Ministry of Defence

We protect the security, independence and interests of our country at home and abroad. We work with our allies and partners whenever possible. Our aim is to ensure that the armed forces have the training, equipment and support necessary for their work, and that we keep within budget.



Secretary of State

 Portrait

Ben Wallace
Secretary of State for Defence

Shadow Ministers / Spokeperson
Scottish National Party
Angela Crawley (SNP - Lanark and Hamilton East)
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Defence Procurement)
Martin Docherty-Hughes (SNP - West Dunbartonshire)
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Defence Team Member)

Labour
John Healey (LAB - Wentworth and Dearne)
Shadow Secretary of State for Defence
Lord Coaker (LAB - Life peer)
Shadow Spokesperson (Defence)

Scottish National Party
Stewart Malcolm McDonald (SNP - Glasgow South)
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Defence)

Labour
Lord Tunnicliffe (LAB - Life peer)
Shadow Spokesperson (Defence)

Liberal Democrat
Baroness Smith of Newnham (LDEM - Life peer)
Liberal Democrat Spokesperson (Defence)

Plaid Cymru
Hywel Williams (PC - Arfon)
Shadow PC Spokesperson (Defence)

Democratic Unionist Party
Gavin Robinson (DUP - Belfast East)
Shadow DUP Spokesperson (Defence)

Liberal Democrat
Jamie Stone (LDEM - Caithness, Sutherland and Easter Ross)
Liberal Democrat Spokesperson (Defence)
Lord Campbell of Pittenweem (LDEM - Life peer)
Liberal Democrat Lords Spokesperson (Defence)

Scottish National Party
Dave Doogan (SNP - Angus)
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Defence Procurement)
Junior Shadow Ministers / Deputy Spokesperson
Labour
Luke Pollard (LAB - Plymouth, Sutton and Devonport)
Shadow Minister (Defence)
Chris Evans (LAB - Islwyn)
Shadow Minister (Defence)
Stephanie Peacock (LAB - Barnsley East)
Shadow Minister (Defence)
Ministers of State
Jeremy Quin (CON - Horsham)
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
Baroness Goldie (CON - Life peer)
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
Parliamentary Under-Secretaries of State
James Heappey (CON - Wells)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
Leo Docherty (CON - Aldershot)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
Scheduled Event
Tuesday 5th July 2022
Ministry of Defence
Orders and regulations - Main Chamber
Draft Armed Forces Act (Continuation) Order 2022
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Scheduled Event
Tuesday 5th July 2022
14:00
Defence Committee - Oral evidence - Select & Joint Committees
5 Jul 2022, 2 p.m.
National Shipbuilding Strategy Refresh
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Scheduled Event
Monday 18th July 2022
14:30
Ministry of Defence
Oral questions - Main Chamber
18 Jul 2022, 2:30 p.m.
Defence (including Topical Questions)
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Debates
Thursday 30th June 2022
Select Committee Inquiry
Thursday 12th May 2022
Defence and Climate Change

 

  • What needs to be done to achieve the Integrated Review of Security, Defence, Development and Foreign Policy’s number one international …
Written Answers
Thursday 30th June 2022
Members: Correspondence
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, when he will respond to the correspondence of 26 January 2022 from …
Secondary Legislation
Monday 13th June 2022
Armed Forces Act (Continuation) Order 2022
Section 382 of the Armed Forces Act 2006 (“the 2006 Act”) provides that the 2006 Act will expire at the …
Bills
Tuesday 26th January 2021
Armed Forces Act 2021
A Bill to continue the Armed Forces Act 2006; to amend that Act and other enactments relating to the armed …
Dept. Publications
Thursday 30th June 2022
16:27

Ministry of Defence Commons Appearances

Oral Answers to Questions is a regularly scheduled appearance where the Secretary of State and junior minister will answer at the Dispatch Box questions from backbench MPs

Other Commons Chamber appearances can be:
  • Urgent Questions where the Speaker has selected a question to which a Minister must reply that day
  • Adjornment Debates a 30 minute debate attended by a Minister that concludes the day in Parliament.
  • Oral Statements informing the Commons of a significant development, where backbench MP's can then question the Minister making the statement.

Westminster Hall debates are performed in response to backbench MPs or e-petitions asking for a Minister to address a detailed issue

Written Statements are made when a current event is not sufficiently significant to require an Oral Statement, but the House is required to be informed.

Most Recent Commons Appearances by Category
Jun. 13
Oral Questions
Feb. 05
Topical Questions
May. 11
Urgent Questions
Jun. 22
Westminster Hall
Jun. 13
Adjournment Debate
View All Ministry of Defence Commons Contibutions

Bills currently before Parliament

Ministry of Defence does not have Bills currently before Parliament


Acts of Parliament created in the 2019 Parliament

Introduced: 26th January 2021

A Bill to continue the Armed Forces Act 2006; to amend that Act and other enactments relating to the armed forces; to make provision about service in the reserve forces; to make provision about pardons for certain abolished service offences; to make provision about war pensions; and for connected purposes.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Wednesday 15th December 2021 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 18th March 2020

A Bill to Make provision about legal proceedings and consideration of derogation from the European Convention on Human Rights in connection with operations of the armed forces outside the British Islands.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Thursday 29th April 2021 and was enacted into law.

