Tanmanjeet Singh Dhesi Portrait

Tanmanjeet Singh Dhesi

Labour - Slough

First elected: 8th June 2017

Shadow Minister (Exports)

(since November 2023)

Shadow Exchequer Secretary (Treasury)
6th Sep 2023 - 27th Nov 2023
Shadow Minister (Transport)
10th Apr 2020 - 6th Sep 2023
Firearms Bill
8th Mar 2023 - 15th Mar 2023
Approved Premises (Substance Testing) Bill
8th Dec 2021 - 15th Dec 2021
Defence Committee
2nd Mar 2020 - 11th May 2020
Defence Sub-Committee
5th Mar 2020 - 11th May 2020
Housing, Communities and Local Government Committee
23rd Jul 2018 - 6th Nov 2019
Levelling Up, Housing and Communities Committee
23rd Jul 2018 - 6th Nov 2019


Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Tanmanjeet Singh Dhesi has voted in 740 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
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Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Lindsay Hoyle (Speaker)
(33 debate interactions)
Andrew Mitchell (Conservative)
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office) (Minister for Development)
(26 debate interactions)
Boris Johnson (Conservative)
(20 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Department for Transport
(101 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(73 debate contributions)
Department for Business and Trade
(53 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Tanmanjeet Singh Dhesi's debates

Slough Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petition Debates Contributed

We want the UK to be neutral in the conflict between Israel and Palestine, and withdraw offers of support for Israel.

We want the Government to seek a ceasefire and also seek to address the root cause of the current conflict by promoting dialogue and advocating for the end of Israeli occupation of the West Bank and Gaza Strip.

The UK Government should urge the Israeli Government to stop the blockade of Food, Fuel and Electricity to the already impoverished city of Gaza

The Government needs to change the law so laboratory animals are included in the Animal Welfare Act. Laboratory animals are currently not protected by the Act and are therefore victims of 'unnecessary suffering' (see section 4 of the Act: https://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2006/45/section/4).

Call on the government to consider holding debates in Parliament between MPs and university students to raise/discuss issues that affect them. It will allow students to voice their opinions and concerns about tuition fees of £9250 a year which are too high, particularly as grants have been removed

We would like the Government to ban all animal testing UK, including for the development of cosmetics, household products and medicines. Alternatives need to be actively funded. Many products that are tested on animals end up not being suitable for humans. Animal testing is outmoded and should end.

The Government must recognise the urgent need to use animal-free science and publish a clear and ambitious action plan with timetables and milestones to drive the phase-out of animal experiments. As well as preventing animal suffering, this will benefit public health and business.

We ask Parliament to repeal the High Speed Rail Bills, 2016 and 2019, as MPs voted on misleading environmental, financial and timetable information provided by the Dept of Transport and HS2 Ltd. It fails to address the conditions of the Paris Accord and costs have risen from £56bn to over £100bn.

Undocumented Migrants are suffering in silence, with no access to adequate Financial support, or any help. The Government should grant an urgent Amnesty of 5years to those with no criminal record so that they could live their lives as normal human beings and pay tax to help the UK economy.

As a country we see many water-related fatalities every year. We see many more call outs to water related incidents. Throughout lockdown year our coastguards were tasked to almost double the call outs than in the previous year. Our children NEED to learn about Cold water shock & rip currents.

The Government must make a public statement on the #kissanprotests & press freedoms.

India is the worlds largest democracy & democratic engagement and freedom of the press are fundamental rights and a positive step towards creating a India that works for all.

The Government is refusing to release official research on the characteristics of grooming gangs, claiming it is not in the “public interest”.

We, the British public, demand the release of the official research on grooming gangs undertaken by the Government in full.

The Home Secretary said what happened to victims of child sexual exploitation gangs was “one of the biggest stains on our country’s conscience.” Last year local authorities identified 18,700 suspected victims of child sexual exploitation. We want an independent public inquiry into Grooming Gangs.

We want the Education Secretary and the Government to step in and review the exam board’s decision on how GCSE and A-Level grades will be calculated and awarded due to the current coronavirus crisis. We want a better solution than just using our previous data to be the basis of our grade.

A significant number of students will sit their final 2021 examinations. The outcome of which undoubtedly will be their passport, for many of their future life chances and successes. In order for this to be done fairly, it is imperative that the amount of content they are tested on is reduced.


Latest EDMs signed by Tanmanjeet Singh Dhesi

14th January 2021
Tanmanjeet Singh Dhesi signed this EDM on Monday 18th January 2021

Godfrey Colin Cameron

Tabled by: Chris Stephens (Scottish National Party - Glasgow South West)
That this House is deeply saddened by news of the death of Godfrey Colin Cameron, a hardworking member of Parliamentary security staff and member of the PCS trade union who passed away aged just 55 after contracting covid-19; extends our sincere condolences to his devoted wife Hyacinth, children Leon and …
139 signatures
(Most recent: 8 Feb 2021)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 114
Scottish National Party: 15
Independent: 5
Plaid Cymru: 3
Alba Party: 1
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
4th June 2020
Tanmanjeet Singh Dhesi signed this EDM on Wednesday 17th June 2020

Legal Aid and Advice

Tabled by: David Lammy (Labour - Tottenham)
That an humble Address be presented to Her Majesty, praying that the Civil Legal Aid (Remuneration) (Amendment) (Coronavirus) Regulations 2020 (S.I., 2020, No. 515), dated 15 May 2020, a copy of which was laid before this House on 18 May 2020, be annulled.
138 signatures
(Most recent: 11 Feb 2021)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 111
Liberal Democrat: 9
Independent: 7
Scottish National Party: 4
Plaid Cymru: 3
Social Democratic & Labour Party: 2
Green Party: 1
Alba Party: 1
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
Alliance: 1
View All Tanmanjeet Singh Dhesi's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Tanmanjeet Singh Dhesi, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.



Latest 50 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
16 Other Department Questions
20th Jul 2023
To ask the hon. Member for Broxbourne, representing the House of Commons Commission, what changes were made to the terms and conditions of security staff who were transferred from the Metropolitan Police to the Parliamentary Security Department.

The transfer of Security staff from the Metropolitan Police Service (MPS) to the Parliamentary Security Department (PSD) was undertaken in accordance with Transfer of Undertaking Protection of Employment (TUPE) regulations. Contractual terms and conditions, along with continuity of service from the MPS, were protected at the point of transfer on 1st April 2016. These included (but were not limited to) pay, pension and holiday entitlement.

