Nigeria budget was for 2020-21; and what the reduction is in that budget as a result of his 22 July 2020 announcement of a £2.9 billion reduction in the overall aid budget.

Revised ODA allocations for 2020/21 will be published by HM Treasury at Autumn Budget.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what was the total budget for financial year 2020-21 for DFID Liberia aid programme; and what effect his announcement of 22 July on cuts to aid budgets has had on the proposed spend of the programme.

Revised ODA allocations for 2020/21 will be published by HM Treasury at Autumn Budget.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what was the total budget for financial year 2020-21 for DFID Malawi aid programme; and what effect his announcement of 22 July on cuts to aid budgets has had on the proposed spend of the programme.

Revised ODA allocations for 2020/21 will be published by HM Treasury at Autumn Budget.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
20th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what representations (a) he has and (b) officials of his Department have made to the Government of Bahrain on abolishing the death penalty in that country in the last 12 months.

The UK strongly opposes the death penalty in all countries and in all circumstances, as a matter of principle. We regularly raise our concerns about the use of the death penalty with the Bahraini authorities using a range of Ministerial and diplomatic channels. The Government of Bahrain is well aware of the UK's opposition to use of the death penalty.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
20th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what representations (a) he has and (b) officials of his Department have made to the Government of China on abolishing the death penalty in that country in the last 12 months.

Recent discussions with the Chinese authorities in China on human rights have focused on the situation in Xinjiang and Hong Kong, which the Foreign Secretary has raised directly with his Chinese counterpart. However, we have urged the Chinese authorities on many occasions to reduce their use of capital punishment, in line with global trends. The UK Government opposes the death penalty in all circumstances as a matter of principle.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
20th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what representations (a) he has and (b) officials of his Department have made to the Government of Saudi Arabia on abolishing the death penalty in that country in the last 12 months.

The UK strongly opposes the death penalty in all countries and in all circumstances, as a matter of principle. This is especially the case for juveniles and for crimes other than the most serious. This is in line with the provisions of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and the Arab Charter on Human Rights. We regularly raise our concerns about use of the death penalty with the Saudi Arabian authorities. We utilise a range of Ministerial and diplomatic channels, including our Ambassador and British Embassy officials in Riyadh. I raised the death penalty with Dr Awwad al Awwad, President of Saudi Arabia's Human Rights Commission during my virtual visit in July. The Minister for human rights, Lord Ahmad, raised the death penalty in a call with Dr Awwad in June and raised a range of human rights concerns during his visit last September. The Foreign Secretary raised human rights during his visit in March this year. In February, the Saudi Deputy Justice Minister, HE Abdullah Al Sulaimi, visited the UK. My predecessor raised the death penalty with him, as did our officials. The UK Ambassador to Saudi Arabia raised the death penalty with Dr Awwad al Awwad in February.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
20th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what representations (a) he has and (b) officials of his Department have made to the Government of Iraq on abolishing the death penalty in that country in the last 12 months.

It remains a long-standing policy of the United Kingdom to oppose the death penalty in all circumstances as a matter of principle. The Government of Iraq is well aware of our position on this issue, which officials have regularly reiterated in the past 12 months, both in direct discussions and in multilateral fora such as the UN Human Rights Council.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
20th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what representations (a) he has and (b) officials of his Department have made to the Government of Egypt on abolishing the death penalty in that country in the last 12 months.

It remains a long-standing policy of the United Kingdom to oppose the death penalty in all circumstances as a matter of principle. We continue to make our position clear to the Egyptian authorities, including in our Advanced Questions to Egypt during its Universal Periodic Review at the UN Human Rights Council in November 2019.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
23rd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what representations he has made to the Government of Zimbabwe on allegations of maltreatment and abduction of opposition activists Cecilia Chimbiri, Netsai Marowa, and Joana Mamombe MP; and what recent assessment he has made of the political situation in that country.

As I said in the House on 11 May, I had been an optimist on Zimbabwe post-Mugabe, but things are bleak across the political, economic, social and humanitarian fronts.

The UK is particularly concerned about the challenging human rights situation. I spoke to the Zimbabwean Foreign Minister on 8 June and expressed my deep concern regarding recent reports of the abduction and torture of Cecilia Chimbiri, Netsai Marowa, and Joana Mamombe. I urged the Foreign Minister to ensure the Government of Zimbabwe makes concrete progress on human rights, including investigations into violations.

It is vital that the Zimbabwean authorities adhere to their international human rights obligations and respect their Constitution, which prohibits enforced disappearances and cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment. This was reiterated in a joint local statement issued on 20 May by the UK alongside other partners, including Ambassadors from the European Union, France, Germany and the United States of America. The UK will continue to monitor developments in Zimbabwe closely and call for the Government of Zimbabwe to uphold the rule of law and respect human rights.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
23rd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what assessment he has made of the (a) political and human rights situation in the Republic of Guinea and (b) the effect of the covid-19 pandemic on that country.

The UK Government is concerned by the deteriorating human rights and political environment in Guinea and the demonstrations that have led to violence in recent months. On 27 February, I set out the UK Government's deep concern over the violence and civilian deaths, following the announcement of legislative elections in Guinea and in the lead up to the referendum on the constitution. The elections and referendum were then postponed until 22 March. We urge the Government of Guinea to respect democratic institutions and all forms of human rights, including the right to peaceful protest. It was deeply saddening that there was a further loss of life on the day the election and referendum were held in Guinea. The UK has urged the Government of Guinea to ensure that all deaths are properly investigated. We encourage all parties, the Government and the Opposition, to engage in constructive dialogue, refrain from violence and protect democracy.

We continue to raise our concerns with representatives of the Government of Guinea, through our Ambassador in Conakry, on civic and political issues including the importance of respect for the rule of law, and the need for elections to be free and fair. The UK will continue to work with the Government of Guinea, international partners and regional institutions both to support Guinea's democracy and stability and to improve the day-to-day lives of all Guineans.

The elections took place against the challenging context of the COVID-19 pandemic. We are working with the Government of Guinea to support them in their own response to COVID-19. To support the people of Guinea, we are funding a programme of mass media communications to increase the public's awareness and understanding of the pandemic, and we have offered the Government of Guinea technical assistance in responding to the economic impacts of COVID-19.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what assessment he has made of recent trends in the level of violence and terrorist attacks in Burkina Faso; and what steps the Government is taking to help ensure security in that region.

The UK is deeply concerned by the ongoing reports of terrorist violence in Burkina Faso and the tragic consequences for the population. The number of displaced people due to instability continues to rise. As of April this year, over 800,000 people were recorded as displaced in Burkina Faso. The UK condemns the violence and is committed to working with all partners, including the G5 Sahel countries, to support those most in need and tackle the long-term drivers of instability in the region. In February, I attended the first meeting of the Sahel Alliance General Assembly and G5 Leaders' Summit, where I reaffirmed the UK's commitment to improved security and increased development in the Sahel.

We are also deeply concerned by reports of abuses and violations of human rights in Burkina Faso, including by armed groups and the Burkinabe security forces. We welcome the Government of Burkina Faso's commitment to investigate recent abuses and hold those responsible to account.

The UK is supporting the security response across the Sahel region, including in Burkina Faso, through non-combat assistance to the French-led counter-terrorism mission Operation BARKHANE, in the form of three CH47 chinook helicopters. The UK is committed to helping the G5 Sahel Joint Force reach full operational capability. Bilateral funding has gone towards the provision of non-lethal military equipment and support for the human rights compliance framework. The UK is also supporting Burkina Faso by providing life-saving humanitarian assistance to those affected by the crisis. Over £23 million of UK humanitarian aid will go to Burkina Faso between 2019 and 2021, including to help tackle food insecurity and treat acute malnutrition. We are also funding a number of programmes that help provide access to education in emergencies and support women's sexual and reproductive health.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what discussions he has had with his counterpart in the Falkland Islands on the effect of the (a) covid-19 pandemic and (b) negotiations for the UK's future relationship with the EU on the (i) economy, (ii) wool industry and (iii) fishing industry in that Overseas Territory.

The UK Government is firmly committed to supporting the Falkland Islands and all of the Overseas Territories in dealing with Covid-19. The Foreign and Commonwealth Office, Ministry of Defence and the Department for International Development are leading a cross-Whitehall effort to provide bespoke support to the Territories. For the Falkland Islands specifically, the UK has procured and transported medical supplies, ventilators and oxygen generation facilities, as well as the necessary equipment to develop an on-island testing capability. This has been supported by facilitating access to UK medical expertise through Public Health England. To support the Falkland civilian population and the British military base on the islands, a military clinical team of six personnel has also been sent to the main hospital on the islands.

