Chris Bryant Portrait

Chris Bryant

Labour - Rhondda

First elected: 7th June 2001

Shadow Minister (Creative Industries and Digital)

(since September 2023)

Foreign Affairs Committee
2nd Mar 2020 - 28th Nov 2023
Speaker's Committee for the Independent Parliamentary Standards Authority
6th May 2020 - 7th Sep 2023
Committee on Standards
6th May 2020 - 7th Sep 2023
Liaison Committee (Commons)
20th May 2020 - 7th Sep 2023
Child Support Collection (Domestic Abuse) Bill
7th Dec 2022 - 14th Dec 2022
Committee of Privileges
19th May 2020 - 14th Jun 2022
Committee of Privileges
12th May 2020 - 14th Jun 2022
Local Government (Disqualification) Bill
24th Nov 2021 - 1st Dec 2021
Cultural Objects (Protection From Seizure) Bill
9th Nov 2021 - 17th Nov 2021
Liaison Committee Sub-committee on the effectiveness and influence of the select committee system
13th Feb 2019 - 6th Nov 2019
Speaker's Advisory Committee on Works of Art
28th Jan 2019 - 6th Nov 2019
Liaison Committee (Commons)
6th Nov 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Speaker's Committee for the Independent Parliamentary Standards Authority
31st Oct 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Finance Committee (Commons)
30th Oct 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Foreign Affairs Committee
11th Sep 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Finance Committee (Commons)
31st Oct 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Speaker's Committee for the Independent Parliamentary Standards Authority
10th Nov 2015 - 3rd May 2017
Palace of Westminster (Joint Committee)
16th Sep 2015 - 3rd May 2017
House of Commons Commission
14th Sep 2015 - 21st Nov 2016
Shadow Leader of the House of Commons
14th Sep 2015 - 26th Jun 2016
Shadow Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport
8th May 2015 - 14th Sep 2015
Shadow Minister (Culture, Media and Sport)
3rd Dec 2014 - 8th May 2015
Shadow Minister (Work and Pensions)
7th Oct 2013 - 3rd Dec 2014
Shadow Minister (Home Affairs)
7th Oct 2011 - 7th Oct 2013
Shadow Minister (Justice) (Political and Constitutional Reform)
8th Oct 2010 - 7th Oct 2011
Shadow Minister (Europe)
12th May 2010 - 8th Oct 2010
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Europe)
13th Oct 2009 - 6th May 2010
Modernisation of the House of Commons
26th Jul 2007 - 6th May 2010
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign and Commonwealth Office)
9th Jun 2009 - 13th Oct 2009
Deputy Leader of the House of Commons
5th Oct 2008 - 5th Jun 2009
Public Accounts Committee
4th Jun 2007 - 8th Nov 2007
Culture, Media and Sport Committee
16th Jul 2001 - 12th Jul 2005
House of Lords Reform (Joint Committee)
19th Jun 2002 - 5th May 2005


There are no upcoming events identified
Division Votes
Wednesday 21st February 2024
Ceasefire in Gaza
voted No - in line with the party majority
One of 173 Labour No votes vs 0 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 20 Noes - 212
Speeches
Thursday 22nd February 2024
Oral Answers to Questions
I am sorry, but the Government’s answer to the Chair of the Culture, Media and Sport Committee was a load …
Written Answers
Monday 22nd January 2024
Business Rates: Film and Television
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether he has made an assessment of the potential impact of changes in …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
Tuesday 7th February 2023
Seizure of Russian State Assets and Support for Ukraine Bill 2022-23
A Bill to require the Secretary of State to lay before Parliament proposals for the seizure of Russian state assets …
MP Financial Interests
Monday 30th October 2023
1. Employment and earnings
19 January 2024, received £1,000 from Bloomsbury Publishing, 50 Bedford Square, London WC1B 3DP, for reading the audiobook of my …
EDM signed
Monday 28th November 2022
Funding for fire and rescue services
That this House recognises and celebrates the significant role firefighters play in society, particularly in the face of increasing extreme …
Supported Legislation
Tuesday 21st February 2023
Sun Protection Products (Value Added Tax) Bill 2022-23
A Bill to exempt sun protection products from VAT; and for connected purposes.

Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Chris Bryant has voted in 634 divisions, and 1 time against the majority of their Party.

19 Oct 2021 - Independent Expert Panel Recommendations for Sanctions and the Recall of MPs Act 2015 - View Vote Context
Chris Bryant voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 1 Labour No votes vs 158 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 213 Noes - 297
View All Chris Bryant Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Jacob Rees-Mogg (Conservative)
(147 debate interactions)
Boris Johnson (Conservative)
(62 debate interactions)
Eleanor Laing (Conservative)
(60 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Cabinet Office
(254 debate contributions)
Leader of the House
(242 debate contributions)
Department of Health and Social Care
(122 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
Legislation Debates
National Security Act 2023
(2,008 words contributed)
Coronavirus Act 2020
(1,995 words contributed)
View All Legislation Debates
View all Chris Bryant's debates

Rhondda Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petitions with highest Rhondda signature proportion
Petitions with most Rhondda signatures
Petition Debates Contributed

A new offence should be created and legal sanctions should be introduced to stop MPs intentionally or recklessly misleading the public. This could restore a degree of trust in the UK's political system.

The Government should introduce legislation to make lying in the House of Commons a criminal offence. This would mean that all MPs, including Ministers, would face a serious penalty for knowingly making false statements in the House of Commons, as is the case in a court of law.


Latest EDMs signed by Chris Bryant

3rd March 2022
Chris Bryant signed this EDM as a sponsor on Thursday 3rd March 2022

Russia and the Intelligence and Security Committee's report

Tabled by: Caroline Lucas (Green Party - Brighton, Pavilion)
That this House unequivocally condemns the Russian invasion of Ukraine and decision of President Putin to start a brutal war in Europe; notes that the Intelligence and Security Committee of Parliament report, entitled Russia, published 21 July 2020, HC 632, is of critical importance to UK national security and particularly …
36 signatures
(Most recent: 19 Apr 2022)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 17
Scottish National Party: 8
Liberal Democrat: 5
Plaid Cymru: 3
Green Party: 1
Social Democratic & Labour Party: 1
Independent: 1
Alba Party: 1
6th September 2021
Chris Bryant signed this EDM on Wednesday 8th September 2021

Communication of changes to the state pension age for 1950s-born women

Tabled by: Andrew Gwynne (Labour - Denton and Reddish)
That this House notes the recent findings of the Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman's report entitled Women's State Pension Age: our findings on the Department for Work and Pensions' communication of changes; urges the Government to recognise the negative effects of successive DWP maladministration; calls for compensation for 1950s-born women; …
94 signatures
(Most recent: 24 Jan 2022)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 44
Scottish National Party: 27
Democratic Unionist Party: 6
Liberal Democrat: 5
Independent: 4
Plaid Cymru: 3
Conservative: 3
Social Democratic & Labour Party: 2
Green Party: 1
Alba Party: 1
View All Chris Bryant's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Chris Bryant, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


1 Urgent Question tabled by Chris Bryant

Thursday 9th September 2021

2 Adjournment Debates led by Chris Bryant

Thursday 11th March 2021
Monday 23rd March 2020

4 Bills introduced by Chris Bryant


To make provision about offences when perpetrated against emergency workers, and persons assisting such workers; to make certain offences aggravated when perpetrated against such workers in the exercise of their duty; to require persons suspected of certain assaults against such workers which may pose a health risk to provide intimate samples and to make it an offence, without reasonable excuse, to refuse to provide such samples; and for connected purposes.

This Bill received Royal Assent on 13th September 2018 and was enacted into law.


A Bill to make provision about meeting the needs of adults and children with an acquired brain injury; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 40%

Last Event - 2nd Reading
Friday 3rd December 2021

A Bill to require the Secretary of State to lay before Parliament proposals for the seizure of Russian state assets to provide support for Ukraine; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading
Tuesday 7th February 2023
(Read Debate)

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to require schools to provide sex and relationships education to registered pupils; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 8th September 2010

127 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
5th Jan 2024
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, if the Government will publish a list of meetings he held with Dominic Cummings in (a) 2022 and (b) 2023.

Since May 2010, the Government has published on gov.uk details of official government meetings with external organisations.

In 2011, this was extended to include details of meetings with senior media executives, covering official government, social and political meetings.

But otherwise, the Government does not record political meetings.

I would observe that since 2016, the Labour Party has stopped publishing its own meeting data on shadow frontbench meetings with senior media executives, breaking a commitment made by the then Labour Party leader (the Rt Hon Member for Doncaster North) during the Leveson Inquiry. The Hon. Member may recall how previous data illustrated his engagement with Evgeny Lebedev (now Lord Lebedev). As a shadow DCMS spokesman, the Hon. Member may wish to raise this subsequent shyness with his Opposition colleagues.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
4th Jul 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether any (a) parliamentary private secretary and (b) hon. Members have travelled on overseas visits organised by Government Departments since December 2019.

As set out in the Ministerial Code, official overseas travel by a Parliamentary Private Secretary would be exceptional. There have been no approvals by 10 Downing Street for such Parliamentary Private Secretary travel under this Administration.

Official overseas travel is permitted for trade envoys in line with their responsibilities. In that respect, I refer the hon. Member to the answer to him of 29 June 2023, PQ 190260.

This answer also serves as a reply to the hon. Member to his recent question to the Prime Minister at the Liaison Committee.



Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
19th Jun 2023
To ask the Prime Minister, when he plans to respond to the letter from the hon. Member for Rhondda dated 18 April 2023.

I refer the hon. Member to the letter from the Immigration Minister (my right hon. Friend, the Member for Newark) of 25 April, which serves as a substantive reply to the points the hon. Member raised in his letters of 18 April.

Regretfully, due to an administrative error, the reply was not clearer that the letter was being sent in response to both his letters.

A copy of that reply is in the Library (Deposited paper DEP2023-0421).

Rishi Sunak
Prime Minister, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, and Minister for the Union
20th Sep 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, when his Department plans to respond to the letter from the hon. Member for Rhondda dated 10 August 2022 on the (a) accuracy of and (b) delay in publication of transparency data on ministerial gifts, hospitality, travel and external meetings.