Ministry of Defence - Secondary Legislation

Section 382 of the Armed Forces Act 2006 (“the 2006 Act”) provides that the 2006 Act will expire at the end of one year beginning with the day on which the Armed Forces Act 2021 (“the 2021 Act”) was passed, unless continued in force by Order in Council in accordance with that section. The 2021 Act was passed on 15th December 2021 and the 2006 Act was therefore due to expire at the end of 14th December 2022. This Order provides for the continuation of the 2006 Act until the end of 14th December 2023.
These Rules make amendments to the Youth Justice and Criminal Evidence Act 1999 (Application to Service Courts) Order 2009 (S.I. 1999/2083) (“the 1999 Order”), the Armed Forces (Court Martial) Rules 2009 (S.I. 2009/2041) (“the Court Martial rules”) and the Armed Forces (Service Civilian Court) Rules 2009 (S.I. 2009/1209) (“the Service Civilian Court rules”). These amendments relate to the provision of special measures for vulnerable and intimidated witnesses in proceedings in the service courts.
View All Ministry of Defence Secondary Legislation

Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Trending Petitions
Petition Open
4,263 Signatures
(11 in the last 7 days)
Petition Open
140 Signatures
(9 in the last 7 days)
Petition Open
384 Signatures
(6 in the last 7 days)
Petition Open
21 Signatures
(5 in the last 7 days)
Petitions with most signatures
Petition Open
4,263 Signatures
(11 in the last 7 days)
Petition Open
978 Signatures
(3 in the last 7 days)
Petition Open
676 Signatures
(4 in the last 7 days)
Petition Open
384 Signatures
(6 in the last 7 days)
Petition Debates Contributed
108,289
Petition Closed
6 Feb 2022
closed 4 months, 3 weeks ago

We are demanding that the government treats Gurkhas fairly and pays them the same pension as other British veterans of the same rank and service. Many Gurkhas joined the Queen’s Gurkha Army believing their pension would sustain them and their families but sadly this has not been the case.

View All Ministry of Defence Petitions

Departmental Select Committee

Defence Committee

Commons Select Committees are a formally established cross-party group of backbench MPs tasked with holding a Government department to account.

At any time there will be number of ongoing investigations into the work of the Department, or issues which fall within the oversight of the Department. Witnesses can be summoned from within the Government and outside to assist in these inquiries.

Select Committee findings are reported to the Commons, printed, and published on the Parliament website. The government then usually has 60 days to reply to the committee's recommendations.


11 Members of the Defence Committee
Tobias Ellwood Portrait
Tobias Ellwood (Conservative - Bournemouth East)
Defence Committee Chair since 29th January 2020
John Spellar Portrait
John Spellar (Labour - Warley)
Defence Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
Gavin Robinson Portrait
Gavin Robinson (Democratic Unionist Party - Belfast East)
Defence Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
Emma Lewell-Buck Portrait
Emma Lewell-Buck (Labour - South Shields)
Defence Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
Mark Francois Portrait
Mark Francois (Conservative - Rayleigh and Wickford)
Defence Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
Richard Drax Portrait
Richard Drax (Conservative - South Dorset)
Defence Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
Sarah Atherton Portrait
Sarah Atherton (Conservative - Wrexham)
Defence Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
Stuart Anderson Portrait
Stuart Anderson (Conservative - Wolverhampton South West)
Defence Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
Derek Twigg Portrait
Derek Twigg (Labour - Halton)
Defence Committee Member since 11th May 2020
Kevan Jones Portrait
Kevan Jones (Labour - North Durham)
Defence Committee Member since 11th May 2020
Dave Doogan Portrait
Dave Doogan (Scottish National Party - Angus)
Defence Committee Member since 5th January 2022
Defence Committee: Upcoming Events
Defence Committee - Oral evidence
National Shipbuilding Strategy Refresh
5 Jul 2022, 2 p.m.
At 2.30pm: Oral evidence
Rt Hon Ben Wallace MP, Secretary of State for Defence
Vice Admiral Sir Chris Gardner KBE - Director General (Ships), Defence Equipment & Support at Ministry of Defence
Rear Admiral Paul Marshall CBE - Director Navy Acquisition, Senior Responsible Owner – T31 and FSS at Ministry of Defence
Rear Admiral Rex Cox - CEO National Shipbuilding Office at Ministry of Defence