Economic management is devolved to the Falkland Island Government, who have put various measures in place to support their economy through the crisis. Fishing has been mostly unaffected thanks to the conclusion of the season before the peak of the virus, and the Falkland Island Government has offered to buy any unsold wool this year at pre-crisis prices. In addition, a local business support package has been put in place, modelled on the UK package.

I am in regular contact with the political leaders of the Falkland Islands to understand the impact the virus is having on both public health and the economy, to ensure they are receiving support from the UK where needed.

We are seeking a comprehensive Free Trade Agreement with the EU and want to have the greatest possible tariff and barrier-free trade with our European neighbours. We have been engaging closely with the Falkland Islands on their interests in these negotiations and have been representing these robustly in negotiations.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what assessment he has made of the (a) freedom, (b) fairness and (c) effectiveness of other elements of the conduct of the recent presidential election in Burundi.

The UK notes irregularities reported by observers during the elections in Burundi on 20 May and remains concerned by reports of violence against political party members during the electoral period. Election day itself was broadly peaceful, which we have welcomed. We have taken note of the provisional presidential and parliamentary results and await the outcome of legal challenge by the opposition. We continue to call on all parties to resolve electoral disputes through legal mechanisms and to ensure a peaceful post-electoral environment.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
20th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, whether he has made representations to his Nigerian counterpart on the arrest of the President of the Humanist Association of Nigeria, Mubarak Bala.

The UK Government, along with international partners, is monitoring the arrest of Mubarak Bala closely. The Nigerian authorities are yet to confirm the charges against Mr Bala. I raised Mr Bala's case with the Nigerian Minister of Foreign Affairs during our call on 21 May. Our High Commission in Abuja is discussing the case with the Nigerian Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Police.

The Prime Minister's Special Envoy for Freedom of Religion or Belief, Rehman Chishti MP, is also personally looking into Mr Bala's case on an urgent basis, and has raised this matter with international counterparts. On 6 May, Mr Chishti spoke with the Chief Executive of Humanists UK and stressed the UK's engagement on this case. The Minister of State responsible for Human Rights, Lord (Tariq) Ahmad of Wimbledon, also discussed Mr Bala's case with the Chief Executive on 20 May.

We will continue to stress the importance of a transparent investigation that respects Mr Bala's human rights, the rule of law, and the Nigerian constitutional right to freedom of religion or belief. Defending freedom of religion or belief for all remains a UK policy priority and we will continue to use our voice internationally to protect this human right, championed by Mr Chishti.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
18th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what representations he has made to his Ethiopian counterpart on that country's change to its asylum policy in January 2020 towards Eritrean refugees.

The UK Government is concerned about the recent changes in Ethiopia's status determination procedures for asylum seekers. We have sought a dialogue with the Government of Ethiopia (GoE) on its changes so that we can discuss how they will be delivered and the implications for those fleeing from Eritrea and elsewhere. Through our £170 million refugee and migration programme in Ethiopia (2016-2023), the UK is a leading donor to the refugee response in Ethiopia and plays a proactive role in the coordination of the refugee response alongside UN agencies, other donors and the GoE.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
18th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what assessment his Department has made of the location of 20 people arrested by the Eritrean security forces in November 2019 in the Mendefera and Adi Quala areas in the Southern Zone of the State of Eritrea.

We are aware of reports that at least 20 Muslim males, including local businessmen, religious teachers and community leaders, were arrested in Mendefera and Adi Quala on 28 November by Eritrean security forces. It is difficult for diplomatic staff to verify such reports given the lack of free media reporting in Eritrea and Eritrean Government restrictions on internal travel by diplomats.

Eritrea remains a priority country for the FCO in our annual human rights reporting, and we will continue to monitor the situation there. We regularly raise our concerns about human rights in Eritrea with their Government and in international fora. On 26 February, the UK's International Ambassador for Human Rights delivered a statement during the 43rd Session of the Human Rights Council expressing concern at continuing human rights abuses; she welcomed Eritrean acceptance of Universal Periodic Review recommendations with an offer to support their implementation, and called for the UN Special Rapporteur to be allowed to visit Eritrea.

During visits to Eritrea, the FCO's Head of East Africa Department, in November 2019, and the Home Office International Director, in February 2020, both raised human rights issues with senior members of the Eritrean government, including Freedom of Expression and National Service. In April our Ambassador in Asmara raised the prospect of releasing prisoners given their increasing risk of infection from Covid-19 with the President's chief political adviser, Yemane Gebreab.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
27th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, how many UK Embassy and High Commission staff throughout Africa are unavailable to work at post due to health or logistical effects of the covid-19 pandemic.

In response to the covid-19 pandemic, as of 29 April we have temporarily withdrawn 95 FCO staff, and 235 staff from other Government Departments, from Posts in our Africa network, where the risk warrants it. These staff are continuing to work remotely from outside the country of their deployment, either supporting Post or carrying out wider COVID-19 work. Posts continue to carry out essential work, including providing 24/7 consular assistance and support to British people overseas.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
27th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what support the Government is providing to help the UK Overseas Territories respond to the (a) health, (b) economic, (c) logistical and (d) transport effects of the covid-19 pandemic.

The UK Government is firmly committed to supporting the Overseas Territories in dealing with Covid-19. The Foreign and Commonwealth Office and the Department for International Development are leading a cross Whitehall effort, working closely with the Overseas Territories governments. The Minister for the Overseas Territories and Sustainable Development is in regular contact with the political leaders and Governors of the Territories. The impact of the pandemic in the Territories varies, and our support is being calibrated accordingly.

In the areas where it is needed, we are providing support to strengthen territories' public health systems, through provision of essential medical supplies, equipment and personnel. We are also working with partners to maintain lifeline transport routes. The Government has organised flights to enable British nationals to return to the UK from the Overseas Territories, and to enable a number of?British nationals in the UK to return to their?homes?in the territories. The flights also carried medical equipment to the territories.

Just as the UK is doing, we are looking to Overseas Territories to make full use of their financial resources in order to address the needs of their people. Requests for further support to complement comprehensive local economic response plans are being considered on a needs basis. In the Territories which are in receipt of financial assistance from DFID, the UK Government will continue to provide the support needed to ensure delivery of essential services and to protect their economies.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
27th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what recent discussions he has had with the (a) UN Human Rights Council and (b) UN High Commissioner for Human Rights on the effects of the covid-19 pandemic.

On 9 April, the UK and other UN member states participated in the UN Human Rights Council's first ever virtual conversation with Michelle Bachelet, UN High Commissioner for Human Rights. Discussion focused on the human rights implications of the COVID-19 crisis; both the immediate impact of the response on human rights around the world, and the social and economic consequences, including the prospect of greater inequality. The UK stressed the importance of ensuring that measures to tackle the crisis be proportionate, time-bound, transparent and regularly reviewed. Since the outbreak of the pandemic, the UK Mission to the UN in Geneva has continued to engage regularly with the High Commissioner and with other senior leaders in her office. The UK supports all efforts by the UN to minimise long-term damage to global economies, societies, politics and freedoms.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
27th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, how many Government assistance programmes were assessed against the Overseas Security and Justice Assistance guidelines in each of the last five years.

The Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) updated its guidance on Overseas Security and Justice Assistance (OSJA) in 2017 by written ministerial statement. Since then, information on its implementation has been included in the FCO's Annual Human Rights and Democracy Report. Information on the number of programmes that have drawn on the OSJA guidance and a more detailed breakdown of assessments identifying specific forms of human rights risks, is not held centrally nor readily available. Any technical assistance we provide is kept under regular review to ensure it is in line with international standards, and fully complies with our human rights obligations and the Overseas Security and Justice Assistance process.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
27th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, how many Overseas Security and Justice Assistance assessments of proposed Government assistance in each of the last five years raised concerns about (a) death penalty policies, (b) torture and (c) extra-judicial killings.

The Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) updated its guidance on Overseas Security and Justice Assistance (OSJA) in 2017 by written ministerial statement. Since then, information on its implementation has been included in the FCO's annual Human Rights and Democracy Report. Information on the number of programmes that have drawn on the OSJA guidance and a more detailed breakdown of assessments identifying specific forms of human rights risks, is not held centrally nor readily available. Any technical assistance we provide is kept under regular review to ensure it is in line with international standards, and fully complies with our human rights obligations and the Overseas Security and Justice Assistance process.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
22nd Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what assessment he has made of the level of risk of militants linked to (a) Al-Shabaab, (b) Al-Qaeda and (c) Boko Haram taking advantage of the disruption caused by the covid-19 pandemic to commit terrorist actions targeting civilian or military personnel across Africa.