The Cabinet Office replied to the hon. member’s letter of 10 August 2022 regarding transparency data on 27 September 2022.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
6th Sep 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what definition of a meeting is used for transparency reports on Ministerial meetings published by Government departments.

Section 8.14 of the Ministerial Code clarifies the scope of ministerial meetings for quarterly transparency returns. Detailed guidance provided to government departments is also available online.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
22nd Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, when he plans for the list of ministers' interests, last updated in July 2020, to be updated.

Since the first List of Ministers’ Interests was published in 2009, the timing of publication has varied. The next list of Ministers’ interests will be published in due course, following the appointment of a new Independent Adviser on Ministers’ Interests.

15th Jul 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what recent discussions he has had with Cabinet colleagues on acquired brain injury.

I can assure the Hon Member that all colleagues across government recognise the importance of coordinating support for people with acquired brain injury, as I highlighted to him in our meeting of 1 July. The Hon Member is a powerful champion of this significant cause on which government is determined to make progress.

In line with the practice of successive governments, I am not able to disclose details of internal discussions, but I will update the Hon Member on the government’s work on this issue in due course.

Michael Gove
Minister for Intergovernmental Relations
20th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, how much from the public purse was spent by each of his Trade Envoys in the last year.

Trade Envoys are a valuable resource and support Ministers in progressing our trade and investment agenda in 66 markets across the world. A total of £264,192 was spent in the last year (June 2022 – June 2023). These costs represent the cost of flights and some hotel and other sundry expenses when the official British residence was unavailable or inappropriate. It would not be in the national interest to publish individual breakdowns, given it could create misconceptions that certain countries were favoured or prioritised over others, undermining the UK’s international relations and diplomacy.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
17th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, when she will implement (a) Section 61 to 65 and (b) the remaining provisions of the Product Security and Telecommunications Infrastructure Act 2022.

We are aiming to implement all remaining provisions of the Product Security and Telecommunications Infrastructure Act 2022 by the end of 2024.

These provisions are complex, and it is important we ensure they are commenced in a manner that effectively delivers the changes legislated for by Parliament in the Act.

DSIT officials will continue to keep stakeholders informed of progress, including more detailed information on likely timelines when appropriate.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
12th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, if she will make an assessment of the potential merits of instructing Ofcom to (a) monitor compliance by (i) network operators and (ii) contractors using Openreach ducts and (b) require registration from any organisation using Openreach ducts to help ensure the (A) resilience of the UK’s networks and (B) security of national infrastructure.

Openreach has commercial contracts with broadband contractors who access its ducts and poles. These contracts include detailed requirements on how Openreach should be notified of where and when companies will be building fibre. It is ultimately a commercial decision for Openreach to decide how it enforces these contracts, and we understand it already has an active non-compliance process in place.

If there are concerns that competition issues might arise from the enforcement of these commercial contracts, these should be raised with Ofcom. Ofcom’s Openreach Monitoring Unit ensures that the company meets expectations in how it deals with both its customers and its competitors.

DSIT engages with Ofcom and Openreach on a regular basis and no concerns have been raised to date regarding the use of Openreach ducts by other companies and contractors. DSIT will continue to monitor potential risks to the cyber, physical and personnel security of telecoms infrastructure and assess the need for intervention, based on advice from NCSC and NPSA.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
10th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, what steps her Department is taking to (a) ensure the security of network infrastructure and (b) prevent unauthorised access to fibre lines during the (i) installation and (ii) utilisation of Openreach ducting.

The Department for Science, Innovation and Technology (DSIT) works with Ofcom, UK technical authorities (the National Cyber Security Centre and the National Protective Security Authority) and industry to identify risks and ensure the security of telecoms network infrastructure.

Through the Telecommunications (Security) Act 2021 and working with the National Cyber Security Centre and Ofcom, we have one of the toughest telecoms cyber security regimes in the world with the Electronic Communications (Security Measures) Regulations 2022 and Code of Practice. These place stringent obligations on providers of public telecoms networks to protect those networks against security threats. The Act also created new national security powers to manage and control the use of high-risk vendors in the UK’s telecoms network.

DSIT also works with the National Protective Security Agency (NPSA) in developing telecoms security policies. The NPSA advises government and industry on the physical security of infrastructure, including its installation.

DSIT will continue to develop policies to address significant risks to the cyber, physical and personnel security of telecoms infrastructure where necessary, based on advice from the NPSA and NCSC.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
15th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, what information her Department holds on the number and proportion of (a) railway signals, (b) motorway signs and (c) cash machines that rely on the public switched telephone network.

The change to digital landlines will affect many sectors of the economy. Generally, we cannot definitively comment on the number or proportion of any services and devices that rely on the Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN). They are procured from various manufacturers and function differently depending on their make. Many services and devices are also purchased privately by individuals or businesses who have no obligation to supply us with this information.

Having said that, we know that an estimated 1.8 million people in the UK currently use telecare services. Of these, roughly 1.3 million use alarms in their own homes and 0.5 million in a range of care homes, supported housing and sheltered living arrangements. There are multiple different telecare manufacturers; the make-up of their devices, including their connectivity solution, depends on the provider.

We understand that National Highways do not have any motorway signs that depend on the PSTN, as they own and operate their own switched network. With regards to railway signals, Network Rail has a migration programme for its estate but does not use PSTN telephony for its signals.

DSIT convenes the relevant government departments, agencies and stakeholders to a Cross Whitehall meeting on a quarterly basis to encourage all parties to consider the potential impacts of the PSTN migration on their respective sectors.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
15th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, how many (a) traffic lights, (b) CCTV cameras and (c) telecare systems rely on the public switched telephone network.

The change to digital landlines will affect many sectors of the economy. Generally, we cannot definitively comment on the number or proportion of any services and devices that rely on the Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN). They are procured from various manufacturers and function differently depending on their make. Many services and devices are also purchased privately by individuals or businesses who have no obligation to supply us with this information.

Having said that, we know that an estimated 1.8 million people in the UK currently use telecare services. Of these, roughly 1.3 million use alarms in their own homes and 0.5 million in a range of care homes, supported housing and sheltered living arrangements. There are multiple different telecare manufacturers; the make-up of their devices, including their connectivity solution, depends on the provider.

We understand that National Highways do not have any motorway signs that depend on the PSTN, as they own and operate their own switched network. With regards to railway signals, Network Rail has a migration programme for its estate but does not use PSTN telephony for its signals.

DSIT convenes the relevant government departments, agencies and stakeholders to a Cross Whitehall meeting on a quarterly basis to encourage all parties to consider the potential impacts of the PSTN migration on their respective sectors.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
15th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, how much and what proportion of the Project Gigabit fund has been allocated as of 15 November 2023.

Up to £5 billion of funding is available through Project Gigabit, which was launched in 2021 to roll out gigabit-capable broadband to premises across the UK that are not included in suppliers' commercial plans. The programme is scheduled to run until 2030.

We have already made over £2 billion of funding available to suppliers through our live procurements and contracts. In addition, the Government is providing up to £210 million through the Gigabit Broadband Voucher Scheme.

15th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, what financial support has UK Research and Innovation given to catapults in each of the last five years.

The UK’s nine Catapults fuel economic growth in the UK by enabling innovative businesses to turn great ideas into reality. Between April 2018 and March 2023 the Catapults received the financial support set out below from UKRI. These figures are based on committed spend and include core grant funding and additional, competitive funding won by Catapults from UKRI in collaboration with businesses. They exclude spend from other Government departments and Arms Length Bodies.

Financial Year

Spend

2018/2019

2019/2020

£310m

£317m

2020/2021

£348m

2021/2022

£346m

2022/2023

£367m

Andrew Griffith
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
13th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, when she plans to publish her Department's transparency returns for Ministers' gifts, hospitality, meetings and travel for February to March, April to June and July to September.

The Department's transparency returns for Ministers' gifts, hospitality, meetings and travel for February to March and July to September will be published shortly. The return for April to June was published on 21st November 2023 here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/dsit-ministerial-gifts-hospitality-travel-meetings-april-to-june-2023

Michelle Donelan
Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology
19th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, what her Department's expected timescale is for publishing the list of the six new Creative Industries Clusters.

The Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC), on behalf of UK Research Innovation (UKRI), has committed to delivering at least £50m of funding for Creative Industries Clusters as signalled in the Creative Sector Vision. The first wave of the programme supported clusters in the South West, Yorkshire, and the South East in England, two clusters in Scotland, one in south Wales and one in Northern Ireland. AHRC is committed to ensuring that this second wave of funding for Clusters reaches new sub-sectors and new geographies across the UK. Further details will be published in this financial year.

10th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what percentage of Subject Access Requests are fully answered by government departments within the legal time limit.

The Secretary of State for the Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy (BEIS) as Data Controller for BEIS is only responsible Subject Access Requests (SARs) processed by the department.

100% of SARs processed by BEIS for 2022 have met the statutory deadline set down in UK data protection legislation.

10th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many subject access requests his Department has (a) received and (b) responded to within the statutory limit in the last five years.

The Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy (BEIS) has received 17,459 Subject Access Requests (SARs) in the last 5 years (01 January 2017 to 31 July 2022 inclusive).

All SARs were responded to within the statutory deadline set down in UK data protection legislation.

10th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many and what proportion of staff in his Department work from home.

The Department’s hybrid working policy states that all staff can only work up to a maximum of 60% of their time at home over a 4 week period, on the condition that business needs are prioritised. On average, most staff work at least 2 days a week, each week in an office. Last week between 3 -7 October, 16% of staff were working at home or on annual or other sorts of leave.

30th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many artists have received royalties through the artist's resale right.

Artist’s Resale Right is administered by the Design and Artists Copyright Society (DACS) and the Artists’ Collecting Society (ACS). Since the right was introduced in 2006, DACS reported in 2019 to paying out royalties to 5,424 artists and artists’ estates and ACS reported in 2020 to paying out royalties to 780 artists and artists’ estates.

25th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what support his Department is giving to customers of energy companies that have gone into administration to retrieve their personal data.

