Anna Turley Portrait

Anna Turley

Labour (Co-op) - Former Member for Redcar

Party Chair, Co-operative Party
8th Jun 2019 - 12th Dec 2020
Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy Committee
11th Sep 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy Committee
31st Oct 2016 - 3rd May 2017
Shadow Minister (Cabinet Office)
18th Sep 2015 - 27th Jun 2016
Home Affairs Committee
8th Jul 2015 - 26th Oct 2015


Division Voting information

Anna Turley has voted in 630 divisions, and 3 times against the majority of their Party.

2 Dec 2015 - ISIL in Syria - View Vote Context
Anna Turley voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 56 Labour No votes vs 139 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 211 Noes - 390
2 Dec 2015 - ISIL in Syria - View Vote Context
Anna Turley voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 65 Labour Aye votes vs 153 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 397 Noes - 223
11 Sep 2015 - Assisted Dying (No. 2) Bill - View Vote Context
Anna Turley voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 73 Labour Aye votes vs 91 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 118 Noes - 330
View All Anna Turley Division Votes

All Debates

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Rob Wilson (Conservative)
(52 debate interactions)
Sajid Javid (Conservative)
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
(19 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Cabinet Office
(124 debate contributions)
HM Treasury
(69 debate contributions)
Department of Health and Social Care
(35 debate contributions)
Home Office
(22 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Anna Turley's debates

Latest EDMs signed by Anna Turley

9th January 2020
Anna Turley signed this EDM on Monday 24th February 2020

Ban on trophy hunting imports

Tabled by: Tracey Crouch (Conservative - Chatham and Aylesford)
That this House welcomes the Government's public consultation on controls on the import and export of hunting trophies; notes the strong cross-party support for EDM 1829, Session 2017-19 and that 86 per cent of the British public support an end to trophy hunting; further notes that most UK trophy imports …
168 signatures
(Most recent: 12 Apr 2021)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 80
Scottish National Party: 44
Conservative: 16
Liberal Democrat: 11
Democratic Unionist Party: 6
Independent: 5
Alba Party: 2
Plaid Cymru: 2
Social Democratic & Labour Party: 2
Green Party: 1
Alliance: 1
6th February 2020
Anna Turley signed this EDM on Monday 24th February 2020

Department of Work and Pensions Review of food bank use

Tabled by: Chris Stephens (Scottish National Party - Glasgow South West)
That this House acknowledges that the Department for Work and Pensions commissioned an evidence review on the drivers of food bank use in 2018; notes the Government's commitment to this House to publish the findings of the review; further notes the Government's failure to date to publish those findings; and …
76 signatures
(Most recent: 15 Sep 2020)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 37
Scottish National Party: 25
Liberal Democrat: 5
Democratic Unionist Party: 3
Independent: 2
Plaid Cymru: 2
Alba Party: 2
View All Anna Turley's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Anna Turley, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


1 Urgent Question tabled by Anna Turley

Wednesday 24th July 2019

Anna Turley has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

3 Bills introduced by Anna Turley


A Bill to amend the Bread and Flour Regulations 1998 to require flour to be fortified with folic acid.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 8th February 2017

A Bill to increase the maximum sentences available to the court for specified offences related to animal cruelty; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Monday 4th July 2016

A Bill to make provision about offences, penalties and sentences in relation to communications containing threats transmitted or broadcast using online social media; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Monday 4th July 2016

316 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
30 Other Department Questions
4th Dec 2017
To ask the Prime Minister, whether the @Number10gov twitter account has (a) received from and (b) sent any direct messages to the (i) @realDonaldTrump twitter account and (ii) any other account that might be reasonably assumed to have been under the control of the current President of the United States of America.

None.

17th Oct 2016
To ask the Prime Minister, how many meetings she has had with social media companies to discuss harmful online content since May 2015.

Details of Ministers’ meetings with external organisations, including with newspaper and other media proprietors, editors and senior executives, are published on a quarterly basis and made available on the gov.uk website.

8th Jun 2016
To ask the Prime Minister, when he plans to reply to the letter of 27 April 2016 from the hon. Member for Redcar and the hon. Member for Middlesbrough South and East Cleveland on the All Party Parliamentary Group on Steel.

A reply has been sent.

24th May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, what assessment she has made of the performance of the Green Deal Home Improvement Fund.

The uptake and implementation of the Green Deal Home Improvement Fund (GDHIF) has been assessed as part of the wider Green Deal evaluation programme. This information can be found via the following links:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/green-deal-and-eco-evaluation

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/green-deal-assessments-research

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/research-in-to-the-green-deal-and-eco-programme-supply-chain-follow-up-study

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/green-deal-household-tracker-survey-july-2014-dip-headline-findings.

By the end of February 2016, 35,330 GDHIF vouchers had been paid, following the installation of 41,263 measures. Around three quarters of the measures installed were solid wall insulation (74 per cent of measures installed). These and other latest statistics which include those relating to GDHIF are to be found via this link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/household-energy-efficiency-national-statistics-headline-release-may-2016.

23rd May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, what support her Department is providing to recipients of Green Deal funding whose vouchers expired before their home improvements were completed.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave her on 26 May 2016, Question number 37787.

27th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, if he will extend the protective award to employees made redundant at a company which dismisses more than 20 people across the organisation but fewer than 20 people in individual working environments.

The Government has no plans to bring forward legislation amending collective redundancy provisions and the treatment of ‘establishment’. The European Court of Justice has confirmed that ‘establishment’ means the individual workplace and not necessarily the whole enterprise.
27th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, if he will bring forward legislative proposals to extend the statutory obligation for employers to consult appropriate representatives of employees being made redundant when that employer dismisses fewer than 20 people at an establishment.

The Government has no plans to bring forward legislation in relation to collective redundancies and existing thresholds for employers to consult with employee representatives nor in the treatment of ‘establishment’. The existing threshold balances such consultation rights of employees with the need for businesses to be able to restructure effectively to respond to changing market conditions.

26th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, if he will take steps to ensure the protective award is made to employees made redundant who worked across several establishments within one business.

My Rt hon Friend the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills has no power to make a protective award to employees; the decision to make a protective award lies with the Employment Tribunal. The Employment Tribunal considers the facts of each case and decides whether to make a protective award, and if so, which employees are eligible, based on the circumstances of each case presented to it.

26th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, if he will bring forward legislative proposals on redundancy to specify that the word establishment applies to a whole business rather than an individual working environment.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

25th Apr 2016
To ask the Prime Minister, when he plans to respond to the letter of 9 March 2016 from the hon. Member for Redcar relating to a donation given to the Minister for the Cabinet Office.

A reply has been sent.
18th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, what estimate she has made of the number of people from the North East of England working offshore in each year since 2010.

Oil and Gas UK in the UK Continental Shelf Offshore Workforce Demographics Report 2015 estimate that of the total number of offshore workers resident in the UK, 13.8 per cent (7,711) live in the North East of England.

10th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what assessment his Department made of the financial viability of the Redcar coke ovens and blast furnace as a standalone operation without South Bank coke ovens.

We have made no such assessment. On liquidation of a company, it is the responsibility of the liquidator to sell the free assets of the company. In the case of SSI UK, this was the Official Receiver who is independent. I am informed that the Official Receiver did maintain operations at SSI, including the coke ovens, for a period while he tried to find purchasers for the assets of SSI UK but as of the 12 October, no purchaser had been found and the Official Receiver ceased operations of the coke ovens and blast furnace.

9th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, if he will list (a) his Department's correspondence and (b) meetings with the former hon. Member for Redcar between May 2010 and May 2015 on SSI Redcar.


It is an established convention that Minsters of one Administration cannot see the documents of a previous Administration. I am therefore unable to provide the information requested by the hon Member.

6th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what assessment he made prior to the closure of SSI Redcar of the (a) opportunity to produce foundry coke at Redcar coke ovens and (b) potential market for foundry coke.


As with any business, prior to the liquidation of SSI UK, these were commercial matters for SSI.

5th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what assessment he has made of the effect of the closure of Redcar coke ovens and blast furnace on the local economy.

The closure of SSI in Redcar will undoubtedly have a significant impact on individuals, the supply chain and local economy more broadly. That is why we have announced a support package, worth up to £80 million, to support the future of the Tees Valley economy and we are working closely with a local Task Force, chaired by Amanda Skelton, to deliver this support.


In total we have agreed over £40 million of support aimed at skills and jobs creation:


  • £3m has been made available to four Further Education colleges in the region to support re-training activity, as well as a further £2.65m skills funding to plug any gaps in skills provision not available via the Further Education Offer;
  • £1.7m to ensure that the fifty apprentices who were with SSI can continue their apprenticeships with alternative employers;
  • A £16.5m Jobs and Skills Fund to help local firms employ former SSI workers or their spouses in full-time or part-time jobs for a minimum of three years;
  • £16m support for firms in the SSI supply chain and wider Tees Valley impacted by the Redcar steelworks closure, to safeguard jobs, provide the stimulus to create new posts and provide expert assistance to help them expand their business
  • £750,000 to fund advice and grants to start up a new business.

5th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what correspondence his Department has had with PwC regarding SSI Redcar in the last three years; and how many meetings his Department has had with PwC in that period.

My officials had a number of telephone calls and one meeting with PwC between 28 August 2015 and 1 October 2015 to discuss SSI.

5th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what steps (a) he and (b) his Department made to secure a buyer for Redcar coke ovens and blast furnace before the Official Receiver called for a hard closure.

Commercial decisions on the purchase of assets are the prerogative of the companies involved and government has no powers to oblige companies to purchase assets.


On liquidation of a company, it is the responsibility of the liquidator to sell the free assets of the company. In the case of SSI UK, this was the Official Receiver.


I am informed that the Official Receiver did maintain operations at SSI, including the coke ovens, for a period while he tried to find purchasers for the assets of SSI UK but as of the 12 October, no purchaser had been found and the Official Receiver ceased operations of the coke ovens and blast furnace.


5th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what information his Department holds on how many bids were received by the Official Receiver to buy or operate any element of the former SSI site in Redcar prior to the Receiver's decision on hard closure.

My Rt hon Friend the Secretary of State does not hold information regarding the number of bids received by the Official Receiver in respect to the former SSI site. The Official Receiver holds this information in his statutory role as an independent liquidator appointed by the Court. The Official Receiver received a number of expressions of interest in various assets of the company but none were translated into viable offers for the coke ovens or blast furnace ahead of his decisions to close them on 12 October 2015. The Official Receiver can be contacted at the address below: Ken Beasley, Official Receiver, Public Interest Unit, 2nd Floor, 3 Piccadilly Place, London Road, Manchester, M1 3BN.

4th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what action can be taken within state aid rules to secure assets of national strategic significance to the British economy.

A Member State may purchase or invest in an asset on purely commercial terms, as commercial investment is not subject to state aid rules. However, any subsequent injection of funds would be subject to the rules, unless it too was on commercial terms. It should be noted that the state aid rules apply equally to nationalised and privatised companies. With losses of over £600 million in just over three years and hundreds of millions in debts, commercial terms for SSI UK would have been impossible to meet.


More generally, it is possible to give a variety of types of aid under the rules including aid for research and development, and environmental protection. Restructuring and rescue of steel however is prohibited.

4th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, when concerns were first raised with his Department over the financial viability of SSI in Redcar.

SSI UK had been in financial difficulties ever since it reopened the Redcar plant in 2012. This is a company that unfortunately made significant losses. In 2012, it lost £275million. In 2013, it lost £193.5million. In 2014, it lost £81million. And up to the end of June in 2015, it had lost £92.5m

4th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, when his Department was first made aware that employer pension payments were not being made by SSI UK.


There is a statutory process in place for the reporting of missing pension contributions. Managers of pension schemes are required to report any material non-payment of contributions to The Pensions Regulator within 90 days of those contributions falling due. There is no role for my department in this process.


In insolvency situations, such as SSI’s liquidation, unpaid pension contributions can be claimed from the Redundancy Payments Service within specified legal limits. If there are unpaid contributions, then the manager of the pension scheme will submit a claim to the Redundancy Payments Service on behalf of employees.


As part of his role as liquidator of SSI UK, the Official Receiver will look into all aspects leading to the company’s failure, including the directors’ conduct.

4th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what due diligence was undertaken by his Department prior to the purchase of the Redcar coke ovens and blast furnace.

The purchase of the Redcar coke ovens and blast furnace was a commercial transaction between SSI and Tata Steel, both privately owned companies.

4th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, whether monitoring activity was put in place by his Department to oversee the financial viability of SSI in Redcar.

It is up to companies to run their own financial affairs and to submit annual returns and accounts. My Department was aware of the serious financial difficulties facing SSI UK prior to its closure and made every effort within the bounds of the law to provide assistance where we could, including ensuring workers could be paid their monthly salaries.

3rd Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what discussions he has had with the Prime Minister about the value of the Government support package for people affected by the closure of the SSI Steelworks in Redcar.

The package, worth up to £80 million, announced to support former SSI workers and the Tees Valley economy more broadly was agreed across Government.

3rd Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, if he will assess the performance of the Official Receiver during the liquidation of SSI UK.

It is not part of the Secretary of State’s functions to assess the performance of the Official Receiver when acting as liquidator. The Secretary of State cannot interfere in the administration of the liquidation.

3rd Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what criteria were used to cap the value of the Government support package to £80 million for people affected by the closure of SSI Redcar.

The package, worth up to £80 million, announced to support former SSI workers and the Tees Valley economy more broadly was based on an initial assessment of what could make an immediate and lasting difference to the people affected and the local economy.


We are looking closely Task Force to deliver proposals which they have identified will help recover from this closure, including funding to support apprentices complete their training, support for workers to retrain, and help for local businesses to grow. As the Prime Minister and Secretary of State have said, should more funding be needed, we will consider that.

3rd Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what estimate he has made of the number of people who have accessed the Government support package for people affected by the closure of the SSI steelworks in Redcar.


There are a number of different elements of support for people affected by the closure of the SSI steelworks in Redcar. These include:


  • Redundancy-related payments paid by the Redundancy Payments Service. 1988 payments are currently being or have been processed and the majority of payments made to individuals.

  • A Jobs Fair, which was attended by over 1800 people

  • A Jobcentre Plus helpline, which has dealt with around 4000 calls

  • A support Hub, which has provided a wide range of advice and guidance to over 2000 individuals

The Government will not impose solutions from Whitehall and will continue to work closely with the local taskforce to deliver the proposals it has identified as having a real and lasting impact. This includes:


- a £1.7m support fund to enable SSI’s 50 apprentices complete their training


- a £16.5m Jobs and Skills Fund to help local firms employ former SSI workers or their spouses in full-time or part-time jobs for a minimum of three years


- £16m support for firms in the SSI supply chain and wider Tees Valley impacted by the Redcar steelworks closure, to safeguard jobs, provide the stimulus to create new posts and provide expert assistance to help them expand their business

17th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, what steps she is taking to ensure that domestic energy suppliers are passing on reductions in the wholesale prices of electricity and gas to consumers.

Strong competition in the energy supply market is the best way to keep prices down. The Government is committed to ensuring that the market works effectively for consumers, including through implementing the final recommendations of the Competition and Markets Authority following their investigation. In the meantime we will continue our focus on keeping bills down through promoting competition, making switching quicker and easier, and providing direct help to the most vulnerable.

17th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, what estimate she has made of the average domestic energy bill in (a) Redcar constituency, (b) the North East and (c) the UK in (i) 2010 and (ii) 2015.

Energy bill data are only produced at regional level. The tables below show the average annual domestic energy bill for the North East public electricity supply area, which includes Redcar constituency, and the UK. Bill estimates are shown for the years 2010 and 2014, the most recent data available, and are based on fixed consumption levels of 3,800kWh/year for electricity and 15,000 kWh/year for gas. The bills provided are averaged across all methods of payment and expressed in cash terms.

North East

Electricity

Gas

Combined

2010

£462

£562

£1,024

2014

£589

£737

£1,326

UK average

Electricity

Gas

Combined

2010

£474

£564

£1,038

2014

£592

£752

£1,344

Estimates of average domestic energy bills by region are derived from data in tables 2.2 and 2.3 of DECC’s Quarterly Energy Prices publication.

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/annual-domestic-energy-price-statistics.

21st Feb 2017
To ask the Attorney General, whether any individuals under investigation during Operation Sacristy were charged with perverting the course of justice.