During a period of consultation for the transfer it was agreed with the trade unions that a number of terms and conditions would be adapted, meaning that they would be subject to some changes. Details of those terms that were adapted are provided in the Annex.

19th Jul 2023
To ask the hon. Member for Broxbourne, representing the House of Commons Commission, whether the Commission plans to publish a report on Operation Marquee.

The House of Commons Annual Report and Accounts 2022-23 (HC 1684), published on 19 July 2023, include detail on the delivery, cost and impact of the Lying in State in September 2022. In particular, pages 30-31 provide an overview of work undertaken while pages 38-39 detail the related expenditure.

19th Jul 2023
To ask the hon. Member for Broxbourne, representing the House of Commons Commission, how many and what proportion of written parliamentary questions have been carded by the Table Office in each of the last 12 months that the House was sitting.

The IT programmes used by the Table Office do not separately record the number or proportion of questions that have been carded. The information requested could only be established by going through each of the 62,668 questions tabled in the periods specified, which would incur disproportionate expense. However, the figures for 3 July 2023, given below, are likely to be representative:

Published unamended or with style edits

233 (78% of total processed)

Published having been carded and subsequently discussed with Member/Member’s office

28 (9%)

TOTAL PUBLISHED

261

Carded and not yet resolved/published

23 (8%)

Of which 5 information readily available, 4 duplicate question, 14 other reason

Carded and withdrawn

12 (4%)

Of which 1 information readily available, 5 duplicate question, 6 other reason

Withdrawn for other reasons

2

TOTAL PROCESSED

298

The Table Office can only put on to the Order Paper questions which comply with the rules of the House. Questions substantially the same as one already tabled are not published. If a question appears to be disorderly the Member is ‘carded’: asked to discuss with the Table Office how the question might be brought within the rules. The rules regarding questions are set out at 3.22 in Erskine May, which is available online: Rules of order regarding form and contents of questions - Erskine May - UK Parliament

The Table Office also provides tailored briefing and coaching in drafting questions for Members and their staff.

23rd Feb 2023
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, if she will make an assessment of the adequacy of the process for reporting violations of disabled access legislation in commercial properties.

The Equality Act 2010 provides strong protection for disabled users of commercial premises and effective enforcement mechanisms where the owners or managers of such buildings fail in their duty to make reasonable adjustments such as the installation of a ramp for wheelchair access.

In common with other civil law, where alleged violations of the Act have occurred with no resolution, reporting and enforcement is for the individual or their representative at the County Court or Sheriff’s Court in Scotland, both having effective remedial powers in cases that are proven.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
3rd Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, how many (a) fossil fuel-, (b) electric- and (c) hybrid-powered road-legal vehicles their Department purchased in the last 24 months.

None for all three categories.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
19th May 2021
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, if she will hold discussions with the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions on collecting data on domestic abuse survivors’ access to Discretionary Housing Payments.

Equalities Ministers meet frequently with Ministerial colleagues across government to discuss a range of issues.

Since 2011, the Department for Work and Pensions has provided local authorities (LAs) with Discretionary Housing Payments funding of over £1 billion, to support vulnerable groups. The allocation of these payments is for LAs to decide, in line with their own priorities and reflecting government guidance aimed at targeting funds to those most in need, including domestic abuse survivors.

Kemi Badenoch
President of the Board of Trade
15th Apr 2021
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, with reference to the Department of Health and Social Care’s press release on uptake of covid-19 vaccinations within the Black community published on 30 March 2021, what steps she is taking to tackle low levels of trust in institutions and authorities within the Black community; and what information her Department holds on levels of trust amongst the Black community in those institutions and authorities.

The Government has access to, and regularly monitors, data with breakdowns by ethnicity on trust in public institutions, trust in government, attitudes towards the vaccine programme and wider government policy on COVID-19. The Government also carefully monitors data on vaccine uptake, intention to take a vaccine and reasons for hesitancy. This is from a number of sources, including data from the ONS and other surveys.

There is a significant cross-government programme of work underway to increase confidence in the vaccination programme and to drive uptake among ethnic minority groups. This includes hosting vaccination centres in places of worship, tackling misinformation through the Counter Disinformation Unit and, through the Government's Community Champions scheme, using trusted local voices to encourage uptake.

There is also a wider government communications campaign using media medics and recognised voices across ethnic minority and faith communities to build trust and encourage vaccine uptake.

Kemi Badenoch
President of the Board of Trade
8th Mar 2021
To ask the hon. Member for City of Chester, representing the Speaker's Committee on the Electoral Commission, what recent assessment he has made of the potential merits of introducing automatic voter registration.

The Commission supports electoral registration reforms that would make it easier for people to register or to update their details throughout the year. This might include adding people automatically from other datasets, or other automated solutions which still require confirmatory action by the voter.

In 2019, the Commission investigated the feasibilty of such reforms. It found these were possible from a technical perspective and could be implemented without radically altering the structure of the electoral registration system in the UK.

The Commission's view is that this could help improve registration levels among some under-registered groups, including the youngest part of the franchise. This would ensure that as many people as possible are able to participate in our democracy.

18th Jan 2021
To ask the hon. Member for Broxbourne, representing the Speaker's Committee for the Independent Parliamentary Standards Authority, pursuant to the Answer of 18 January 2021 to Question 136593, whether Members' staff working on the parliamentary estate or in a constituency office incur a work-related expense that is additional to usual living costs by needing to purchase food at that location.

As is common in most employment arrangements, Members' employees are expected to provide for their own nourishment and refreshment at work, whether they purchase that or bring it in from home. The position is different for volunteers as they are not employed and provided with a salary from which to provide that sustenance. For that reason, volunteers can claim for the additional costs associated with volunteering for an MP, for example when on the parliamentary estate or in a constituency office (which includes food) which Members' staff cannot.

18th Jan 2021
To ask the hon. Member for Broxbourne, representing the Speaker's Committee for the Independent Parliamentary Standards Authority, pursuant to the Answer of 18 January 2021 to Question 136594, for what reasons IPSA recognise that Members' staff incur additional costs while working at home through introducing a monthly working from home payment, but do not consider volunteers to be similarly incurring additional costs while volunteering from home for an hon Member.

The payment the Hon Member refer's to is IPSA's administration of the tax-free allowance which can be paid to employees who are required to work from home, under HMRC rules. As a tax mechanism, this does not apply to people who volunteer.