When an energy supplier fails the customers are transferred by Ofgem to a new supplier under the Supplier of Last Resort process. This includes the personal data necessary to set up an account with the new supplier and ensure the customer’s credit balance with the failed supplier is honoured.

Insolvency practitioners are appointed to administer the failed company and must comply with the requirements of the Data Protection Act in relation to any personal data that remains within the failed company. Customers rights regarding data protection and access to personal data remain unaffected.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
11th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many disused coal tips there are in (a) England and (b) Wales.

There are 2144 coal tips in Wales, with continued refinement of information ongoing.

There is no central assessment of the number of Tips in England but the Coal Authority own 7 tips in England and these are kept under regular monitoring.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
11th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of the Mines and Quarries Act 1969 for securing disused coal tips in England and Wales.

The Welsh Government has asked the Law Commission to evaluate current legislation relating to coal tip safety with a view to identifying gaps, inconsistencies and approaches which are unhelpful or have become outdated. It will identify options for alternative regulatory models appropriate for adoption in Wales, and consider the features needed to ensure that any proposed system is effective. The project is expected to take between 13 and 15 months.

The majority of Tips in England are lower risk as the topography is flatter in England and more have been economically restored/developed as they are more suitable for that and there has been more economic drivers. Following the Tylorstown slip in Wales local authorities in England were asked to check any tips they owned and report any concerns. No concerns were reported.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
11th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the cost of securing disused coal tips in (a) England and (b) Wales.

£9m from UK funding has been allocated for coal tip safety in Wales in 2020/21. The UK and Welsh Governments are discussing longer term funding.

The Coal Authority budget an average of £10k per tip per annum for ongoing maintenance and inspection for the tips they own across the UK (26 in Wales, 7 in England). There can be additional costs on individual tips if more extensive work is identified.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
24th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans the Coal Authority has to tackle (a) landslides on and (b) the flooding of former coal sites.

As part of its statutory responsibilities the Coal Authority, one of the Department’s Partner Organisations, has regular contact with Local Authorities in former coal field areas on a range of issues relating to liabilities arising from former coal workings. Following the recent floods, the Coal Authority will be writing to all Local Authorities to remind them of their responsibilities in relation to the management and oversight of coal sites, offering support and advice where required.

The Coal Authority are already working with the Wales Office, the Welsh Assembly Government, Local Authorities and Natural Resource Wales to assess the risks in relation to coal tips in Wales where there have been specific concerns raised.

13th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, when she plans to publish her Department's transparency returns for ministers' gifts, hospitality, meetings and travel for April to June and July to September.

The timing for the publication of Ministerial Gifts & Hospitality Transparency data is set by the Cabinet Office. The data for Q1 April - June 23 was published on gov.uk on 19 October 2023 and can be found here. The timing for publication of the Q2 July - September 23 data has not yet been confirmed, but it is expected to be published from mid December.

19th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, which SMEs have received funding via the Create Growth Programme since its inception.

The Create Growth Programme provides finance, business support and investor capacity building to turn creative businesses into high growth firms. So far, the finance strand of the programme has awarded more than £3m to over 100 businesses. The business support and investor capacity strands do not provide direct grant funding to businesses.

In the Creative Industries Sector Vision, we announced new funding of £10.9m to expand the programme to £28.4m, providing support to another six English regions, to make 12 in total. As part of this, we are working with our national delivery partner, Innovate UK, to deliver a further two grant-funding competitions over the next 18 months. These will benefit even more high-potential creative businesses.

An initial list of funded SMEs can be accessed from the "Innovate UK's funded projects since 2004" dataset (filtered for "DCMS Create Growth Programme"), accessible here. The remainder of funded SMEs will be added in due course.

19th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, whether she is taking steps to establish how many performing venues have reinforced autoclaved aerated concrete.

Individual building owners and managers are responsible for health and safety, including responding to safety alerts such as the one issued by the Standing Committee on Structural Safety on 1 May 2019 on the failure of reinforced autoclaved aerated concrete (RAAC) planks.

As buildings are identified as having suspected or confirmed instances of RAAC, building owners and managers should follow the guidance to put appropriate mitigation in place.

3rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if he will publish the evidence behind the Government's decision to allow aquaria and galleries that sell art to open as early as April 2021, but not museums and galleries.

  • The government published the roadmap on 22 February, which sets out a step-by-step plan to ease restrictions in England cautiously.

  • The design of the roadmap has been informed by the latest scientific evidence and seeks a balance between our key social and economic priorities, whilst preserving the health and safety of the country. The scientific evidence shows that opening too early or too quickly risks a further lockdown.

  • Under the roadmap, we seek to reopen outdoor elements of museums and galleries and aquariums in Step 2 (no earlier than 12th April), with indoor elements at these attractions opening at Step 3 (no earlier than 17th May).

  • Commercial art galleries can reopen in Step 2, when restrictions on non-essential retail are lifted.

1st Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the Acquired Brain Injury Card for people under 18 years old produced by the Child Brain Injury Trust, what steps officials in his Department have taken with officials in the (a) Department for Health and Social Care and (b) Department for Levelling up, Housing and Communities to ensure that that injury card is promoted in (i) schools, (ii) hospitals and (iii) local authorities.

We welcome the introduction of the Acquired Brain Injury Card and feel that offering young people this personal Card is a helpful in supporting their independence and to help others to better understand the potential impact of their injury. It is up to individual schools to choose what to promote in their schools.

1st Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps officials in his Department is taking with officials in other Government departments to establish a joined up approach to support children and adults with an Acquired Brain Injury.

It is important that children with medical conditions, such as acquired brain injury, are supported to receive a full education.

A pupil’s acquired brain injury could manifest in different ways. Support should be tailored to their own learning barriers, irrespective of their diagnosis. The special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) Code of Practice asks schools and colleges to address pupils’ individual educational needs, regardless of their condition.

Under Section 100 of the Children and Families Act 2014, governing boards are required to make arrangements to support pupils with medical conditions and to have regard to statutory guidance. The guidance covers a range of areas and is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/supporting-pupils-at-school-with-medical-conditions--3.

To be awarded qualified teacher status, trainees must meet the Teachers’ Standards, which include a requirement that they adapt teaching to meet the strengths and needs of all pupils. The performance of all existing teachers in maintained schools must be assessed every year against the Teachers' Standards. It is the responsibility of school leaders to determine the training needs of their staff, within their approach to school improvement, professional development and performance management.

In line with the approach that we expect school-based staff to identify and intervene to support any pupil who presents with difficulties in learning, we expect that training should relate to the specific learning needs an individual child has. For example, we have a contract with NASEN (the Whole School SEND consortium) to support schools, this includes training for school staff on how to tailor provision for different types of learning needs.

The SEND system is designed to get the right support in place for all children and young people with additional needs, so they are able to fulfil their potential, just like other children.

The reforms to the SEND system are key to this. The government has strengthened systems for joining up education, health and care support for those with complex needs, and placed families at the heart of the decision-making about their children. The Education, Health and Care (EHC) plan process is crucial in meeting the needs of those with complex needs. The arrangements are intended to support:

  • Joint working between health, social care and education
  • Multi-professional assessment of a child or young person’s needs involving relevant experts
  • The development of an individual EHC plan to meet those needs

This should provide a basis for the sharing of information and of expertise to ensure the needs of children and young people with acquired brain injury are supported in school.

1st Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he has taken to ensure that children and young people with an Acquired Brain Injury have a return to school pathway plan that provides tailored support for them, their family and their teachers.

It is important that children with medical conditions, such as acquired brain injury, are supported to receive a full education.

A pupil’s acquired brain injury could manifest in different ways. Support should be tailored to their own learning barriers, irrespective of their diagnosis. The special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) Code of Practice asks schools and colleges to address pupils’ individual educational needs, regardless of their condition.

Under Section 100 of the Children and Families Act 2014, governing boards are required to make arrangements to support pupils with medical conditions and to have regard to statutory guidance. The guidance covers a range of areas and is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/supporting-pupils-at-school-with-medical-conditions--3.

To be awarded qualified teacher status, trainees must meet the Teachers’ Standards, which include a requirement that they adapt teaching to meet the strengths and needs of all pupils. The performance of all existing teachers in maintained schools must be assessed every year against the Teachers' Standards. It is the responsibility of school leaders to determine the training needs of their staff, within their approach to school improvement, professional development and performance management.

In line with the approach that we expect school-based staff to identify and intervene to support any pupil who presents with difficulties in learning, we expect that training should relate to the specific learning needs an individual child has. For example, we have a contract with NASEN (the Whole School SEND consortium) to support schools, this includes training for school staff on how to tailor provision for different types of learning needs.

The SEND system is designed to get the right support in place for all children and young people with additional needs, so they are able to fulfil their potential, just like other children.

The reforms to the SEND system are key to this. The government has strengthened systems for joining up education, health and care support for those with complex needs, and placed families at the heart of the decision-making about their children. The Education, Health and Care (EHC) plan process is crucial in meeting the needs of those with complex needs. The arrangements are intended to support:

  • Joint working between health, social care and education
  • Multi-professional assessment of a child or young person’s needs involving relevant experts
  • The development of an individual EHC plan to meet those needs

This should provide a basis for the sharing of information and of expertise to ensure the needs of children and young people with acquired brain injury are supported in school.

1st Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he has taken to ensure that additional training on acquired brain injury awareness is in place for school-based staff, particularly named lead professionals who support pupils with an Acquired Brain Injury and Special Educational Needs Coordinators.

It is important that children with medical conditions, such as acquired brain injury, are supported to receive a full education.

A pupil’s acquired brain injury could manifest in different ways. Support should be tailored to their own learning barriers, irrespective of their diagnosis. The special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) Code of Practice asks schools and colleges to address pupils’ individual educational needs, regardless of their condition.

Under Section 100 of the Children and Families Act 2014, governing boards are required to make arrangements to support pupils with medical conditions and to have regard to statutory guidance. The guidance covers a range of areas and is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/supporting-pupils-at-school-with-medical-conditions--3.