We are deeply concerned by the recent reported attacks on civilian and military personnel across Africa by Al-Shabaab, Al-Qaeda and Boko Haram. It continues to be our assessment that these groups represent a serious threat to security and stability in Africa, including in the face of the Covid-19 pandemic. We are monitoring closely the risk that militants could seek to take advantage of this unprecedented global health challenge to carry out terrorist attacks. We continue to keep our Travel Advice under close review, to ensure that we are giving British Nationals still in Africa the best possible advice about the threat.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
22nd Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, how many charter flights the Government has commissioned to repatriate UK citizens stranded in African countries since the start of the covid-19 pandemic, by location.

The British Government is working with the airline industry and host governments across the world to help bring back British travellers to the UK as part of the plan announced by the Foreign Secretary on 30 March - with up to £75 million available for special charter flights to priority countries, focused on helping the most vulnerable travellers. We have run 21 charter flights from Africa from seven different countries which include Ghana, Tunisia, Algeria, South Africa, Nigeria, Sierra Leone and Gambia.

The welfare of British nationals remains our top priority, and we remain committed to ensuring that British travellers around the globe are able to return home.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
25th May 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what discussions he has had with the Welsh Government since the Senedd elections on (a) Barnett consequentials of fire safety remediation funds announced by his Department and (b) the design and operation of new taxes and levies related to fire and building safety.

The Welsh and UK governments regularly discuss a range of policy issues.

As part of the cladding remediation package announced by the UK Government this year the devolved administrations will receive additional funding through the Barnett formula at future fiscal events and spending reviews, except where new departmental spending is funded by an England-only levy.

Steve Barclay
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
10th Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government's oral statement of 10 February 2021 on Building Safety, what the Barnett consequential will be for the (a) Welsh Government and (b) other devolved administrations.

The Secretary of State for the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government made an oral statement to the House of Commons on building safety on 10 February 2021.

The devolved administrations will receive additional funding through the Barnett formula at future fiscal events and spending reviews, except where new departmental spending is funded by an England-only levy. The devolved administrations can implement their own levies should they choose to do so.

Kemi Badenoch
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
18th May 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps he has taken to support people who are paid a substantial part of their income via commission and have lost that income as a result of the covid-19 outbreak where that income is not covered as part of the calculation for payments under the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme.

The objective of the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme is to enable employers to keep people in employment. To achieve this, the grants compensate employers for the payments that they are contractually obliged to make, in order to avoid the need for redundancies. Covering discretionary payments, for example commission, would go beyond the objectives of the scheme.

The Government recognises that for some employees, the pay in scope for this emergency grant package will be less than the overall sum they usually receive. The Government is supporting people on low incomes who need to rely on the welfare system through a significant package of temporary measures. This includes a £20 per week increase to the Universal Credit standard allowance and Working Tax Credit basic element, and a nearly £1 billion increase in support for renters through increases to the Local Housing Allowance rates for Universal Credit and Housing Benefit claimants. These changes will benefit new and existing claimants. Anyone can check their eligibility and apply for Universal Credit by visiting https://www.gov.uk/universal-credit.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
13th May 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many people have received support through the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme in (a) Cardiff and (b) Vale of Glamorgan in each week since that scheme commenced; and how much has been paid out to those claimants during that period.

Applications for the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS) opened on Monday 20th April. By close 11 May 2020, 935,000 employers had submitted claims to HMRC representing 7.5m furloughed employments and £10.1bn. This is a new scheme and HMRC are currently working through the analysis they will be able to provide based on the data available. HMRC will make the timescales for publication and the types of data available in due course.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
1st May 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether he plans to provide support in the form of loans to the steel sector during the covid-19 outbreak.

Since the outbreak, the government has announced a comprehensive package of support for businesses and workers to protect them against the current economic emergency. The Coronavirus Large Business Interruption Loan Scheme will provide a government guarantee of 80% to enable banks to make loans up to £25m to viable firms with a turnover of between £45m and £250m per annum, and loans of up to £50m to viable firms with a turnover over £250m.

This support complements the unprecedented help available for businesses including the CCFF, tax deferrals, the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, and covering the cost of statutory sick pay. These measures have also resulted in more than £6.8 billion of funding being allocated to the devolved administrations to deal with Covid 19.

Prior to Covid 19, the government had already begun to take wide-ranging action to support the UK steel industry, including compensation for energy costs, supporting innovation and clean steel production – through the £315m Industrial Energy Transformation Fund and £250m Clean Steel Fund, and working with the industry to introduce steel procurement guidance.

Kemi Badenoch
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
27th Apr 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the consequential funding is for Wales as a result of the announcement of 8 April 2020 of £750 million for charities, voluntary sector organisations and the social enterprise sector; and on what date that funding was confirmed to the Welsh Government.

The UK government is applying the Barnett formula in the normal way to the additional funding for charities announced by the Chancellor.

The devolved administrations are receiving £60 million as a result of funding provided to the National Lottery Communities Fund from the charities pot. This means £30m for the Scottish Government, £18m for the Welsh Government and £10m for the Northern Ireland Executive, as confirmed on the day of the announcement.

Further Barnett allocations will be provided in relation to the £360m direct grant pot. The UK government has agreed to provide Hospices UK with up to £200m from this pot to support hospices in England. The devolved administrations will therefore receive up to £38m in Barnett consequentials on this element of the pot. This means up to £19m for the Scottish Government, £12m for the Welsh Government and £7m for the Northern Ireland Executive. Further consequentials are dependent on the final proposals funded from this pot so will be communicated shortly.

The UK government has so far announced almost £7 billion in Covid-19 Barnett consequentials to the devolved administrations to support people, business and public services in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

Steve Barclay
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
27th Apr 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether there is consequential funding for Wales as a result of the announcement of £750 million for charities, voluntary sector organisations and the social enterprise sector; and how much funding will be allocated to the charity hospice sector in Wales.

The UK government is applying the Barnett formula in the normal way to the additional funding for charities announced by the Chancellor.

The devolved administrations are receiving £60 million as a result of funding provided to the National Lottery Communities Fund from the charities pot. This means £30m for the Scottish Government, £18m for the Welsh Government and £10m for the Northern Ireland Executive, as confirmed on the day of the announcement.

Further Barnett allocations will be provided in relation to the £360m direct grant pot. The UK government has agreed to provide Hospices UK with up to £200m from this pot to support hospices in England. The devolved administrations will therefore receive up to £38m in Barnett consequentials on this element of the pot. This means up to £19m for the Scottish Government, £12m for the Welsh Government and £7m for the Northern Ireland Executive. Further consequentials are dependent on the final proposals funded from this pot so will be communicated shortly.

The UK government has so far announced almost £7 billion in Covid-19 Barnett consequentials to the devolved administrations to support people, business and public services in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

Steve Barclay
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
28th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 28 May 2020 to Question 41464 on UK Border Force and UK Visas and Immigration: Coronavirus; if she will publish the same data for each month from May 2020 to January 2021.

The attached table shows at column C the number of Border Force and UK Visas and Immigration employees who have been recorded as beginning a period of sickness absence due to COVID-19 symptoms.

Column D shows the number of employees recorded as beginning a period of isolation at home on paid special leave, either resulting from being identified as a close contact of someone with COVID-19 symptoms or because the employee themselves had been required to shield in line with Government guidance.

We do not hold data centrally on those employees who have mild symptoms and are well enough to continue to work from home, or who are isolating at home but are able to work from home and therefore do not need to take paid special leave.

We do not hold data centrally on the outcomes of COVID-19 testing of our employees.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
7th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what discussions she has had with social media and streaming platforms on the availability of violent gang and drug-related content to under 18s.

The Government is committed to delivering on the people’s priorities by tackling violent crime. We are clear that internet companies must go further and faster to tackle illegal content online. It is already an offence to incite, assist or encourage violence online.

We are proactively working with law enforcement agencies and meeting with social media companies to address a full range of online harms (including serious violence, gang and drug content online), as part of our wider aims set out in the Online Harms White Paper. The full Government response to the Online Harms White Paper will be published shortly. This?will set out our plans for a new legislative framework that will drive robust action to tackle the spread of illegal content online and to keep children safe.

The Government has invested significantly to tackle serious violence and county lines: £119million in 2020-21, including £20 million to tackle county lines drug dealing and £1.5million to fund the Social Media Hub, delivered by the Metropolitan Police Service. The Hub includes a dedicated team of police officers and staff to take action against harmful online material, focusing on investigative, disruption and enforcement work against online gang activity, as well as making referrals to social media companies so illegal and harmful content can be taken down.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
24th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the extent of the use of the messaging platform Telegram by far-right and extreme-right wing organisations to organise; and when she last made representations to representatives of that company on that matter.

The Government has been clear that tech companies need to work together and act more quickly to remove all forms of terrorist content from their platforms.

We know that terrorists and extremists exploit a wide range of platforms to spread their views and to incite terrorist attacks, from mainstream platforms to secure messaging applications and anonymous forums.