No individual who was investigated as part of Operation Sacristy was charged with perverting the course of justice.

Robert Buckland
Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice
4th Dec 2017
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether direct messages (a) sent from and (b) received by government Twitter accounts will be transferred to the National Archives as official records.

The National Archives currently captures government Twitter accounts. This does not include direct messages.

16th Nov 2017
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what discussions he has had with Redcar and Cleveland Borough Council on ensuring that the council has in place sufficient security measures to protect against cyber-attacks.

The Government takes the threat of cyber attacks against public services very seriously. We support Local Government in improving their cyber resilience and encourage all organisations to implement the advice and guidance developed by National Cyber Security Centre experts and published on their website (www.ncsc.gov.uk).

In addition, the Government's Active Cyber Defence (ACD) programme has launched, with four key services made available for use across the public sector. The NCSC’s Annual Report, published on 3 October 2017, provided an update on rollout.

13th Nov 2015
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether his Department was consulted by HM Treasury before the Government announced its intention to exclude subsidised renewable energy generation by community energy organisations from eligibility for social investment tax relief.

The Government is committed to helping social enterprises access finance as part of its drive to build a bigger, stronger society. This is why we developed the world’s first Social Investment Tax Relief. Cabinet Office continues to work closely with HM Treasury, the relevant social regulators and social investment market champions like Big Society Capital to ensure that this tax relief achieves its policy goals in a way that is fair and provides value for money to taxpayers.
13th Nov 2015
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what progress the Government has made on developing a right to mutualise within the public sector; and if he will make a statement.

The Government is committed to supporting the growth of public service mutuals and delivering the manifesto commitment to guarantee the right to mutualise within the public sector. The Government will set out its plan in more detail in due course.


13th Nov 2015
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what plans the Government has for the funding of the Commissioning Academy over the next five years.

The Government will continue to support the Commissioning Academy. We are looking at a variety of funding options to put it on a sustainable footing.


15th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent assessment he has made of the effect on the local economy of his Department's decision to not support a finance package for Sirius Minerals' Woodsmith Mine project.

Sirius Minerals have recently made a statement to adjust their work programme and undertake a strategic review of the project. The Government will continue to monitor the progress of the work. Sirius Minerals have stated they will continue to find alternative sources of investment so that they can complete the Woodsmith Mine project.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
15th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the cost to Sirius Minerals PLC of the decision by his Department not to support a finance package for that company's Woodsmith Mine project.

Sirius Minerals have recently made a statement to adjust their work programme and undertake a strategic review of the project. The Government will continue to monitor the progress of the work. Sirius Minerals have stated they will continue to find alternative sources of investment so that they can complete the Woodsmith Mine project.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
2nd Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Government’s target to reach net zero emissions by 2050, by how much her Department plans to increase the proportion of green gas in the gas network; and if she will bring forward proposals to amend Section 3 of the Gas Safety (Management) Regulations 1996 to prepare for the increased use of green gas in the grid.

In this year’s Spring Statement, the Government stated our commitment to accelerating the decarbonisation of our gas supplies by increasing the proportion of green gas in the grid and to consult on the appropriate mechanism to deliver this commitment later this year.

The Gas Safety (Management) Regulations are the responsibility of the Health and Safety Executive. Officials continue to engage with the HSE to support their ongoing assessment of proposals to amend Section 3 of the Gas Safety (Management) Regulations.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
19th Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the H21 North of England report by H21 et al. published in November 2018, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of the proposals in that report to convert the gas networks across the North of England to hydrogen.

I welcome the contribution this study makes to the evidence base on the potential approaches to decarbonising how we heat our homes, businesses and industry. There is no clear consensus on how best to decarbonise heat at scale. Using the gas grid to transport hydrogen is one of several potential approaches, which include heat networks, heat pumps and biogas. The government's review of the evidence base on approaches to decarbonising heat is set out in our report ‘Clean Growth: Transforming Heating’.

18th Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to support the development and innovation of UK-produced domestic appliances that use hydrogen.

The Department is currently undertaking a £25 million project to explore the option of using hydrogen gas for heating UK homes and businesses. This work includes supporting the development of domestic boilers, fires, cookers and other innovative appliances that use hydrogen. BEIS has awarded 16 contracts as part of this development process which is scheduled to complete by March 2021.

26th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of progress that (a) Tees Valley Combined Authority, (b) Liverpool City Region and (c) Leeds City Council have made in supporting the development and implementation of hydrogen conversion technology.

The Department has not made a formal assessment of the progress that that Local Authorities have made in supporting the development and implementation of hydrogen conversion technology. However, in the course of work to understand how the UK can move to low carbon heating and the potential role of hydrogen in the wider energy system, my officials and I have met with a range of national, regional and local stakeholders.

Our engagement has taken a number of forms - bilateral engagement, roundtables, conferences and workshops - and has included engagement with, among others: Scottish Government, Welsh Government, the Tees Valley Combined Authority, Liverpool City Region, Swindon Council, Swindon and Wiltshire LEP, Cheshire and Warrington LEP, and Greater London Authority.

26th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, which local authorities he has met with to discuss the steps they are taking to support the development and implementation of hydrogen conversion technology.

The Department has not made a formal assessment of the progress that that Local Authorities have made in supporting the development and implementation of hydrogen conversion technology. However, in the course of work to understand how the UK can move to low carbon heating and the potential role of hydrogen in the wider energy system, my officials and I have met with a range of national, regional and local stakeholders.

Our engagement has taken a number of forms - bilateral engagement, roundtables, conferences and workshops - and has included engagement with, among others: Scottish Government, Welsh Government, the Tees Valley Combined Authority, Liverpool City Region, Swindon Council, Swindon and Wiltshire LEP, Cheshire and Warrington LEP, and Greater London Authority.

26th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the progress by local authorities on supporting development and implementation of hydrogen conversion technology in their local area.

The Department has not made a formal assessment of the progress that that Local Authorities have made in supporting the development and implementation of hydrogen conversion technology. However, in the course of work to understand how the UK can move to low carbon heating and the potential role of hydrogen in the wider energy system, my officials and I have met with a range of national, regional and local stakeholders.

Our engagement has taken a number of forms - bilateral engagement, roundtables, conferences and workshops - and has included engagement with, among others: Scottish Government, Welsh Government, the Tees Valley Combined Authority, Liverpool City Region, Swindon Council, Swindon and Wiltshire LEP, Cheshire and Warrington LEP, and Greater London Authority.

26th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 5 September 2018 to Question 166496 on Energy: Hydrogen, when the Government plans to publish further information on the work it is undertaking to strengthen and assess the evidence on the range of potential approaches to decarbonising heat.

The Department continues to publish findings from externally commissioned studies in support of work to strengthen the evidence of potential approaches to decarbonising heat. We plan to publish a report on our review of the evidence in due course.

5th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment the Government has made of the potential merits of providing support to to steel companies for the construction of electric arc furnaces on Teesside; and if he will make a statement.

The Government continues to work with Mayor Ben Houchen and the Tees Valley Combined Authority to promote new investment in the Tees Valley, including in the materials sector. Discussions with potential investors are at various stages of maturity and remain commercially sensitive. Any proposals that request public funding will be assessed for their robustness and the value for money it would represent.

2nd Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what support the Government plans to provide to Ineos for choosing the South Tees Development Corporation site as the manufacturing location of that company’s Projekt Grenadier 4x4 vehicles.

Government has a long-standing programme of support to maintain the competitiveness of the UK automotive sector. This includes the Automotive Sector Deal. This is a joint strategic vision for how government and industry will work together to respond to the Grand Challenges of the Industrial Strategy, such as Clean Growth and the Future of Mobility.

The Department has maintained close engagement with INEOS throughout their process and has met with the company and members of the South Tees Development Corporation on several occasions. We continue to promote UK options with INEOS, and stand ready to support in any way we can.

1st Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions he has with Ineos on that company choosing the South Tees Development Corporation site as the manufacturing location for its Projekt Grenadier 4x4 vehicles.

Government has a long-standing programme of support to maintain the competitiveness of the UK automotive sector. This includes the Automotive Sector Deal. This is a joint strategic vision for how government and industry will work together to respond to the Grand Challenges of the Industrial Strategy, such as Clean Growth and the Future of Mobility.

I am delighted that Sir Jim Ratcliffe is considering the UK as a place for large-scale investment into the automotive sector. The Department has maintained close engagement with INEOS throughout their process and has met with the company and members of the South Tees Development Corporation on several occasions. We continue to promote UK options with INEOS, and stand ready to support in any way we can.

1st Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions the Government has had with steel companies on the construction of electric arc furnaces on Teesside.

The Government continues to work with Mayor Ben Houchen and the Tees Valley Combined Authority to promote new investment in the Tees Valley, including in the materials sector. Such discussions are commercially sensitive. Any proposals that request public funding are assessed for their robustness, strategic fit and value for money.

20th Jul 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential for large-scale hydrogen conversion projects to support the UK to meet its de-carbonisation targets.

The Government recognises the significant potential of hydrogen in meeting our long-term decarbonisation targets.

We are currently undertaking work to strengthen and assess the evidence on the range of potential approaches to decarbonising heat, including the possibility of large scale conversion of the gas network to hydrogen, and will set out further detail on this work later this year.

In support of this work we are investing in hydrogen innovation, with up to £65 million supporting projects addressing the fundamental challenges of large-scale hydrogen conversion, such as establishing the safety case and reducing production costs.

20th Jul 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps is he taking to support research and development for large-scale hydrogen conversion projects.

The Government is currently undertaking work to strengthen and assess the evidence on the range of potential approaches to decarbonising heat in the long-term. This work includes examining the possibility of large scale conversion of the gas network to hydrogen, as well as looking at the potential of other low carbon gases, heat networks, and large-scale electrification of heating.

In support of this work we are investing in hydrogen innovation, with up to £65 million supporting projects addressing the fundamental challenges of large-scale hydrogen conversion, such as establishing the safety case and reducing production costs.

20th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many households in (a) Redcar constituency (b) Redcar and Cleveland and (c) the North East spend more than 10 per cent of their income on fuel bills.

In the North East, approximately 0.15 million households (13.3 per cent), spent more than 10 per cent of their full income on fuel bills. Data is only available at the regional level and is not broken down further to Local Authority or Parliamentary Constituency level.

7th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to ensure that unspent funds allocated to the SSI taskforce remain available to that taskforce.

The Government provided a comprehensive funding package to support the affected workforce and promote the economic recovery of the Tees Valley in response to the SSI liquidation. Of this funding, £50 million was allocated specifically to the SSI Task Force to deliver a range of tailored support initiatives. All of this funding has already been paid to the accountable bodies. Task Force members continue to work closely with officials in the Department to deliver this support package.

9th Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how his Department monitors the effect on existing commercial innovation facilities after an award of public funding has been made for new innovation facilities.

I refer the Hon. Member to the answer I gave on 20 October 2016 to Questions UIN 49036, 49037 and 49038.

17th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the risk and potential effect of new government-funded assets on commercial innovation activity in existing commercial innovation facilities.

All potential major capital projects are assessed against the additional value they add, including an evaluation of whether the research or innovation activity is already being undertaken elsewhere. The majority of decisions about which research investments to undertake are taken directly by Research Councils, based on rigorous criteria including peer review.

In respect of the establishment of Innovate UK’s 11 Catapult Centres, all candidate areas have undergone a robust evaluation by Innovate UK’s Senior Innovation Leads who have relevant domain expertise. In addition, facilitated workshops, with leading figures in the relevant industries - including business, academic and representatives from the public sector, are held to ascertain whether Innovate UK’s analysis of the market opportunities in this area is correct. Each candidate area is evaluated according to an agreed process to assess the size of the global market opportunity and the demand for a Catapult to help business build on their capabilities to commercialise innovation and realise this potential in the UK.

In setting up new Catapult centres Innovate UK take into account the option of working within or alongside existing physical centres in the UK either to avoid duplication or to achieve quicker delivery.

At a local level, Local Enterprise Partnerships (LEPs) are responsible for identifying, assessing and approving Local Growth Funded projects. They do this in accordance with their strategic economic objectives and Local Assurance Frameworks which have to comply with the LEP National Assurance Framework. The National Assurance Framework covers value for money and states that methodology should be proportionate to the funding allocated and in line with established Government guidance including the HM Treasury Green Book.

17th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the presence and scope of existing commercial assets when considering new public funding for research and development and innovation.

All potential major capital projects are assessed against the additional value they add, including an evaluation of whether the research or innovation activity is already being undertaken elsewhere. The majority of decisions about which research investments to undertake are taken directly by Research Councils, based on rigorous criteria including peer review.

In respect of the establishment of Innovate UK’s 11 Catapult Centres, all candidate areas have undergone a robust evaluation by Innovate UK’s Senior Innovation Leads who have relevant domain expertise. In addition, facilitated workshops, with leading figures in the relevant industries - including business, academic and representatives from the public sector, are held to ascertain whether Innovate UK’s analysis of the market opportunities in this area is correct. Each candidate area is evaluated according to an agreed process to assess the size of the global market opportunity and the demand for a Catapult to help business build on their capabilities to commercialise innovation and realise this potential in the UK.

In setting up new Catapult centres Innovate UK take into account the option of working within or alongside existing physical centres in the UK either to avoid duplication or to achieve quicker delivery.

At a local level, Local Enterprise Partnerships (LEPs) are responsible for identifying, assessing and approving Local Growth Funded projects. They do this in accordance with their strategic economic objectives and Local Assurance Frameworks which have to comply with the LEP National Assurance Framework. The National Assurance Framework covers value for money and states that methodology should be proportionate to the funding allocated and in line with established Government guidance including the HM Treasury Green Book.

17th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what checks his Department and its agencies undertake to ensure public funding for new innovation facilities does not result in a duplication of existing commercial assets.

All potential major capital projects are assessed against the additional value they add, including an evaluation of whether the research or innovation activity is already being undertaken elsewhere. The majority of decisions about which research investments to undertake are taken directly by Research Councils, based on rigorous criteria including peer review.

In respect of the establishment of Innovate UK’s 11 Catapult Centres, all candidate areas have undergone a robust evaluation by Innovate UK’s Senior Innovation Leads who have relevant domain expertise. In addition, facilitated workshops, with leading figures in the relevant industries - including business, academic and representatives from the public sector, are held to ascertain whether Innovate UK’s analysis of the market opportunities in this area is correct. Each candidate area is evaluated according to an agreed process to assess the size of the global market opportunity and the demand for a Catapult to help business build on their capabilities to commercialise innovation and realise this potential in the UK.

In setting up new Catapult centres Innovate UK take into account the option of working within or alongside existing physical centres in the UK either to avoid duplication or to achieve quicker delivery.

At a local level, Local Enterprise Partnerships (LEPs) are responsible for identifying, assessing and approving Local Growth Funded projects. They do this in accordance with their strategic economic objectives and Local Assurance Frameworks which have to comply with the LEP National Assurance Framework. The National Assurance Framework covers value for money and states that methodology should be proportionate to the funding allocated and in line with established Government guidance including the HM Treasury Green Book.

13th Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to ensure that unspent financial resources from the Redcar Taskforce are spent in the local community.

The Government has provided £50 million to the Redcar Task Force to support individuals directly affected by the SSI liquidation and to boost economic development across Tees Valley. £43 million of that funding has already been approved, with more than £30 million paid out to accountable local authorities and colleges. Task Force members continue to work closely with officials in the Department in delivering the remainder of the support package.

13th Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to negotiate a financial settlement with those banks in Thailand which have a controlling interest in the former SSI UK site to ensure redevelopment in a timely manner for the benefit of the local community.

My Rt Hon Friend the Secretary of State and I are committed to the future of the Redcar area following the closure of the SSI steelworks. I am pleased that we have recently had the opportunity to discuss this in depth with the hon Member for Redcar and the leader of Redcar and Cleveland Council, Sue Jeffrey.

13th Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions he has had with the official receiver on the future of the former SSI UK site in Redcar since July 2016.

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy is in regular contact with the Official Receiver regarding the continuing safety and security of the former SSI UK site, and are providing regular updates to My Rt Hon Friend the Secretary of State and other Ministers.

18th Jul 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what his Department's responsibilities are on developing and implementing an industrial strategy.