To be awarded qualified teacher status, trainees must meet the Teachers’ Standards, which include a requirement that they adapt teaching to meet the strengths and needs of all pupils. The performance of all existing teachers in maintained schools must be assessed every year against the Teachers' Standards. It is the responsibility of school leaders to determine the training needs of their staff, within their approach to school improvement, professional development and performance management.

In line with the approach that we expect school-based staff to identify and intervene to support any pupil who presents with difficulties in learning, we expect that training should relate to the specific learning needs an individual child has. For example, we have a contract with NASEN (the Whole School SEND consortium) to support schools, this includes training for school staff on how to tailor provision for different types of learning needs.

The SEND system is designed to get the right support in place for all children and young people with additional needs, so they are able to fulfil their potential, just like other children.

The reforms to the SEND system are key to this. The government has strengthened systems for joining up education, health and care support for those with complex needs, and placed families at the heart of the decision-making about their children. The Education, Health and Care (EHC) plan process is crucial in meeting the needs of those with complex needs. The arrangements are intended to support:

  • Joint working between health, social care and education
  • Multi-professional assessment of a child or young person’s needs involving relevant experts
  • The development of an individual EHC plan to meet those needs

This should provide a basis for the sharing of information and of expertise to ensure the needs of children and young people with acquired brain injury are supported in school.

1st Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department has taken to include Acquired Brain Injury in the Special Educational Needs and Disability Code of Practice.

It is important that children with medical conditions, such as acquired brain injury, are supported to receive a full education.

A pupil’s acquired brain injury could manifest in different ways. Support should be tailored to their own learning barriers, irrespective of their diagnosis. The special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) Code of Practice asks schools and colleges to address pupils’ individual educational needs, regardless of their condition.

Under Section 100 of the Children and Families Act 2014, governing boards are required to make arrangements to support pupils with medical conditions and to have regard to statutory guidance. The guidance covers a range of areas and is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/supporting-pupils-at-school-with-medical-conditions--3.

To be awarded qualified teacher status, trainees must meet the Teachers’ Standards, which include a requirement that they adapt teaching to meet the strengths and needs of all pupils. The performance of all existing teachers in maintained schools must be assessed every year against the Teachers' Standards. It is the responsibility of school leaders to determine the training needs of their staff, within their approach to school improvement, professional development and performance management.

In line with the approach that we expect school-based staff to identify and intervene to support any pupil who presents with difficulties in learning, we expect that training should relate to the specific learning needs an individual child has. For example, we have a contract with NASEN (the Whole School SEND consortium) to support schools, this includes training for school staff on how to tailor provision for different types of learning needs.

The SEND system is designed to get the right support in place for all children and young people with additional needs, so they are able to fulfil their potential, just like other children.

The reforms to the SEND system are key to this. The government has strengthened systems for joining up education, health and care support for those with complex needs, and placed families at the heart of the decision-making about their children. The Education, Health and Care (EHC) plan process is crucial in meeting the needs of those with complex needs. The arrangements are intended to support:

  • Joint working between health, social care and education
  • Multi-professional assessment of a child or young person’s needs involving relevant experts
  • The development of an individual EHC plan to meet those needs

This should provide a basis for the sharing of information and of expertise to ensure the needs of children and young people with acquired brain injury are supported in school.

21st Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what estimate he has made of the number and proportion of products in UK supermarkets that contain any amount of propiconazole.

Our pesticides regulations set strict controls on the amounts of pesticide residues that are permitted in food. We have an ongoing monitoring programme to provide assurance that food – including food imported from overseas – complies with the statutory maximum residue levels (MRLs) allowed. The results of this monitoring are published on the GOV.uk website.

In the most recent data (2020 and the first half of 2021), a total of 2,747 samples of food were collected and analysed for the presence of propiconazole. Of these, 38 samples were found to contain residues of this chemical, none of which were above the permitted MRLs set by law. These results indicate that propiconazole is not widely detected in food available to UK shoppers, and when it is detected, has been within the permitted limits.

HSE have proposed to lower the MRL for propiconazole to the default minimum level and details are expected to be announced shortly. This would mean food containing residues of this pesticide would no longer be able to be placed on the market in Great Britain.

Victoria Prentis
Attorney General
15th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent discussions he has had with representatives of supermarket chains on factors affecting the supply of fresh fruit and vegetables.

The UK has a highly resilient food supply chain, as demonstrated throughout the Covid-19 response. It is well equipped to deal with situations with the potential to cause disruption. Our high degree of food security is built on access to a range of sources, including robust supply chains domestically, and from other countries, including supplementing our excellent domestic production of fresh vegetables and fruit with imports of produce that cannot be grown here for all or part of the year. In the latest statistical release of Agriculture in the UK (July 2021), vegetables and fruit were the largest value imported commodity group in 2020.

Defra has well established ways of working with the industry and across Government to monitor risks that may arise. This includes extensive, regular and ongoing engagement with food retailers in preparedness for, and response to, issues with the potential to cause disruption to food supply chains, including those for fresh produce.

Victoria Prentis
Attorney General
1st Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the potential effect on the Welsh lamb industry in the event of a deal on the future relationship with the EU not being agreed by the end of the transition period.

The Government is fully committed to agreeing a trade deal with the EU from 1 January 2021. As any responsible government would, we are also preparing for the possibility of ‘no deal’, which is why we have contingency plans in place to minimise disruption for the food and farming sectors as much as possible.

Through the UK Agriculture Market Monitoring Group, Defra and the Devolved Administrations continue to monitor the market situation across various agricultural commodities. Officials have also been reviewing and updating the analysis we undertook as part of our no deal preparations in 2019. No decisions have been taken on any sector specific interventions, including lamb, after the end of the Transition Period.

Victoria Prentis
Attorney General
1st Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, if she will publish the list of (a) members of and (b) advisers to the Board of Trade.

The list of Advisers to the Board of Trade is available on GOV.UK. The President of the Board of Trade is my Rt Hon. Friend the Secretary of State for International Trade.

The advisers are:

  • Deputy President, Marcus Fysh MP

  • Secretary of State for Scotland

  • Secretary of State for Northern Ireland

  • Secretary of State for Wales

  • Minister for Trade Policy

  • Minister for Investment

  • Minister for Exports

  • Minister for International Trade

  • The Hon Tony Abbott AC

  • Karen Betts

  • Anne Boden MBE

  • Daniel Hannan

  • Rt Hon Patricia Hewitt

  • Emma Howard Boyd

  • Michael Liebreich

  • Rt Hon the Lord Mayor of the City of London, William Russell

  • Dr Linda Yueh

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
1st Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what criteria she uses in the appointment of (a) members of and (c) advisers to the Board of Trade.

Permanent members of the UK Board of Trade have to be members of the Privy Council. The President of the Board of Trade is my Rt Hon. Friend the Secretary of State for International Trade.

Advisers to the UK Board of Trade are appointed through the Direct Ministerial Appointment process, following Cabinet Office Propriety & Ethics guidelines. This means that individuals are appointed at the discretion of the Secretary of State. The roles are taken on a voluntary basis and are not remunerated.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
17th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of reducing the Universal Credit taper rate.

In November 2021, The Government reduced the taper rate from 63% to 55%. There are no current plans to further reduce the taper, however this will be kept under review.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
14th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if he will publish a further equalities impact assessment for the Data Protection and Digital Information Bill relating to third party data gathering.

The department has assessed the impact of the third-party data measure in the regulatory impact assessment scrutinised and green-rated by the Regulatory Policy Committee. This was published on the 27th November 2023 as part of the supporting documentation for the Data Protection and Information Bill and is available here: Data Protection and Digital Information Bill: supporting documents - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk).

The department has fulfilled all the requirements of the Public Sector Equality Duty (PSED) as set out in section 149 of the Equality Act 2010 and in line with our statutory duty keeps the impact of this measure on groups with protected characteristics under continuous review.

Paul Maynard
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
10th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many subject access requests her Department has (a) received and (b) responded to within the statutory limit in the last five years.

In replying to the Parliamentary Question, I have taken the “last five years” to refer to the period 1/9/2017 to 30/9/2022 inclusive.

Prior to GDPR coming into force on 25/5/2018, Subject Access Requests (SARs) were actioned by Local Data Disclosure Officers at District level.

Therefore, there is no DWP MI available regarding the receipt or clearance of SARs prior to this date.

From 25/5/2018, the SAR process in DWP was centralised. However, the administration of SARs did not start to transition to the eCase software until July 2018, and further SARs in respect of Compensation Recovery Unit only were managed by a separate team at that time. Therefore, full and/or accurate MI is not available for this period, nor is the information still available to retrospectively create it due the information retention period.

From December 2018, DWP commenced monthly reporting of SAR performance to the ICO. Full and accurate MI is available from this date. Therefore, the following information relates to SARs received or completed from 1/12/2018 to 30/09/2022 inclusive.

Year

From

To

SARs Received

SARs
Closed (Complete)

SARs
Closed (Complete)
within statutory limit

SAR's Closed NRN

2018

01/12/2018

31/12/2018

3404

2635

1959

379

2019

01/01/2019

31/12/2019

55438

49266

39102

5057

2020

01/01/2020

31/12/2020

38849

33657

24197

5971

2021

01/01/2021

31/12/2021

34884

26937

23611

9866

2022

01/01/2022

30/09/2022

25031

18409

16775

4999

Not all Subject Access Requests received will progress to be processed & records released. Some requests require further clarification to verify the identity of the requester. Where this is not provided the SAR is not validated and will be Closed NRN (No Response Necessary). Also, other requests may later be identified as not being a SAR, but for other areas of DWP. These will also be Closed NRN. I have therefore included the volume of SARS that were Closed NRN over the same period.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
18th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if she will reinstate the £20 a week uplift to Universal Credit in the context of 9 per cent inflation and the rising cost of living.

There are no plans to reinstate the temporary increase to Universal Credit.

The government understands the pressures people are facing with the cost of living and these are global challenges, but the government has taken action to support and help families with a package worth over £22 billion in 2022-23.These steps help ensure that on average a person in work is £6000 better off in work than on benefits. And we stand ready to do more as the situation evolves.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
23rd Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what support her Department is planning to provide to women affected by the changes to the state pension age.