12th Jan 2021
To ask the hon. Member for Broxbourne, representing the Speaker's Committee for the Independent Parliamentary Standards Authority, pursuant to the Answer of 11 January 2021 to Question 133126, for what reasons IPSA has not included the geographical restrictions of volunteer subsistence expenses within the wording of the (i) scheme as it relates to volunteers and (ii) IPSA model volunteer contract; what steps IPSA has taken to ensure that policy complies with section 5(1) of the Parliamentary Standards Act 2009; where previously IPSA has published its policy of geographical restrictions of volunteer subsistence costs; when and with whom IPSA consulted ahead of introducing that policy; what steps IPSA took to communicate that policy; on what dates that communication occurred; and whether IPSA has undertaken an assessment of the appropriateness of that policy position during the covid-19 outbreak.

IPSA has informed me that the arrangements for volunteer expenses were updated in March 2014 when the new model volunteer agreement was produced. This was communicated through the IPSA bulletin at the time and is available on the IPSA website. The Hon. Member is correct that there is no geographical stipulation in the volunteer expenses rules. There is a balance to strike when drawing up policy and guidance between on the one hand brevity and clarity and on the other detailing all possible scenarios. There will always be an element of judgement and interpretation when unusual situations such as the Covid19 pandemic occur.

12th Jan 2021
To ask the hon. Member for Broxbourne, representing the Speaker's Committee for the Independent Parliamentary Standards Authority, on which dates in January 2021 the directors of IPSA (a) met and (b) plan to meet to discuss volunteer subsistence costs; and if IPSA will publish minutes relating to (i) those meetings and (ii) other senior IPSA management meetings in the past six months on volunteer subsistence costs.

There have not been any specific director meetings on volunteer expenses but the policy team and the Chief Executive of IPSA considered carefully the issue of food costs for volunteers who are working from home. A guiding principle in the stewardship of the use of public funds is that reimbursement is appropriate where there is a work-related expense that is additional to usual living costs. In this case, volunteers working on the parliamentary estate or in a constituency office would be incurring additional expense by needing to purchase food. This is not the case when the volunteer is at home as they would not incur additional food costs whilst working for an MP.

30th Dec 2020
To ask the hon. Member for Broxbourne, representing the Speaker's Committee for the Independent Parliamentary Standards Authority, if IPSA will provide volunteers working at home during the covid-19 outbreak with the lunch expenses as provided for in the model volunteer agreement.

The Independent Parliamentary Standards Authority (IPSA) provides funding for staffing and business costs to support MPs in their parliamentary functions, in line with the rules and general conditions set out in its Scheme.

MPs may claim for the cost of reasonable food and travel expenses to be paid to volunteers who are supporting their parliamentary work, to ensure they are not out of pocket as a result of their volunteer activities. This may include, for example, the purchase of lunch when working away from home. Volunteer expenses may only be reimbursed to cover actual costs incurred as a result of supporting the MP and are not intended to be used as a daily food allowance to fund the consumption of food and drink in a volunteer's own home.

24th Jan 2020
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what recent steps she has taken to ensure that more women are appointed to (a) leadership and (b) executive roles in companies.

The Government has commissioned and supports the business led, independent Hampton-Alexander Review which has a 33% target for women on boards and in senior leadership positions across the FTSE350 by close 2020.

The Government also supports the recently launched Leaders As Change Agents board which is working to increase diversity in critical decision-making roles.

Women hold a higher percentage of senior leadership positions than ever before. I am pleased to report the good news that the FTSE100 have achieved their 33% target ahead of schedule. The FTSE350 have 31.5% women on boards and 28.2% of women in executive positions and their direct reports.

Victoria Atkins
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
24th Jan 2020
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what steps the Government is taking to reduce the gender pay gap in the public sector.

We are working across government and with representative bodies to address the gender pay gap in different public sector workforces.

This includes supporting the Department of Health and Social Care and the independent review of the gender pay gap in medicine led by Dame Jane Dacre. We are also encouraging initiatives in other public sector workforces, including policing and different parts of the education sector.

To support all employers, we have published evidence-based guidance on practical actions they can take to create more inclusive workplaces.

Victoria Atkins
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
15th Jan 2024
To ask the Attorney General, what recent assessment she has made of the effectiveness of the Crown Prosecution Service in (a) prosecuting cases and (b) providing (i) information, (ii) assistance and (iii) support to victims.

The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) rolled out a new Crown Court operating model last year. This is a more effective and efficient approach to justice as it means the CPS serve more material on the defence at a much earlier stage so they can be more robust with case management and encourage earlier guilty pleas.

The CPS is transforming the service it provides to victims through its Victim Transformation Programme. The Programme is delivering an improved Universal Service offer for all victims of crime, which will build victims’ understanding of the role of the CPS, ensure that victims understand their rights, and signpost victims to relevant support.

The Victim Transformation Programme also includes an Enhanced Service offer for adult victims of rape and serious sexual offences (RASSO). The Enhanced Service will include the offer of a meeting with a member of the prosecution team once a victim has been notified their case is proceeding to trial. This will give victims the opportunity to discuss what happens next and ask questions about the process. The Enhanced Offer will also include a dedicated Victim Liaison Officer in all CPS RASSO Units to help improve the quality of engagement with adult RASSO victims.

The Victim Transformation Programme builds on actions the CPS has already taken to improve the quality of the communications and the service it provides to victims. For example, the CPS has published an online guide for all victims of crime, which explains what they can expect when their case reaches the CPS and what their entitlements are as victims. This has had nearly 110,000 views in total since its launch in September 2022. It follows an earlier guide the CPS produced for victims of rape and serious sexual offences, which has had over 320,000 views since November 2021.

Robert Courts
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
12th Jan 2024
To ask the Attorney General, what recent assessment she has made of the effectiveness of the CPS in ensuring access to justice for victims of crime.

Speedy access to justice is in the interest of victims, defendants, witnesses, and society.

The Ministry of Justice is co-ordinating cross-government action to support the Crown Courts and the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) is engaging with key delivery partners to support longer term improvements. The national Criminal Justice Board, re-instated last year by the Lord Chancellor, is a welcomed opportunity to identify and tackle the challenges faced by the criminal justice system.

The CPS rolled out a new Crown Court operating model last year. This is a more effective and efficient approach to justice as it means the CPS serve more material on the defence at a much earlier stage so they can be more robust with case management and encourage earlier guilty pleas.