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Defence Committee: Previous Inquiries
The Integrated Security, Defence and Foreign Policy Review The Security of 5G Defence contribution to the UK’s pandemic response Progress in delivering the British Army’s armoured vehicle capability Foreign Involvement in the Defence Supply Chain The Integrated Review – Threats, Capabilities and Concepts Defence and Climate Change National Shipbuilding Strategy Refresh NATO, US and UK Defence Relations National security and investment Beyond endurance? Military exercises and the duty of care Defence in the Arctic MoD support for former and serving personnel subject to judicial processes Defence in the Arctic (Sub-Committee) Armed Forces Covenant Annual Report 2018 Defence industrial policy: procurement and prosperity Departmental Priorities – Post-NATO Summit Domestic Threat of Drones Evidence from the new Defence Secretary Global Islamist Terrorism INF Treaty withdrawal UK Military Operations in Mosul and Raqqa Future anti-ship missile system Statute of limitations – veterans protection Mental Health and the Armed Forces, Part Two: The Provision of Care Work of Defence Equipment and Support Ministry of Defence Annual Reports and Accounts 2018-19 European Defence Industrial Development Programme Modernising Defence Programme Military Exercises and the Duty of Care: Further Follow-Up Procurement Update Work of the Service Complaints Ombudsman UK Defence and the Far East UK Defence and the Strait of Hormuz UK Response to Hybrid Threats Work of the Chief of Defence Staff

50 most recent Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department

27th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether all current Invitation to Negotiate arrangements in the contracts awarded by his Department allow, in extremis, a route to Ministers.

I refer the Right Hon. Gentleman to the letter I sent on 19 November 2020 (a copy of which I placed in the Library of the House) which made clear that no wording should be included in an Invitation to Tender which precludes contact being made, in extremis, with Ministers.

I am conducting an exercise to ensure this remains the case and will write to the Right Hon. Gentleman and place a copy of the letter in the library of the House.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
27th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, when he will respond to the correspondence of 26 January 2022 from the hon. Member for Wentworth and Dearne on the evacuation of the Nowzad animal charity from Kabul.

I have now responded to the right hon. Member's letter of 26 January 2022.

Ben Wallace
Secretary of State for Defence
8th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 19 May 2022 to Question 1525 on Armed Forces: Sexual Offences, how many serving personnel are on the Sex Offender Register as of 8 June 2022.

The Ministry of Defence (MOD) has made it absolutely clear there is no place for unacceptable behaviour in the Armed Forces. On 30 March this year the MOD published a Zero-Tolerance to Sexual Offending policy which introduced mandatory discharge from the Armed Forces for anyone convicted of a sexual offence, this includes anyone subject to notification requirements as set out in Part 2 of the Sexual Offences Act (SOA) 2003 (more widely recognised as the Sex Offenders Register). Prior to 30 March 2022, termination of Service was an option, but it was not mandatory.

As of 8 June 2022, a total of 10 Serving personnel are on the Sex Offender Register. This figure has been rounded to 10 to limit disclosure and ensure confidentiality, in-line with Departmental rounding policy. Please note that this figure is based on data which is not gathered for statistical purposes or subject to the same level of scrutiny as that applied to our Official Statistics.

Ministers are carefully considering further options for strengthening our Zero Tolerance policy taking legal advice.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
23rd Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the total value of shipbuilding contracts awarded by his Department was in each year since 2015.

I have interpreted the Right Hon. Gentleman’s question as referring to contracts for the building of new surface vessels. I have therefore not taken into account the ongoing programmes to manufacture Astute and Dreadnought Class submarines. On this basis two shipbuilding contracts have been awarded by the Ministry of Defence since 2015. In June 2017, a contract worth £3.58 billion was awarded to BAE Systems for the manufacture of three Type 26 frigates and in November 2019 a contract worth over £1.2 billion was awarded to Babcock for the design and build of five Type 31 frigates.

Since 2015 the Ministry of Defence has also brought into service the two Queen Elizabeth Class aircraft carriers, the culmination of a £6 billion programme of UK shipbuilding, and the Tide Class of Royal Fleet Auxiliaries providing around £150 million of work to UK shipyards and other suppliers.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
16th Jun 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to provide more weapons to the Ukrainian armed forces, including (1) any necessary missiles, and (2) sufficient munitions for self-defence.

The UK has already committed £1.3 billion for military operations and lethal aid that has assisted Ukraine in defending itself and its sovereignty. We liaise on a daily basis with Ukraine to ensure we can continue to provide the defensive equipment it needs. We have recently announced that we will be providing multiple launch rocket systems which will provide Ukraine with a significant boost in capability.

Baroness Goldie
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
27th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether his Department has made a recent assessment of the potential merits of upgrading the Warrior.

The decision not to extend the Warrior Capability Sustainment Programme (CSP) was announced by the Defence Secretary in 2021.. The intent remains to withdraw Warrior from service in conjunction with entry of new capabilities and concepts. We will continue to ensure the Warrior fleet remains effective until new capabilities are introduced into service.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
27th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that stocks of weapons used by the British Army do not deplete as a result of exports of arms to Ukraine.

Defence continually manages and reviews its stocks of weapons and munitions. This analysis informs the numbers of munitions granted in kind to the Armed Forces of Ukraine. There are regular strategic supplier conversations throughout Defence and the Department is fully engaged with industry, allies and partners to ensure that all equipment and munitions granted in kind are replaced as expeditiously as possible.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
27th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 14 June 2022 to Question 11554 on Social Security Benefits: Armed Forces, how many and what proportion of the 33,800 Universal Credit recipients with an Armed Forces background were in the (a) Army, (b) Navy and (c) Air Force.