To tackle terrorism online, the Counter Terrorism Internet Referral Unit (CTIRU), based in the Metropolitan Police, refers illegal terrorist content to companies for removal. Within the Home Office, we work closely with our international partners and engage with industry colleagues to discuss how platforms can best safeguard their users from terrorism, while also encouraging tech companies work together as one coordinated body through the Global Internet Forum to Counter Terrorism (GIFCT), to reduce the availability of terrorist content online.

Details of meetings between Ministers and external bodies and organisations are provided through the usual quarterly returns published by the Cabinet Office.

James Brokenshire
Minister of State (Home Office)
24th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when she last met with representatives of (a) Facebook, (b) YouTube, (c) Twitter, (d) Telegram, (e) FourChan, (f) WhatsApp, (g) Instagram, (h) TikTok, and (i) Gab to discuss the steps those organisations are taking to (i) combat extremist material, (ii) remove material from proscribed organisations and (iii) remove other material linked to criminal activity in the UK from their platforms.

The Government has been clear that tech companies need to work together and act more quickly to remove all forms of terrorist content from their platforms.

We know that terrorists and extremists exploit a wide range of platforms to spread their views and to incite terrorist attacks, from mainstream platforms to secure messaging applications and anonymous forums.

To tackle terrorism online, the Counter Terrorism Internet Referral Unit (CTIRU), based in the Metropolitan Police, refers illegal terrorist content to companies for removal. Within the Home Office, we work closely with our international partners and engage with industry colleagues to discuss how platforms can best safeguard their users from terrorism, while also encouraging tech companies work together as one coordinated body through the Global Internet Forum to Counter Terrorism (GIFCT), to reduce the availability of terrorist content online.

Details of meetings between Ministers and external bodies and organisations are provided through the usual quarterly returns published by the Cabinet Office.

James Brokenshire
Minister of State (Home Office)
24th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the (a) security of and (b) use of by extremist, far-right and extreme-right organisations the platform Telegram.

The Government has been clear that tech companies need to work together and act more quickly to remove all forms of terrorist content from their platforms.

We know that terrorists and extremists exploit a wide range of platforms to spread their views and to incite terrorist attacks, from mainstream platforms to secure messaging applications and anonymous forums.

To tackle terrorism online, the Counter Terrorism Internet Referral Unit (CTIRU), based in the Metropolitan Police, refers illegal terrorist content to companies for removal. Within the Home Office, we work closely with our international partners and engage with industry colleagues to discuss how platforms can best safeguard their users from terrorism, while also encouraging tech companies work together as one coordinated body through the Global Internet Forum to Counter Terrorism (GIFCT), to reduce the availability of terrorist content online.

Details of meetings between Ministers and external bodies and organisations are provided through the usual quarterly returns published by the Cabinet Office.

James Brokenshire
Minister of State (Home Office)
24th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the activities of Sonnenkrieg Division, System Resistance Network, and National Action since their proscription.

The Government does not routinely comment on intelligence matters.

James Brokenshire
Minister of State (Home Office)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much her Department spent that was classified as Official Development Assistance in each of the last five years, and what the (a) individual projects or (b) budget headings were for that spending.

The Departments Official Development Assistance spend in each of the last two years is published at https://devtracker.dfid.gov.uk/department/HO we have recently updated that to include spend dating back to 2015/2016. It may take until June 12 for the update to be reflected on the website.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to immigration statistics published by her Department on 21 May 2020 showing that in January to March 2020 there were an estimated 23.7 million passenger arrivals at the UK Border (including returning UK residents), how many of those arrivals arrived after (a) 13 March 2020 and (b) 23 March 2020 by (i) method of arrival and (ii) origination of their journey.

On 28 May 2020, the Home Office published additional statistics relating to Covid-19 and the immigration system here. This contains information on the impact of COVID-19 on passenger arrivals, and includes data on the number of passengers arriving in the UK by air routes only.

The Home Office is due to publish the next quarterly Immigration Statistics on 27 August 2020. Information on future Home Office statistical release dates can be found in the ‘Research and statistics calendar’.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
20th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when her Department first appointed a Director of Official Development Assistance, and what the (a) salary and (b) job description is for that position.

Currently the Home Office does not have a dedicated Director of Official Development Assistance (ODA). The ODA work falls under the remit of the International Directorate, and the International Director.

A new role of Director of Official Development Assistance has been created, and the vacancy is live on the Civil Service jobs website. The closing deadline for this application is 17th June.

The role is to build and lead a new ODA Directorate for the Home Office and enact transformative change to focus the Department’s activities on strategic upstream interventions.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
19th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many times UK Border Force officials have requested assistance from Public Health England officials to deal with suspected cases of covid-19 at each UK Port of Entry in each of the last five months.

Border Force does not hold the detailed data requested.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
18th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when she plans to answer Questions 41463 and 41464 tabled by the hon. Member for Cardiff South and Penarth.

The responses to UIN 41463 was answered on 26th May 2020 and UIN 41464 was answered 28th May 2020.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
18th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people including crew members arrived at the UK border via (a) general aviation, (b) military airfields and (c) non-control point maritime ports of entry in each week from 1 January 2020 to 18 May 2020.

The Home Office does not routinely collect number of Passengers and crew members arriving at the UK Border at this level of detail.

The Immigration Statistics publication on the 21 May included data on total passenger arrivals, up to the end of March 2020. In addition, on 28 May, the Home Office published an ad hoc statistical release ‘Statistics relating to Covid-19 and the immigration system, May 2020’, which provided further information on the number of arrivals to the UK up to the end of April 2020.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
18th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many (a) flights of private non-scheduled aircraft and (b) individuals, including crew members, landed at UK airfields from 1 January 2020 to 18 May 2020; how many and what proportion of those flights were categorised as (i) private / general aviation, (ii) cargo, (iii) military and (iv) other; and what the five most common points of departure were for those flights.

I have been asked by the Department for Transport to respond to this question

Monitoring of flight traffic conducted by Eurocontrol shows that between 01 January 2020 and 30 April 2020 there were 14,225 aircraft arrivals at UK airports. An estimated categorisation of these aircraft arrivals based on Eurocontrol’s identification rules are provided in the table below. This data source does not provide information about the aircrafts’ point of departure or information about passengers or crew on board.

Aircraft category

Estimated proportion

Tradition Scheduled

27%

Low Cost

16%

Charter

9%

Business Aviation

25%

All-Cargo

10%

Military

3%

Other

9%

Information on passenger numbers are officially collected by the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) and received from applicable UK airports in adherence to statistical regulation (EC) 437/2003 on statistical returns in respect of the carriage of passengers, freight and mail by air. However, this data collection relates to commercial aircraft movements only.

James Brokenshire
Minister of State (Home Office)
13th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the evidence provided by the Chief Scientific Adviser to the Home Office to the Science and Technology Committee on 13 May 2020, if she will publish the full provisional management information on the number of arrivals at the UK border from 23 March 2020 to 13 May 2020.

The Home Office is due to publish the next quarterly Immigration Statistics on 21 May. In addition, an ad hoc statistical release ‘Statistics relating to Covid-19 and the immigration system, May 2020’ will be published on the 28 May.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
13th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate she has made of the (a) proportion and (b) number of people likely to have covid-19 that arrived in the UK from (i) Wuhan, China and (ii) Lombardy, Italy in each month since 1 January 2020.

On 23 March, SAGE advised that the effect of closing borders would have a negligible effect on spread of COVID-19, based on the fact that numbers of cases arriving from other countries were estimated to be insignificant in comparison with domestic cases, comprising approximately 0.5% of total domestic cases. The Home Office and SAGE have been keeping these figures under review. The numbers of passengers arriving in the UK are extremely small, and as such, there is uncertainty in any estimate at such a low level; however, we are confident that the percentage remains under 0.5% of total domestic cases.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
13th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the evidence provided to the Science and Technology Committee on 13 March, on what date advice from scientific modellers was first provided to (a) COBR, (b) the Prime Minister, (c) the Secretary of State for Health and (d) the Secretary of State for Transport on the likely incidence of covid-19 infection among travellers arriving at the UK Border; and on what dates any subsequent revision of those models was provided.

The modelling in question was done by SAGE. The Home Office cannot provide information on when SAGE advised (a) COBR, (b) the Prime Minister, (c) the Secretary of State for Health and (d) the Secretary of State for Transport.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
5th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, on what dates SAGE provided advice to Ministers on the potential effect of introducing restrictions at the UK borders on the spread of covid-19 in the UK.

The Home Office Chief Scientific Adviser is a participant in SAGE and regularly updates Home Office ministers on all aspects of SAGE relating to their departmental interests.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
5th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will publish the scientific assessment that informed the decision to (a) introduce formal quarantine measures for the flights from (i) Wuhan, China on (A) 31 January, (B) 2 February and (C) 9 February 2020 and (b) Tokyo, Japan on 22 February, and (b) not to introduce formal quarantine measures for other UK arrivals from 1 January 2020.