Further, the CPS has an important role in ensuring that victims are informed and supported. The CPS is transforming the service it provides to victims through its Victim Transformation Programme. The Programme is delivering an improved Universal Service offer for all victims of crime, which will build victims’ understanding of the CPS’ role, ensure that victims understand their rights, and signpost victims to relevant support.

The Victim Transformation Programme also includes an Enhanced Service offer for victims with the greatest needs. The first cohort of victims to receive the Enhanced Service offer will be adult victims of rape and serious sexual offences (RASSO). The Enhanced Service will include the offer of a meeting with a member of the prosecution team once a victim has been notified their case is proceeding to trial. This will give victims the opportunity to discuss what happens next and ask questions about the process. The Enhanced Offer will also include a dedicated Victim Liaison Officer in all CPS RASSO Units to help improve the quality of engagement with adult RASSO victims.

Robert Courts
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
31st Mar 2021
To ask the Attorney General, what estimate she has made of the number of CPS prosecutions that have been classified as no longer in the public interest as a result of delays in criminal trials beginning in each of the last five years.

The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) case outcome records compiled in the Case Management System include an allocation of a principal reason for finalised prosecutions not resulting in a conviction (non-conviction outcomes), including the numbers which failed for public interest reasons.

The CPS does not have a specific reason accounting for delays in criminal trials. However, the category ‘Other charge/indictment; loss/harm minor from single incident; delay between offence/charge and trial’ may be allocated. This can apply where there has been a delay since the commission of the offence, or since the defendant was charged, leading either to the case being dropped by the CPS, or stopped by the court on the grounds of abuse of process. It is not possible to further disaggregate these reasons.

The table below shows the number of defendants allocated this reason in each of the last five years, and the six months April to September 2020

2015-2016

2016-2017

2017-2018

2018-2019

2019-2020

April - Sept 2020

Other charge/indictment, loss/harm minor from single incident, delay between offence/charge and trial

5,706

4,711

4,011

4,194

4,417

6,107

% Other charge/indictment, loss/harm minor from single incident, delay between offence/charge and trial

0.9%

0.8%

0.8%

0.8%

1.0%

4.3%

Total Non-Conviction Outcomes

107,579

94,692

84,834

80,474

70,816

21,857

% Non-Conviction Outcomes

16.9%

16.1%

15.9%

16.3%

15.7%

15.4%

Total Completed Prosecution Outcomes

637,778

588,021

533,161

494,811

451,046

141,885

Data Source: CPS Case Management Information System

Between April and September 2020, the volume of completed prosecution outcomes reduced due to court closures and social distancing. However, the volume of cases dropped by the CPS are not as reliant on court hearings and were less impacted.

In response to COVID-19 the CPS introduced an Interim Case Review Guidance on the Application of the Public Interest, as part of the COVID-19 crisis response. The guidance is to be applied for charging decisions, including decisions on whether to continue or discontinue a case that has already been charged. The guidance advises that when considering the question of whether a prosecution is a proportionate response, prosecutors should do so in the context of the ongoing impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, including the potential delay to criminal proceedings. Application of the principles set out in this guidance may have contributed to an increase in the proportion of cases dropped under the category of ‘Other charge/indictment; loss/harm minor from single incident; delay between offence/charge and trial’.

Lucy Frazer
Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport
3rd Dec 2020
To ask the Attorney General, what proportion of the vehicles used by her Department on Government business are electric vehicles.

The Department for Transport is responsible for all government vehicles managed by the Government Car Service.

The Attorney General’s Office, Government Legal Department, Serious Fraud Office and HM Crown Prosecution Service Inspectorate have no other vehicles to report.

The Crown Prosecution Service currently lease 4 vehicles, none are currently electric vehicles.

20th Mar 2024
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether he is taking steps to (a) ensure consistency in the accessibility of departmental communications and (b) support the use of (i) sign language videos, (ii) audio recordings and (iii) other accessible formats in such communications across Departments.

On 5 February 2024 the government published the final Disability Action Plan together with the independent analysis of the consultation findings. The Disability Action Plan sets out 32 practical actions which the government will take forward over the next 12 months.

Action 28 outlines steps the government is taking to ensure consistency in the accessibility of departmental communications. These steps include the publication of accessible standards, revising and improving guidance, training, and monitoring. The accessibility guidance emphasises the need for government organisations to consider the communication needs of individuals and, where appropriate, the provision of BSL and commonly-requested alternative formats.

In July 2024, the government will publish the second BSL report that will outline what ministerial departments have done to promote and facilitate the use of BSL in their communications with the public. This follows the publication of the first BSL report in July 2023, which included a number of actions to continually improve the government’s use of BSL in public communications (https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-british-sign-language-bsl-report-2022)

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
14th Mar 2024
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether he has made a recent assessment of the potential impact of unpaid internships on (a) social mobility and (b) equality of opportunity.

The Cabinet Office is only responsible for the Civil Service Summer Internship Programmes and the Autism Exchange Internship Programme. It does not oversee any unpaid internships. Both programmes pay the National Living Wage. Internships provide a fantastic opportunity for individuals at the beginning of their career to gain valuable experience in their field regardless of background. Last year, we offered over 500 internships to undergraduates through our Fast Stream Summer Internship Programme and 21.5% of these were to students from Lower Socio-Economic backgrounds.

John Glen
Paymaster General and Minister for the Cabinet Office
13th Mar 2024
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what recent steps he has taken to (a) assess and (b) enhance preparedness in response to nuclear threats.

The United Kingdom has well-developed contingency plans to respond to a wide range of eventualities. The plans and supporting arrangements have been developed, refined and tested over many years.

The scale of these capabilities is driven by classified planning assumptions derived from the United Kingdom’s National Security Risk Assessment. The Government sets out some of the main risks and emergencies that drive this common consequence planning in the National Risk Register.

As part of the UK’s broad emergency response capabilities, there are Local Resilience Forums (LRFs), multi-agency partnerships made up of representatives from local public services such as the NHS, local authorities, emergency services, and others.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
11th Mar 2024
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what plans he has to support departments to manage (a) workforce planning and (b) recruitment processes affected by the time taken to complete Developed Vetting clearances.

The National Audit Office (NAO) investigation into the performance of UK Security Vetting published in January 2023 and the subsequent Public Accounts Committee in February 2023 identified that United Kingdom Security Vetting’s (UKSV) performance was affected by a range of issues including rising customer demand. The demand increased as the employment landscape grew following national lockdowns. Societal pressures and wider events (including conflict in Ukraine) also added to the demand impact.