The requested information is neither collected nor held by the Ministry of Defence (MOD). Data relating to Social Security Benefits is collected and held by the Department for Work and Pensions, who provided the figure of 33,800. As such, the MOD is unable to provide a breakdown of another Department's data or advise if that level of detail is recorded by them.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
27th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 23 June 2022 to Question 21086, what role the other 150 deployed as part of proposals to train Ukrainian troops will fulfil as part of that deployment.

Of the 1,050 UK Service personnel facilitating the training of the Armed Forces of Ukraine, 150 are providing support for logistics and movement, medical support, processing and communications, and overall command and control. These personnel are held at readiness and may not necessarily support the training immediately or simultaneously.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
27th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 17 June 2022 to Question 14426, if he will provide the location of the building which is 95 per cent partially clad with flammable cladding.

The high-rise building, which has approximately 95% of external wall system containing combustible components, is Glenart Castle, Longbridge.

Glenart Castle has a current Fire Risk Assessment in place and remains legally compliant for continued occupation.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
23rd Jun 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Goldie on 20 June (HL692), whether the RAF Tempest jet will be a carrier-capable aircraft.

The Future Combat Air System (FCAS) is being designed to replace the capabilities provided by the RAF’s Typhoon aircraft, which will leave service by 2040. This includes roles such as quick reaction alert with the ability to be fully interoperable with F-35B. It is therefore being designed to operate from airfields on the land.

Baroness Goldie
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
22nd Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how much his Department spent on external consultants in each of the last five years.

The Department maintains a central record of overall Consultancy expenditure which is disclosed as part of the Annual Report and Accounts (ARAC) and for ease of reference the values reported for all Consultancy since 2016 are as follows:

FY2020-21 £109.668 million [ARAC 20/21 page 171]

FY2019-20 £98.080 million [ARAC 20/21 page 171]

FY2018-19 £116.914 million [ARAC 19/20 page 126]

FY2017-18 £49.955 million [ARAC 18/19 page 147]

FY2016-17 £60.500 million [ARAC 16/17 page 113]

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
21st Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how much his Department spent on (a) management and (b) other consultancy fees in each year since 2017.

The Department maintains a central record of overall Consultancy expenditure although not by the categories referenced in the right hon. Member's question. The Department discloses this expenditure as part of our Annual Report and Accounts (ARAC) and for ease of reference the values reported for all Consultancy since 2016 are as follows:

FY2020-21 £109.668 million [ARAC 20/21 page 171]

FY2019-20 £98.080 million [ARAC 20/21 page 171]

FY2018-19 £116.914 million [ARAC 19/20 page 126]

FY2017-18 £49.955 million [ARAC 18/19 page 147]

FY2016-17 £60.500 million [ARAC 16/17 page 113]

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
15th Jun 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the case for an immediate increase in UK defence (1) spending, and (2) equipment.

We have already secured a generous £24 billion uplift in Spending Review 20 towards delivering the outcomes of the Integrated Review, the largest sustained spending increase since the end of the Cold War. Further analysis is required before we make substantial changes to our Equipment Plan, however the Russian invasion of Ukraine has provided an additional impetus to focus on its delivery.

Baroness Goldie
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
15th Jun 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they will reconsider their decision, announced in March 2021, to reduce the size of the army by 10,000 troops by 2025.

I refer the noble Lord to the reply I gave on 24 May 2022 to the noble Lord, the Lord Coaker, in response to Questions HL43 and HL44.

Baroness Goldie
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
15th Jun 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to honour the UK’s commitments to the NATO military alliance.

The UK is stronger with its NATO Allies and our commitment to the Alliance is unwavering. We have committed our Continuous at Sea Nuclear Deterrent (CASD) to NATO for the past 50 years and we are contributing well-supported and highly equipped conventional fighting forces across all domains.

The UK remains the highest spending European Ally, meeting the NATO Defence Investment Pledge to spend at least 2% of GDP on Defence. We secured a generous £24 billion uplift in Spending Review 20, cementing our position as the second largest spender in NATO.

The UK contributes heavily to NATO deterrence activity, leading NATO's Forward Presence battlegroup in Estonia alongside Danish and French forces. We have also provided a Reconnaissance Squadron in Poland to support the US led battlegroup and are providing support to the NATO enhanced Air Policing mission.

At the NATO Summit in June, it is expected that NATO leaders will agree the new Strategic Concept. This will reaffirm our commitment to freedom, openness and the rules-based order. It must also ensure that the Alliance is fit for future challenges, including how to modernise and adapt to emerging threats, advanced technologies and improving national resilience.

Baroness Goldie
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
21st Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what steps his Department is taking to (a) strengthen (i) communication and (ii) digitisation and (b) reduce clearance times for War Pension and Armed Forces Compensation Scheme claims.

Defence Business Services is working hard to address feedback from Veterans to improve its communications around the War Pensions and Armed Forces Compensation Schemes. This includes the rolling out of customer journey maps that explain the end-to-end process for AFCS and WPS claims, which are readily available on gov.uk. at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/learning-from-our-experiences-together

Further supporting products are in development with the next set being a series of short, how-to videos on making a claim that will be published on YouTube.