Scientific evidence from SAGE will continue to be published by Government Office for Science in due course.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
5th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, on what date SAGE first discussed the potential effect of introducing restrictions at the UK borders on the (a) rate of covid-19 infections in the UK and (b) ability of the NHS to respond to that rate; and whether SAGE reported the conclusions of those discussion to her.

The Home Office Chief Scientific Adviser is a participant in SAGE and regularly updates Home Office ministers on all aspects of SAGE relating to their departmental interests.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
5th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, which (a) Minister and (b) officials in her Department were provided with SAGE (a) advice and (b) modelling on the potential effect of introducing restrictions at the UK borders on the spread of covid-19 in the UK.

The Home Office Chief Scientific Adviser participates in SAGE and regularly updates Home Office ministers and officials on all aspects of SAGE relating to their departmental interests.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
5th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will publish the provisional management information on the number of arrivals at the UK border from 23 March to 5 May 2020.

The next Quarterly Immigration Statistics will be published on 21st May and Home Office statisticians are considering the additional information that can be provided as part of this national statistics publication, including data relating to the impact of Covid-19.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
1st May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many (a) staff members and (b) residents living in Home Office supported (i) asylum accommodation and (ii) detention facilities have (A) been tested and (B) tested positive for covid-19 since 1 January 2020.

The health of those in asylum accommodation and immigration removal centres (IRC) is of the utmost importance.

The Accommodation providers recognise the challenge of managing COVID 19 within our accommodation estate and are working closely with Public Health England (PHE) on how their guidance on social distancing and self-isolation is properly applied, while ensuring that people can continue to access essential services.

Any individual who has symptoms is able to be tested for covid 19. We do not currently publish figures in relation to the testing of asylum accommodation staff and our service users for Covid-19.

All immigration removal centres have dedicated health facilities run by doctors and nurses which are managed by the NHS or appropriate providers. The Home Office is working closely with NHS England health and justice teams and regional commissioning teams to support their planning and delivery of healthcare services, including testing, in immigration removal centres during the COVID-19 outbreak.

Provisional management information indicates that as of 21 June, there have been 12 confirmed cases of COVID-19 across our detention supplier, healthcare and escorting staff. All of whom have now recovered. In addition, there have been two confirmed cases of COVID-19 in detained individuals. A third individual was identified but after his release from detention had been agreed. Whilst in the IRC the individual was in isolation. He was released as there was no immediate prospect of removal.

As of 26 June, no other detained individuals have tested positive for COVID-19.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
29th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many individuals arrived at the UK border from (a) Spain, (b) China, (c) Italy, (d) USA, (e) Iran, (f) Turkey and (g) France in each week since 1 January 2020.

Border Force are unable to provide the arrival data requested, as it would require a manual review of thousands of records and this would be cost prohibitive.

Border Force are not responsible for making any medical assessments or medical interventions when dealing with individuals at the border.

Our approach to tackling coronavirus is and has always been driven by the latest scientific and medical advice, and procedures at the border have been strictly following the latest PHE guidance throughout.

In line with that advice, no changes have been required at the UK border.

To bolster public health measures already in place, passengers at airports are provided with information on symptoms and the social distancing processes.

Border Force continues to work collaboratively with devolved administrations, including Department of Health and Social Care, NHS England and Public Health England, to support the COVID 19 response.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
29th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many (a) UK Border Force and (b) UK Visas and Immigration staff have (i) had to self-isolate due to presenting symptoms and (ii) have tested positive for covid-19 in each week since 1 January 2020.

The attached table shows at column C the number of Border Force and UK Visas and Immigration employees who have been recorded as beginning a period of sickness absence due to COVID-19 symptoms.

Column D shows the number of employees recorded as beginning a period of isolation at home on paid special leave either because a member of their household has COVID-19 symptoms or because the employee themselves is vulnerable / extremely vulnerable to infection.

We do not hold data centrally on those employees who have mild symptoms and are well enough to continue to work from home, or who are isolating at home but are able to work from home and therefore do not need to take paid special leave.

We do not hold data centrally on the outcomes of COVID-19 testing of our employees.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
29th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether she registered a written or other objection to the decision by Public Health England to rescind the advice entitled COVID-19: specified countries and areas with implications for returning travellers or visitors arriving in the UK in the last 14 days, available on gov.uk until 13 March 2020.

Our approach to tackling coronavirus has been driven by the latest scientific and medical advice provided by the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) and Public Health England.

All decisions relating to international travel to the UK or on arrival at ports/airports have been made by Ministers across Government.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
29th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many (a) masks, (b) visors, (c) pairs of gloves and (d) other items of personal protective equipment were provided to (i) UK Border Force and (ii) UK Visas and Immigration staff for use in preventing the spread of covid-19 in each week since 1 January 2020.

Detailed Border Force record keeping commenced from 12th February when Public Health England (PHE) guidance for First Responders changed. Over 850,000 individual items of PPE have been provided to Border Force officers.

Border Force have also supplied a significant number of additional protective items/measures such as hand sanitizer & wipes which is not classed as PPE.

Since 1st March 2020 over 44,000 individual items of PPE have been provided to UKVI staff in customer facing roles along with thousands of protective measures such as hand sanitiser/antibacterial wipes. UKVI also currently have over 22,000 individual items of PPE on order.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
29th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people arriving at the UK Border from (a) Spain, (b) China, (c) Italy, (d) USA, (e) Iran, (f) Turkey and (g) France were taken to Government supported covid-19 quarantine centres in each week from 1 January 2020 to 23 March 2020; and how many of those people were required to remain at those quarantine centres for a defined period of time.

Individuals arriving from Wuhan and Tokyo were taken to Government supported isolation facilities.

On 31/01, a total of 83 passengers arrived in the UK on an evacuation flight arranged by the FCO from Wuhan. Upon arrival, these passengers were taken to an isolation facility at Arrowe Park, The Wirral, Merseyside.

On 02/02, a further 11 passengers arrived in the UK on a French led flight evacuation from Wuhan. These passengers were also taken to the isolation facility at Arrowe Park.

09/02, a total of 147 passengers arrived in the UK on a final evacuation flight arranged by the FCO from Wuhan. Upon arrival, these passengers were taken to an isolation facility at Kents Hill Park conference Centre in Milton Keynes. On this flight were an additional 104 passengers who were transferred onto further aircraft for onward travel to Germany, Italy and France.

On 22/02, a total of 32 passengers arrived in the UK on an evacuation flight arranged by the FCO from Tokyo. These passengers had been aboard the Diamond Princess cruise ship. Upon arrival, these passengers were taken to the isolation facility at Arrowe Park.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
29th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, from which countries or specific locations, individuals arriving in the UK from 1 January to 23 March 2020 were taken to Government supported covid-19 quarantine centres and required to remain there.

Individuals arriving from Wuhan and Tokyo were taken to Government supported isolation facilities.

On 31/01, a total of 83 passengers arrived in the UK on an evacuation flight arranged by the FCO from Wuhan. Upon arrival, these passengers were taken to an isolation facility at Arrowe Park, The Wirral, Merseyside.

On 02/02, a further 11 passengers arrived in the UK on a French led flight evacuation from Wuhan. These passengers were also taken to the isolation facility at Arrowe Park.

09/02, a total of 147 passengers arrived in the UK on a final evacuation flight arranged by the FCO from Wuhan. Upon arrival, these passengers were taken to an isolation facility at Kents Hill Park conference Centre in Milton Keynes. On this flight were an additional 104 passengers who were transferred onto further aircraft for onward travel to Germany, Italy and France.

On 22/02, a total of 32 passengers arrived in the UK on an evacuation flight arranged by the FCO from Tokyo. These passengers had been aboard the Diamond Princess cruise ship. Upon arrival, these passengers were taken to the isolation facility at Arrowe Park.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
29th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many individuals arriving at the UK border from (a) Spain, (b) China, (c) Italy, (d) USA, (e) Iran, (f) Turkey and (g) France were (i) assessed for symptoms of and (ii) tested for covid-19 in each week from 1 January to 23 March 2020.

Border Force are unable to provide the arrival data requested, as it would require a manual review of thousands of records and this would be cost prohibitive.

Border Force are not responsible for making any medical assessments or medical interventions when dealing with individuals at the border.

Our approach to tackling coronavirus is and has always been driven by the latest scientific and medical advice, and procedures at the border have been strictly following the latest PHE guidance throughout.

In line with that advice, no changes have been required at the UK border.

To bolster public health measures already in place, passengers at airports are provided with information on symptoms and the social distancing processes.