In 2023, UKSV implemented a stabilisation programme which included an increase in headcount. Under Ministerial direction, UKSV prioritised the recovery of initial Developed Vetting turnaround times, followed by Security Check and Counter Terrorist Check turnaround times. These first two targets were met on time and are now being processed within agreed timescales with a focus on supporting recruitment. UKSV is currently focussing efforts to maintain the performance of these and is making good progress to meet the third target to recover the turnaround times of Developed Vetting review cases.

Departments and relevant Ministers receive regular updates on UKSV’s performance through governance boards and from the UKSV Customer Management Team. Sponsored individuals undergoing a clearance application are able to obtain updates relevant to their own application from the UKSV helpdesk.

The security of our people, assets and information is a Government priority. UKSV are working with departments to better forecast demand and working on both efficiency and technology solutions to maintain long term stability. Furthermore, there is a clear and robust policy in place to support departments in ensuring their employees and contractors are security cleared to the appropriate level based on the information they need to access for their role.

Though often concurrent, National Security Vetting (NSV) is distinct from recruitment processes and only required in some roles.

In line with the practice followed by successive administrations, the Government does not otherwise comment on security matters.

John Glen
Paymaster General and Minister for the Cabinet Office
11th Mar 2024
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what assessment he has made of the potential impact of Developed Vetting clearance times on the (a) recruitment and (b) retention of (i) civil service personnel in roles requiring high-level security clearance and (ii) other civil service personnel.

The National Audit Office (NAO) investigation into the performance of UK Security Vetting published in January 2023 and the subsequent Public Accounts Committee in February 2023 identified that United Kingdom Security Vetting’s (UKSV) performance was affected by a range of issues including rising customer demand. The demand increased as the employment landscape grew following national lockdowns. Societal pressures and wider events (including conflict in Ukraine) also added to the demand impact.

In 2023, UKSV implemented a stabilisation programme which included an increase in headcount. Under Ministerial direction, UKSV prioritised the recovery of initial Developed Vetting turnaround times, followed by Security Check and Counter Terrorist Check turnaround times. These first two targets were met on time and are now being processed within agreed timescales with a focus on supporting recruitment. UKSV is currently focussing efforts to maintain the performance of these and is making good progress to meet the third target to recover the turnaround times of Developed Vetting review cases.

Departments and relevant Ministers receive regular updates on UKSV’s performance through governance boards and from the UKSV Customer Management Team. Sponsored individuals undergoing a clearance application are able to obtain updates relevant to their own application from the UKSV helpdesk.

The security of our people, assets and information is a Government priority. UKSV are working with departments to better forecast demand and working on both efficiency and technology solutions to maintain long term stability. Furthermore, there is a clear and robust policy in place to support departments in ensuring their employees and contractors are security cleared to the appropriate level based on the information they need to access for their role.

Though often concurrent, National Security Vetting (NSV) is distinct from recruitment processes and only required in some roles.

In line with the practice followed by successive administrations, the Government does not otherwise comment on security matters.

John Glen
Paymaster General and Minister for the Cabinet Office
11th Mar 2024
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will make an assessment of the factors contributing to the average waiting time for Developed Vetting clearances; and what steps his Department is taking to help tackle these factors.

The National Audit Office (NAO) investigation into the performance of UK Security Vetting published in January 2023 and the subsequent Public Accounts Committee in February 2023 identified that United Kingdom Security Vetting’s (UKSV) performance was affected by a range of issues including rising customer demand. The demand increased as the employment landscape grew following national lockdowns. Societal pressures and wider events (including conflict in Ukraine) also added to the demand impact.

In 2023, UKSV implemented a stabilisation programme which included an increase in headcount. Under Ministerial direction, UKSV prioritised the recovery of initial Developed Vetting turnaround times, followed by Security Check and Counter Terrorist Check turnaround times. These first two targets were met on time and are now being processed within agreed timescales with a focus on supporting recruitment. UKSV is currently focussing efforts to maintain the performance of these and is making good progress to meet the third target to recover the turnaround times of Developed Vetting review cases.

Departments and relevant Ministers receive regular updates on UKSV’s performance through governance boards and from the UKSV Customer Management Team. Sponsored individuals undergoing a clearance application are able to obtain updates relevant to their own application from the UKSV helpdesk.

The security of our people, assets and information is a Government priority. UKSV are working with departments to better forecast demand and working on both efficiency and technology solutions to maintain long term stability. Furthermore, there is a clear and robust policy in place to support departments in ensuring their employees and contractors are security cleared to the appropriate level based on the information they need to access for their role.

Though often concurrent, National Security Vetting (NSV) is distinct from recruitment processes and only required in some roles.

In line with the practice followed by successive administrations, the Government does not otherwise comment on security matters.

John Glen
Paymaster General and Minister for the Cabinet Office
11th Mar 2024
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the Fifty-Third Report of Session 2022–23 of the Committee of Public Accounts entitled Performance of the UK Security Vetting service, HC 994, published on 12 May 2023, what steps his Department has taken to reduce delays in processing (a) Counter Terrorist Checks, (b) Security Checks and (c) Developed Vetting since the publication of that report.

The National Audit Office (NAO) investigation into the performance of UK Security Vetting published in January 2023 and the subsequent Public Accounts Committee in February 2023 identified that United Kingdom Security Vetting’s (UKSV) performance was affected by a range of issues including rising customer demand. The demand increased as the employment landscape grew following national lockdowns. Societal pressures and wider events (including conflict in Ukraine) also added to the demand impact.

In 2023, UKSV implemented a stabilisation programme which included an increase in headcount. Under Ministerial direction, UKSV prioritised the recovery of initial Developed Vetting turnaround times, followed by Security Check and Counter Terrorist Check turnaround times. These first two targets were met on time and are now being processed within agreed timescales with a focus on supporting recruitment. UKSV is currently focussing efforts to maintain the performance of these and is making good progress to meet the third target to recover the turnaround times of Developed Vetting review cases.

Departments and relevant Ministers receive regular updates on UKSV’s performance through governance boards and from the UKSV Customer Management Team. Sponsored individuals undergoing a clearance application are able to obtain updates relevant to their own application from the UKSV helpdesk.

The security of our people, assets and information is a Government priority. UKSV are working with departments to better forecast demand and working on both efficiency and technology solutions to maintain long term stability. Furthermore, there is a clear and robust policy in place to support departments in ensuring their employees and contractors are security cleared to the appropriate level based on the information they need to access for their role.

Though often concurrent, National Security Vetting (NSV) is distinct from recruitment processes and only required in some roles.