Responsibility for developing and implementing an industrial strategy clearly sits within the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy. We will be working closely across Government and with a range of organisations – including regional representatives, businesses, trade and research bodies, universities, and trade unions - to deliver this, to help ensure that the economy grows strongly in all parts of the country, and to support the UK’s global competitiveness.

We will be engaging with all sectors, including the steel industry through the Steel Council, to understand issues common to multiple sectors, and where Government needs to focus its effort to support UK businesses.

18th Jul 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what his Department's policy is on including the steel industry in its industrial strategy.

Responsibility for developing and implementing an industrial strategy clearly sits within the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy. We will be working closely across Government and with a range of organisations – including regional representatives, businesses, trade and research bodies, universities, and trade unions - to deliver this, to help ensure that the economy grows strongly in all parts of the country, and to support the UK’s global competitiveness.

We will be engaging with all sectors, including the steel industry through the Steel Council, to understand issues common to multiple sectors, and where Government needs to focus its effort to support UK businesses.

11th Jul 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, which official engagements he has undertaken in Redcar since May 2015.

My Rt hon Friend the Member for Bromsgrove (Sajid Javid) visited Redcar on 2 October 2015 following the announcement of the liquidation of Sahaviriya Steel Industries UK (SSI).

The then Secretary of State announced a support package worth up to £80 million for former employees affected by the closure. He was accompanied by the then Minister for Small Businesses, Industry and Enterprise, Anna Soubry.

The Minister for Small Businesses, Industry and Enterprise then attended the Redcar taskforce on 21 March 2016.

In his previous role as Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, my Rt hon Friend met the Mayor and Leaders of the five Tees Valley authorities on the following dates: 15 July 2015 (a joint meeting with James Wharton), 23 March 2016, 7 June 2016 (to launch Lord Heseltine’s report Tees Valley: opportunity unlimited) and 12 July 2016. These were regular catch-up meetings, which took place in Westminster.

11th Jul 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how much electricity has been generated by Teesside Wind Farm in each year since it opened.

The Teesside Offshore Wind farm has generated the following amounts of electricity in each year since it opened;

2013 (July to December):

79,405 MWh

2014

121,808 MWh

2015

210,057 MWh

2016 (January to March)

57,729 MWh

This information is publically available on the Ofgem website at:

https://www.renewablesandchp.ofgem.gov.uk/Public/ReportManager.aspx?ReportVisibility=1&ReportCategory=0.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
8th May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether he has plans to visit Celtic Park football stadium to make an assessment of the merits of their rail seating installation.

The Sports Grounds Safety Authority (SGSA) is the regulatory body responsible for overseeing and advising on safety at sports grounds.

DCMS officials together with those from the SGSA have visited Celtic Park to view the rail seating in operation.

The SGSA has produced a technical report on the Installation of Dual Purpose Seating and Standing Area at Celtic Park, Glasgow, following its introduction at that ground. We will be publishing this report in due course.

14th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what (a) legislative frameworks and (b) guidance are in place to ensure the protection of children from practices that (i) encourage them to gamble and (ii) expose them to situations that may lead to gambling through in-game purchasing in video games.

Protecting children and the vulnerable from being harmed or exploited by gambling is a core objective of the regulation of gambling in Great Britain, and a priority for the government. Under the Gambling Act 2005 it is an offence to invite a child or young person to gamble. This includes, in particular, intentionally bringing to the attention of a child or young person information about gambling with a view to encouraging them to gamble.

Where gambling facilities are offered to British consumers using in-game items which can be converted into cash or traded for items of real-world value, then such activities must be licensed by the Gambling Commission. The Gambling Commission has a range of powers to enforce compliance, including bringing criminal action against unlicensed operators that offer gambling to children.

The Video Standards Council Rating Board is the statutory body responsible for the age rating of video games in the UK using the Pan-European Games Information (PEGI) system.

Pictographic content descriptors supplement the PEGI age ratings, and there is a descriptor for games that contain elements that may encourage gambling. Games with this type of content carry a PEGI 12, 16 or 18 age ratings. The VSC Rating Board is working with PEGI to assess further steps to inform consumers about purchases in games.

The Competition and Markets Authority provides guidance and advice for parents and carers, in respect of children’s use of online games. The advice includes information on checking device settings to prevent children from making in-play purchases, as well as guidance on game descriptors. The guidance can be found on its website at the following address: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/buying-features-in-online-games-advice-for-parents-and-carers/childrens-app-and-online-games-advice-for-parents-and-care

13th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps he is taking to regulate in-game purchasing in video games.

Game purchasers are protected by general consumer law such as the Consumer Protection from Unfair Trading Regulations 2008. This includes a requirement on businesses not to subject anyone to misleading or aggressive marketing practices, or, for example, direct exhortation to buy products, such as games content, including in-game purchases such as loot boxes. The government is committed to ensuring that consumers are properly protected and not exploited by aggressive commercial practices.

13th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if he will bring forward legislative proposals to regulate the game mechanics of (a) loot boxes and (b) similar in-game reward mechanisms in video games to ensure fair practices.

Video games are subject to a mixture of statutory and voluntary regulation mainly linked to the Pan-European Games Information (PEGI) classification system. The PEGI ratings system is used to classify video games content against criteria which includes, among other things, gambling. Additionally, PEGI informs consumers purchasing products from major app stores if they contain further purchases and are considering the possibility of placing these notifications on boxed products.

Regulators such as PEGI and the Gambling Commission are speaking to industry to ensure that those who purchase and play video games are informed and protected. The government’s Internet Safety Strategy sets out how the government will work with the industry to promote further awareness and understanding of PEGI age ratings, parental controls and advice on safe gaming.

We recognise the risks that come from increasing convergence between gambling and video games. The Gambling Commission is keeping this matter under review and will continue to monitor developments in the market.

13th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if he will bring forward legislative proposals to ensure the disclosure of the odds of winning items in (a) loot boxes and (b) similar variable reward mechanisms on screen at the time of purchase in video games.

Video games are subject to a mixture of statutory and voluntary regulation mainly linked to the Pan-European Games Information (PEGI) classification system. The PEGI ratings system is used to classify video games content against criteria which includes, among other things, gambling. Additionally, PEGI informs consumers purchasing products from major app stores if they contain further purchases and are considering the possibility of placing these notifications on boxed products.

Regulators such as PEGI and the Gambling Commission are speaking to industry to ensure that those who purchase and play video games are informed and protected. The government’s Internet Safety Strategy sets out how the government will work with the industry to promote further awareness and understanding of PEGI age ratings, parental controls and advice on safe gaming.

We recognise the risks that come from increasing convergence between gambling and video games. The Gambling Commission is keeping this matter under review and will continue to monitor developments in the market.

22nd Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent meetings officials and ministers from his Department have had with their counterparts at the Department for Education on education and the proposed Digital Charter.

Ministers and officials have regular meetings and discussions with their counterparts in the Department for Education to discuss a range of issues, including the Digital Charter.

20th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether her Department has any plans to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the birth of Gertrude Bell in 2018; and if she will make a statement.

My Department has no plans to mark the anniversary in question.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
16th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what estimate she has made of the amount of funding given directly by Government to charities in Redcar and Cleveland.

Government contributes a significant amount of funding to the voluntary sector through grants and contracts. According to the latest figures from the National Council for Voluntary Organisations, government contributed a total of £14.4 billion annually to the sector, £7.3 billion of which came from central government. We do not hold information on total funding for charities in individual boroughs.

16th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what discussions she has had with Redcar and Cleveland Borough Council on steps to increase tourism in the area.

VisitBritain and VisitEngland work with Destination Management Organisations to promote tourism in the regions across England. Government also provides funding for projects to improve the visitor offer in particular areas, including the Discover England Fund and the Coastal Communities Fund. Redcar and Cleveland has received recent funding for The Cleveland Way, a Discover England Fund project, and has received three Coastal Communities Fund grants since 2013 totalling £2.5m.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
6th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if she will make representations to Snap Inc. about the data protection and privacy implications of the Snap Map feature available to users of the Snapchat service.

The Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) is responsible for the protection of personal data and the right to privacy. The Secretary of State and I also met with the Information Commissioner last week to discuss data protection. The Government understands the concerns that have been raised and have discussed Snap Map with the ICO.

6th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if she will make an assessment of the child protection implications of the Snap Map service available to users of Snapchat; and if she will take steps to ensure that children and vulnerable people who use that service have their location data protected from unofficial third parties.

The Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) is responsible for the protection of personal data and the right to privacy. The Secretary of State and I also met with the Information Commissioner last week to discuss data protection. The Government understands the concerns that have been raised and have discussed Snap Map with the ICO.

5th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent discussions she has had with the Information Commissioner's Office on the data protection and privacy implications of the Snap Map feature available to users of the Snapchat service.

The Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) is responsible for the protection of personal data and the right to privacy. The Secretary of State and I also met with the Information Commissioner last week to discuss data protection. The Government understands the concerns that have been raised and have discussed Snap Map with the ICO.

23rd Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what steps she is taking to ensure that buildings in the North East on the National Heritage List for England are properly maintained.

Historic England maintains a national Heritage at Risk Register that includes details of all Grade I and II* listed buildings at risk, plus details of Grade II listed buildings at risk in London and Grade II listed places of worship at risk outside London. In relation to buildings on the Register, Historic England operates a grant scheme for project development and urgent structural repairs, and provides advice to owners, developers and local authorities on changes, plus other sources of funding and advice. Such sources include the Heritage Lottery Fund, which has awarded over £90 million towards projects in the North East primarily focused on listed buildings. These projects typically focus on repair and redevelopment, but can also include funding for other activities such as engagement which help ensure the long term sustainability of a project.

14th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, when she plans to lay provisions for the new Horseracing Betting Levy Scheme before Parliament.

The Horserace Betting Levy Regulations 2017 were laid before Parliament on 7th March 2017 and can be viewed via the following link: http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukdsi/2017/9780111155530/introduction

The regulations will ensure a level playing field amongst bookmakers based in Britain and those offshore while ensuring a fair return to the sport.

6th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, if she will bring forward legislative proposals to amend Ofcom's duties to include the regulation of social media platforms; and if she will make an assessment of the adequacy of the non-imposition of a general duty to monitor in Article 15 of E-Commerce Directive 2000/31/EC as it relates to the means by which social media platforms might be expected to monitor abusive content.

Social media companies are already subject to a variety of different regulations and we have no plans to amend Ofcom's duties to regulate in this area. Government expects online industries to ensure that they have relevant safeguards and processes in place, including access restrictions, for children and young people who use their services.

A decision will be made in due course regarding any assessment of the adequacy of the non-imposition of a general duty to monitor in Article 15 of E-Commerce Directive 2000/31/EC of the eCommerce Directive.

20th Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, if she will make it her policy to review the adequacy of the Electronic Commerce (EC Directive) Regulations 2002 in so far as they relate to social media platforms after the UK leaves the EU.

A decision will be made in due course.

20th Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, pursuant to the Answer of 19 October 2016 to Question 48756, what steps the Government plans to take to ensure that its expectations for social media providers to have robust processes in place to deal with abusive content are met.

Government continues to engage intensively with industry, including major social media companies, and charities through the UK Council for Child Internet Safety (UKCCIS) a multi-stakeholder forum representing over 200 organisations with an interest in internet safety. UKCCIS has published a guide for providers of social media and interactive services to help make their platforms safer for children and young people under 18. UKCCIS is working to ensure this guide influences policy and practice by online service providers both within and outside the UK. Government expects industry to review and improve its child internet safety provisions as technology changes.

Leading providers report on their online safety practices voluntarily as part of the safety framework of the ICT Coalition for Children Online: http://ictcoalition.org/

22nd Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what recent estimate she has made of the number of library closures in each of the last six years.

The Department for Culture, Media and Sport monitors proposed changes to library service provision throughout England. The Department does not maintain detail on the number of public libraries closed each calendar year.

14th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, how many meetings Ministers of her Department have had with social media companies to discuss harmful online content since May 2015.

Department for Culture, Media and Sport Ministers regularly meet a wide range of stakeholders, including social media companies, to discuss a number of issues including those affecting children and young people on the internet.

Details of Ministerial meetings with external stakeholders are available via the Department’s transparency returns, which can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/search?q=DCMS+ministerial+meetings.

14th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment she has made of the power conferred on Ofcom to regulation offensive communications sent in the UK on (a) the internet and (b) social media platforms.

We are aware of concerns about offensive content on social media. Where this is the case Government expects social media providers to have robust process in place and act promptly when abuse is reported. The UK has strict laws governing such content, which apply equally online and offline.

Ofcom does not regulate offensive communications on either the internet or social media platforms. The Communications Act 2003 requires Ofcom to set standards to ensure that generally accepted standards are applied to the content of television and radio programmes.

20th Jul 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what discussions she has had with Nintendo about incidences of trespass or disrespecting of cemeteries or religious sites caused by players of Pokémon Go.

Many people in the UK enjoy playing Pokemon Go and most act responsibly whilst doing so. It is important that all players abide by the law and respect their surroundings. During the summer Pokemon Go’s developers in the US, Niantic, added some new warnings to the game’s loading screen, for example reminding players not to trespass and not to enter dangerous areas. Owners or managers of specific sites who are concerned about players visiting a nearby PokeStop or Gym are able to use Niantic’s report system to request that the stop is removed from the game.

Meanwhile, we are in touch with representatives of Niantic to discuss features of Pokemon Go and the advice they provide to consumers in the UK.

11th Jul 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, how many works of art from public collections were loaned to institutions in Redcar and Cleveland in each year since 2010.

The Department does not hold information about loans made from public collections. The national museums and galleries have responsibility for their specific loan arrangements and information about their loans is not held centrally.

All Government funded museums and galleries are encouraged to loan works from their collections to institutions across the UK.Sponsored National Museums actively support and partner regional museums, which includes touring and large scale loans. In 2014/15 the national museums and galleries loaned items to 1,629 venues, including regional museums and historic houses.

A new tax relief for museums and galleries will be introduced from 1 April 2017 to encourage them to develop creative new exhibitions and display their collections across the country. The relief will be available on qualifying costs for temporary and touring exhibitions.

An independent report by Lord Heseltine, published in June, makes recommendations to further develop the Tees Valley area. The report called Tees Valley: Opportunity Unlimited has strong arts and cultural content and says the area hosts public art of national significance. The report also highlights the strengths of museums and galleries in the region, which include the Middlesbrough Institute of Modern Art (MiMA), the MOD funded Museum of the Royal Navy’s HMS Trincomalee in Hartlepool, the "Head of Steam" Railway Museum in Darlington and the Science Museum Group’s Locomotion branch at Shildon near Darlington.

MiMa is a Tate Plus partner and has strong links with Tate Modern. It receives funding from Arts Council England as a Visual Arts Gallery. The Government is also funding £500k towards the development of a new Captain Cook exhibition resource at the Captain Cook Birthplace Museum in Middlesbrough.

17th Sep 2015
BBC
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, if he will take steps to ensure that the amount of original radio and television content on the BBC does not decrease following the review of the BBC Charter.

The Charter Review consultation document, published on 16 July, invited views on the BBC's approach to content production and the quota systems in place. This issue will be considered as part of the Charter Review process.

17th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what steps he is taking to ensure that national galleries and museums remain free at the point of use.

Free access to all national museums and galleries was a commitment made in the 2015 Conservative Party Manifesto and remains government policy.

Management agreements between DCMS and all national museums and galleries highlight as a priority that “free entry to the permanent collections of the national museums will continue to be available and public access will be protected.”

22nd Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent assessment he has made of the potential merits of expanding his Department's review of education outcomes for children in need to consider (a) employment outcomes, (b) training outcomes, (c) housing outcomes and (d) health outcomes.

The department is committed to ensuring that all children, regardless of background, have the opportunity to fulfil their potential. To this end we have undertaken a broad programme of evidence gathering to review the outcomes of and support for Children in Need.

The scope of the review is focussed on educational outcomes, and we have no plans to extend this – however we recognise that the factors affecting these children and young people’s educational outcomes, such as the support they receive, may also lead to other poorer outcomes. That is why our March data publication set out our intention to understand the lifetime outcomes of Children in Need, including exploring the feasibility of matching the Department for Education’s Children in Need data with data from other government departments.

Children’s social care and schools have a central role in supporting Children in Need – it is therefore important for us to focus the review on what we can do now whilst making progress and working across government to understand more about other outcomes over the longer-term.