The Government has strengthened the safety net to provide financial support during the COVID-19 pandemic. It is committed to providing financial support for people at every stage of their life, including when they near or reach retirement. The welfare system will continue to provide support to men and women who are unable to work or those who are on a low income but who are not eligible to pensioner benefits because of their age.

We have invested in a significant new programme, the Plan for Jobs, to help people of all ages who may be made redundant find work and acquire the skills they need to return to work. Our Fuller Working Lives strategy and the Business Champion for Older Workers and Employers will continue to encourage businesses to recognise the value and skills of employing older workers. Jobcentre Plus Older Claimant Champions provide additional tailored support to help people return to work. We have never spent more as a country on welfare support than we do now.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
23rd Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps her Department is taking to assist women affected by the changes to the state pension age during the covid-19 crisis.

The Government has strengthened the safety net to provide financial support during the COVID-19 pandemic. It is committed to providing financial support for people at every stage of their life, including when they near or reach retirement. The welfare system will continue to provide support to men and women who are unable to work or those who are on a low income but who are not eligible to pensioner benefits because of their age.

We have invested in a significant new programme, the Plan for Jobs, to help people of all ages who may be made redundant find work and acquire the skills they need to return to work. Our Fuller Working Lives strategy and the Business Champion for Older Workers and Employers will continue to encourage businesses to recognise the value and skills of employing older workers. Jobcentre Plus Older Claimant Champions provide additional tailored support to help people return to work. We have never spent more as a country on welfare support than we do now.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
24th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether crowd funded donations to people affected by flooding as a result of Storm Dennis will be treated as exempted hardship payments in relation to benefits.

Across the range of income-related benefits, there are provisions to disregard payments received for the express purpose of effecting essential repairs to a home damaged by flooding, to make it habitable again, and intended to be used for that purpose. Monies raised though crowd funding have no impact on contributory benefits.

5th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans his Department has to (a) improve and (b) invest in services supporting people with tinnitus.

Commissioning of hearing services, including support for people with tinnitus, takes place at a local level based on the needs of the local population. We expect commissioners to follow relevant National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines, including the NICE guideline [NG155] Tinnitus: assessment and management.

In addition, the Action Plan on Hearing Loss (2015) sets out key objectives on hearing loss and related hearing conditions including tinnitus: prevention, early diagnosis, maximising independence, and enabling people to take part in everyday activities.

A large group of people with tinnitus will also benefit from reassurance and advice. Some people with distressing tinnitus may need to access a range of further specialist support through their local National Health Service hearing services that could include counselling, sound therapy, Cognitive Behavioural Therapy and Tinnitus Retraining Therapy, which aims to retrain the way people respond to tinnitus.

31st Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many fully qualified full time equivalent GPs there were in England in each year since 2015.

The table below shows the number of fully qualified full-time equivalent GPs in England in each year since 2015.

Date

Fully Qualified GPs (FTE)

Doctors in GP Training Grade (FTE)

Total Doctors in General Practice (FTE)

September 2015

29,364

5,027

34,392

September 2016

29,474

5,732

35,206

September 2017

29,129

5,508

34,637

September 2018

28,489

5,880

34,369

September 2019

28,182

6,547

34,729

September 2020

27,939

7,454

35,393

September 2021

27,920

8,576

36,495

September 2022

27,556

9,470

37,026

Notes:

  • Data includes estimates for practices that did not provide fully valid staff records.
  • Full-Time Equivalent (FTE) refers to the proportion of full time contracted hours that the post holder is contracted to work. 1 would indicate they work a full set of hours (37.5), 0.5 that they worked half time.
  • In GPs in Training Grade contracts 1 FTE = 40 hours and in this table these FTEs have been converted to the standard wMDS measure of 1 FTE = 37.5 hours for consistency.
  • Figures shown do not include staff working in Prisons, Army Bases, Educational Establishments, Specialist Care Centres including Drug Rehabilitation Centres, Walk-In Centres and other alternative settings outside of traditional general practice such as urgent treatment centres and minor injury units.
  • Figures from the first three collections (September 2015, March 2016 and September 2016) should be treated with caution as the data submission rates from practices were appreciably lower than for subsequent reporting periods. This means that the reported figures for the early years of the collection may be lower than the true picture. In September 2015, which was the first extract from the new Workforce Minimum Data Set, only three of four Health Education England regions submitted data. Consequently, September 2015 figures should be treated with additional caution.
  • From June 2018 onwards, the data source for doctors in GP Training Grade (foundation and specialty registrar trainees on placements in General Practice) changed to the HEE Trainee Information System (TIS). To ensure comparability across the national time series, data from both old and new sources was used to calculate estimates for previously uncounted doctors in GP Training Grade back to September 2015. Prior to TIS, the sources for the GP registrar data were the main General Practice Workforce data collection and an additional extract of medical trainees delivering primary care services who were paid through ESR. In doctors in GP Training Grade contracts 1 FTE = 40 hours, however to ensure consistency in this table these FTEs have been converted to the standard wMDS measure of 1 FTE = 37.5 hours.
24th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans she has to improve access to radiotherapy for patients waiting for cancer treatment.

Since 2016, NHS England has invested over £160m in radiotherapy equipment, resulting in around 100 ageing linear accelerators being replaced or upgraded and meaning that every part of the NHS in England has local access to advanced and innovative radiotherapy techniques and treatments like Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy, for which the list of commissioned clinical indications continues to expand driven by evidence of benefit.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps her Department plans to take to reduce waiting times for cancer treatment.

The ‘Delivery plan for tackling the COVID-19 backlog of elective care’ sets out how the National Health Service will recover and expand elective services over the next three years, including cancer services. The plan states the ambition that the number of people waiting more than 62 days to start treatment following suspected cancer will return to pre-pandemic levels by March 2023. We have allocated more than £8 billion from 2022/23 to 2024/25, in addition to the £2 billion Elective Recovery Fund and £700 million Targeted Investment Fund already made available in 2021/2022 to increase elective activity, including cancer services.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
10th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many full time equivalent doctors have (a) entered and (b) left General Practice in England in each of the last three years.

The following table shows the number of full-time equivalent (FTE) qualified permanent general practitioners (GPs), excluding GPs in training grades and locums, who have left and joined practice in each year from from March 2019 to March 2022.

FTE leavers

FTE joiners

March 2021 to March 2022

2,137

2,285

March 2020 to March 2021

1,937

2,341

March 2019 to March 2020

2,227

2,171

Notes:

  1. Figures do not contain estimates for practices which did not provide fully valid records.
  2. It is not recommended that comparisons be made between quarterly or monthly figures due to the unknown effect of seasonality on workforce numbers. Therefore, the latest comparable data available is March 2022.
  3. Figures shown do not include GPs working in prisons, army bases, educational establishments, specialist care centres including drug rehabilitation centres, walk-in centres and other alternative settings outside of traditional general practice such as urgent treatment centres and minor injury units.
  4. FTE refers to the proportion of full time contracted hours that the post holder is contracted to work. ‘1’ would indicate they work a full set of hours (37.5), 0.5 that they worked half time.
  5. Data shows GPs who joined and/or left the cohort workforce between the beginning and end of each specified time period.
  6. Due to data quality, a GP recorded as a leaver in these figures may have left one practice and joined another practice with poor data completion. In instances such as this, a GP will be incorrectly recorded as a leaver due to the identifying information no longer being present in the dataset. Conversely, a GP could appear in the practice cohort as a joiner but may have joined from a practice with poor data completion rather than being a new addition to the GP workforce.
20th Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many occupational therapists were employed by NHS England in (a) 2010 and (b) 2022.

The following table shows the number of full-time equivalent occupational therapists working in National Health Service trusts and clinical commissioning groups in England in May 2010 and May 2022.

May 2010 13,678

May 2022 15,976

Source: NHS Digital Hospital and Community Health Service Workforce Statistics

20th Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many speech and language therapists were employed by NHS England in (a) 2010 and (b) 2022.

The following table shows the number of full-time equivalent speech and language therapists working in National Health Service trusts and clinical commissioning groups in England in May 2010 and May 2022.

May 2010

5,760

May 2022

6,821

Source: NHS Digital Hospital and Community Health Service Workforce Statistics

20th Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many dermatologists were employed by the NHS in England in (a) 2017 and (b) 2022.

The following table shows the number of full-time equivalent doctors working in the speciality of dermatology in National Health Service trusts and clinical commissioning groups in England in May 2017 and May 2022.

May 2017

990

May 2022

1,191

Source: NHS Digital Hospital and Community Health Service Workforce Statistics

Note:

The data includes doctors in Foundation Years 1 and 2 who may not specialise in dermatology upon completion of the foundation years.

29th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many new prisoners have been screened for acquired brain injury since April 2021.

The information requested is not held centrally. Each arrival at a prison, whether sentenced or remanded, should receive a first night health screen. This screening tool contains questions on acquired brain injury which, if answered in the affirmative, would result in a referral for a specific assessment.

Gillian Keegan
Secretary of State for Education
21st Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to reply to the letter from the hon. Member for Rhondda of 22 April 2021 on vaccination passports.

We replied to the hon. Member on 1 July 2021.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
30th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department plans to take to ensure the continuation of Cancer Drugs Fund funding for patients needing adjuvant nivolumab in high risk resected malignant melanoma groups.

The Cancer Drugs Fund (CDF) is now linked to the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) technology appraisal programme.

In the case of nivolumab for adjuvant treatment of completely resected melanoma with lymph node involvement or metastatic disease, this drug has been available to eligible National Health Service patients through the CDF in accordance with NICE’s recommendation in January 2019.

NICE is now reviewing this decision and published its draft recommendation in November 2020. NICE was unable to recommend nivolumab for routine funding in its draft guidance. However, this is not final guidance and a consultation on the draft recommendations closed on 25 November. NICE will has now considered the responses to the draft recommendation at the committee meeting on 5 January 2021 and expects to publish its final guidance in March 2021.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
30th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to ensure an effective range of adjuvant treatment options for melanoma patients.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) is the independent body responsible for producing evidence-based guidance for the National Health Service on whether medicines represent a clinical and cost-effective use of resources. The NHS in England is legally required to fund medicines recommended through a NICE appraisal.