Border Force continues to work collaboratively with devolved administrations, including Department of Health and Social Care, NHS England and Public Health England, to support the COVID 19 response.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
29th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will publish scientific assessments provided to her Department on the efficacy of closing or restricting the UK border to people arriving at the UK Border from (a) Spain, (b) China, (c) Italy, (d) USA, (e) Iran, (f) Turkey and (g) France to prevent the spread of covid-19 in the UK from 1 January 2020 to 23 March 2020.

SAGE advice and reports in response to the Covid 19 outbreak will be published in accordance with requirements.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
5th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what additional resources have been provided to the Welsh Extremism and Counter Terrorism Unit to tackle extreme right-wing organisations in the last 12 months.

In 2020-21 the Government is increasing funding for counter-terrorism policing by £90m year-on-year, taking CT police funding for England and Wales to over £900m.

The Government is committed to supporting our superb police, security and intelligence agencies who work round the clock to keep us safe. Since March 2017, the police and the security and intelligence agencies have foiled 25 Terrorist plots, including eight extreme right-wing plots.

For security reasons we do not disclose the breakdown of counter-terrorism police funding to individual forces.

James Brokenshire
Minister of State (Home Office)
5th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many places of worship have received funding from her Department for additional safety and security measures by religious denomination in Wales in the last 12 months; and how much each such place of worship has received.

The Places of Worship Protective Security Fund (POW) is a key commitment in the Hate Crime Action Plan published in 2016. The Scheme provides funding to places of worship that have been victims of or are vulnerable to hate crime attacks and provides for physical protective measures such as alarms, fencing and access control. The fifth year of the scheme recently closed, and successful applicants will be announced in due course.

Funding in the region of £38,500 was allocated to one place of worship in Wales in year four (2019/2020). The scheme is open to places of worship across England and Wales, and we will continue to promote the scheme across Wales for future rounds of funding.

The Jewish Community Protective Security Grant was introduced in 2015 following a series of terrorist attacks against Jews and Jewish locations across Europe. For 2019-20 a grant of £14m was provided to fund additional protective security measures, primarily guarding, at Jewish state, free and independent schools, colleges, nurseries and some other Jewish community sites, including synagogues. A grant of £14m is to be provided in 2020-21. We do not keep a breakdown of funding by region.

Victoria Atkins
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
5th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what progress she has made on the proscription of (a) System Resistance Network, (b) Sonnenkrieg Division, (c) Atomwaffen Division and (d) other extreme right organisations.

Whilst we keep the list of proscribed groups under review, we do not routinely comment on whether an organisation is or is not under consideration for

proscription.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
5th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps the Government is taking to monitor UK citizens in prison in northern Syria who are believed to have been supporting or fighting with ISIS.

We recognise that the situation in northern Syria is fragile and complex. We are continuing to work closely with international partners and partners in the region to address issues associated with foreign terrorist fighters. It would not be appropriate to comment further on the monitoring of UK-linked individuals in detention in northern Syria.

The Government’s position remains that those who have fought for or supported Daesh should, wherever possible, face justice for their crimes in the most appropriate jurisdiction, which will often be in the region where their offences have been committed. Any decision in relation to the continued detention, transfer or prosecution of detainees is ultimately a matter for authorities under whose jurisdiction the individuals are detained or located.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
5th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many Terrorism Prevention and Investigation Measures were issued in each of the last 12 months.

Section 19(1) of the Terrorism Prevention and Investigation Measures Act 2011 (the Act) requires ?the Secretary of State to report to Parliament as soon as reasonably practicable after the end of every relevant three-month period on the exercise of her TPIM powers under the Act during that period. The report comments on the number of TPIMs that were in force at the end of the reporting period. For operational reasons we do not comment on the number of new TPIMs that were served.

The number of TPIMs in force in the last 12 months are recorded below:

Period

No of TPIMs in force at end of the period

1 December 2018 to 28 February 2019

4

1 March 2019 to 31 May 2019

4

1 June 2019 to 31 August 2019

3

1 September 2019 to 30 November 2019

5

The numbers of TPIMs in force for the period 1 December 2019 to 29 February 2020 will be published in March 2020.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
20th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the delayed Police Grant announcement for 2020-21, what steps she is taking to ensure Police and Crime Commissioners and Mayors are able to make precept announcements that comply with the Police Reform Act 2011.

The 2020-21 police funding settlement – including proposed precept referendum principles – was laid before the House on [Wednesday 22 January], allowing Police and Crime Commissioners and mayors to comply with the Police Reform Act 2011.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
20th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will publish her Department's proposals for the level of Police Grant for each police force in England and Wales.

The 2020-21 final Police Funding Settlement was laid before the House on [Wednesday 22 January] and includes details of Police Grant levels for each force in England and Wales.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
20th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many additional police officers are undertaking initial training as part of the Government's campaign to recruit 20,000 police officers.

In October 2019 Home Office confirmed officer allocations for every force in England and Wales in the first year of the uplift. The Home Office is working with the National Police Chiefs’ Council to support all forces deliver these allocations.

The Home Office publishes the statistical series 'Police workforce, England and Wales' on a biannual basis. The next publication is scheduled for release on Thursday 30 January and will contain information on the number of officers in post as at 30 September 2019. Data on joiners and leavers are published annually, in the July release of the bulletin, which covers the situation as at 31 March.

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/home-office-announces-first-wave-of-20000-police-officer-uplift

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
16th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many instances of (a) serious violence, (b) hate crime, (c) malicious communications were recorded targeting the LGBT+ community in each of the last 24 months.

The Home Office does not hold all the information on the sexual orientation of victims of the offences listed in the question.

However, the Home Office does hold information of number of offences perceived to be hate crimes by sexual orientation for selected offence groups which are routinely released as official statistics with the most recently published found here:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/839172/hate-crime-1819-hosb2419.pdf

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
16th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the timeframe is for her Department to rectify the software error that has resulted in conviction alerts for foreign nationals on the police national computer not being shared with their home countries.

The Home Office is working to support ACRO to resolve the issue and find a technical fix which will be implemented as soon as possible.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
16th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when she last had discussions with the European Commission to discuss security and intelligence cooperation after the UK has left the EU.

Home Office officials regularly engage with their counterparts in the European Commission and in other Member States on internal security cooperation post-exit through EU channels.

The Ministerial team also engage with international counterparts on a regular basis.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
16th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much has been spent on the development of the LEDS database in each of the last 12 months.

In the last 12 months (January 2019 – December 2019), the National Law Enforcement Data Programme has spent £42,056,745 which equates to an average monthly spend of £3.5m.

The figures provided are within the allocated budget for the NLEDP programme. The programme remains on track to spend against its forecast for the remainder of this financial year.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
16th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many conviction alerts on foreign nationals have not been sent to police in their home countries in each of the last three years, by country.

In order to resolve this issue, an ongoing technical response has been put in place. It is not possible to provide a specific figure of the number of notifications per EU Member States until the technical response is complete. Each Member State will be notified with the number of notifications they will receive as they are sent, to enable them to process the data as they see appropriate.

The Home Office is working closely with the national Criminal Records Office (ACRO) to finalise the resolution of this issue as soon as possible.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
8th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much compensation her Department paid to people wrongly (a) detained and (b) deported by her Department in each of the last six months.

Compensation data for people wrongly detained is published in the Home Office Annual Report and Accounts but is not published on a month by month basis.

Published information for financial year 2018-19, for wrongful detention, can be found in the Home Office’s 2018-19 Annual Report and Accounts on page 105.

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/807126/6.5571_HO_Annual_Report_201920_WEB.PDF

Compensation data is published in the Home Office Annual Report and Accounts but is not published separately for wrongful deportation

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
8th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people were wrongly (a) detained and (b) deported by her Department in each of the last six months.

The Home Office publishes data from 2012 onwards in its Annual Report and Accounts for the number of claimants who have been compensated following legal challenge of the lawfulness of their detention.

Whilst providing a clear sense of overall scale, the numbers are subject to caveats: (i) 'number of cases' is drawn from records of unique names of people, solicitors acting for them and Government Legal Department reference numbers; (ii) amounts paid are the amounts paid in each year (individual cases might see payments in more than one year, for example, if there are staged payments that fall across financial year boundaries).

Providing the information requested in relation to deportations or returns, would require a manual check of individual records and I am therefore not able to provide this to you. In a small number of cases each year individuals are brought back to the UK either by the Home Office or a Court for further consideration of their case. When this occurs, we review all circumstances with the Courts as appropriate.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
8th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much her Department spent on advertising the EU Settlement Scheme by (a) channel and (b) region or nation in each of the last six months.

In October 2019, the Home Office launched a new £1m wave of UK wide marketing campaign to encourage EU citizens to apply to the EU Settlement Scheme. Outdoor advertising, social media and search went live across the whole of the UK including in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

http://www.gov.uk/government/news/home-office-launches-1-million-advertising-campaign-for-eu-settlement-scheme.