We recognise that there are times when children and families need additional support when experiencing difficulties in their day to day lives. Our new data shows that many families have received help from children’s services at times of difficulty over the three year period. In many cases these families have received the support they need to move on without further contact with children’s services.

We will spend the final part of the review considering what more we can do, in policy and practice, to support the change that is needed.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
8th May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether his Department has carried out an assessment of the effect of (a) endometriosis and (b) other menstrual condition on the performance of children and young people in school; and if he will make a statement.

In 2014, the government introduced a new duty on schools to support pupils with medical conditions and published statutory guidance on this for schools and others to follow. The guidance can be found here https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/supporting-pupils-at-school-with-medical-conditions--3.

The guidance is clear that schools, local authorities, health professionals, commissioners and other support services should work together to ensure that children with medical conditions receive a full education. I met with the Health Conditions in Schools Alliance last week to discuss this. The guidance does not specify individual medical conditions schools should support and the department has not assessed endometriosis or menstrual conditions specifically.

For any child whose illness will prevent them from attending school, local authorities are responsible for arranging suitable full-time education.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
4th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many schools are in receipt of the Service Pupil Premium; and how much each such school receives.

In the financial year 2017-18 there are 10,742 schools which are in receipt of Service Pupil Premium funding – totalling £22,515,000.

The Department for Education does not publish details of Service Pupil Premium allocations to individual schools, as doing so would risk making those pupils who are eligible for the funding individually identifiable.

4th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much was spent from the public purse on the Service Pupil Premium in each year from 2011 to 2017.

The table below shows the total Service Pupil Premium funding allocated to schools by the Department for Education in each financial year from 2011 to 2017.

Financial year

Total Service Pupil Premium funding allocated to schools

Number of eligible pupils

2011-12 [1]

£9,014,000

45,070

2012-13 [2]

£13,093,000

52,370

2013-14 [3]

£17,381,000

57,940

2014-15 [4]

£19,317,000

64,390

2015-16 [5]

£20,668,700

68,896

2016-17 [6]

£22,040,775

73,469

2017-18 [7]

£22,580,400

75,268

It should be noted that the rate of funding increased from £200 per pupil in 2011-12 to £250 per pupil in 2012-13; and then to £300 per pupil in 2013-14 and all subsequent years.

Eligibility for the Service Pupil Premium has also been extended since the funding was introduced. In 2011-12, only those pupils who were identified in the January 2011 school census as currently being Service children attracted the funding. In subsequent years, pupils have also been eligible for the Service Premium if they were recorded as Service children in any school census since January 2011 but no longer have this status (e.g. because their parent has left the armed forces); or if they are in receipt of a pension under the Armed Forces Compensation Scheme or the War Pensions Scheme.

[1]http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20120109202126/https://www.education.gov.uk/schools/adminandfinance/financialmanagement/schoolsrevenuefunding/settlement2012pupilpremium/a0075963/pupil-premium-2011-12

[2]http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20140107120523/https://www.education.gov.uk/schools/adminandfinance/financialmanagement/schoolsrevenuefunding/a00200465/schools-funding-settlement-2012-13

[3] https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/pupil-premium-2013-to-2014-final-allocation-tables

[4] https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/pupil-premium-2014-to-2015-final-allocations

[5] https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/pupil-premium-2015-to-2016-allocations

[6] https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/pupil-premium-conditions-of-grant-2016-to-2017

[7] https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/pupil-premium-conditions-of-grant-2017-to-2018

20th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate she has made of the proportion of the schools budget spent on supply teachers in (a) Redcar and Cleveland local authority area (b) the North East and (c) England in the last 12 months for which figures are available.

The below data has been taken from ‘income and expenditure in academies in England 2015/16’ and ‘consistent financial returns 2015-16 data’ for maintained schools. It covers directly employed supply teachers, agency supply teachers and supply teacher insurance.

Academies

Area

School count

Total expenditure (£)

Total supply spend percentage

Redcar and Cleveland

19

53,618,000

3.05%

North East

222

742,382,000

2.52%

England

5,266

17,095,395,000

2.28%

Maintained schools

Area

School count

Total expenditure (£)

Total supply spend percentage

Redcar and Cleveland

41

70,969,936

3.43%

North East

953

1,410,755,499

3.18%

England

16,774

27,728,910,048

3.26%

In July 2017 we announced an additional £1.3 billion for schools and high needs across 2018-19 and 2019-20, in addition to the schools budget set at Spending Review 2015. This means funding per pupil for schools and high needs will be maintained in real terms for the next two years.

Alongside our substantial investment, we are committed to helping schools improve outcomes for pupils and promote social mobility by getting the best value from all of their resources. This includes providing support to schools – on issues like managing teacher workload, implementing flexible working, the recruitment of supply staff and the effective deployment of support staff – so that as much resource as possible is focused on enabling teachers to improve outcomes for pupils.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
20th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate she has made of the number of parliamentary constituencies in England that have no further education institution that provides A-Levels.

We do not hold data for further education (FE) institutions not providing A Levels by parliamentary constituency.

From the Single Individualised Learner Record for the 2015/16 academic year, there were 280 parliamentary constituencies where there were no learners participating in A Level courses in FE institutions based on the delivery location.

It is important to note that this does not include A level provision in school sixth forms. There are significantly more school sixth forms than FE institutions providing A levels.

14th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate she has made of the cost to local authorities in England of using independent fostering agencies in each of the last five years.

Local council expenditure on independent (including private and voluntary) fostering service providers has been between 45 and 47 per cent of the total expenditure on fostering services between 2011 and 2016. This information can be found in the attached table. The 2016-17 data will be published in December.

14th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate she has made of the number of hours taken as long-term sickness leave by social workers in (a) Redcar and Cleveland Borough Council, (b) the North East and (c) England in each of the last five years.

The department has not made an estimate for the number of hours of long-term sickness absence taken by social workers.

Information on the sickness absence rate for children’s social workers in local councils in England has been collected on a comparable basis as of 30 September each year since 2013. The most recent data for 30 September 2016 was published by the department on 16 February 2017 and is available online at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/statistics-childrens-social-care-workforce.

The available data is shown below:

As at 30 September

Redcar and Cleveland

North East

England

2013

-

-

4%

2014

3%

5%

4%

2015

3%

4%

4%

2016

4%

5%

4%

Note: Absence rates at 30 September 2013 have not been disseminated below national level due to concerns with data quality.

14th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate she has made of the employee turnover rate for social workers in (a) Redcar and Cleveland Borough Council, (b) the North East and (c) England in each of the last five years.

Information on the turnover of children’s social workers in local authorities in England has been collected on a comparable basis as of 30 September each year since 2013. The most recent data was published by the department on 16 February 2017 and is available online at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/statistics-childrens-social-care-workforce.

The requested data is shown below:

As at 30 September

Redcar and Cleveland

North East

England

2013

19%

14%

15%

2014

9%

12%

17%

2015

18%

13%

16%

2016

16%

16%

15%

Note: turnover rates have been calculated using the number of leavers during the year ending 30 September as a percentage of the number of children’s social workers at 30 September.

14th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps her Department is taking to reduce the number of looked-after children being placed 20 miles or more outside the boundary of their local authority.

The government is clear that the needs of the child are paramount when making decisions about the right care placement. Local councils have a statutory duty to consider the right placement for each child and take into account a number of factors, one of which is placement area. Sometimes circumstances make it the right decision for a local council to identify a placement outside of the child’s local area, for example when a child is at risk from child sexual exploitation, trafficking or gang violence or when they need very specialist care.

Out of area placements require approval from the Director of Children’s Services, and Ofsted will challenge local councils where they believe poor out of area placement are being made. The government is funding Innovation Programme pilots for residential care in areas where demand for residential places outstrips supply. We are also setting up a Residential Care Leadership Board, which will bring together representatives from local councils and providers to explore how to improve commissioning of children’s residential placements. As part of this work we expect the Board to assess data on the use of out of area placements.

14th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps her Department is taking to ensure that local authorities provide adequate pastoral support for social workers; and if she will make a statement.

Local councils as employers are responsible for the provision of appropriate pastoral support. The Standards for Employers of Social Workers, published by the Local Government Association, provide an important means of ensuring that employers are providing the right support to social workers in the difficult work they do.

14th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many looked-after children were placed 20 miles or more outside the boundary of their local authority in (a) Redcar and Cleveland, (b) the North East and (c) England in each of the last five years.

At 31 March in each of the last five years for which figures are available, the number of looked-after children placed outside their local council boundary and more than 20 miles from their home is given in the table below:

Children looked after who were placed outside the boundary of their responsible local council and over 20 miles from home at 31 March1,2,3

Years ending 31 March 2012 to 2016

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

Redcar and Cleveland

25

25

30

25

25

North East

350

360

380

390

410

England

8,160

8,430

9,500

9,890

10,000

Source: SSDA903

1. England and regional figures have been rounded to the nearest 10. Local council figures have been rounded to the nearest 5.

2. Figures exclude children looked after under an agreed series of short term placements.

3. Figures exclude children whose local council of placement is not known.

6th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what systems are in place for schools reporting hate incidents occurring in the classroom.

Schools are required by law to have behaviour and safeguarding policies. Schools should record and deal with incidents according to those policies and are held to account for how they do so by Ofsted. The Department for Education’s statutory safeguarding guidance, ‘Keeping children safe in education’ (September 2016), is clear that if staff have any concerns about a child, or think that the child is in danger, they should speak to the school’s designated safeguarding lead.

The Department’s ‘Preventing and Tackling Bullying’ guidance (July 2017) sets out that some types of harassing or threatening behaviour or communications could constitute a criminal offence. When school staff feel that an offence may have been committed, they should seek assistance from the police.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
6th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what information her Department holds on how many schools teach anti-racism education; and what assessment her Department has made of the quality of that education.

We do not hold data on how many schools teach anti-racism education. Every school is different and each school will face its own challenges. Schools have the autonomy to tailor their approach to tackling these issues and to take action according to their individual requirements.

The Equality Act introduced the Public Sector Equality Duty. Under this duty, state funded schools must have due regard to the need to eliminate discrimination, advance equality of opportunity and foster good relations between people with protected characteristics and none.

The National Curriculum also provides many opportunities to raise awareness of racial and religious diversity and tolerance.

Teaching about racism and discrimination can be included as part of the statutory programme of study for citizenship education at ages 11-16 in maintained schools. Citizenship education should include the development of pupils’ understanding of the diverse national, regional, religious and ethnic identities in the United Kingdom and the need for mutual respect and understanding.

Schools are also free to teach about racism in personal, social, health, economic (PSHE) education, where pupils can reflect on and challenge notions of prejudice.

Schools are already expected to promote the spiritual, moral, social and cultural development of pupils and, as part of this, fundamental British values, including the values of mutual respect and tolerance of those with different faiths and beliefs. This is at the heart of their responsibility to prepare pupils for life in modern Britain.


Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
22nd Feb 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if she will take steps to give teaching of the law more prominence in the national curriculum.

The teaching of the legal system in the UK is a key element of the National Curriculum as part of the citizenship education taught at Key Stages 3 and 4. Citizenship education aims to ensure that all pupils develop a sound knowledge and understanding of the role of law and the justice system in our society. The subject also fosters pupils’ keen awareness of democracy, Government and how laws are made and upheld.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
30th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many places were available for trainee teachers who wish to specialise in citizenship education on teacher training courses in each of the last 10 years.

The number of places initially allocated for citizenship each year since the academic year 2013/14 is shown in the table below:

Academic year (of training)

Initial allocation of citizenship places

2013/14

147

2014/15

149

2015/16

175

Source: Published ITT Allocations Official Statistics.[1]

Data for earlier years are not directly comparable with those shown in the table as they include allocations for Personal, Social and Health Education and Social Studies within the total for Citizenship.

[1] This includes postgraduate and undergraduate allocated places.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
30th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps she is taking to review the national curriculum's citizenship programme of study as proposed in the Government's White Paper Education Excellence Everywhere, published in March 2016.

The Government is committed to ensuring that high quality citizenship education helps to provide pupils with knowledge, skills and understanding to prepare them to play a full and active part in society.

Citizenship education is therefore part of the National Curriculum at Key Stages 3 and 4. The revised programmes of study were introduced in September 2014 and seek to direct teaching towards the core knowledge of citizenship, and to give schools more scope to decide how to teach citizenship.

The Secretary of State is considering the proposal in the White Paper regarding citizenship.

Teachers are encouraged to develop their practice with the support of specialist organisations and expert professionals such as subject associations.

Ofsted, in its inspections of schools, considers the breadth and balance of the curriculum, including provision for pupils’ personal development, behaviour and welfare, as well as their spiritual, moral, social and cultural development. This includes how pupils develop and demonstrate skills and attitudes that will allow them to participate fully in and contribute positively to life in modern Britain. Ofsted have strengthened their inspection frameworks so that inspectors assess how well all schools protect pupils from the risks of extremism and radicalisation, and promote fundamental British values.

We are also supporting schools to meet their obligations to protect pupils from radicalisation and promote fundamental British values, and to help them build pupils’ resilience to extremism through knowledge so that they can question information, weigh arguments, and make reasoned judgments.

We are currently working with the Association of Citizenship Teaching on producing guidance and resources packs to help teachers lead knowledge based debates on topics relating to extremism, fundamental British values and contemporary political and social issues.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
30th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps she is taking to ensure effective teaching of citizenship education in schools in England; and if she will make a statement.

The Government is committed to ensuring that high quality citizenship education helps to provide pupils with knowledge, skills and understanding to prepare them to play a full and active part in society.

Citizenship education is therefore part of the National Curriculum at Key Stages 3 and 4. The revised programmes of study were introduced in September 2014 and seek to direct teaching towards the core knowledge of citizenship, and to give schools more scope to decide how to teach citizenship.

The Secretary of State is considering the proposal in the White Paper regarding citizenship.

Teachers are encouraged to develop their practice with the support of specialist organisations and expert professionals such as subject associations.

Ofsted, in its inspections of schools, considers the breadth and balance of the curriculum, including provision for pupils’ personal development, behaviour and welfare, as well as their spiritual, moral, social and cultural development. This includes how pupils develop and demonstrate skills and attitudes that will allow them to participate fully in and contribute positively to life in modern Britain. Ofsted have strengthened their inspection frameworks so that inspectors assess how well all schools protect pupils from the risks of extremism and radicalisation, and promote fundamental British values.

We are also supporting schools to meet their obligations to protect pupils from radicalisation and promote fundamental British values, and to help them build pupils’ resilience to extremism through knowledge so that they can question information, weigh arguments, and make reasoned judgments.

We are currently working with the Association of Citizenship Teaching on producing guidance and resources packs to help teachers lead knowledge based debates on topics relating to extremism, fundamental British values and contemporary political and social issues.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
26th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if she will take steps to ensure that teaching assistants receive full remuneration for the responsibilities they undertake.

The Government believes that all decisions on the use, deployment and pay of teaching assistants are best made at a local level, in a way that reflects the specific needs of schools in that area.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
25th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment she has made of the change in responsibilities of teaching assistants since 2010; and what steps her Department takes to support teaching assistants who have taken on additional responsibilities.

Head teachers are responsible for the deployment of their teaching assistants, which is based on the existing guidance available such as the Education Endowment Foundation’s report “Making Best Use of Teaching Assistants”.

The report offers the latest evidence and identifies ways that schools can deploy teaching assistants in different contexts to deliver high quality support to pupils. It also recommends that teaching assistants should be fully prepared for their role by having the knowledge and training necessary to carry out their work. The report is available at: https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/uploads/pdf/TA_Guidance_Report_Interactive.pdf

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
11th Jul 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many school leavers in Redcar and Cleveland who were (a) entitled and (b) not entitled to free school meals went to university in the last three years for which information is available.

The table below shows information on the number and percentage of students completing key stage 5 (e.g. A level) study in mainstream state funded schools and colleges and progressing to study at a UK Higher Education Institution for at least two terms the following year; in each of the last three years for which information is available.

Numbers of pupils are shown rounded to the nearest ten, as published. Percentages are calculated on unrounded figures.

  1. In the latest year around 50 students in Redcar & Cleveland who had been eligible for free school meals in year 11, or 55% of the key stage 5 cohort, progressed to Higher Education. This compares with 38% of pupils elsewhere in the North East and 44% of free school meal eligible students nationally.