Overall 82% of the recommendations in the technology appraisal guidance are positive - recommended, optimised, or recommended in the Cancer Drugs Fund - the percentage positive recommendations in melanoma treatments is higher at more than 92%.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
30th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the NICE draft guidance ID681 which recommends that nivolumab is not recommended for the adjuvant treatment of melanoma.

We have made no such assessment. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) is an independent body and it would not be appropriate for the Department to interfere in the development of NICE’s recommendations


While NICE was unable to recommend Nivolumab for routine funding in its draft recommendation of November 2020 (ID1681), this is not final guidance and a consultation on the draft recommendations closed on 25 November. NICE will now consider the responses to the draft recommendation and expects to publish its final guidance in March 2021.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
13th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what is the value of the (a) wine and (b) spirits and brandies from the Government Wine Cellar consumed in each of the last two years.

The Bi-Annual Report on the Government Hospitality Wine Cellar for 2020-2022, will include a full breakdown of the number of bottles of red wine, white wine, spirits and brandies from the Government wine cellar that were consumed in each of the last two years and their value. The report will be published before the Christmas recess and copies will be placed in the Libraries of the House when the Written Ministerial Statement has been released.

Andrew Mitchell
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office) (Minister for Development)
13th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how many bottles of (a) red wine (b) white wine and (c) spirits and brandies from the Government wine cellar were consumed in each of the last two years.

The Bi-Annual Report on the Government Hospitality Wine Cellar for 2020-2022, will include a full breakdown of the number of bottles of red wine, white wine, spirits and brandies from the Government wine cellar that were consumed in each of the last two years and their value. The report will be published before the Christmas recess and copies will be placed in the Libraries of the House when the Written Ministerial Statement has been released.

Andrew Mitchell
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office) (Minister for Development)
13th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, when he plans to publish the bi-annual report on the Government Wine Cellar for 2020-22.

The Bi-Annual Report on the Government Hospitality Wine Cellar for 2020-2022, will include a full breakdown of the number of bottles of red wine, white wine, spirits and brandies from the Government wine cellar that were consumed in each of the last two years and their value. The report will be published before the Christmas recess and copies will be placed in the Libraries of the House when the Written Ministerial Statement has been released.

Andrew Mitchell
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office) (Minister for Development)
20th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, which of the Prime Minister's (a) Trade and (b) Special Envoys have been provided with (i) office space and (ii) residential accommodation since December 2019.

The Prime Minister's Trade Envoys are a network of appointed parliamentarians, drawn from both Houses and across the political spectrum. Special Envoys are officials of the Government.

Both the Prime Minister's Trade and Special Envoys are based in the UK and travel if needed. They are not allocated residential accommodation, either in the UK or overseas. The Trade Envoys are not provided with offices in the UK. FCDO Special Envoys have access to two shared offices in the FCDO in King Charles Street. They can book these on the occasions they wish to use them.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
14th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what discussions he has had with (a) the US Administration and (b) EU counterparts on the imposition of sanctions on (i) Ali Ghanaatkar, (ii) Ali Rezvani and (iii) Amened Sadat Zahbipour for their role in Iran’s state hostage-taking; and if he will impose sanctions on those individuals.

The UK will never accept our nationals being used as political leverage. Working with our international partners, including the USA and European Union, we continue to press Iran to end this abhorrent practice. In December 2022, the UK sanctioned ten officials connected to Iran's judicial and prison systems. This includes six individuals linked to the Revolutionary Courts which have been responsible for egregious sentences on British nationals. In January, we sanctioned Iran's Prosecutor General and deputy Prosecutor General, two of the most powerful figures in Iran's judiciary and responsible for the trial process and sentencing. The UK sanctions over 300 Iranian individuals and entities, including in relation to human rights violations, counter-proliferation, regional activity and terrorism. This includes 60 new human rights designations since October 2022. We do not speculate on future designations as doing so could reduce their impact.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
10th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what was the most expensive bottle of wine (a) purchased by and (b) consumed from the Government Wine Cellar this year.

The most expensive bottle of wine (a) purchased by the Government Wine Cellar this year was a Ridgeview Blanc de Blanc 2016. The most expensive bottle of wine (b) consumed from the Government Wine Cellar this year was a Chateau Lynch Bages 2000.

Gillian Keegan
Secretary of State for Education
10th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how many bottles of (a) port, (b) champagne and (c) sherry were consumed from the Government Wine Cellar in 2021.

The following number of bottles were consumed from the Government Wine Cellar in 2021.

(a) Port - 22

(b) Champagne - 4

(c) Sherry - 0

Gillian Keegan
Secretary of State for Education
10th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how many subject access requests his Department has (a) received and (b) responded to within the statutory limit in the last five years.

The FCDO can provide the following data regarding the number of cases received and closed with statutory deadlines over the last 5 years. However, only the last two years are for the FCDO since it was established. The further 3 years are for the legacy FCO and DFID departments.

Year

No of Cases

Closed within statutory limit

Closed

2021

94

38

75

2020

114

70

113

2019

107

76

104

2018

103

59

100

2017

101

50

98

Gillian Keegan
Secretary of State for Education
10th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 21 September 2022 to Question 48277 on Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office: Disclosure of Information, when she plans to respond to the Subject Access Request FCDO reference DPR 2022/08995 submitted to her on 17 March 2022.

On the 6 October the Information Rights Unit at the FCDO responded to your DPR request 2022/08995 with the Information identified to date. The FCDO also committed to identifying any further personal information held by our overseas posts and will provide this information to you as soon as possible.

Gillian Keegan
Secretary of State for Education
20th Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, when he will respond to the correspondence of 7 April 2022 from the hon. Member for Rhondda on the UK's sanctions regime.

We are grateful to the Honourable member for bringing this matter to our attention and for re-sending this correspondence on 15 June, of which we had no record of receiving previously. We apologise for the delay and will work to expedite a response.

6th Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 19 July 2022 to Question 34834 on Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office: Disclosure of Information, when she plans to respond to the Subject Access Request FCDO reference DPR 2022/08995 submitted to her on 17 March 2022.

The Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office's Information Rights Unit continues to review and assess the large amount of information returned in our searches. We hope to be able to respond by the end of September.

Gillian Keegan
Secretary of State for Education
19th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what steps her Department is taking to help reduce the maternal mortality rate in South Africa.

The UK does not provide direct support to help reduce maternal mortality in South Africa. The UK has, however, provided £7.5 million since 2020 to support health system strengthening including through knowledge exchange between health experts in both countries. This is helping South Africa to put in place the building blocks to achieve its goal of universal access to good quality healthcare and to reduce morbidity and mortality rates.

12th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, when she will respond to the Subject Access Request, FCDO Ref: DPR2022/08995, submitted to her on 17 March.

The Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office is continuing to review and process a large amount of information that was returned in our searches. We must review all information returned to assess whether it is personal information and, if so, whether any exemptions such as the personal data of third parties apply. Our Information Rights Unit has recently been able to allocate additional resources to help with all such cases, however given the large quantity of information in this case, it is unlikely that we will be in a position to respond before September.

13th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, when she plans to reply to the letter of 7 April 2022 from the hon. Member for Rhondda on the UK Sanctions regime.

The FCDO does not have a record of receiving this correspondence. We have asked the Honourable Member's office to resend the letter.

23rd Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, if she will introduce economic sanctions on Russian shipping.

UK Government ministers have signed legislation banning all ships that are Russian owned, operated, controlled, chartered, registered or flagged from entering British ports since 1 March 2022. These measures also include powers to detain Russian vessels already in port and to direct them out of British ports, as well as ensuring that anyone sanctioned by the UK can no longer register a vessel - and will have any existing registrations terminated - in the UK.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
23rd Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what Russian banks (a) have and (b) have not yet been sanctioned by the UK.

In close coordination with our allies, we are introducing the largest and most severe economic sanctions that Russia has ever faced, including asset freezes on 16 major banks, a prohibition on clearing for Sberbank, and the removal of selected banks from SWIFT. The banks currently sanctioned represent the majority of the Russian banking sector. The UK Sanctions List, published by the FCDO on GOV.UK, is the comprehensive list of persons or ships designated. Additionally, there are entities listed in Schedule 2 of the Russia (Sanctions) (EU Exit) Regulations 2019, which are covered by sectoral financial measures.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
7th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how much the evacuation of Nowzad cost the Government in expenditure of time and money.

The FCDO was not involved in the evacuation from Kabul by private charter flight of Nowzad's animals. After the end of Operation Pitting, FCDO officials provided some support to the departure of Nowzad staff from Afghanistan for the UK via Pakistan.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
14th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how many UK nationals remain in Afghanistan as at 14 September 2021.

As the Minister of State for the Middle East and North Africa stated in the House on 15 September, it remains difficult to put a precise number on the number of UK nationals remaining in Afghanistan. We have evacuated over 8000 British nationals to date and we believe that the vast majority of UK nationals who wanted to leave and had valid documentation were evacuated. Since then, more UK nationals have sought assistance and more than 4,200 individuals as of today have signed up to the FCDO's "Register your Presence in Afghanistan". We are working to verify how many of these are British nationals and are continuing to look at all possible avenues to ensure that any British Nationals are able to leave safely if they wish to.

Amanda Milling
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
14th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what provisions the UK is putting in place for consular services for people in Afghanistan either in country through another nation state or out of country.

Four Rapid Deployment Teams have been deployed to Pakistan, Uzbekistan and Tajikistan to reinforce our Embassy staff to process arrivals from Afghanistan and provide consular assistance on travel documentation and transport to support the return of British nationals to the UK. We continue to work closely with international partners, including the Qatari authorities, to get as many remaining British Nationals as possible out of Afghanistan.

Amanda Milling
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what steps he has taken to provide evacuation for LGBTQ+ people escaping persecution in Afghanistan.