In line with the practice followed by successive administrations, the Government does not otherwise comment on security matters.

John Glen
Paymaster General and Minister for the Cabinet Office
7th Mar 2024
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what (a) process and (b) criteria the Prime Minister will use to determine the timing of a general election.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer of 26 February, Official Report, PQ 14293.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
7th Mar 2024
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what recent discussions the Prime Minister has had with Cabinet colleagues on the potential operational readiness of the Government to hold a general election in May.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer of 26 February, Official Report, PQ 14293.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
7th Mar 2024
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether his Department issues guidance for Departments on ensuring (a) fiscal responsibility and (b) propriety in international contract management.

a) Senior commercial professionals in central government are required to hold a commercial accreditation that demonstrates they meet the People Standards, as agreed by the Civil Service Board. The Commercial accreditation process involves a rigorous day-long capability assessment and ensures that responsible individuals have the commercial skills required to execute their fiscal responsibilities.

b) Professionals responsible for management of relevant international programmes within the FCDO are required to complete the Contract Management Capability Programme, which is grounded in the Contract Management People Standards. The Programme is tiered and provides rigorous training as well as assessment. Again, this ensures that responsible individuals have the skills required to execute their contract management responsibilities.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
26th Feb 2024
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, when he plans that all eligible under the (a) Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy and (b) Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme will be relocated from (i) Iran, (ii) Pakistan and (iii) other third countries to the UK.

The UK has made an ambitious and generous commitment to help at-risk people in Afghanistan and, so far, we have brought around 24,600 people to safety, including over 21,600, people eligible for the Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme (ACRS) and the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy (ARAP) schemes, as of September 2023. The Government is committed to relocating all eligible persons who remain in Pakistan and third countries as soon as possible, and have made significant progress in the last few months.

Johnny Mercer
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister for Veterans' Affairs)
19th Feb 2024
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what safeguards are in place to prevent government officials from betting on the (a) success and (b) timing of policy implementations.

The Civil Service Code sets out the standards of behaviour expected of all civil servants to uphold the Civil Service’s core values, which are integrity, honesty, objectivity and impartiality.

The Code makes clear that civil servants must not misuse their official position, for example by using information acquired in the course of their official duties to further their private interests or those of others.

The Code is part of the contractual relationship between civil servants and their employer. Breaches of the Code can result in disciplinary action with potential sanctions extending to dismissal.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
31st Jan 2024
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps his Department has taken to improve the cyber resilience of public services.

We are working extensively to improve the cyber resilience of public services, particularly through the Government Cyber Security Strategy. As part of this, in April 2023 we launched GovAssure, which introduced stringent new measures for Government cyber security to be reviewed against. We have also published the Cyber Policy Handbook and the Secure by Design Framework, as well as soft launching the Government Cyber Coordination Centre (GC3), to share best practice and embed it throughout the UK’s public services.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
31st Jan 2024
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will make an assessment of the impact of the National Procurement Policy Statement, published in June 2021, on cybersecurity in public sector procurement processes.

The Procurement Act 2023 brings in new powers to exclude and debar companies from public procurement on grounds of national security. The new National Security Unit for Procurement (NSUP), in the Cabinet Office, will work across government to coordinate assessments of companies and support ministers in national security debarment decisions.

In addition, Procurement Policy Note 09/14 requires central government contracting authorities to ensure that for contracts with certain characteristics, suppliers must meet the technical requirements prescribed by Cyber Essentials, including where suppliers store, or process, personal information or data at Official level.

The Cabinet Office encourages all organisations to follow National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) guidance which sets out the security matters to be considered during the procurement process. The National Protective Security Agency (NPSA) has also published guidance to prevent hostile actors exploiting vulnerabilities in supply chains.

The National Procurement Policy Statement sets out the national priorities that all contracting authorities should have regard to in their procurement where it is relevant to the subject matter of the contract and proportionate to do so. The current statement does not include cyber security as a separate, wider policy because the need for cyber security protection is fundamental to procurements where it applies and therefore built into the procurement process as described above. The new legislative statement that will come into force alongside the Procurement Act is currently being drafted and will be subject to a consultation process as set out in Section 13 of the Act.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
31st Jan 2024
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will make an assessment of the effectiveness of the Procurement Act 2023 for tackling cybersecurity threats in public tenders.

The Procurement Act 2023 brings in new powers to exclude and debar companies from public procurement on grounds of national security. The new National Security Unit for Procurement (NSUP), in the Cabinet Office, will work across government to coordinate assessments of companies and support ministers in national security debarment decisions.

In addition, Procurement Policy Note 09/14 requires central government contracting authorities to ensure that for contracts with certain characteristics, suppliers must meet the technical requirements prescribed by Cyber Essentials, including where suppliers store, or process, personal information or data at Official level.

The Cabinet Office encourages all organisations to follow National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) guidance which sets out the security matters to be considered during the procurement process. The National Protective Security Agency (NPSA) has also published guidance to prevent hostile actors exploiting vulnerabilities in supply chains.

The National Procurement Policy Statement sets out the national priorities that all contracting authorities should have regard to in their procurement where it is relevant to the subject matter of the contract and proportionate to do so. The current statement does not include cyber security as a separate, wider policy because the need for cyber security protection is fundamental to procurements where it applies and therefore built into the procurement process as described above. The new legislative statement that will come into force alongside the Procurement Act is currently being drafted and will be subject to a consultation process as set out in Section 13 of the Act.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
31st Jan 2024
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the Procurement Act 2023 on strengthening cyber security requirements for public tenders.

The Procurement Act 2023 brings in new powers to exclude and debar companies from public procurement on grounds of national security. The new National Security Unit for Procurement (NSUP), in the Cabinet Office, will work across government to coordinate assessments of companies and support ministers in national security debarment decisions.

In addition, Procurement Policy Note 09/14 requires central government contracting authorities to ensure that for contracts with certain characteristics, suppliers must meet the technical requirements prescribed by Cyber Essentials, including where suppliers store, or process, personal information or data at Official level.

The Cabinet Office encourages all organisations to follow National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) guidance which sets out the security matters to be considered during the procurement process. The National Protective Security Agency (NPSA) has also published guidance to prevent hostile actors exploiting vulnerabilities in supply chains.