  2. In the latest year around 490 students in Redcar & Cleveland who had not been recorded as eligible for free school meals in year 11, or 55% of the key stage 5 cohort, progressed to Higher Education. This compares with 51% of pupils elsewhere in the North East and 49% of non-eligible students nationally.

Information on pupil destinations is published annually on gov.uk at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/statistics-destinations

Students with sustained destinations at UK Higher Education Institutions, mainstream state-funded schools and colleges, 2011/2 to 2013/14

Redcar & Cleveland

Number of students completing KS5 (rounded to nearest 10)

Number at UK Higher Education Institution (rounded to nearest 10)

% at UK Higher Education Institution (calculated on unrounded figures)

FSM

Non-FSM

FSM

Non-FSM

FSM

Non-FSM

2013/14 (2012/13 KS5 cohort)

100

880

50

490

55%

55%

2012/13 (2011/12 KS5 cohort)

100

850

40

490

40%

57%

2011/12 (2010/11 KS5 cohort)

80

780

40

490

53%

62%

North East

Number of students completing KS5 (rounded to nearest 10)

Number at UK Higher Education Institution (rounded to nearest 10)

% at UK Higher Education Institution (calculated on unrounded figures)

FSM

Non-FSM

FSM

Non-FSM

FSM

Non-FSM

2013/14 (2012/13 KS5 cohort)

1,750

15,430

660

7,920

38%

51%

2012/13 (2011/12 KS5 cohort)

1,560

14,450

550

7,250

36%

50%

2011/12 (2010/11 KS5 cohort)

1,370

14,610

510

7,930

37%

54%

England

Number of students completing KS5 (rounded to nearest 10)

Number at UK Higher Education Institution (rounded to nearest 10)

% at UK Higher Education Institution (calculated on unrounded figures)

FSM

Non-FSM

FSM

Non-FSM

FSM

Non-FSM

2013/14 (2012/13 KS5 cohort)

35,390

323,580

15,550

157,220

44%

49%

2012/13 (2011/12 KS5 cohort)

31,670

314,120

14,140

150,300

45%

48%

2011/12 (2010/11 KS5 cohort)

28,770

306,720

13,540

163,010

47%

53%

3rd Jun 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps her Department is taking to provide support to parents of children experiencing emotionally-based school refusal.

All children of compulsory school age are entitled to a full time education which is suitable to their age, ability, aptitude and any special educational needs they may have. Schools and local authorities are empowered to keep absences to a minimum and have measures available to support and promote good attendance.

Where parents are struggling to get their child to go to school, the school and local authorities can provide support and work with families to improve their child’s attendance. The Department’s advice on school attendance sets out that a conversation between parents and the school is the first step. It also sets out how schools and local authorities can help with wider issues. This guidance can be found on GOV.UK at: https://www.gov.uk/school-attendance-absence/help-with-getting-your-child-to-go-to-school

Where there is an underlying mental health issue, such as a social anxiety disorder, schools should look to secure the right support. To help schools identify underlying mental health problems in young people, in June 2014, the Department issued advice on mental health and behaviour to ensure all young people get the help they need, which can be found on GOV.UK at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/mental-health-and-behaviour-in-schools--2

To secure specialist support where it is needed, the Government is making £1.4 billion available over the course of this Parliament to transform local children and young people’s mental health services to deliver more integrated and accessible services. We have also contributed to a £3 million joint pilot of single points of contact in schools and specialist mental health services to ensure students have timely access to appropriate specialist support where needed.

We are also promoting support for parents on mental health. We continue to provide funding to Young Minds for their Parent Helpline. We have also funded the MindEd website to provide a new section for parents – the materials include information for parents on children who refuse to go to school and what steps to take, this information is attached.

3rd Jun 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment she has made of the current guidance for schools and local authorities on emotionally-based school refusal; and if her Department will publish distinct statutory guidance on emotionally-based school refusal.

All children of compulsory school age are entitled to a full time education which is suitable to their age, ability, aptitude and any special educational needs they may have. Schools and local authorities are empowered to keep absences to a minimum and have measures available to support and promote good attendance.

Where parents are struggling to get their child to go to school, the school and local authorities can provide support and work with families to improve their child’s attendance. The Department’s advice on school attendance sets out that a conversation between parents and the school is the first step. It also sets out how schools and local authorities can help with wider issues. This guidance can be found on GOV.UK at: https://www.gov.uk/school-attendance-absence/help-with-getting-your-child-to-go-to-school

Where there is an underlying mental health issue, such as a social anxiety disorder, schools should look to secure the right support. To help schools identify underlying mental health problems in young people, in June 2014, the Department issued advice on mental health and behaviour to ensure all young people get the help they need, which can be found on GOV.UK at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/mental-health-and-behaviour-in-schools--2

To secure specialist support where it is needed, the Government is making £1.4 billion available over the course of this Parliament to transform local children and young people’s mental health services to deliver more integrated and accessible services. We have also contributed to a £3 million joint pilot of single points of contact in schools and specialist mental health services to ensure students have timely access to appropriate specialist support where needed.

We are also promoting support for parents on mental health. We continue to provide funding to Young Minds for their Parent Helpline. We have also funded the MindEd website to provide a new section for parents – the materials include information for parents on children who refuse to go to school and what steps to take, this information is attached.

8th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what plans she has to ensure there is adequate funding made available to childcare providers to provide sufficient high quality childcare places.

The Government is committed to delivering flexible, affordable and quality childcare for parents. We are carefully consulting parents, employers, providers and local authorities, and reviewing of the cost of providing childcare with a commitment to increase the average funding rate paid to providers.

The market is growing (with around 230,000 more places than in 2009) and has already demonstrated that it is able to respond through the roll-out of the entitlement for disadvantaged two-year-olds introduced in the last Parliament.

We recognise that there is natural growth in the childcare system, we can and should encourage new providers to enter the childcare market or existing providers to expand. We have supported this expansion with changes made to reduce bureaucracy, helping schools to provide places, and by enabling the setting up of childminder agencies.

Our new entitlement of 30 hours of free childcare provides an opportunity for further growth for existing childcare providers to expand and for new providers to enter the market, helping to build a stronger economy and give parents increased choice. Full roll-out is scheduled for September 2017, and our approach will be informed by the experiences of pilot areas in 2016. We want to learn from the experience of early implementers to ensure that the market works effectively for both parents and providers.

We are in the process of undertaking a review of the cost of provision and have committed to increasing the average funding rate providers receive, which will help the sector to grow. It is important that the hourly rate for the childcare entitlement strikes the right balance between being fair for providers and delivering value for money to the taxpayer.

8th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many people have (a) begun and (b) graduated from early years initial teacher training courses in each year since the introduction of the early years teacher status.

The Early Years Foundation Stage sets staffing and qualification requirements for early years providers. The government would like to see more trained graduates in the workforce, and we are supporting this by providing funding for course fees and bursaries to eligible trainees, and also funding for employers to support trainees.

The number of graduates in the workforce continues to rise, and between 2008 and 2013 the proportion of full day care staff with a degree or higher increased from 5% to 13%. The National Day Nursery Association’s June 2015 survey showed that 88% of settings employ a graduate Early Years Teacher. There are currently 15,962 individuals who have achieved Early Years Professional Status and Early Years Teacher Status.

Since the inception of early years initial teacher training in September 2013, we have recruited an overall number of 3206 trainees, of which 2358 have graduated and been awarded Early Years Teacher Status (EYTS). The 2014/15 cohort has 421 individuals still in training and awaiting an outcome. We have set high standards for individuals gaining Early Years Teacher Status as we want individuals of the highest calibre in these roles.

8th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what plans her Department has to ensure that there will be sufficient high quality early education places to meet the proposed target of 30 hours of free childcare a week for working parents of three and four year olds.

The Government is committed to delivering flexible, affordable and quality childcare for parents. We are carefully consulting parents, employers, providers and local authorities, and reviewing of the cost of providing childcare with a commitment to increase the average funding rate paid to providers.

The market is growing (with around 230,000 more places than in 2009) and has already demonstrated that it is able to respond through the roll-out of the entitlement for disadvantaged two-year-olds introduced in the last Parliament.

We recognise that there is natural growth in the childcare system, we can and should encourage new providers to enter the childcare market or existing providers to expand. We have supported this expansion with changes made to reduce bureaucracy, helping schools to provide places, and by enabling the setting up of childminder agencies.

Our new entitlement of 30 hours of free childcare provides an opportunity for further growth for existing childcare providers to expand and for new providers to enter the market, helping to build a stronger economy and give parents increased choice. Full roll-out is scheduled for September 2017, and our approach will be informed by the experiences of pilot areas in 2016. We want to learn from the experience of early implementers to ensure that the market works effectively for both parents and providers.

We are in the process of undertaking a review of the cost of provision and have committed to increasing the average funding rate providers receive, which will help the sector to grow. It is important that the hourly rate for the childcare entitlement strikes the right balance between being fair for providers and delivering value for money to the taxpayer.

8th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what plans she has to increase the supply of high quality childcare.

The Government is committed to delivering flexible, affordable and quality childcare for parents. We are carefully consulting parents, employers, providers and local authorities, and reviewing of the cost of providing childcare with a commitment to increase the average funding rate paid to providers.

The market is growing (with around 230,000 more places than in 2009) and has already demonstrated that it is able to respond through the roll-out of the entitlement for disadvantaged two-year-olds introduced in the last Parliament.

We recognise that there is natural growth in the childcare system, we can and should encourage new providers to enter the childcare market or existing providers to expand. We have supported this expansion with changes made to reduce bureaucracy, helping schools to provide places, and by enabling the setting up of childminder agencies.

Our new entitlement of 30 hours of free childcare provides an opportunity for further growth for existing childcare providers to expand and for new providers to enter the market, helping to build a stronger economy and give parents increased choice. Full roll-out is scheduled for September 2017, and our approach will be informed by the experiences of pilot areas in 2016. We want to learn from the experience of early implementers to ensure that the market works effectively for both parents and providers.

We are in the process of undertaking a review of the cost of provision and have committed to increasing the average funding rate providers receive, which will help the sector to grow. It is important that the hourly rate for the childcare entitlement strikes the right balance between being fair for providers and delivering value for money to the taxpayer.

8th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what plans her Department has to increase the skills and qualification level of the early years workforce.

Early years providers play an important role in developing their workforce in line with Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS). The EYFS sets clear staffing and qualification requirements for the workforce. The skills of the workforce have increased significantly, with 87% of full day care staff holding level 3 qualification or higher (as of 2013).

In order to meet the requirements of the EYFS, and to increase the skills and qualification level of the early years workforce, the Department for Education has:

  1. Developed a robust new set of standards for the Early Years Educator qualification at Level 3. Staff operating at Level 3 must also have GCSEs in English and maths at grade C or above. The department has recently made these GCSEs an entry to work requirement rather than an entry to training requirement. This has opened up training routes, ensuring more people with the right skills are able to join the early years workforce, including individuals on an apprenticeship.

  2. Introduced the Early Years Teachers Status for graduates who specialise in early years. Early years teachers must meet the same entry and qualifications requirements as teachers of older children, including skills tests, and a robust set of teachers’ standards.

The Early Years Foundation Stage Framework can be found online at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/early-years-foundation-stage-framework--2

Guidance on early years educator criteria can be found here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/early-years-educator-level-3-qualifications-criteria

The teachers’ standards (early years) can be found here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/early-years-teachers-standards

26th Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps his Department is taking to encourage the development of local food plans.

The Government works closely with the full spectrum of food and drink businesses across the country to promote growth, jobs, productivity and exports. We engage with businesses both directly and through trade associations, Local Enterprise Partnerships, regional food groups and other business groups. We support them in their efforts to address economic challenges and mitigate regulatory and compliance issues, and prepare successfully for EU exit.

David Rutley
Lord Commissioner (HM Treasury) (Whip)
4th Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent assessment his Department has made of the effect of consented offshore wind on seabirds, marine mammals and other coastal wildlife.

Consent is required from the Marine Management Organisation (MMO) to construct, extend or operate any offshore generating stations with a generating capacity of between 1 and 100 megawatts (MW). Stations which would generate more than 100MW are classed as nationally significant infrastructure projects and require a development consent order granted by the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy.

Some electricity generating works may be subject to regulation under the Electricity Works (Environmental Impact Assessment) (England and Wales) Regulations 2000 (as amended) and require an Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) to be submitted to the MMO alongside the main application. EIAs are required to include a description of the likely significant effects of the development on the environment, including any effects on seabirds, marine mammals and other coastal wildlife.

In addition, offshore wind farms are required to have pre and post consent monitoring plans which are managed by the MMO. For example, a Marine Mammal Mitigation Plan (MMMP) lists the appropriate mitigation measures that should be utilised during offshore activities that are likely to produce underwater noise and vibration levels capable of potentially causing injury and disturbance to marine mammals.

Any environmental assessment, including EIAs and MMMPs, submitted as part of any application are available online via the Planning Inspectorate’s national register of applications and the MMO’s public register.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
18th Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of using large-scale hydrogen conversion projects to deliver improvements in air quality.

This question concerns both energy and air quality. Defra is the Government Department with policy responsibility for air quality and energy policy is within the remit of the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy.

We are working across Government to ensure future electricity, heat and industrial policies will together improve air quality and tackle climate change. Phasing out coal-fired power stations, improving energy efficiency, and shifting to cleaner power sources will reduce emissions of air pollution, as well as carbon.

As we phase out oil and coal heating, we will ensure this transition improves air quality wherever possible and cost-effective to do so.

Although Defra is unable to comment on hydrogen specifically, as part of our cross-departmental review into the role of biomass for heat and power, we have established a framework of principles and processes to ensure air quality is considered at the outset of policy development and appropriate tools and evidence are used to assess the impact on public health.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
14th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what plans the Government has for replacing the EU’s LIFE and BEST funding programmes beyond 2020.

I refer the hon. Member to the reply given to the hon. Member for Oxford West and Abingdon, Layla Moran, on 1 February 2019, PQ UIN 213461.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
22nd Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 14 January 2019 to Question 206880 on Special protection areas, when the lesser black-backed gull is planned to be added as a qualifying feature to the Bowland Fells SPA; and whether there are any remaining barriers to that being done.

There are no plans to do so.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
28th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to Answer of 24 July 2018 to Question 166215 and the review of the evidence base for the Bowland Fells SPA, on what basis that review was considered to be necessary; when that review was commissioned; what the scope was of that review; who carried out that review; when that review will be made available to his Department; and if he will make a statement.

The need to review the evidence base outlined in my previous response (Question 166215) was in regard to the Solent and Dorset Coast potential SPA. In regard to the proposal to add lesser black backed gull to the Bowland Fells SPA, Natural England has also been reviewing the existing site management measures with the aim of providing a long-term sustainable management plan for the species. This includes the provision of supplementary advice to the sites’s objectives, which are anticipated to be published in spring 2019.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
16th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether the Department has made an assessment of adequacy of the injury and retirement data published by the Greyhound Board of Great Britain.

The format of the injury and retirement data published by the Greyhound Board of Great Britain (GBGB) for the first time in March this year was requested and approved by Defra. Alongside publication of the data, which has been independently verified, the GBGB also made several commitments to improve the figures, which the Government has welcomed. Defra will continue to monitor the data, and the progress of GBGB’s commitments.

David Rutley
Lord Commissioner (HM Treasury) (Whip)
10th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what discussions his Department has had with the Greyhound Board of Great Britain on that organisation’s injury and retirement data, published on 14 March 2018.

The Greyhound Board of Great Britain (GBGB) began publishing injury and retirement data from GBGB affiliated tracks earlier this year as part of several non-regulatory agreements they have with Defra arising from Defra’s Post Implementation Review of the Welfare of Racing Greyhounds Regulations 2010. Officials have regular discussions with the GBGB on this, and are satisfied with the progress being made. Officials also meet regularly with the Chair of the Greyhound Forum, which represents a series of welfare groups with an interest in the welfare of racing and retired greyhounds.

David Rutley
Lord Commissioner (HM Treasury) (Whip)
23rd Jul 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many prosecutions or other proceedings on illegally imported puppies taken in by Dogs Trust under its puppy pilot quarantine scheme have begun since 2017.