The ongoing £40 million Transformation Programme to digitise existing paper based processes and create a single customer portal for veterans aims to introduce automation, processing improvements and significantly reduce paper holdings. The first release of the new system is expected in late 2023. This will underpin the customer portal, which is being developed concurrently. This will enable claimants to provide and retrieve information electronically and allow them to securely access details of their entitlement and payments.

Clearance times for AFCS and WPS claims have generally been falling with average clearance time for AFCS at the end of May 2022 being 86 working days against a Key Performance Indicator of 90 working days. Average Clearance times for WPS claims had been falling each month since January, but rose to 132 working days in May, breaking the KPI of 127 working days for the first time since February after a high percentage of older cases were cleared.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
24th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many staff worked at the Defence Fire and Rescue service in each year since 2010.

The data to answer the right hon. Gentleman's question needs to be collected from multiple sources. I will write to him in due course and place a copy of my response in the Library of the House.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
24th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, when his Department first made 550 Service Family Accommodation units available for Afghans relocated to the UK under the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy.

550 Service Family Accommodation (SFA) units were made available for Afghans relocated to the UK under the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy (ARAP) in three tranches, the details of which can be found below:

Month

SFA units made available

August 2021

50

September 2021

50

October 2021

Up to 450

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
24th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 13 June 2022 to Question 13049 on Armed Forces: Pay, when he expects to receive the Armed Forces Pay Review Body's recommendation for 2022-23.

The Government is considering the recommendations of the Armed Forces Pay Review Body and will respond as soon as is practicable.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
24th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what steps his Department has taken to help support armed forces (a) personnel, (b) veterans, and (c) families in the context of the rise in the cost of living.

The Armed Forces' community, like everyone else, is subject to the effects of inflationary and cost of living pressures. Defence has frozen the daily food charge for our Armed Forces personnel and has capped accommodation charges at one per cent. We are also ensuring that the council tax rebate reaches those in military accommodation, and increasing the availability of free wraparound childcare at the start of the new academic year.

Support for veterans is provided by a number of Government Departments and is overseen by the Office for Veterans' Affairs within the Cabinet Office. Officials at Veterans UK will process Winter Fuel Payments for eligible veterans whose only government-paid income is from a War Disablement Pension. Through its Veterans Welfare Service, Veterans UK provides one-to-one welfare support and advice to veterans or anyone supporting a veteran, their families and dependants.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
24th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what progress has been made by the Royal Military Police on supporting Kenyan detectives investigating the potential involvement of British soldiers in the death of Agnes Wanjiru in Kenya in 2012; and if he will make a statement.

Jurisdiction for the investigation lies with the Kenyan authorities. The Royal Military Police (RMP) are proactively engaged with the Kenyan Police Service (KPS) to support and assist their investigation and, where appropriate and requested to do so, undertake investigative actions on behalf of the KPS. A number of formal and informal discussions have taken place, however, to protect the sanctity of the investigation and the interest of justice, we will not comment in detail on activity.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
27th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what proportion of Army personnel hold the rank of major or higher as of 27 June 2022.

As at 1 April 2022, 9.0% of Regular Trade Trained Army personnel held the Paid Rank of Major or above (6,580 out of 73,310 Regular Trade Trained personnel). These numbers have been rounded to the nearest 10.

These figures are for the Trade Trained Regular Army only and therefore exclude Gurkhas, Full Time Reserve Service, Mobilised Reserves, Army Reserve and all other Reserves, but includes those personnel that have transferred from Gurkha Trained Adult Male (GTAM) to UK Trained Army Personnel (UKTAP). Figures as at 1 April 2022 have been provided, in line with the most recently published Service Personnel Statistics (SPS).

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
24th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, when he plans trials on the Ajax armoured vehicle programme to resume.

Investigations continue into the effectiveness of the internal communications system. User validation trials will resume once the data has been fully reviewed and understood and the safety panel is satisfied that it is right to do so.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
20th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether his Department has made an assessment of the potential merits of creating permanent garrisons in Eastern Europe in collaboration with allies outside of the already existing Nato enhanced forward presence.

The UK is the Framework Nation for NATO's enhanced Forward Presence (eFP) in Estonia, currently providing a permanent Headquarters and two Battle Groups to Estonia. UK Personnel are also deployed in the US led eFP in Poland. NATO leaders have agreed to strengthen the Alliance's deterrence and defence posture, and the forthcoming NATO summit will bolster the Eastern flank and ensure every inch of allied territory is defended. Permanent personnel contributions to NATO countries will be considered by Allies as NATO's Deterrence and Defence of the Euro-Atlantic Area (DDA) is developed, and any contributions will be aligned with SACEUR's regional plans. The UK will continue to work and exercise extensively with Eastern European Allies and partners going forward, both through NATO and the Joint Expeditionary Force.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
20th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what assessment his Department has made of the prevalence of piracy incidents in the (a) Gulf of Aden, (b) Guardafui Channel and (c) Somali Sea, in the last three years.

There have been no formal piracy events (according to the definition specified in UNCLOS) reported to us since 2019 in the areas mentioned. Whilst any act of Piracy remains a concern, we continue to work with international partners to counter piracy. Events are 'defined' based solely on the information reported to us by Industry or other reporting bodies.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
24th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to his speech at the Atlantic Future Forum on October 2021, what his policy is on UK involvement in the Fleet Solid Support Ship contract.