We worked round the clock to airlift over 15000 people out of Afghanistan. We are working urgently with neighbouring countries to ensure that at-risk Afghans who are eligible to come to the UK can secure for safe passage. Minister for Human Rights Lord (Tariq) Ahmad of Wimbledon addressed the UN Human Rights Council on 24 August to underscore the UK's commitment to protecting the human rights of all Afghan people.

8th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what steps he is taking with his NATO counterparts to mitigate the threat posed by Russia's attempts to develop a military airbase close to NATO's southern flank in Libya; and if he will make a statement.

We continue to discuss with NATO allies how we must continue to work together on Libya to encourage all parties to de-escalate, support the UN ceasefire talks and respect the UN arms embargo. We share the concerns of the US and other allies about Russia's reported deployment of fighter aircraft from Syria and Wagner Group personnel to Libya in breach of the embargo.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
8th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, whether the Government plans to introduce (a) additional sanctions and (b) other measures in relation to (i) the Russian Wagner Group and (ii) other groups operating in Libya in violation of international law.

The UK is deeply concerned about reports of Russian Wagner Group personnel and other external actors operating in Libya. We take seriously violations of International Humanitarian Law and breaches of sanctions, including the UN arms embargo. We continue to stress to all states the necessity of complying with and enforcing international law. The UK carefully considers all reports of sanctions breaches, including the reports of the UN Panel of Experts, and regularly reviews sanctions measures.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
17th Jan 2024
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether he has made an assessment of the potential impact of changes in the level of business rates for film and TV studios on investment in that sector.

The Government recognises the importance of the film and TV sector to the UK and is committed to maintaining a competitive offer for studios. The Valuation Office Agency is working closely with the film studio sector and its representatives to review valuation evidence through a Group Pre-Challenge Review (GPCR).

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
17th Jan 2024
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether his Department has made an impact assessment of the Valuation Office Agency's decision to raise business rates on film and TV studios.

The Government recognises the importance of the film and TV sector to the UK and is committed to maintaining a competitive offer for studios. The Valuation Office Agency is working closely with the film studio sector and its representatives to review valuation evidence through a Group Pre-Challenge Review (GPCR).

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
22nd Nov 2023
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what discussions he has had with Cabinet Colleagues on the Valuation Office Agency's planned increase in business rate evaluations for film studios.

The government recognises the importance of the film and TV sector to the UK and is committed to maintaining a competitive offer for studios. The Valuation Office Agency is working closely with the film studio sector and its representatives to review valuation evidence through a Group Pre-Challenge Review (GPCR).

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
21st Nov 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the value is of oil originating in the Russian Federation and imported through other countries and accepted in British ports in each of the last six months.

HM Revenue & Customs (HMRC) is responsible for the collection and publication of data on imports and exports of goods to and from the UK. HMRC releases this information monthly, as a National Statistic called the Overseas Trade in Goods Statistics, which is available via their dedicated website (www.uktradeinfo.com). From this website, it is possible to build your own data tables based upon bespoke search criteria, and download bulk datasets.

The published statistics show that there were no imports of crude oil (falling under commodity code 2709 0090 00) originating from the Russian Federation imported into the UK via another country in the last 6 months.

In the same period, the value of such goods imported direct from the Russian Federation was £58,532,668 (in April 2022).

Victoria Atkins
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
24th Feb 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether HMRC will treat crowd funded payments to people affected by Storm Dennis as taxable income.

Gratuitous payments to people, made from a pot of funds raised by crowdfunding, will not be taxable income. To be gratuitous, there must be no agreement or expectation that the recipient will provide something in return.

17th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 17 April to Question 175523 on Asylum, how many asylum applications were awaiting processing in June 2010.

The Home Office publishes data on asylum in the ‘Immigration System Statistics Quarterly Release’. Data on asylum applications awaiting initial decision can be found in table Asy_D03 of the ‘asylum and resettlement detailed datasets’. The latest data covers the period from June 2010 to December 2022.

28th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many asylum applications were awaiting processing in (a) June 2010 and (b) December 2022.

The Home Office publishes data on asylum in the ‘Immigration System Statistics Quarterly Release’. Data on asylum applications awaiting initial decision can be found in table Asy_D03 of the ‘asylum and resettlement detailed datasets’. The latest data relates to December 2022.

Information on future Home Office statistical release dates can be found in the ‘Research and statistics calendar’.

10th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many subject access requests her Department has (a) received and (b) responded to within the statutory limit in the last five years.

The Department has received 145,591 valid subject access requests in the last five years (01/01/2018 to 31/12/2021) and 112,686 were responded to within the statutory time limit.

This is unpublished data from internal management information systems which could be subject to change, alteration or deletion once quality assured.

Tom Tugendhat
Minister of State (Home Office) (Security)
5th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate he has made of the number of British passports that will require additional biometric details before the EU requires ETIAS for a visa waiver.

The British passport is compliant with the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO 9303) on international passport standards so there are no plans to make changes.

18th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent steps she has taken to improve the time taken to process passport applications.

Ahead of unrestricted international travel returning, HM Passport Office prepared extensively to serve an unprecedented number of customers, with 9.5 million British passport applications forecasted throughout 2022.

These preparations have ensured that passport applications can be processed in higher numbers than ever before. This was demonstrated in March and April 2022 when HM Passport Office achieved a record monthly high by completing the processing of approximately two million applications.

Ministers continue to meet regularly with officials to monitor performance, and to explore further options that will help to ensure that people receive their passports in good time.

18th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will take steps to increase staffing levels on the dedicated advice line for hon. Members at UK Visas and Immigration in the context of widespread delays experienced by customers.

We have seen significant increase in call volumes to the MP enquiry line in recent weeks linked to the situation in Ukraine and to passport applications.

As a result of this we have worked to increase staffing across the MP enquiry line, but more specifically on the HMPO and Ukraine options. We expect to have up to 25 dedicated HMPO and up to 20 dedicated Ukraine call handlers available to take calls.

MP’s can also contact the Home Office via the MP’s Urgent Enquiries inbox or in person at the Portcullis House walk-in hub.

14th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she is taking to ensure that her Department processes passport applications on time and resolves delays as swiftly as possible.

Due to COVID-19, over 5 million people delayed applying for a British passport in 2020 and 2021.

In March 2022 HM Passport Office decided over one million passport applications, the highest recorded in any month to date.

Since April 2021 British passport applicants have been advised to allow up to ten weeks to get their passport. However, HM Passport Office seeks to ensure its customers receive their passport as quickly as possible and is working alongside its suppliers to develop further ways to maximise its ability to cope with an unprecedented level of demand.

HM Passport Office has already deployed a range of tried and tested contingency arrangements, which includes the increasing of resources through recruitment and enabling the flexing of resources from across the Home Office and other government departments.

In addition, technical solutions, such as its latest digital application system, mean more passport applications are securely processed with fewer manual interventions, enabling them to be processed more quickly.

7th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much the evacuation of Nowzad cost the Government in expenditure of time and money.

The evacuation from Afghanistan under Operation Pitting from 14 August to 29 August was organised and controlled by the Ministry of Defence.

14th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many additional staff her Department has deployed to countries neighbouring Afghanistan to process Afghans fleeing Afghanistan.

The Home Office uses a “hub and spoke” model for all overseas visa applications whereby applications made at Visa Application Centres across the globe are routed electronically into regional hubs, including in the UK.

We will be able to meet any increase in demand through redirecting applications and redeploying staff to relevant decision making centres where required. We have not needed to deploy any additional staff to countries neighbouring Afghanistan but will keep this under review.

Victoria Atkins
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
20th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what representations she has received, and from whom, regarding conducting a review of the Report of the Daniel Morgan Independent Panel.

The Home Secretary is working with the Chair of the Daniel Morgan Independent Panel to agree a date for publication. The Home Secretary has not yet received the report from the DMIP. The Home Secretary has a responsibility to review the report to ensure publication complies with human rights obligations and that it doesn’t cause any risk to national security should either arise. As soon as the Home Secretary receives the report and has discharged her responsibilities, she will agree a date for publication of the report.

The Home Secretary has confirmed she hasn’t had any substantive engagement or discussions with the MP for Maidenhead regarding the report of the Daniel Morgan Independent Panel.

The Home Secretary’s review is purely for the purpose of ensuring that the publication of the report does not breach her human rights and national security responsibilities in relation to publication. The Home Secretary is fully aware of her responsibilities and is committed to complying with them.

The Home Secretary has been advised by Home Office lawyers and has received advice from external Counsel.

Victoria Atkins
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
20th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what discussions she has had with the hon. Member for Maidenhead on the report of the Daniel Morgan Independent Panel.

The Home Secretary is working with the Chair of the Daniel Morgan Independent Panel to agree a date for publication. The Home Secretary has not yet received the report from the DMIP. The Home Secretary has a responsibility to review the report to ensure publication complies with human rights obligations and that it doesn’t cause any risk to national security should either arise. As soon as the Home Secretary receives the report and has discharged her responsibilities, she will agree a date for publication of the report.

The Home Secretary has confirmed she hasn’t had any substantive engagement or discussions with the MP for Maidenhead regarding the report of the Daniel Morgan Independent Panel.

The Home Secretary’s review is purely for the purpose of ensuring that the publication of the report does not breach her human rights and national security responsibilities in relation to publication. The Home Secretary is fully aware of her responsibilities and is committed to complying with them.

The Home Secretary has been advised by Home Office lawyers and has received advice from external Counsel.

Victoria Atkins
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
20th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will agree a date with the (a) family of Daniel Morgan and (b) Daniel Morgan Independent Panel for the publication of the panel’s report.

The Home Secretary is working with the Chair of the Daniel Morgan Independent Panel to agree a date for publication. The Home Secretary has not yet received the report from the DMIP. The Home Secretary has a responsibility to review the report to ensure publication complies with human rights obligations and that it doesn’t cause any risk to national security should either arise. As soon as the Home Secretary receives the report and has discharged her responsibilities, she will agree a date for publication of the report.

The Home Secretary has confirmed she hasn’t had any substantive engagement or discussions with the MP for Maidenhead regarding the report of the Daniel Morgan Independent Panel.

The Home Secretary’s review is purely for the purpose of ensuring that the publication of the report does not breach her human rights and national security responsibilities in relation to publication. The Home Secretary is fully aware of her responsibilities and is committed to complying with them.