During 2017, two individuals were prosecuted under the Rabies (Importation of Dogs, Cats and other Mammals) Order 1974 for the illegal importation of puppies by Kent Trading Standards. This action was taken following an interception at Dover Port by Port of Dover Police with the puppies being held at the quarantine premises funded by Dogs Trust.

The Animal and Plant Health Agency continues to work closely with enforcement partners to identify opportunities for enforcement action to be taken both at the port of arrival and point of destination.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
19th Jul 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to Answer of 15 June 2018 to Question 152799 and Answer of 02 July 2018 to Question 157791 on Special Protection Areas: Birds, on what date her Department received the results of the public consultations and associated recommendations of Natural England for the Flamborough and Filey Coast, the Bowland Fells and the Solent and Dorset Coast potential Special Protection Areas; what the other site designation priorities were that have caused delays to the decision to classify each site; and if he will make a statement.

The Government received the results of the public consultations and associated recommendations of Natural England on the following dates:

  • Flamborough and Filey Coast (site extension) - 27 March 2015

  • Bowland Fells (addition of lesser black backed gull) - 27 November 2014

  • Solent and Dorset Coast (new marine site) – 16 June 2017

The Secretary of State has since agreed to classify the extensions of the Flamborough and Filey Coast potential Special Protection Areas, which will be formally classified in due course.

The decision to formally classify the other two sites will be made following consideration of the respective public consultations, which informed a need to undertake a further review of the evidence base.

Formal classification of these sites will also need to take account of other designation priorities, which are published on GOV.UK here:

www.gov.uk/government/publications/natural-england-designations-programme-for-areas-sites-and-trails/natural-englands-designations-programme-to-march-2017

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
26th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to Answer of 15 June 2018 to Question 152799 on Special Protection Areas: Birds, for which of the potential Special Protection Areas he has received Natural England’s recommendation on classification; on what date was each such recommendation was received; and when he plans to classify those sites.

Ministers have received Natural England’s scientific advice for the following potential Special Protection Areas (SPAs):

  • Bowland Fells (addition of lesser black backed gull) - 22 February 2013;
  • Flamborough and Filey Coast (site extension) - 11 July 2013;
  • Solway Firth (site extension) - 20 August 2015;
  • Solent and Dorset Coast (new marine site) - 22 October 2015;
  • Crouch and Roach Estuaries (site extension) - 30 March 2017; and
  • Teesmouth and Cleveland Coast (site extension) - 22 June 2018.

Ministers have yet to receive Natural England’s scientific advice regarding the Isles of Scilly SPA proposed site extension.

The decision to formally classify the sites will be made following consideration of the respective public consultations and in view of other site designation priorities. The Secretary of State agreed to classify the Crouch and Roach Estuaries pSPA, which will be classified shortly.

As a matter of Government policy, sites on which the Government has initiated public consultation on the scientific case for classification as a SPA are given the same protection as if formally classified.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
12th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what sites recommended to his Department by Natural England for classification or reclassification as Special Protection Areas under the Wild Birds Directive are not yet classified as such; on what date each such recommendation was received; and when he plans to classify those sites.

Defra has received scientific advice from Natural England regarding the following potential Special Protection Areas:

  • Bowland Fells (addition of lesser black backed gull) - Natural England departmental brief received 2 October 2012;
  • Flamborough and Filey Coast (site extension) - Natural England departmental brief received 19 June 2013;
  • Solway Firth (site extension) – Natural England departmental brief received 26 June 2015;
  • Solent and Dorset Coast (new marine site) – Natural England departmental brief received 8 September 2015;
  • Crouch and Roach Estuaries (site extension) - Natural England departmental brief received 9 March 2016;
  • Isles of Scilly (site extension) – Natural England departmental brief received 9 March 2018; and
  • Teesmouth and Cleveland Coast (site extension) - Natural England departmental brief received 9 March 2018.

The decision to classify the above sites formally will be made following consideration of the respective public consultations and in view of other site designation priorities.

David Rutley
Lord Commissioner (HM Treasury) (Whip)
4th May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what discussions he had with animal welfare organisations between the publication of the draft Animal Welfare Bill and the publication of his Department’s response to the Second Report of the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Committee, Pre-Legislative Scrutiny of the draft Animal Welfare (Sentencing and Recognition of Sentience) Bill 2017, HC709.

The Government holds regular discussions with representatives of animal welfare organisations in relation to a range of animal welfare issues.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
22nd Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will bring forward legislative proposals on banning the slaughter of non-stunned animals.

The Government encourages the highest standards of welfare at slaughter. The Government would prefer all animals to be stunned before slaughter, but respects the right of the Jewish and Muslim communities to eat meat prepared in accordance with their religious beliefs.

We have stricter national rules aimed at reducing stress and providing protection for animals slaughtered in accordance with religious rites. These national rules include requirements for sheep, goats and bovines to be slaughtered immediately that they are restrained and not to be released from restraint until they are unconscious and at least 20 seconds have elapsed, in the case of sheep and goats, and at least 30 seconds have elapsed in the case of bovines.

This year the Government is introducing mandatory CCTV recording in slaughterhouses. This will further enable official veterinarians to monitor and verify animal welfare standards in the slaughterhouse and ensure strict adherence to stand still time rules.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
22nd Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps he is taking to regulate the non-stun slaughter of animals.

The Government encourages the highest standards of welfare at slaughter. The Government would prefer all animals to be stunned before slaughter, but respects the right of the Jewish and Muslim communities to eat meat prepared in accordance with their religious beliefs.

We have stricter national rules aimed at reducing stress and providing protection for animals slaughtered in accordance with religious rites. These national rules include requirements for sheep, goats and bovines to be slaughtered immediately that they are restrained and not to be released from restraint until they are unconscious and at least 20 seconds have elapsed, in the case of sheep and goats, and at least 30 seconds have elapsed in the case of bovines.

This year the Government is introducing mandatory CCTV recording in slaughterhouses. This will further enable official veterinarians to monitor and verify animal welfare standards in the slaughterhouse and ensure strict adherence to stand still time rules.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
22nd Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will bring forward legislative proposals on banning the use of caged hens in egg production.

The conventional ‘battery’ cage for laying hens was banned in 2012. The current enriched ‘colony’ cages provide more space for the hen, a nest area, litter, perches and claw shortening devices. All permitted housing production systems for laying hens have their strengths and weaknesses, or offer some compromise on the different key elements of animal welfare. We have no plans to ban the use of enriched ‘colony’ systems in egg production.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
21st Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs whether legislative proposals to increase penalties available for animal cruelty offences require the commencement of section 281(5) of the Criminal Justice Act 2003.

Section 281(5) of the Criminal Justice Act 2003 does not need to be commenced. The necessary changes can be made by amending section 32(1) of the Animal Welfare Act 2006.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
20th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will review the effectiveness of the Statutory Code of Practice for the welfare of game birds reared for sporting purposes.

The statutory Code of Practice for the Welfare of Gamebirds Reared for Sporting Purposes provides keepers with guidance on how to meet the welfare needs of their gamebirds as required by the Animal Welfare Act 2006. We are considering how best to engage with industry to identify and disseminate best practice and ensure effective enforcement. Any future update of the gamebird code will consider further improvements.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
16th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many prosecutions under section 9 of the Animal Welfare Act 2006 resulted in a prison sentence in (a) 2014, (b) 2015 and (c) 2016.

The numbers of prosecutions, those which were found guilty and sentenced, and those which resulted in prison sentence under section 4 and 9 of Animal Welfare Act 2006 can be viewed in the table below.

Court proceedings data for 2016 are planned for publication in May 2017.

Animal Welfare Act 2006 Section 4

Animal Welfare Act 2006 Section 9

Outcome

2014

2015

2014

2015

Proceeded against

1,016

775

391

302

Found guilty

800

612

266

208

Sentenced

801

614

263

208

of which

Immediate Custody

78

55

10

21

The table includes the following offences:

  1. Animal Welfare Act 2006 Section 4(1)(2), 32(1)(2), 9.

  2. The figures given in the table relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe.

  1. Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.

  1. The numbers of offenders sentenced and found guilty in the same year may differ due to some being sentenced the following year.

    Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services - Ministry of Justice. PQ 60104 & 60113

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
16th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many prosecutions under section 4 of the Animal Welfare Act 2006 resulted in a prison sentence in (a) 2014, (b) 2015 and (c) 2016.

The numbers of prosecutions, those which were found guilty and sentenced, and those which resulted in prison sentence under section 4 and 9 of Animal Welfare Act 2006 can be viewed in the table below.

Court proceedings data for 2016 are planned for publication in May 2017.

Animal Welfare Act 2006 Section 4

Animal Welfare Act 2006 Section 9

Outcome

2014

2015

2014

2015

Proceeded against

1,016

775

391

302

Found guilty

800

612

266

208

Sentenced

801

614

263

208

of which

Immediate Custody

78

55

10

21

The table includes the following offences:

  1. Animal Welfare Act 2006 Section 4(1)(2), 32(1)(2), 9.

  2. The figures given in the table relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe.

  1. Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.

  1. The numbers of offenders sentenced and found guilty in the same year may differ due to some being sentenced the following year.

    Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services - Ministry of Justice. PQ 60104 & 60113

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
16th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many prosecutions under the Animal Welfare Act 2006 were heard at magistrates' courts in England and Wales in (a) 2014, (b) 2015 and (c) 2016.

The number of proceedings heard at magistrates’ courts, and those which were found guilty, sentenced and had a fine imposed under the Animal Welfare Act 2006 in England and Wales, 2014 and 2015 can be viewed below.

Court proceedings data for 2016 are planned for publication in May 2017.

Outcome

2014

2015

Proceeded against

1,433

1,103

Found Guilty

1,080

831

Sentenced

1,078

833

of which Fine

219

143

The table includes the following offences:

  1. Animal Welfare Act 2006 Section 4(1)(2), 5(a)(b)32(1)(2(40), 6(1)(a)(b)2,8,9,12, 7(a)(b)2, 8(1)(a to i),(2), 9, 11(1)(3), 13(6), 18(12),34(9)

  2. The figures given in the table relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe.

  3. Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.

  4. The numbers of offenders sentenced and found guilty in the same year may differ due to some being sentenced the following year.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
16th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, in how many cases under the Animal Welfare Act 2006 a fine was imposed in (a) 2014, (b) 2015 and (c) 2016.

The number of proceedings heard at magistrates’ courts, and those which were found guilty, sentenced and had a fine imposed under the Animal Welfare Act 2006 in England and Wales, 2014 and 2015 can be viewed below.

Court proceedings data for 2016 are planned for publication in May 2017.

Outcome

2014

2015

Proceeded against

1,433

1,103

Found Guilty

1,080

831

Sentenced

1,078

833

of which Fine

219

143

The table includes the following offences:

  1. Animal Welfare Act 2006 Section 4(1)(2), 5(a)(b)32(1)(2(40), 6(1)(a)(b)2,8,9,12, 7(a)(b)2, 8(1)(a to i),(2), 9, 11(1)(3), 13(6), 18(12),34(9)

  2. The figures given in the table relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe.

  3. Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.

  4. The numbers of offenders sentenced and found guilty in the same year may differ due to some being sentenced the following year.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
7th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether there are any remaining staff on the former SSI site responsible for environmental management; what estimate she has made of the number of staff responsible for environmental management who are no longer employed; and what assessment she has made of the minimum level of environmental staffing required.

The Environment Agency has been working closely with the Official Receiver in order to ensure that the site is being safely overseen by staff under his direction. Whilst staffing matters are for the Official Receiver to decide, the Environment Agency are in regular contact with staff overseeing the former SSI site and do not have any concerns with regards to their environment management.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
13th Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 15 July 2016 to Question 42347, what assessment she has made of the public health implications of slag and metal contaminants in surface and ground waters at the former SSI site; and if she will make an assessment of the (a) likely cost and (b) timetable for remediation of those contaminants.

Government Officials continue to work with the Official Receiver to maintain a ‘safe state’ position for the SSI site, including managing risks to human health and the water environment.

Government has committed to fund site assessments to understand the scale and complexity of the SSI site, which will help inform future decisions about the site.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
11th Jul 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment she has made of the effect of the closure of the SSI site in Redcar on (a) the natural environment and (b) Teesmouth national nature reserve.

Currently, the SSI site is being maintained in a ‘steady state’ which prevents any potential contaminants from entering the natural environment as well as keeping the public safe and the site secure. Teesmouth National Nature Reserve is not directly affected by the closure of the SSI site.

Natural England and the Environment Agency are working together with local business leaders, the Tees Valley Combined Authority and a range of non-government organisations, to explore and identify how existing operations, new economic developments and a series of ambitious environmental enhancements can be taken forward in combination with each other on the estuary. Any future uses of the site would readily be included in this approach.

18th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many staple foods in the UK are subject to mandatory fortification.

Wheat flour is the only food with mandatory fortification requirements in the UK. All wheat flour (except wholemeal) is required to be fortified with calcium, iron, niacin and thiamin at specific levels prescribed in the Bread and Flour Regulations 1998.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
14th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps she is taking to help tackle serious cases of animal cruelty.

In this country we have one of the most comprehensive pieces of legislation anywhere in the world to protect animals. Under the Animal Welfare Act 2006 it is an offence either to cause any captive animal unnecessary suffering or to fail to provide for its welfare needs. The maximum penalty is 6 months’ imprisonment and/or an unlimited fine. The financial element of the penalty was raised only last year from a maximum fine of £20,000. Courts can also disqualify offenders found guilty of animal cruelty from keeping animals for as long a period as they consider appropriate. The overwhelming majority of people in this country are responsible but in circumstances where cruelty does occur I believe we have the necessary measures for enforcement agencies and courts to take action.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
14th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, with reference to paragraph 52 of the Joint Report of the Negotiators of the European Union and the United Kingdom Government, published on 8 December 2017, what assessment he has made of the compatibility of a Withdrawal Agreement respecting the rights, opportunities, and identity of one part of the UK population with section 149 of the Equality Act 2010.

Paragraph 52 of the Joint Report recognises the identity and citizenship rights of the people of Northern Ireland under the Belfast Agreement and the associated British-Irish Agreement (the Agreement between the Government of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and the Government of Ireland, done at Belfast on 10 April 1998), which gives effect to those rights under international law. Section 149 of the Equality Act 2010 does not extend to Northern Ireland and nor does it impact the rights that Ireland affords its citizens. There is a similar public sector duty in section 75 of the Northern Ireland Act 1998.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Northern Ireland Office)
22nd Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what steps she is taking to support the reduction in the use of children involved in cobalt mining in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

DFID is working to tackle the root causes that enable child labour to flourish in the mining sector in the Democratic Republic of Congo. To this end, DFID collaborates closely with other Government Departments and through a European Partnership for Responsible Minerals. We provide funding to the Carter Center in the DRC to improve transparency and governance of the sector. DFID DRC is also working with other international partners to consider how we might tackle the issues in the cobalt supply chain in future programme design.

17th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, if her Department will take steps to ensure that a target to end violence towards women forms part of the proposed UN Sustainable Development Goals.

The UK has worked hard to lead efforts across the globe to ensure that a target to end violence against women and girls formed part of the agreed UN Sustainable Development Goals. We are pleased that a strong gender goal was included as one of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals adopted at the United Nations General Assembly, which includes targets on violence against women and girls, harmful practices, female genital mutilation and child early and forced marriage. Seeing these Sustainable Development Goals and targets implemented is a continuing top priority for the UK.

19th Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the answer to the Answer of 29 November 2018 to Question 195615 on Hydrogen: Technology, if he will publish his Department’s assessment of how it can support UK-based hydrogen companies.

The Department’s assessment of hydrogen technologies is ongoing, working with the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy. There are no plans for a formal publication, however information on how the Department supports UK exporters can be found at www.great.gov.uk.

Graham Stuart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
5th Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 28 February 2019 to Question 225546 on Biofuels: Import Duties, when she plans to make a public announcement on biofuel tariffs ahead of the UK leaving the EU on the 29 March 2019; (a) when and (b) how she plans to inform representatives of the UK bioethanol industry of the decision on those tariffs; and if she will make it her policy that there will be at least 15 working days between informing representatives of the UK bioethanol industry and making that public announcement.

It is the job of a responsible government to prepare for all scenarios. No deal preparations are continuing at pace, including on secondary legislation. We will communicate a decision on what is a market sensitive information to stakeholders and the public as soon as possible.

26th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what steps he is taking to promote and export UK skills and technology in hydrogen conversion technologies.