The Government's policy on UK involvement in the manufacture of the Fleet Solid Support ships remains unchanged.

It is an objective of the Fleet Solid Support ship competition to deliver UK social value in recognition of the opportunities for prosperity and levelling-up that the programme presents, maximising the social value contribution shipbuilding can make. This includes encouraging investment whilst balancing the need for value for money and a fully compliant solution.

The final contract for the manufacture of the fleet solid support ships will be awarded to a UK business, either solely or as part of a consortium. We have been clear that a significant proportion of the build work will be carried out in the UK.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
22nd Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, if he will publish a table, taking into account any remaining penalty factors, identifying (a) the tail numbers of all tranche one, two and three Typhoon aircraft, (b) their flight hours used and (c) their flight hours remaining.

Tail numbers for Tranche One, Tranche Two and Tranche Three aircraft in the Typhoon fleet are given in the following/attached table:

Tranche 1

ZJ910

ZJ911

ZJ912

ZJ913

ZJ914

ZJ915

ZJ916

ZJ917

ZJ918

ZJ919

ZJ920

ZJ921

ZJ923

ZJ924

ZJ925

ZJ926

ZJ927

ZJ928

ZJ929

ZJ930

ZJ931

ZJ932

ZJ933

ZJ934

ZJ935

ZJ936

ZJ937

ZJ939

ZJ941

ZJ942

Tranche2

ZJ944

ZJ945

ZJ946

ZJ947

ZJ948

ZJ949

ZJ950

ZK300

ZK301

ZK302

ZK303

ZK304

ZK305

ZK306

ZK307

ZK308

ZK309

ZK310

ZK311

ZK312

ZK313

ZK314

ZK315

ZK316

ZK317

ZK318

ZK319

ZK320

ZK321

ZK322

ZK323

ZK324

ZK325

ZK326

ZK327

ZK328

ZK329

ZK330

ZK331

ZK332

ZK333

ZK334

ZK335

ZK336

ZK337

ZK338

ZK339

ZK340

ZK341

ZK342

ZK343

ZK344

ZK345

ZK346

ZK347

ZK348

ZK349

ZK350

ZK351

ZK352

ZK353

ZK354

ZK379

ZK380

ZK381

ZK382

ZK383

Tranche 3

ZK355

ZK356

ZK357

ZK358

ZK359

ZK360

ZK361

ZK362

ZK363

ZK364

ZK365

ZK366

ZK367

ZK368

ZK369

ZK370

ZK371

ZK372

ZK373

ZK374

ZK375

ZK376

ZK377

ZK378

ZK424

ZK425

ZK426

ZK427

ZK428

ZK429

ZK430

ZK431

ZK432

ZK433

ZK434

ZK435

ZK436

ZK437

ZK438

ZK439

However, I am withholding details of flying hours used and remaining for individual aircraft as its disclosure would or would be likely to prejudice the capability, effectiveness or security of the Armed Forces.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
23rd Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what arrangements are in place for ships within the Carrier Strike Group to receive dry stores from the support ships of other nations during deployment as of 23 June 2022.

NATO nations maintain equipment that is compatible to enable replenishments at sea for Royal Navy warships, as well as permissions and protocols for re-supply through rotary wing aviation.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
23rd Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, when the Fleet Solid Support Ship contracts will be awarded.

I refer the right hon. Member to the answer I gave on 23 May 2022 to Question 2495 to the hon. Member for South Shields (Emma Lewell-Buck).

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
22nd Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what estimate he has made of the level of defence inflation for each year in the current spending review period.

In the first year of the current spending review period, defence inflation, which is the average change in pay and prices of goods and services that make up the defence budget, is estimated to have been 4.1% in 2020-21. The Department does not forecast future levels of defence inflation, as key factors such as pay inflation and contract inflation are subject to high levels of uncertainty.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
23rd Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what estimate he has made of the number of jobs that will be created by the Fleet Solid Support Ship contract.

I refer the right hon. Member to the answer I gave him on 14 September 2021 to Question number 44199.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
23rd Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what estimate he has made of how many jobs the Fleet Solid Support Ship will create in the UK.

I refer the right hon. Member to the answer I gave him on 14 September 2021 to Question number 44199.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
23rd Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what estimate he has made of the proportion of steel that will be used in the new Fleet Solid Support Ships that will be UK steel.

I refer the right hon. Member to the answer I gave him on 7 June 2021 to Question 7747.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
20th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of introducing Panther KF51s to supplement the British Army's current stock of Main Battle Tanks while they wait for Challenger 3 to be completed.

The Ministry of Defence is progressing Challenger 3. We have no current intention of procuring Panther KF51 when it is ready for production (which is not the case at present).

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
21st Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many anti-tank Javelin missiles the army has as of 20 June 2022.

For Operational Security reasons, I cannot comment on stock numbers for anti-tank Javelin missiles. However, I can assure the right hon. Member that we monitor stock availability for UK forces and take action, where required, to maintain appropriate stock levels.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
21st Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what assessment his Department has been made of the potential impact on security of converting Military Provost Guard Service positions at Leuchars base to civilian posts.