The Home Secretary has been advised by Home Office lawyers and has received advice from external Counsel.

Victoria Atkins
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
7th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how much the evacuation of Nowzad cost the Government in expenditure of time and money.

The Secretary of State for Defence was clear that the Ministry of Defence did not evacuate Nowzad. No costs were incurred in the limited support provided to Nowzad to secure the required permissions for the charter aircraft to land, and enable safe passage through the airport.

James Heappey
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence) (Minister for the Armed Forces)
10th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, how many subject access requests his Department has (a) received and (b) responded to within the statutory limit in the last five years.

The Department has received 45 Subject Access requests and responded to 100% within the statutory limit in the last 5 calendar years.

Lee Rowley
Minister of State (Minister for Housing)
23rd Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, whether he has plans to bring forward legislative proposals to allow the seizure of assets of sanctioned Russian individuals.

The Government is taking action against the billions of pounds worth UK property accumulated by the Russian state-linked individuals and companies. We have already frozen the assets of those individuals on the sanctions list. The new legislation in the Economic Crime Act will mean the Government can move more quickly to impose sanctions against oligarchs already designated by our allies, as well as intensifying our sanctions enforcement. These measures form part of a wider package of legislative proposals to tackle illicit finance which will be introduced in Parliament in the coming months. We will set out details in due course.

5th Oct 2020
How the Government allocates resources between local authorities.

In England, the Government generally allocates funding to local authorities in line with their relative need. For example, since the start of the pandemic, we have allocated an additional £3.7 billion un-ringfenced funding to local authorities in England, and have taken into account population, deprivation and how service delivery costs vary across the country in distributing this money.

Local authority allocations in Wales are a fully devolved matter.

10th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many subject access requests his Department has (a) received and (b) responded to within the statutory limit in the last five years.

In the last five years, the department has:

a) received 33,932 subject access requests,

b) responded to 28,052 within the statutory limit.

14th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, when his Department plans to provide substantive answers to hon. Members queries regarding Afghans seeking evacuation or resettlement.

I set out the position during her statement on 13th September. Given the very difficult circumstances in Afghanistan, we cannot pursue cases concerning Afghan people in country in the usual ways. The Home Office is logging the cases we have received, and we are considering how this data will be used in the future. Accordingly, please signpost individuals to gov.uk to check for the latest information about Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy (ARAP) Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy: further information on eligibility criteria and offer details - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk) and the Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme (ACRS) (Afghan citizens’ resettlement scheme - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)) rather than seek to pursue cases on their behalf.

Victoria Atkins
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
14th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justicet, what fees applicants to the Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme will be charged.

There will be no fees charged to those brought to the UK through the Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme.

On 13 September further details on the Scheme were published in a policy statement, including in relation to eligibility and referral. This statement can be found at: Afghan citizens’ resettlement scheme - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk).

Victoria Atkins
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
14th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether Afghan nationals who have had an application to the Afghans Relocation and Assistance Policy scheme declined will automatically be considered for resettlement under the Afghan citizen's resettlement scheme.

There are no plans to automatically consider Afghan nationals who have not been successful in applying to come to the UK under the Afghan Relocation and Assistance Policy for resettlement through the Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme (ACRS).

Further information on the eligibility, prioritisation and referral of people for the ACRS is set out in the policy statement published on gov.uk on 13 September, available at www.gov.uk/government/publications/afghanistan-resettlement-and-immigration-policy-statement.

Victoria Atkins
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
16th Mar 2021
What recent estimate he has made of the number of magistrate vacancies.

The Government announced on 8 March its intention to bring forward legislation to change the mandatory retirement age for all judicial office holders, including magistrates, to 75 – a step which I know has been welcomed by many magistrates

We will also be legislating to allow retired magistrates to apply to return to the bench where there is a business need.

On 1 April 2020, there were 13,177 magistrates. We are currently updating our modelling to assess the impact of a change to the retirement age on our recruitment requirements in each region for 2021/22 and beyond.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
20th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 20 July to Question 74457 on Court protection, what the average waiting time was for an application for deputyship to be heard by the Court of Protection in (a) April, (b) May and (c) June 2020.

Applications for deputyship heard by the Court of Protection are published in Family Court Statistics Quarterly (FCSQ). They are a subset of data which is due for publication in September so cannot be provided at this stage.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
15th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the average waiting time is for an application for deputyship to be heard by the Court of Protection.

The average waiting time for an application for deputyship to be heard by the Court of Protection is 39 days based on March 2020.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
17th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what plans he has for funerals during the covid-19 outbreak.

Government is putting in place a range of measures to ensure the UK is prepared to manage the impacts of a Covid-19 outbreak. Part of this planning is ensuring we are prepared for higher numbers of people dying over the period of the pandemic.

Ensuring the deceased are treated with dignity and respect whilst minimising the risks to public health is at the forefront of Government planning. Measures underway will increase capacity at a local level to manage additional demand.

The Government’s Action Plan (https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-action-plan) sets out planning principles that underpin the response to the Covid-19 outbreak. As part of this response, provisions have been included in the Coronavirus Bill which will ensure the sector can manage the impact of the pandemic.

.

Alex Chalk
Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice
17th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to the covid-19 outbreak, what assessment he has made of available capacity at crematoria and cemeteries.

Government is putting in place a range of measures to ensure the UK is prepared to manage the impacts of a Covid-19 outbreak. Part of this planning is ensuring we are prepared for higher numbers of people dying over the period of the pandemic.

Ensuring the deceased are treated with dignity and respect whilst minimising the risks to public health is at the forefront of Government planning. Measures underway will increase capacity at a local level to manage additional demand.

The Government’s Action Plan (https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-action-plan) sets out planning principles that underpin the response to the Covid-19 outbreak. As part of this response, provisions have been included in the Coronavirus Bill which will ensure the sector can manage the impact of the pandemic.

.

Alex Chalk
Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice
17th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment he has made of the capacity of morgues, mortuaries and funeral homes to cope with additional casualties of covid-19.

Government is putting in place a range of measures to ensure the UK is prepared to manage the impacts of a Covid-19 outbreak. Part of this planning is ensuring we are prepared for higher numbers of people dying over the period of the pandemic.

Ensuring the deceased are treated with dignity and respect whilst minimising the risks to public health is at the forefront of Government planning. Measures underway will increase capacity at a local level to manage additional demand.

The Government’s Action Plan (https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-action-plan) sets out planning principles that underpin the response to the Covid-19 outbreak. As part of this response, provisions have been included in the Coronavirus Bill which will ensure the sector can manage the impact of the pandemic.

.

Alex Chalk
Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice
17th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps he will be taking for funerals as a result of covid-19.

Government is putting in place a range of measures to ensure the UK is prepared to manage the impacts of a Covid-19 outbreak. Part of this planning is ensuring we are prepared for higher numbers of people dying over the period of the pandemic.

Ensuring the deceased are treated with dignity and respect whilst minimising the risks to public health is at the forefront of Government planning. Measures underway will increase capacity at a local level to manage additional demand.

The Government’s Action Plan (https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-action-plan) sets out planning principles that underpin the response to the Covid-19 outbreak. As part of this response, provisions have been included in the Coronavirus Bill which will ensure the sector can manage the impact of the pandemic.

.

Alex Chalk
Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice
5th Jan 2024
To ask the Leader of the House, with reference to her oral contributions of 12 December 2022, Official Report column 823, and 30 March 2023, Official Report column 1168, when she plans that the the ministerial registration of interests, hospitality, gifts and so forth will be put on the same footing as Parliament’s.

In July 2023, the Cabinet Office published its response to three reports on strengthening ethics and integrity in central government. This states: “The Government will be implementing comprehensive reforms to improve the quality and accessibility of departments' transparency returns, which cover meetings, gifts, hospitality and travel.”

“The Cabinet Office is developing a single platform to collate and publish departments' transparency returns. This will provide a single public source of transparency data, replacing the system of separate publications. Following the deployment and adoption of an integrated database, the Government will look to move departments' transparency publications from a quarterly to a monthly basis.” The full response is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/strengthening-ethics-and-integrity-in-central-government

My office is already collating monthly returns and we are working with the Cabinet Office in order to publish these ahead of the new system being rolled out across Government.

Separately, and in line with the Ministerial Code, the List of Ministers’ Interests is published twice yearly with updates issued at other times as needed.

Penny Mordaunt
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
10th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Wales, how many subject access requests his Department has (a) received and (b) responded to within the statutory limit in the last five years.

My Department has received two subject access requests in the last five years. One request was responded to within the statutory limit. The other request was sent to my Department in error and was forwarded to the Ministry of Justice as the correct Department to provide a response.

24th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Wales, what discussions he has had with the Coal Authority on former coal mining sites in Wales following the landslides caused by storm Dennis.

Following the unprecedented flooding brought by recent storms, urgent work is being carried out across the UK to assess any risk posed to people or property and to confirm that everyone with a legal responsibility around the tips is fulfilling their safety obligations. Authorities and agencies involved are working together and good progress is being made on this vital work.

I spoke with the Coal Authority on 23 February 2020 and was further reassured following a meeting on 24 February 2020 with the First Minister of Wales, Natural Resources Wales, Rhondda Cynon Taf County Borough Council and the Coal Authority that we have a plan of action to allow us to make the necessary assessment of coal tips across South Wales.

I welcome the commitment from all partners to ensuring that this work is delivered at pace, enabling us to be able to provide the general public in the locality of coal tips with appropriate reassurance. The Welsh and UK Governments will continue to co-ordinate this vital work.

Simon Hart
Parliamentary Secretary to the Treasury (Chief Whip)
24th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Wales, what additional capital funding he plans to allocate to the Welsh Government for local authorities in Wales affected by flooding following storm Dennis.

My Department and others are determined to ensure that all of those affected by flooding are supported in the best way possible. Flood response in Wales is a devolved matter. The UK Government will look seriously at any request from the Welsh Government for additional support and assistance for flood relief, including additional finances.

Simon Hart
Parliamentary Secretary to the Treasury (Chief Whip)