DIT has recently added hydrogen technology to its power and renewables portfolio. Work has started to map UK capabilities, identify international opportunities and determine where UK expertise might apply. Once completed, DIT will look at how it can support UK-based hydrogen companies.

Graham Stuart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
2nd Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, when he plans to publish a report to Parliament on the Government's objectives for walking and cycling as set out in the statutory 2017 Cycling and Walking Investment Strategy.

The Department for Transport (DfT) plans to publish the road safety statistics for England in September. As it would be useful to include this data in its progress report, and given the prorogation of Parliament, DfT is planning to publish the progress report over the autumn.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
18th Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent assessment his Department has made of the safety of train passengers when train guards are removed.

Whilst decisions on staffing are for individual operators, the Government has been clear that it wants to see more staff on our railway, not fewer, and it is not aware of any plans by franchised operators to remove guards from train services.

With respect to the mode of train operation and guards, the ORR, the independent rail regulator, and the Rail Safety and Standards Board (RSSB) have found that Driver Controlled Operation (DCO), where the train driver has responsibility for opening and closing the doors and dispatching the train from a station but a guard / second crew member continues to be rostered on the train, is safe.

An RSSB report also concluded that the introduction of DCO according to the standard safety management requirements that all rail companies routinely meet does not increase any other passenger safety risks and furthermore that cancelling a DCO train in the absence of its guard / second crew member is more risky than running it with only its driver.

18th Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent assessment he has made of the effect of staffing reductions on levels of reported crime on trains.

The Department works with the British Transport Police (BTP) to tackle crime and anti-social behaviour on the railways in Great Britain. Under their franchise agreements, Train Operating Companies are required to work with the BTP to manage and reduce railway crime. British Transport Police officer numbers have remained relatively stable on the network over the last five years and are currently (2017/18) nearly 3,100 by comparison to just over 2,900 in 2009/10.

With growing passenger numbers, the Department has been clear that it wants to see more train operating company customer-facing staff on the railways, not fewer.

The BTP keeps records of crime reported on the railways. Crime figures should be considered in the context of rising passenger numbers, with crimes per million passenger journeys remaining relatively low and having decreased overall between 2014 and 2017.

With regard to factors influencing the levels of report crime on trains, the BTP has run a number of successful initiatives in recent years to encourage more reporting of crimes, which is likely to be a factor in the numbers of crimes reported. For example, BTP has a popular dedicated crime reporting text service - ‘61016’ – which allows people to report offences to the police easily and discreetly.

The levels of crime that are seen on the railway broadly mirror those seen across society as a whole, as recorded by the territorial police forces.

A recent report by the Rail Safety and Standards Board (RSSB) concluded that driver controlled train operation by comparison with conductor operation does not increase passenger safety risks.

19th Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of (a) the trials led by HyDeploy to convert the UK’s domestic gas grid to hydrogen and (b) how those trials can be used to support the development and implementation of the use of hydrogen in transport.

HyDeploy is funded under Ofgem’s Gas Network Innovation Competition and is being delivered by the HyDeploy consortium, led by Cadent and Northern Gas Networks. Officials are following the progress of the project closely and will review the project when it finishes in 2020. More broadly, the Government is exploring hydrogen’s potential to deliver against its clean growth goals across the energy system and the wider economy. Specifically, in the case of transport, the approach has been to support the market in its early stages, by funding the deployment of Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles with the appropriate hydrogen refuelling infrastructure.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
25th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect on the UK bioethanol industry of the introduction of a zero tariff regime for imported ethanol in the event that the UK leaves the EU without a deal; and what representations he has received from that industry on a zero tariff regime.

The Government continues to work towards a Withdrawal Agreement with the EU. If the UK leaves without a deal in place, an independent tariff regime will be set striking a balance between protecting consumers and businesses from possible price rises and avoiding the exposure of sensitive industries to competition. The Government has considered carefully the evidence available in developing a future tariff regime. Once a final decision has been taken, we will bring forward legislation to the House and communicate this in an appropriate way for a market sensitive announcement.

The Department is in regular contact with representatives from the UK bioethanol industry on a range of topics, including on the implications of the UK’s withdrawal from the EU.

5th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to the consultation, E10 petrol, consumer protection and fuel pump labelling, published by his Department on 20 July 2018, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of combining a mandated introduction of E10 fuels with a scrappage scheme for incompatible vehicles.

The Department's consultation, “E10 petrol, consumer protection and fuel pump labelling”, included a call for evidence inviting stakeholders to contribute ideas on whether and how E10 could be introduced in a way which maximises the benefits of that fuel and ensures consumers are protected.

The Department is carefully considering the responses submitted, including proposals for a mandate or scrappage scheme, and will respond to the call for evidence in due course. The information gathered in the call for evidence will help the Department to ensure that decision making on this important policy area is robust. Any legislative proposals on the mandatory introduction of E10 would be subject to a full consultation with an accompanying impact assessment.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
5th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to the his Department's consultation, E10 petrol, consumer protection and fuel pump labelling, published on 20 July 2018, for what reason that consultation did not consider the mandatory introduction of E10 fuels.

The Department's consultation, “E10 petrol, consumer protection and fuel pump labelling”, included a call for evidence inviting stakeholders to contribute ideas on whether and how E10 could be introduced in a way which maximises the benefits of that fuel and ensures consumers are protected.

The Department is carefully considering the responses submitted, including proposals for a mandate or scrappage scheme, and will respond to the call for evidence in due course. The information gathered in the call for evidence will help the Department to ensure that decision making on this important policy area is robust. Any legislative proposals on the mandatory introduction of E10 would be subject to a full consultation with an accompanying impact assessment.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
3rd Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps he is taking to ensure that London North Eastern Railway fulfils the commitment made by Virgin Trains East Coast to operate a direct train service between Middlesbrough and London King's Cross; and when the planned start date is for that service.

The Department is working with Network Rail to deliver infrastructure enhancements on the East Coast Main Line planned to be delivered in the early 2020s, and with London North Eastern Railway (LNER) to introduce into service a new fleet of trains through the Intercity Express Programme planned to be fully introduced in 2020. It remains our intention to deliver additional services to Middlesbrough when capacity is available to do so.

18th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the potential effect on the strength of the steel industry of the commitment by Heathrow Airport Limited to follow public sector procurement rules on steel purchasing as part of its expansion programme.

The Government welcomes Heathrow Airport Limited’s (HAL) commitment to follow public sector procurement rules for its purchases of steel. It is one of a number of commitments HAL has already made to British industry, including the development of supply chain hubs across the country and that 95 per cent of the procurement spend will be with the UK supply chain. The Government has not made an assessment of the effect that this commitment will have on the strength of the UK steel industry. HAL’s own assessment is that expansion at Heathrow will require tens of thousands of tonnes of steel, securing hundreds of jobs across the industry.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
13th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what discussions he has had with the Public and Commercial Services Union on the implications for public safety of the new satellite navigation test.

The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) introduced the new practical driving test on 4 December 2017. Senior officials engaged with representatives from the Public and Commercial Services (PCS) union throughout the development of the new driving test and considered any concerns raised by PCS.

The new elements of the test were trialled extensively. No incidents were recorded during the trial of in excess of 3,000 candidates.

In July 2017, the DVSA carried out a risk assessment of the new test and conducted further evaluations in September 2017, which did not identify any unacceptable risk. It also commissioned an independent assessment of the test from The Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents (RoSPA). The RoSPA report concluded that all new parts of the driving test were low risk.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
16th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps he is taking to ensure that railway stations on the Tees Valley Line are accessible to passengers with assistant dogs.

The National Rail Conditions of Travel permit the carriage of assistance dogs. Whilst it is not essential, it is recommended that advance notification of travel is provided to ensure that any required assistance is in place at stations. Northern and Transpennine franchise agreements contain a number of relevant obligations such as Minor Works budget expenditure, to make improvements such as new handrails, level access and tactile surfaces. Other obligations include a map covering station accessibility and the installation of ‘Harrington Humps’ to support making stations more accessible in general.

16th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that there are adequate levels of coastguard patrols and provision for (a) Redcar and (b) North Yorkshire.

Coastguard patrols in Redcar, North Yorkshire and the rest of the UK are undertaken by volunteer Coastguard Rescue Officers. These patrols support the delivery of search, mud, cliff, and water rescue by enabling the volunteers to enhance their local geographical knowledge.

Each volunteer undertakes a minimum of eight hours patrolling a year and are encouraged to take as many voluntary patrols as they believe are necessary to meet these operational requirements.

10th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, when the Government plans to publish its response to the consultation on the proposed changes to the Renewable Transport Fuel Obligation Order.

We plan to publish the Government’s response later this year. We recognise the need to provide the UK biofuel industry with certainty if it is to realise the industrial opportunities highlighted in the consultation. It is therefore our intention to implement changes to the Renewable Transport Fuel Obligation as soon as possible.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
13th Apr 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the effect of changes to Mode Shift Revenue Support grants on the volume of rail and road freight in the UK; and what steps he is taking to ensure that roads across the UK are able to handle increased volumes of HGV transportation as a result of those changes.

The final number of lorry journeys that the Department for Transport’s Mode Shift Revenue Support (MSRS) funding will have helped to remove from Britain’s roads in 2016/17 is not yet known. The maximum number is 983,162, but current estimates are that it will be about 17,000 fewer.

Funding allocated at the Department’s first bid round for 2017/18 and 2018/19 will help to remove up to 796,854 and 776,497 lorry journeys respectively. There are further bid rounds to come, which may increase the figures or alter what is covered by this grant and the parallel Waterborne Freight Grant scheme.

Since applications for grant are prioritised on the basis of value for money, the services that are allocated funding, and therefore the potential impact on the road network, varies from one bid round to another.

23rd Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many passenger journeys have (a) started and (b) ended at British Steel Redcar Railway Station in the last five years.

The number of passenger journeys starting and ending at British Steel Redcar railway station over the last five years is as follows:

Year

Starting at British Steel Redcar station

Ending at British Steel Redcar station

2015/16

370

370

2014/15

785

785

2013/14

709

709

2012/13

445

445

2011/12

411

411

Source: Office of Rail and Road, Estimates of Station Usage

8th Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what support his Department provides to communities seeking to establish their own not-for-profit bus operator.

Community bus services can provide valuable connections for people living in areas where commercial services are not viable, helping people who might otherwise be isolated. Bodies who wish to run a local bus service on a non-profit basis may apply to the Traffic Commissioner for a Section 22 Community Bus Permit, which allows the holder to operate without the need for a full public service vehicle (PSV) operator’s licence.

8th Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent estimate he has made of the number of bus miles on English roads in (a) 2017, (b) 2018, and (c) 2019.

The Department publishes estimates of bus miles on local bus services in England up to 2015/16 in statistical table bus0203: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/bus02-vehicle-distance-travelled#table-bus0203. However, forecasts of these figures for future years are not available.

8th Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent assessment he has made of the benefits of not-for-profit delivery of community transport operators.

The Government has made no recent formal assessment of the benefits of the not-for-profit delivery of community transport operators. Such operators provide accessible and inclusive transport to communities and people who might otherwise be isolated. The Government’s support for the sector can be seen in the recent Community Transport Minibus Fund, which is providing over 300 organisations with new minibuses to help them continue their work.

8th Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent assessment he has made of the (a) benefits and (b) methods of increasing passenger involvement in bus service procurement.

Procurement of bus services where these are not provided commercially is a matter for local authorities. The Government has made no formal assessment, but would encourage local authorities to consult bus passengers about changes they propose to make to the services they procure. Transport Focus has produced a best practice toolkit to help local authorities do this.

As part of the Bus Services Bill proposals, authorities will be required to consult Transport Focus and other organisations representative of users of local services on their plans to take forward a partnership or franchising scheme. The Bill also requires authorities to give careful thought to how they intend to consult users to obtain views on how well the scheme is working.

7th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, on what date his Department plans to open a consultation on biofuels; and if he will take steps to ensure that that consultation addresses indirect land use change and the level of the crop cap.

We plan to consult later this year on changes to the Renewable Transport Fuel Obligation including steps to provide more long term confidence for producers and to address indirect land use change with options to limit the contribution from crop based biofuels.

7th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, when his Department plans to launch its consultation on biofuels; and whether that consultation will address the issues of indirect land use and level of the crop cap.

We plan to consult later this year on changes to the Renewable Transport Fuel Obligation including steps to provide more long term confidence for producers and to address indirect land use change with options to limit the contribution from crop based biofuels.

20th Jul 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many cyclists died as a result of road traffic incident in each year since 2010 in (a) Redcar, (b) the North East and (c) the UK.

The table below provides the number of cyclists killed in a road traffic accident on public roads in a) Redcar, b) the North East of England, and c) Great Britain.

Year

Redcar constituency

North East England

Great Britain

2010

0

4

111

2011

3

7

107

2012

0

6

118

2013

0

6

109

2014

0

3

113

2015

0

1

100

The Department does not hold data for Northern Ireland, therefore the table includes statistics for Great Britain rather than the United Kingdom.

These statistics come from police reported data on personal injury accidents on the public highway. The Department does not collect information about accidents that were on private roads, car parks or off-road.

11th Jul 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, by what date his Department expects the replacement of Pacer trains on the Tees Valley Line to be completed.

The replacement of Pacer trains across the Northern network will be completed by December 2019, although the timing of when this will occur on individual lines will be a matter for Northern Rail.

11th Jul 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps his Department is taking to improve journey times on the Tees Valley Line.

As part of the new franchise award, the Northern franchisee will be required before October 2017 to undertake a feasibility study, identifying options for journey time improvements across the whole network, including services in the North East. This will include possible changes to existing infrastructure, improvements to rolling stock capability and reliability and the implementing of changes to service patterns.

Any resulting changes would be in addition to the local benefits secured as part of the franchise including the withdrawal of pacer trains and the refurbishment of all the existing carriages retained in the franchise long term.

11th Jul 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps his Department is taking to support disabled passengers and passengers of reduced mobility on the Tees Valley Line for the duration of operation of Pacer trains.

The Northern franchise was recently awarded to Arriva Rail North, who took over operations in April 2016. Arriva Rail North sets out its policy for providing assistance to disabled passengers and passengers of reduced mobility in its Disabled People’s Protection Policy (DPPP). Publishing commitments to on-board assistance in a DPPP is a passenger train operating licence requirement and is approved by the Office of Rail and Road (ORR). Arriva Rail North is also required to participate in the national Passenger Assist scheme for pre-booking assistance.

‘Pacer’ trains operated by Arriva Rail North on the Tees Valley Line will be replaced ahead of the 2020 accessibility compliance deadline. From that date, all trains operated by Arriva Rail North will have to be compliant with the accessibility standards mandated by the Persons of Reduced Mobility Technical Specification for Interoperability (PRM-TSI). While Pacers do not meet the standards set out in the PRM-TSI, they do offer wheelchair spaces, audio announcements and manual boarding ramps to assist disabled passengers and persons of reduced mobility when travelling.

24th Jun 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, to what extent he plans for the decision on airport expansion in the South East to take account of potential economic benefits outside of London and the South East.

Our global connections are crucial for British business and benefit the whole country. The economic benefits to the UK as a whole, not just London and the South East, will be taken into consideration when making a decision on a preferred scheme for airport expansion, alongside a range of other relevant evidence.

24th Jun 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps he is taking to ensure that airport expansion at (a) Heathrow and (b) Gatwick Airport will benefit the UK steel industry.

The Government’s steel procurement guidance sets out how government buyers should source steel in a more strategic and transparent way and will help to ensure that UK manufacturers are in the best possible place to react to tenders for major procurements when they arise. We would encourage companies to adopt the guidance where possible in their own purchasing activities.

Airports are privately owned companies and all of the promoters have proposed privately-funded schemes. It would be for the airport to procure the materials they need as these are privately financed and developed projects.

24th May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment the Government has made of the potential effect of expansion at (a) Heathrow and (b) Gatwick Airport on the number of jobs that will be created in the North East by (i) 2030 and (ii) 2050.

The Government is currently considering the large amount of very detailed analysis contained in the Airports Commission’s final report. The Government is not providing a running commentary on this work and nor would it be appropriate to outline specific pieces of evidence before an announcement. Any work to inform an announcement will be set out in subsequent publications and associated consultation.

23rd May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect of airport expansion at (a) Heathrow and (b) Gatwick Airport on the level of foreign direct investment to the North East.