All channels were paused in November due to the pre-election period. Activity will restart in February 2020.

A regional breakdown will be available at the conclusion of this wave of activity.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
20th Dec 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much additional funding has been allocated to South Wales Police for tackling knife crime and serious violence in the last 12 months.

This Government is committed to tackling knife crime and serious violence and making our streets safer.

South Wales Police will benefit from being able to recruit 136 officers by the end of March 2021. This is in addition to the £290.3m in funding South Wales Police are receiving in 2019/20 an increase of £19.3m on 2018/19.

In the last 12 months South Wales Police has been provided with £2,080,000 from the Serious Violence Fund; £1,200,00 for surge operational funding and £880,000 to develop their Violence Prevention Unit. £1,211,542 has also been awarded to support projects across all of Wales from the Early Intervention Youth Fund.

Additionally, funding has been awarded from the Anti-knife Community Fund and the Youth Endowment Fund to projects covering South Wales. For more information see:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/844955/Anti_knife_crime_successful_bids_2019-20.csv/preview

https://youthendowmentfund.org.uk/grantees-and-programmes/

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
20th Dec 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much funding her Department has allocated to improving security at places of worship in the South Wales Police area in the last 12 months.

The Places of Worship Protective Security Fund (POW) is a key commitment in the Hate Crime Action Plan published in 2016. The Scheme provides funding to places of worship that have been victims of or are vulnerable to hate crime attacks for physical protective measures such as alarms, fencing and access control. The scheme is currently in its fourth year of funding, and successful applicants for this scheme will be announced in due course. There was only one application from Wales in Year 3. However, the criteria were set across all applications and this application did not meet the minimum requirements to receive funding.

Over the first three years of the scheme we provided £1.5m funding for over 130 grants and have £1.6m committed for this financial year (2019/20). There was not any funding allocated under the POW scheme in the South Wales Police area in year three (2018/19). However, the scheme is open to places of worship across England and Wales, and we will continue to promote the scheme across Wales for future rounds of funding.

Following the attacks in Christchurch, we supported Faith Associates to deliver security training prior to and during Ramadan. They delivered 22 workshops across England and Wales, and distributed advice and guidance to over 2,000 mosques, madrassahs and community centres.

The Jewish Community Protective Security Grant was introduced in 2015 following a series of terrorist attacks against Jews and Jewish locations across Europe. In 2018-19 a grant of £13.4m was provided to fund additional protective security measures, primarily guarding, at Jewish state, free and independent schools, colleges, nurseries and some other Jewish community sites, including synagogues. A grant of £14m is to be provided in 2019-20. We do not keep a breakdown of funding by region.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
23rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 22 February 2021 to Question 152536 on Africa: Armed Forces, which branches the personnel trained from (a) Nigeria and (b) Uganda came from in their respective armed forces.

We have trained military personnel from the Nigerian Army, Nigerian Air Force, and Nigerian Navy, and from the Ugandan Army, Ugandan Air Force, and Ugandan Marines.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
10th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 10 February 2021 to Question 149770 on Africa: Armed Forces, if he publish the number of those training places provided by the country of origin of those armed forces personnel.

Since 2017/18 we have provided training places on UK-based courses to six military personnel from Ethiopia, 51 from Ghana, 14 from Mali, 244 from Nigeria, one from Somalia, 26 from South Africa, two from Tanzania, and 28 from Uganda. At this time we are unable to provide data on training delivered overseas because records are not centralised.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
10th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 10 February 2021 to Question 149770 on Africa: Armed Forces, how many armed forces personnel the UK trained from those countries listed in that Answer in (a) their country of origin and (b) a third country other than the UK.

Since 2017/18 we have provided training places on UK-based courses to six military personnel from Ethiopia, 51 from Ghana, 14 from Mali, 244 from Nigeria, one from Somalia, 26 from South Africa, two from Tanzania, and 28 from Uganda. At this time we are unable to provide data on training delivered overseas because records are not centralised.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
9th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many Foreign and Commonwealth personnel there are in the (a) Welsh Guards, (b) 1 and 3 Royal Welsh, (c) Queens Dragoon Guards and (d) 1 Rifles; and how many of those personnel in each of those categories have (i) regular and (ii) reserve status.

Trade Trained Regular and Trained FR20 Reserve Foreign and Commonwealth Personnel by Regiment/Battalion as at 1st October 2020

Regiment/Battalion (4)

TotalRegularFR20 Reserve
The Queen's Dragoon Guards2020-
1st Battalion Welsh Guards2525-
1st Battalion The Royal Welsh7070-
3rd Battalion The Royal Welsh~~~
1st Battallion The Rifles3030-


Notes/Caveats:

  1. The figures are for Trade Trained Regulars and Trained FR20 Reserves only.
  2. These figures represent only the requested Regiments/Battalions.
  3. This breakdown includes only those members of the Regiment/Battalion serving at Regimental Duty.
  4. These figures include any Attached Arms serving in the Regiment/Battalion including non-Combat personnel, eg Chaplains & clerks.
  5. Nationality is as recorded on the Joint Administration System (JPA).
  6. Nationality is defined by that currently recorded, however this may differ from their Nationality on entry. For example, some Foreign and Commonwealth entrants may have subsequently changed their Nationality to British and will therefore not be included in the above table.
  7. The cohort of Officers with a Paid Rank of Colonel and above are recorded as STAFF and have been excluded from these figures.
  8. The data have been rounded to the nearest 5 to limit disclosure and ensure confidentiality.
  9. "~" denotes fewer than 5. "-" denotes zero
James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
9th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many Foreign and Commonwealth personnel are serving in the (a) Army, (b) Royal Air Force, (c) Royal Navy, (d) Royal Marines, broken down by (i) regular and (ii) reserve status.

Data as at 1 October 2020 for the Regular trained strength and Future Reserves 2020 (FR20) are provided in the table below.

Royal Navy

Royal Marines

Army

Royal Air Force

Regular

FR20

Regular

FR20

Regular

FR20

Regular

FR20

Commonwealth

570

10

110

10

3,880

140

120

20

Nepalese

10

-

~

~

590

60

10

-

Irish

30

10

20

~

410

130

20

10

The Brigade of Gurkhas are not part of the Regular strength of the Army. However, as of 1 October 2020, their trained strength was 3,740.

Notes/Caveats

  1. Nationality is as recorded on the Joint Administration System (JPA).
  2. Nationality is defined by that currently recorded, however this may differ from their Nationality on entry. For example, some Foreign and Commonwealth entrants may have subsequently changed their Nationality to British and will therefore not be included in the above table.
  3. "~" denotes fewer than 5. "-" denotes zero
  4. Nepalese citizens are former Gurkhas who have either transferred out of the Brigade of Gurkhas to serve in the wider Armed Forces or have joined the Reserves on discharge.
James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
5th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many armed forces personnel from (a) Ghana, (b) Uganda, (c) Ethiopia, (d) Tanzania, (e) Somalia, (f) Nigeria, (g) South Africa and (h) Mali trained at a defence establishment in the UK in each of the last three years, broken down by (i) institution and (jii) branch of service.

We are proud of the UK’s record of assisting African militaries to improve professional standards, fight terrorism, contribute to UN peacekeeping missions, and promote democratic accountability.

Since 2017-2018 we have provided a total of 372 training places to military personnel from Ethiopia, Ghana, Mali, Nigeria, Somalia, South Africa, Tanzania, and Uganda. Of these 372 training places, 271 were provided by the British Army, 25 by the Royal Air Force, and 76 by the Royal Navy. Of the 372 training places, 21 were provided by the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, 24 by the Royal College of Defence Studies, 13 by RAF Cranwell, 68 by the Defence Academy, and 10 by the Britannia Royal Naval College Dartmouth.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
25th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what assessment he has made of the implementation of new guidance on the requirements for EWS1 forms by UK lenders that came into effect from 5 April 2021.

MHCLG estimates that nearly 500,000 leaseholders should not require an EWS1 form, following the new EWS1 valuation guidance from RICS, published in March 2021. Most major lenders, representing roughly 80% of the mortgage market, have said that they will adopt the RICS guidance, or already take a markedly less risk-averse approach.

Recent data from one major lender suggests that an EWS1 already exists for 50% of mortgage applications where one is requested, and we are working with industry to ensure this picture only improves.

The Government continues to challenge industry on the use of the EWS1 process. We have requested data from industry so that we can understand how the RICS guidance is being applied, and the implications of the process for mortgage applications.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
23rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, under which legislation he plans to introduce the Gateway 2 developer levy he announced on 10 February 2021.