Over the next four years, the Army Guarding Transition Plan (AGTP) will seek to transform Army guarding services, blending the Military Provost Guard Service (MPGS) workforce with Ministry of Defence Guard Service (MGS) personnel.

Leuchars Station will retain some armed MPGS personnel and, in accordance with Defence Security Policy, will convert certain tasks that do not require an armed guard over to unarmed MGS personnel. This blended model will not affect the security of Leuchars Station and is already an effective and common guarding model utilised successfully at other Army establishments.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
20th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many service personnel left the British Army in each year from 2017 to date.

The information requested can be found in the following table.

Army Regular Outflow by Financial Year 2016-17 – 2021-22

Financial Year

2016-17

2017-18

2018-19

2019-20

2020-21

2021-22

Army Outflow

9,775

9,650

9,046

9,533

7,431

8,856

Trained*

7,881

8,329

7,985

7,669

5,361

6,684

Untrained

1,894

1,321

1,061

1,864

2,070

2,172

Officers

949

906

904

936

745

856

Trained*

894

848

854

900

715

805

Untrained

55

58

50

36

30

51

Other Ranks

8,826

8,744

8,142

8,597

6,686

8,000

Trained*

6,987

7,481

7,131

6,769

4,646

5,879

Untrained

1,839

1,263

1,011

1,828

2,040

2,121

*These figures are for all personnel who have outflowed having completed Phase 1 training and include personnel outflowing from Trade Trained Strength and personnel outflowing from Phase 2 training.

Notes/caveats:

  1. The figures are for Regular Army only and therefore exclude Gurkhas, Full Time Reserve Service, Mobilised Reserves, Army Reserve and all other Reserves, but includes those personnel that have transferred from GURTAM to UKTAP.
  2. Figures show outflow from the Regular Army, both trained and untrained, including personnel leaving the Services, deaths and recalled reservists on release. They do not include promotion from Ranks to Officers or personnel who leave the Army to join the Royal Navy, Royal Marines or Royal Air Force.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
20th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the Order of Battle is of the British Army.

A breakdown of Army units by corps, is provided in the attached table. The units are listed in corps order of precedence and the table includes both reserve and regular units, including training regiments.

Under Future Soldier Plans, the Army is currently reshaping its structures. This means that some details will change as Future Soldier continues to be developed and implemented.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
22nd Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many meetings he has had with the Prime Minister on the replenishment of UK stockpiles following military assistance provided to Ukraine.

I have discussed the replenishment of UK stockpiles following military assistance provided to Ukraine with the Prime Minister on numerous occasions. These discussions have taken place within wider meetings on the invasion of Ukraine. Since April, the Prime Minister and I have both attended three National Security Council meetings on the invasion of Ukraine.

Ben Wallace
Secretary of State for Defence
21st Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many War Pensioner’s Mobility Supplement claims were (a) submitted, (b) accepted and (c) rejected in the last year for which data is available.

The answer to the hon. Member's questions is based on the War Pension Mobility Supplement (WPMS) data for the calendar year 1 January to 31 December 2021.

Claims Registered

328

Claims cleared

322

Accepted claims

190

Not accepted claims

120

Unable to process

12


Appeals Registered

16

Appeals Cleared

16

The Median clearance time for War Pensioner's Mobility Supplement was 208 working days. Clearance times are calculated as the number of working days between the date the claim was registered and the date the claim was cleared

Of the 16 WPMS appeals cleared between 1 January 2021 and 31 December 2021, the average (median) clearance time was 367 working days. Clearance times are calculated as the number of working days between the date the appeal was registered and the final date that the appeal was cleared by Tribunal. Ministry of Defence have no control over the length of time it takes for a decision to be made at Tribunal as appeal tribunals are independent.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
21st Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the average wait time is for a response to a War Pensioner’s Mobility Supplement application.

The answer to the hon. Member's questions is based on the War Pension Mobility Supplement (WPMS) data for the calendar year 1 January to 31 December 2021.

Claims Registered

328

Claims cleared

322

Accepted claims

190

Not accepted claims

120

Unable to process

12


Appeals Registered

16

Appeals Cleared

16

The Median clearance time for War Pensioner's Mobility Supplement was 208 working days. Clearance times are calculated as the number of working days between the date the claim was registered and the date the claim was cleared

Of the 16 WPMS appeals cleared between 1 January 2021 and 31 December 2021, the average (median) clearance time was 367 working days. Clearance times are calculated as the number of working days between the date the appeal was registered and the final date that the appeal was cleared by Tribunal. Ministry of Defence have no control over the length of time it takes for a decision to be made at Tribunal as appeal tribunals are independent.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
21st Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many appeals against a decision on a War Pensioner’s Mobility Supplement application have been made in the last year for which data is available.

The answer to the hon. Member's questions is based on the War Pension Mobility Supplement (WPMS) data for the calendar year 1 January to 31 December 2021.