The National Procurement Policy Statement sets out the national priorities that all contracting authorities should have regard to in their procurement where it is relevant to the subject matter of the contract and proportionate to do so. The current statement does not include cyber security as a separate, wider policy because the need for cyber security protection is fundamental to procurements where it applies and therefore built into the procurement process as described above. The new legislative statement that will come into force alongside the Procurement Act is currently being drafted and will be subject to a consultation process as set out in Section 13 of the Act.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
31st Jan 2024
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what his Department's policy is on the security requirements for endpoint devices procured by the public sector.

The Government Cyber Security Standard requires government organisations to meet or exceed the security outcomes specified in the Cyber Assessment Framework (CAF) developed by the National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC). This includes specific security outcomes in relation to the secure configuration and management of devices.

As the CAF is outcomes-based, it does not specify which commercially available devices meet these security requirements or which vendors government organisations should buy their devices from. That is a matter for government organisations to determine locally, in consultation with their commercial, security and IT teams, based on their organisation’s business needs, risk tolerance and threat profile.

In addition, in November 2023 we published the cross-government Mobile Device Management policy to help government organisations and their Arms Length Bodies keep their corporately owned mobile devices secure and prevent data breaches. NCSC also provides guidance on how to securely configure devices from each of the most commonly used platforms.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
31st Jan 2024
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what criteria his Department uses to determine the security standard of hardware devices before they are purchased by Government.

The Government Cyber Security Standard requires government organisations to meet or exceed the security outcomes specified in the Cyber Assessment Framework (CAF) developed by the National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC). This includes specific security outcomes in relation to the secure configuration and management of devices.

As the CAF is outcomes-based, it does not specify which commercially available devices meet these security requirements or which vendors government organisations should buy their devices from. That is a matter for government organisations to determine locally, in consultation with their commercial, security and IT teams, based on their organisation’s business needs, risk tolerance and threat profile.

In addition, in November 2023 we published the cross-government Mobile Device Management policy to help government organisations and their Arms Length Bodies keep their corporately owned mobile devices secure and prevent data breaches. NCSC also provides guidance on how to securely configure devices from each of the most commonly used platforms.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
31st Jan 2024
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what assessment he has made of the potential impact of incorporating device security in public sector risk management strategies.

The Government Cyber Security Standard requires government organisations to meet or exceed the security outcomes specified in the Cyber Assessment Framework (CAF) developed by the National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC).

One of the four objectives which make up the CAF is managing security risk; this objective covers a range of security outcomes in relation to organisations’ internal processes for managing security risk, accountability and decision-making and managing assets such as corporate devices. The CAF also includes specific security outcomes in relation to the secure configuration and management of devices.

In November 2023 we published the cross-government Mobile Device Management (MDM) policy to help government organisations and their Arms Length Bodies keep their corporately owned mobile devices secure and prevent data breaches. This policy is mandatory for all government organisations and Arms Length Bodies. It requires them to manage corporately owned mobile phones and tablets which access, process or store OFFICIAL government and/or citizen data via critical systems using an appropriate MDM solution.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
31st Jan 2024
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what recent assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the Government's cyber security measures in protecting public sector organisations.

The Government prioritises public sector cyber security, which is why in April 2023 GovAssure was launched. Under GovAssure, government organisations regularly review the effectiveness of their cyber defences against common cyber vulnerabilities and attack methods. We are currently evaluating the first year’s assessments.

GovAssure will enable government organisations to accurately assess their levels of cyber resilience across their critical services, highlight priority areas for improvement and provide the Government with a strategic view of cyber capability, risk and resilience across the sector.

With its foundations in the National Cyber Security Centre’s Cyber Assessment Framework, GovAssure will help us to understand our risk at scale and put us on the pathway to reducing it, as well as aligning Government with the best practice in management of wider UK Critical National Infrastructure sectors.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
17th Jan 2024
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps he is taking to improve cyber security (a) training and (b) awareness in public sector organisations.

Government and the wider public sector remain an attractive target to a broad range of cyber threat actors of every level of capability and motivation from nation states to cyber criminals.

In December last year, the UK and its allies exposed a series of attempts by the Russian Intelligence Services to target high-profile individuals and entities through cyber operations.

The Government Cyber Security Strategy (2022) includes as its key objectives 'protect against cyber attack', 'detect cyber security events', and 'develop the right cyber security skills, knowledge and culture' in order to ensure that the Government’s critical functions are cyber resilient.

The NSCS Active Cyber Defence (ACD) programme has several core services, including the Takedown Service and Protective Domain Name Service or PDNS. In 2022, the total number of takedowns conducted by the Takedown Service was 2.4 million. The same year, PDNS blocked over 5 million requests for domains associated with ransomware, a significant contribution to protecting UK organisations from this threat.

We have a comprehensive approach to attract and develop new talent, and to upskill cyber professionals. This includes the cyber apprenticeship and Fast Stream programmes. Cross-government awareness campaigns and training courses are available for all civil servants, including accredited and examination-based learning. We were recently recognised amongst the 2023 Top 100 Apprenticeship Employers nationally. We provide training for specific cyber roles and mid-career switchers with a high level of core skills.

At a national level, the Government is supporting the demand for skilled people in the strong and growing cyber industry with a diverse range of skills interventions. The Government is also looking at long-term solutions, including through the Digital and Computing Skills and Education Taskforce and support for the UK Cyber Security Council.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
17th Jan 2024
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what recent assessment his Department has made of the level of cyber threat posed to public (a) services and (b) institutions.

Government and the wider public sector remain an attractive target to a broad range of cyber threat actors of every level of capability and motivation from nation states to cyber criminals.

In December last year, the UK and its allies exposed a series of attempts by the Russian Intelligence Services to target high-profile individuals and entities through cyber operations.

The Government Cyber Security Strategy (2022) includes as its key objectives 'protect against cyber attack', 'detect cyber security events', and 'develop the right cyber security skills, knowledge and culture' in order to ensure that the Government’s critical functions are cyber resilient.

The NSCS Active Cyber Defence (ACD) programme has several core services, including the Takedown Service and Protective Domain Name Service or PDNS. In 2022, the total number of takedowns conducted by the Takedown Service was 2.4 million. The same year, PDNS blocked over 5 million requests for domains associated with ransomware, a significant contribution to protecting UK organisations from this threat.

We have a comprehensive approach to attract and develop new talent, and to upskill cyber professionals. This includes the cyber apprenticeship and Fast Stream programmes. Cross-government awareness campaigns and training courses are available for all civil servants, including accredited and examination-based learning. We were recently recognised amongst the 2023 Top 100 Apprenticeship Employers nationally. We provide training for specific cyber roles and mid-career switchers with a high level of core skills.