The levy will be implemented through the forthcoming Building Safety Bill.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
23rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what proportion of the £3.5 billion he announced on 10 February 2021 will be funded from (a) from the Gateway 2 developer Levy, (b) existing revenues and (c) revenue from the new tax scheduled for the residential property development sector from 2022.

We will set out further details of the levy and tax.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
11th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, with reference to his announcement of 11 February 2021, Government to bring an end to unsafe cladding with multi-billion pound intervention, whether funding has been re-allocated from other Departmental spending priorities to support the policies on fire and building safety announced on 11 February 2021.

The Government announced an additional £3.5 billion to provide certainty that leaseholders in high rise residential buildings will face no cost for cladding remediation works, plus a generous financing scheme to ensure all leaseholders in medium and high rise blocks face no costs or very low costs if cladding remediation is needed.

To ensure the industry contributes towards these costs, the Government will introduce a “Gateway 2” developer levy that will be implemented through the Building Safety Bill and a new tax will be introduced for the United Kingdom’s residential property development sector in 2022 which will raise at least £2 billion over a decade to help pay for cladding remediation costs.


We will be providing further details of the grant, the loan, the levy and the tax.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
11th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what discussions he has had with the Welsh Government on the proposed Gateway 2 developer levy.

The proposed gateway 2 developer levy will apply only when developers seek permission to develop certain high-rise buildings in England. It will not apply to Wales. Housing and building safety are devolved matters, with each of the four nations responsible for developing and enforcing their own regulations.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
11th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, pursuant to the Answer of 9 February 2021 to Question 146897 on Buildings: Insulation, whether the additional trained assessors will be working across the UK or England only.

To speed up valuations where EWS1 forms are justified, the Government is providing nearly £700,000 funding to the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors to train up to 2,000 more assessors in 2021. The training is available to relevant professionals across the United Kingdom.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
10th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, with reference to his oral statement of 10 February 2021 on Building Safety, whether the new levy on developers will be applied across the UK; and how revenues derived from that levy will be apportioned to the devolved administrations.

We will be introducing a levy on developers, helping to ensure the industry take on collective responsibility for historical building safety defects. The proposed levy will be targeted and apply when developers seek permission to start building work on certain high-rise buildings in England. It will be implemented through the forthcoming Building Safety Bill.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
10th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, with reference to his oral statement of 10 February 2021 on Building Safety, whether the guidance agreed with UK financial lenders and RICS on EWS1 forms will be applicable across the whole UK; and when that new guidance will come into effect.

I understand that the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) is reviewing the responses to the public consultation on its new draft EWS1 guidance and that the RICS will be publishing its new guidance for surveyors and valuers soon.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
1st Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what agreements he has reached with (a) RICS, (b) UK Finance and (c) other stakeholders on reducing the requirement for EWS1 forms.

Industry have confirmed that buildings without cladding do not need an EWS1 form. This was announced on 21 November 2020. https://www.gov.uk/government/news/government-steps-in-to-help-homeowners-caught-up-in-ews1-process.

The Department estimates that this clarity will benefit 450,000 leaseholders.

RICS has recently completed a consultation on guidance for valuers when using the EWS1 process. When published the final RICS guidance should offer further clarity on the buildings where the EWS1 process should be used.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
1st Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what steps he is taking to reduce fraud in the assessment and certification of EWS1 forms.

RICS are aware of potential fraudulent use of EWS1 forms. RICS coordinate with the police and trading standards on any cases brought to their attention.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
1st Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what steps he is taking to increase the UK-wide capacity of qualified surveyors capable of undertaking assessments for EWS1 forms.

The Department is funding nearly £700,000 to train more assessors to speed up the valuation process for homeowners in cases where an EWS1 form is required. The training is being delivered by RICS, who aim to have trained an additional 2,000 assessors by the end of the summer.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
20th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what recent discussions he has had with the devolved Administrations on the (a) fire safety, (b) building quality and (c) integrity of apartment complexes constructed in the UK since 1995.

The Department is in regular contact with the devolved administration on the subject of Building Regulations including fire safety and building quality.

The devolved administrations are routinely invited and regularly attend meetings of the Building Regulation Advisory Committee where matters in relating to the Building Regulations in England and the United Kingdom are discussed.

20th Dec 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how many complaints have been received by his Department on (a) building defects and (b) fire safety issues relating to developments built by Redrow Homes in each of the last five years.

The Ministry for Housing Communities and Local Government does not routinely maintain data on individual complaints it receives on specific developers. Complainants are directed to developers, the relevant complaints processes for new homes and local authorities. The Department does not deal with individual complaints but responds to correspondence advising how complaints can be resolved through existing processes. However we know that the current complaints and redress system does not provide sufficient protection for consumers and this is why we have committed to legislate to set up a New Homes Ombudsman.

The Department is committed to ensuring all buildings are built and maintained to a good standard. That is why we have announced in the Queen’s Speech that we will bring forward legislation on building safety in this parliament.

16th Mar 2021
What recent assessment he has made of the progress of the implementation of the Lammy review in Wales.

The Ministry of Justice has published regular updates on the actions the department has taken in response to the Lammy Review recommendations.

Of the actions we said we would undertake 29 have been completed out of the 33 recommendations made in the Lammy Review. The remaining recommendations have a justifiable reason for their extended timescales.

Where a recommendation could not be implemented in full or exactly as set out in the Review, alternative approaches have been sought to achieve the same aim.

The recommendations of the Lammy Review apply to services delivered across both Wales and England. One recommendation needed to acknowledge health as a devolved service in Wales in its implementation.

Alex Chalk
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
3rd Feb 2021
What recent discussions he has had with the Chancellor of the Exchequer on financial support for people in Wales affected by the covid-19 outbreak.

I have regular discussions with my Rt. Hon. Friend the Chancellor of the Exchequer on our financial support to people affected by the Covid-19 outbreak. The Government has provided £9.3bn of additional support UK-wide through the welfare system for people affected by COVID-19 including a £20 per week increase to Universal Credit.

Simon Hart
Secretary of State for Wales
27th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Wales, what steps he is taking to ensure a joint package of financial and other support between the UK and Welsh Governments for the steel industry in Wales.

I am involved in ongoing discussions with steel companies in Wales to understand how UK Government can best support the industry during this crisis. I am working closely with the Under-Secretary of State for Industry, the Member for Stratford-upon-Avon, and Welsh Government to discuss support for the steel sector to mitigate the impacts of Covid-19. The Under-Secretary of State for Industry, the Member for Stratford-upon-Avon, has been holding weekly calls with the Devolved Administrations and regular calls with the steel sector, including individual steel companies, trade unions and representatives of the Welsh & Scottish Governments.

The Government will continue to work closely with the Welsh & Scottish Government to support the steel industry throughout the UK, to ensure it can maintain safe production at this time, and ensure they can access the comprehensive package of support made available. The Government has announced an unprecedented financial package to support businesses and has committed to do whatever it takes to get our nation through the impacts of this coronavirus pandemic.

Simon Hart
Secretary of State for Wales
27th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Wales, how many Welsh-based companies are supplying personal protective equipment and other medical supplies to (a) England, (b) Northern Ireland and (c) Scotland in response to the covid-19 outbreak.

My Department does not hold this information. The Secretary of State for Health has previously written to all Members (23 April) to outline that the UK Government has had over 8,000 offers of PPE since the outbreak began. Approximately 1,000 of these offers have been taken forward.

New offers of support to the UK Government should go through https://www.gov.uk/coronavirus-support-from-business. Offers of support to the Welsh Government should go through https://gov.wales/provision-of-personal-protection-equipment.

Simon Hart
Secretary of State for Wales
11th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Wales, with reference to paragraph 1.161 on page 50 of the 2020 Budget Red Book, if he will publish a detailed breakdown by individual Budget 2020 policy announcement of the consequential funding being made available to the Welsh Government totalling £360 million.

The following provides a summary of some of the key drivers of Barnett consequentials, and outlines a selection of the main elements.

Measure – WG (£m)

Category

2020-21

Building Safety Fund (MHCLG)

CDEL

58.9

Business rates measures (Local Gov)

RDEL

45.1

DHSC capital funding (DHSC)

CDEL

40.2

Nurse recruitment, training and retention (DHSC)

RDEL

37.6

Potholes Fund (DfT)

CDEL

29.4

Simon Hart
Secretary of State for Wales
11th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Wales, with reference to paragraph 1.161 on page 50 of the 2020 Budget Red Book, whether the additional funding allocated to deal with the covid-19 outbreak will result in consequential funding for the Welsh Government and NHS in addition to the £360 million announced for the Welsh Government; and when that funding will be made available.

The covid-19 outbreak is an ongoing situation. The Government will make an announcement shortly in relation to further funding for the Welsh Government to deal with the outbreak.

Simon Hart
Secretary of State for Wales