Claims Registered

328

Claims cleared

322

Accepted claims

190

Not accepted claims

120

Unable to process

12


Appeals Registered

16

Appeals Cleared

16

The Median clearance time for War Pensioner's Mobility Supplement was 208 working days. Clearance times are calculated as the number of working days between the date the claim was registered and the date the claim was cleared

Of the 16 WPMS appeals cleared between 1 January 2021 and 31 December 2021, the average (median) clearance time was 367 working days. Clearance times are calculated as the number of working days between the date the appeal was registered and the final date that the appeal was cleared by Tribunal. Ministry of Defence have no control over the length of time it takes for a decision to be made at Tribunal as appeal tribunals are independent.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
21st Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the average length of time is from start to finish for appeals against a decision on a War Pensioner’s Mobility Supplement application.

The answer to the hon. Member's questions is based on the War Pension Mobility Supplement (WPMS) data for the calendar year 1 January to 31 December 2021.

Claims Registered

328

Claims cleared

322

Accepted claims

190

Not accepted claims

120

Unable to process

12


Appeals Registered

16

Appeals Cleared

16

The Median clearance time for War Pensioner's Mobility Supplement was 208 working days. Clearance times are calculated as the number of working days between the date the claim was registered and the date the claim was cleared

Of the 16 WPMS appeals cleared between 1 January 2021 and 31 December 2021, the average (median) clearance time was 367 working days. Clearance times are calculated as the number of working days between the date the appeal was registered and the final date that the appeal was cleared by Tribunal. Ministry of Defence have no control over the length of time it takes for a decision to be made at Tribunal as appeal tribunals are independent.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
21st Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether his Department is (a) taking steps and (b) plans to take steps to make it easier for people to apply for a War Pensioner’s Mobility Supplement.

Any veteran wishing to apply for the War Pension Mobility Supplement (WPMS) can do so via the following link available on GOV.UK: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/war-pension-scheme-mobility-supplement-wpms

The Transformation Programme to digitise existing paper-based processes and create a single customer portal for Veterans is underway. An online Armed Forces Compensation and War Pension Scheme application service has been developed and is currently being tested in a beta phase.

The circa £40 million Transformation Programme will expand the on-line claim service to other types of claims under the Compensation Schemes.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
21st Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many HIV positive service people were dismissed from the (a) Army, (b) Navy and (c) Air force in the latest period for which figures are available.

Between 1 April 2011 and 31 March 2022, 30 UK Regular Armed Forces personnel were medically discharged with an ICD-10 code for HIV cited as the principal or contributory cause. Both principal and contributory causes have been included as it is possible for personnel to be medically discharged for multiple medical reasons. Of the 30 personnel, 24 were Army personnel. The number of Royal Navy and RAF personnel were fewer than five respectively.

Figures include trained and untrained UK Regular personnel; Reserve personnel are excluded. Army Regular personnel include Gurkha and the Military Provost Guard Service. Royal Navy personnel includes both Royal Navy and Royal Marines. In line with Joint Service Publication 200, figures fewer than five have been suppressed.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
21st Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, until what date HIV positive status was a bar to military service; on what evidence was that bar to military service based; and if he will make a statement.

On 21 June 2022, the HIV positive status bar was lifted with amendments being made to the Joint Service Manual of Medical Fitness (Leaflet 6-7-7 of Joint Service Publication 950).

The original policy and its amendment were based on specialist medical opinion. This included consideration of the risk to the individual if they were denied essential medication or access to specialist medical services due to operational circumstances; the risk to everyone operating in the military exposure prone environment in the UK and overseas; and the cost-benefit of training an individual with a chronic medical condition, that would previously have attracted career restrictions in a fixed liability organisation.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
20th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many service personnel left the Royal Navy in each year from 2017 to date.

The information requested is provided in the following table:

Financial Year

2016-17

2017-18

2018-19

2019-20

2020-21

2021-22

RN/RM total outflow

3,003

3,088

3,092

3,322

2,868

3,518

Trained

2,252

2,428

2,460

2,390

1,942

2,494

Untrained

751

660

632

932

926

1,024

Officer

429

460

440

433

359

414

Trained

364

390

355

352

288

360

Untrained

65

70

85

81

71

54

Other Ranks

2,574

2,628

2,652

2,889

2,509

3,104

Trained

1,888

2,038

2,105

2,038

1,654

2,134

Untrained

686

590

547

851

855

970

1. Figures show outflow from UK Regular Forces, both trained and untrained, including personnel leaving the Services, deaths and recalled reservists on release. They do not include promotion from Ranks to Officers or flows between Services.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
20th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many service personnel left the Royal Air Force in each year from 2017 to date.

The information requested is provided in the following table.

Financial Year

2016-17

2017-18

2018-19

2019-20

2020-21

2021-22

Totals

2,269

2,434

2,495

2,600

2,000

2,259

Trained

2,071

2,223

2,223

2,231

1,783

1,938

Untrained

198

211

272

369

217

321

Officers

449

492

429

459

372

350

Trained

424

478

409

435

360

331

Untrained

25

14

20

24

12

19

Other Ranks

1,820

1,942

2,066

2,141

1,628

1,909

Trained

1,647

1,745

1,814

1,796

1,423

1,607

Untrained

173

197

252

345

205

302

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)