At a national level, the Government is supporting the demand for skilled people in the strong and growing cyber industry with a diverse range of skills interventions. The Government is also looking at long-term solutions, including through the Digital and Computing Skills and Education Taskforce and support for the UK Cyber Security Council.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
17th Jan 2024
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether his Department is taking steps to engage with the private sector to improve the cyber resilience of public services.

The Government is working with the private sector as part of our whole-of-society approach to delivering the National Cyber Strategy. The Strategy sets out the Government’s ambitions to raise levels of resilience across all sectors by next year, with a particular focus on our Critical National Infrastructure (CNI) and making government an exemplar.

As announced by the Deputy Prime Minister at the CyberUK conference in April 2023, the Government has set ambitious targets for all CNI sectors to strengthen their cyber resilience and plans to bring private sector businesses working in CNI within the scope of cyber resilience regulations.

The Government also works closely with the private sector through a range of advisory groups. The National Cyber Advisory Board, co-chaired by the Deputy Prime Minister invites senior leaders across the cyber ecosystem to support and inform the Government’s implementation of the National Cyber Strategy. The Board allows the Government to hear alternative viewpoints, invite challenge, and harness networks within the cyber sector and beyond.

The Government Cyber Security Advisory Board brings together leading cyber professionals from industry and academia to provide expertise and constructive challenge, as the Government delivers the Government Cyber Security Strategy.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
17th Jan 2024
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what plans he has to improve the functioning of the House of Lords Appointments Commission.

The House of Lords Appointment Commission (HOLAC) does important work in providing vetting advice to the Prime Minister on all nominations for life peers to ensure the highest standards of propriety. The Government has recently appointed a new Chair as well as two new Independent members to increase HOLAC’s capacity. The Government is grateful for the work it carries out, and has no plans to review its function at the current time.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
17th Jan 2024
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will make an assessment of the potential impact of the border target operating model on the (a) flow and (b) security of goods.

The UK Government is prepared for the implementation of the Border Target Operating Model.

The Border Target Operating Model takes an innovative approach to controls, making use of technology and data to make it simple for businesses to trade while maintaining the flow and security of goods. The controls introduced through the Border Target Operating Model are designed to keep the UK safe, protecting our food supply-chains and our agricultural sector from disease outbreaks that would cause significant economic harm.

We have and will continue to work with the European Commission as well as individually with EU Member States to ensure local authorities are prepared for the controls. The Border Target Operating Model was developed through extensive consultation with industry stakeholders. We continue to publish further advice on gov.uk, and we engage directly with EU-based businesses and UK businesses through webinars, established business-government and commodity-specific fora to raise awareness of the forthcoming controls and seek feedback to address any concerns.

In accordance with usual practice, we are undertaking a programme of operational testing with users of the border prior to the changes being implemented to ensure that any potential issues are identified and resolved. We will continue to monitor preparedness and to support businesses as the Border Target Operating Model is implemented.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
17th Jan 2024
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether he has had recent discussions with industry stakeholders on (a) the border target operating model and (b) the potential impact of that model on (i) trade and (ii) customs operations.

The UK Government is prepared for the implementation of the Border Target Operating Model.

The Border Target Operating Model takes an innovative approach to controls, making use of technology and data to make it simple for businesses to trade while maintaining the flow and security of goods. The controls introduced through the Border Target Operating Model are designed to keep the UK safe, protecting our food supply-chains and our agricultural sector from disease outbreaks that would cause significant economic harm.

We have and will continue to work with the European Commission as well as individually with EU Member States to ensure local authorities are prepared for the controls. The Border Target Operating Model was developed through extensive consultation with industry stakeholders. We continue to publish further advice on gov.uk, and we engage directly with EU-based businesses and UK businesses through webinars, established business-government and commodity-specific fora to raise awareness of the forthcoming controls and seek feedback to address any concerns.

In accordance with usual practice, we are undertaking a programme of operational testing with users of the border prior to the changes being implemented to ensure that any potential issues are identified and resolved. We will continue to monitor preparedness and to support businesses as the Border Target Operating Model is implemented.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
17th Jan 2024
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether he has made a recent assessment of the potential impact of the Border Target Operating Model on the (a) flow and (b) security of goods.

The UK Government is prepared for the implementation of the Border Target Operating Model.

The Border Target Operating Model takes an innovative approach to controls, making use of technology and data to make it simple for businesses to trade while maintaining the flow and security of goods. The controls introduced through the Border Target Operating Model are designed to keep the UK safe, protecting our food supply-chains and our agricultural sector from disease outbreaks that would cause significant economic harm.

We have and will continue to work with the European Commission as well as individually with EU Member States to ensure local authorities are prepared for the controls. The Border Target Operating Model was developed through extensive consultation with industry stakeholders. We continue to publish further advice on gov.uk, and we engage directly with EU-based businesses and UK businesses through webinars, established business-government and commodity-specific fora to raise awareness of the forthcoming controls and seek feedback to address any concerns.

In accordance with usual practice, we are undertaking a programme of operational testing with users of the border prior to the changes being implemented to ensure that any potential issues are identified and resolved. We will continue to monitor preparedness and to support businesses as the Border Target Operating Model is implemented.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
14th Sep 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, which Minister in their Department is responsible for overseeing work on long-term strategic challenges; and how many officials in their Department (a) undertake horizon scanning work and (b) focus on delivering long-term priorities.

The Liaison Committee recently launched an inquiry into select committee scrutiny of strategic thinking across Whitehall. The Government will be providing written evidence to this in due course.

The Cabinet Office has a robust strategic planning regime which promotes horizon scanning and attention to long-term strategic challenges and issues, delivering current priority projects, and responding to current events.This regime and the principles that underpin it are set out in the UK Government Resilience Framework.

Under the Prime Minister, this Conservative Government will always look to make the right long-term decisions for the country.



Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
13th Sep 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what guidance his Department provides officials with (a) developed vetting and (b) other security clearances on public interactions.

All staff are given a security induction when joining the department that includes the required security behaviours, a modified version of this induction is repeated for experienced Civil Servants when a new access pass is required.

Alongside this the Resilience and Security team also offer security briefings to Ministers, staff with security concerns or elevated risk and travel advice for all staff.

All staff are reminded, in writing, on receipt of their vetting clearance, that their actions should meet the standards of behaviour set out in the Civil Service Code and the Civil Service Management and that their behaviour must not place themselves in a position where they could be compromised.