The Government is currently considering the large amount of very detailed analysis contained in the Airports Commission’s final report. The Government is not providing a running commentary on this work and nor would it be appropriate to outline specific pieces of evidence before an announcement. Any work to inform an announcement will be set out in subsequent publications and associated consultation.

23rd May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many annual flight movements between airports in the North East and (a) Heathrow and (b) Gatwick Airport took place in each year between 2000 and 2015.

Information on the number of flights between the North East and Heathrow and Gatwick are contained in the tables below:

Year

Heathrow

Gatwick

2000

6,300

3,610

2001

6,070

3,240

2002

6,090

2,950

2003

6,080

2,870

2004

6,420

2,790

2005

6,910

2,870

2006

6,270

3,140

2007

6,450

1,810

2008

6,020

1,970

2009

4,310

2,430

2010

3,590

2,300

2011

4,090

2,100

2012

3,980

1,900

2013

3,910

1,770

2014

4,070

1,210

2015

4,180

260

Reporting airport

Heathrow

Gatwick

Last/next airport

Durham Tees Valley

Newcastle

Durham Tees Valley

Newcastle

2000

2,430

3,870

40

3,570

2001

2,090

3,980

-

3,240

2002

2,080

4,010

-

2,950

2003

1,990

4,090

-

2,870

2004

2,120

4,300

-

2,790

2005

2,150

4,750

100

2,770

2006

2,010

4,260

500

2,650

2007

2,390

4,070

10

1,800

2008

1,990

4,030

-

1,960

2009

450

3,860

-

2,430

2010

-

3,590

-

2,300

2011

-

4,090

-

2,100

2012

-

3,980

-

1,900

2013

-

3,910

-

1,760

2014

-

4,070

-

1,210

2015

-

4,180

-

260

Source: Civil Aviation Authority (CAA)

18th Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how much revenue the removal of the spare room subsidy has generated for the public purse since its introduction.

The removal of the spare room subsidy (RSRS) policy has not generated revenue for the public purse. However, this policy has saved over £1.7bn since its introduction in April 2013. A breakdown by financial year is provided in the table below:

Total Estimated Housing Benefit RSRS Deductions, 2013/14 to 2017/18 (£m pa)

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

385

365

355

335

320

Deductions figures do not take into account any additional savings due to behavioural change before/after the policy has been introduced, for example moving to a smaller property to avoid a deduction.

Figures do not include claimants on Universal Credit (UC) with a removal of the spare room subsidy (RSRS) deduction, as these data are not currently available.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
13th Apr 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment her Department has made of the potential merits of exempting children under child arrangement orders from the benefit cap.

  • The Government acknowledges the immense value of care given by family and friend carers, who look after children whose parents are unable to provide the necessary care themselves. This was discussed during the passage of the Work and Welfare Reform Act 2016.

  • Family and friend carers are able to receive support for the children in their care through the benefit system as they have access to child benefit and child tax credit on the same basis as parents.

  • A cap at £23,000 in Greater London is equivalent to gross family earnings of around £29,000. A cap at £20,000 in the rest of GB is equivalent to gross family earnings of around £25,000
  • If we are to treat family and friend carers in the same way as parents for the other facets of the benefits system then it is right that the benefit cap principles should apply in the same way for family and friend carers as they do for parents.

  • Where claimants need further financial support, Local Authorities can provide additional support through the use of Discretionary Housing Payments (DHPs). The funding for DHPs is specifically aimed at a number of groups who are likely to be particularly affected by the benefit cap. These include people with family and friend care responsibilities.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
13th Apr 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what estimate she has made of the number of families whose benefit entitlement exceeds the benefit cap as a result of looking after children under child arrangements orders.

We do not hold any data that identifies families with a child under child arrangements order.

The lower cap is still the equivalent of gross family earnings of £25k, and £29k in London. Where claimants need further financial support, Local Authorities can provide additional support through the use of Discretionary Housing Payments. The funding for DHPs is specifically aimed at a number of groups who are likely to be particularly affected by the benefit cap. These include people with family and friend care responsibilities.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
13th Apr 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps her Department is taking to support vulnerable people who will become ineligible for pension credit and other passported benefits as a result of the April 2018 state pension increase taking their income above the standard minimum guarantee threshold for pension credit.

In April 2018 there was above indexation increase in the standard minimum guarantee of Pension Credit, to match the cash increase in the basic State Pension. This prevents the increase in the basic State Pension (in isolation) from taking people out of the scope of Pension Credit, excluding the impact of any other changes in circumstances. The full rate of the new State Pension is set each year above the level of the basic means test in Pension Credit, reducing reliance on means testing over time and providing a firm foundation on which to build private pension provision.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
13th Apr 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what estimate she has made of the number of people whose income has increased above the standard minimum guarantee threshold for pension credit as a result of the April 2018 state pension increase.

In April 2018 there was above indexation increase in the standard minimum guarantee of Pension Credit, to match the cash increase in the basic State Pension. This prevents the increase in the basic State Pension (in isolation) from taking people out of the scope of Pension Credit, excluding the impact of any other changes in circumstances. The full rate of the new State Pension is set each year above the level of the basic means test in Pension Credit, reducing reliance on means testing over time and providing a firm foundation on which to build private pension provision.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
14th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps his Department has taken to ensure staff at a JobCentre Plus are adequately trained in their duties to improve the level of claimant satisfaction rates.

The Department has effective processes to identify individual training needs, resulting in role specific learning, including the provision of excellent customer service. This is underpinned by workplace consolidation activities observed by managers, which supports individuals to continuously improve and develop their skills and knowledge.

14th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what estimate he has made of the number of work capability assessment decisions overturned in Redcar in each of the last five years where figures are available; and what steps he is taking to improve the accuracy of benefit entitlement awards.

This information is not readily available at constituency level and could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

The Department is continually working to improve the accuracy of benefit entitlement awards. This includes working with Assessment Providers to ensure claimants receive high quality assessments and improving the way further evidence is collected to ensure all relevant information about an individual’s needs is available to decision makers at the earliest opportunity. Furthermore, the recruitment of approximately 150 Presenting Officers provides valuable insight into why decisions are overturned on appeal and is helping us identify improvements throughout the claimant journey.

7th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, by what date his Department plans to complete its longitudinal study into former employees of Sahaviriya Steel Industries UK; and if he will make a statement.

DWP has been working to identify; quality assure; integrate and securely store and handle data on former Sahaviriya Steel Industries (SSI) UK employees and workers in its supply chain. Our analysis combines data from the official receiver; local tracking data from the SSI taskforce; DWP/HMRC administrative data; and published ONS data. We expect to share our analysis with the SSI Task Force and publish it after quality assurance is complete in 2018.

7th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps his Department is taking to track the employment status of former employees of Sahaviriya Steel Industries UK to complete its study into the former employees of that organisation.

DWP has been working to identify; quality assure; integrate and securely store and handle data on former Sahaviriya Steel Industries (SSI) UK employees and workers in its supply chain. Our analysis combines data from the official receiver; local tracking data from the SSI taskforce; DWP/HMRC administrative data; and published ONS data. We expect to share our analysis with the SSI Task Force and publish it after quality assurance is complete in 2018.

13th Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, by what date his Department plans to complete its longitudinal study into former employees of SSI UK; what the likely outcome of that study will be; and if he will make a statement.

The study has been commissioned. The timing and content are being considered. The honourable member for Redcar and other members of the SSI taskforce will be informed when more information is available.

6th Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment he has made of the effect of the living wage on the earnings threshold for carers allowance; and if he will bring forward proposals to raise the existing threshold.

The primary purpose of Carer's Allowance is to provide a measure of financial support and recognition for people who give up the opportunity of full-time employment in order to provide regular and substantial care for a severely disabled person. It is not, and was never intended to be, a carer’s wage or a payment for the services of caring, nor is it intended to replace lost or forgone earnings in their entirety.

The earnings limit for Carer's Allowance is a net figure which is the figure left once income tax, National Insurance contributions and half of any contributions to an occupational or personal pension are deducted from earnings. There are also a number of other deductions which can be made that mean that people can earn significantly more than £110 per week and still be eligible for Carer's Allowance.

Whilst the Government does not link the earnings limit to any other particular factor (including the National Living Wage), we do keep it under regular review and increase it when it is warranted and affordable, and this will continue to be our approach. Most recently in April 2015 the earnings limit was increased by 8% to £110, far outstripping the general increase in earnings.

Penny Mordaunt
Paymaster General
11th Jul 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if he will commission a comprehensive assessment of the levels of acetaldehyde that workers are exposed to in the UK chemical industry.

The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) has no plans to commission an assessment of the levels of acetaldehyde that workers are exposed to in the UK chemical industry.

Acetaldehyde has been assigned a Workplace Exposure Limit (WEL). WELs are concentrations of hazardous substances in the air, averaged over a specified period of time, referred to as a time-weighted average (TWA). Two time periods are used; long-term (8 hours) and short-term (15 minutes). For acetaldehyde these are concentrations of 37 milligrams per cubic meter (mg.m-3) and 92mg.m-3 respectively.

Substances that have been assigned a WEL are subject to the requirements of the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations (COSHH). COSHH requires employers to prevent or control exposure to hazardous substances. Under COSHH, control is defined as adequate only if a) the principles of good control practice are applied; b) any WEL is not exceeded; and c) exposure to asthmagens, carcinogens and mutagens are reduced as low as is reasonably practicable. As part of the assessment required under regulation 6 of COSHH, employers should determine their own working practices and in-house standards for control of exposure.

Justin Tomlinson
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
11th Jul 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps his Department takes to monitor the levels of acetaldehyde that workers are exposed to in the chemical industry; and what steps he is taking to reduce routine exposure to acetaldehyde in that industry.

The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) has no plans to commission an assessment of the levels of acetaldehyde that workers are exposed to in the UK chemical industry.

Acetaldehyde has been assigned a Workplace Exposure Limit (WEL). WELs are concentrations of hazardous substances in the air, averaged over a specified period of time, referred to as a time-weighted average (TWA). Two time periods are used; long-term (8 hours) and short-term (15 minutes). For acetaldehyde these are concentrations of 37 milligrams per cubic meter (mg.m-3) and 92mg.m-3 respectively.

Substances that have been assigned a WEL are subject to the requirements of the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations (COSHH). COSHH requires employers to prevent or control exposure to hazardous substances. Under COSHH, control is defined as adequate only if a) the principles of good control practice are applied; b) any WEL is not exceeded; and c) exposure to asthmagens, carcinogens and mutagens are reduced as low as is reasonably practicable. As part of the assessment required under regulation 6 of COSHH, employers should determine their own working practices and in-house standards for control of exposure.

Justin Tomlinson
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
11th Jul 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment the Government has made of the safe levels of acetaldehyde to which workers in the chemical industry can be exposed.

The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) has no plans to commission an assessment of the levels of acetaldehyde that workers are exposed to in the UK chemical industry.

Acetaldehyde has been assigned a Workplace Exposure Limit (WEL). WELs are concentrations of hazardous substances in the air, averaged over a specified period of time, referred to as a time-weighted average (TWA). Two time periods are used; long-term (8 hours) and short-term (15 minutes). For acetaldehyde these are concentrations of 37 milligrams per cubic meter (mg.m-3) and 92mg.m-3 respectively.

Substances that have been assigned a WEL are subject to the requirements of the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations (COSHH). COSHH requires employers to prevent or control exposure to hazardous substances. Under COSHH, control is defined as adequate only if a) the principles of good control practice are applied; b) any WEL is not exceeded; and c) exposure to asthmagens, carcinogens and mutagens are reduced as low as is reasonably practicable. As part of the assessment required under regulation 6 of COSHH, employers should determine their own working practices and in-house standards for control of exposure.

Justin Tomlinson
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
23rd May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what criteria the Government considers before making an application to the European Globalisation Fund.

The UK has not made any applications to the European Globalisation Adjustment Fund (EGF).

The European Globalisation Fund (EGF) provides a financial contribution for active labour market measures, aimed at reintegrating those made or at risk of being made redundant in the labour market. EGF Regulations state that these measures must complement actions at national, regional and local level.

The EGF Regulations also set out strict criteria and eligibility for potential applicants with regards to the number of redundancies that take place over a given period of time and the link between these redundancies and globalisation or the global financial and economic crisis.

The UK already offers a broad range of personalised support to workers made redundant through its Rapid Response Service and Jobcentre Plus, which could therefore not be duplicated or substituted by EGF.

The Rapid Response Service and the Jobcentre Plus Core Offer are effective reintegration tools which represent good value for money and are our primary and most effective means of response to support the industry.

In addition to this, the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills also announced packages of support worth up to £80 million for SSI in Redcar.

It has, therefore, not been necessary to make an application for EGF funding to provide complementary support.

23rd May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, for what reasons the Government did not apply to the European Globalisation Fund to secure financial support for those affected by the closure of SSI Redcar in 2015.

The UK has not made any applications to the European Globalisation Adjustment Fund (EGF).

The European Globalisation Fund (EGF) provides a financial contribution for active labour market measures, aimed at reintegrating those made or at risk of being made redundant in the labour market. EGF Regulations state that these measures must complement actions at national, regional and local level.

The EGF Regulations also set out strict criteria and eligibility for potential applicants with regards to the number of redundancies that take place over a given period of time and the link between these redundancies and globalisation or the global financial and economic crisis.

The UK already offers a broad range of personalised support to workers made redundant through its Rapid Response Service and Jobcentre Plus, which could therefore not be duplicated or substituted by EGF.

The Rapid Response Service and the Jobcentre Plus Core Offer are effective reintegration tools which represent good value for money and are our primary and most effective means of response to support the industry.

In addition to this, the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills also announced packages of support worth up to £80 million for SSI in Redcar.

It has, therefore, not been necessary to make an application for EGF funding to provide complementary support.

23rd May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, when the Government has applied to the European Commission Globalisation Adjustment Fund; and whether each such application was successful.

The UK has not made any applications to the European Globalisation Adjustment Fund (EGF).

The European Globalisation Fund (EGF) provides a financial contribution for active labour market measures, aimed at reintegrating those made or at risk of being made redundant in the labour market. EGF Regulations state that these measures must complement actions at national, regional and local level.

The EGF Regulations also set out strict criteria and eligibility for potential applicants with regards to the number of redundancies that take place over a given period of time and the link between these redundancies and globalisation or the global financial and economic crisis.

The UK already offers a broad range of personalised support to workers made redundant through its Rapid Response Service and Jobcentre Plus, which could therefore not be duplicated or substituted by EGF.

The Rapid Response Service and the Jobcentre Plus Core Offer are effective reintegration tools which represent good value for money and are our primary and most effective means of response to support the industry.

In addition to this, the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills also announced packages of support worth up to £80 million for SSI in Redcar.

It has, therefore, not been necessary to make an application for EGF funding to provide complementary support.

19th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what his policy is on a person providing child maintenance having their payments regarded for the purpose of an income assessment for means-tested benefit.

A person who is providing child maintenance does not have their payments disregarded for the purpose of an income assessment, in a means-tested benefit, as this would amount to the tax payer meeting a person’s liabilities.

Priti Patel
Home Secretary
17th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what estimate he has made of the number of people who will be affected by the introduction of the individual award limit to the Access to Work scheme.

The annual limit on Access to Work awards of 1.5x average salaries (which currently equates to £40,800 per person per year) will be introduced for new customers from October 1st 2015.

There are 200 current customers, (approximately 0.5% of the current caseload) who are currently above this level. Current customers with awards above that level as of 1st October 2015 will have their existing award levels protected until 1st April 2018, provided their needs remain the same.

Justin Tomlinson
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
18th Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps the Government is taking to support female kinship carers who care as a result of alcohol misuse.

The Department for Education has advised that the Government issued statutory guidance in 2011 for local authorities about supporting family and friends providing care for children who cannot live with their parents. The guidance makes it clear that children and young people should receive the support that they and their carers need to safeguard and promote their welfare. It explains that support, can be provided under section 17 of the Children Act 1989. There is no limit on the level of support, that local authorities can provide. Local authorities are required to publish a policy setting out their approach to promoting and supporting the needs of all children living with family and friends carers, regardless of their legal status.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
19th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, will he will make it his policy to undertake a public consultation with patients in the north east of England on proposals to change NHS waiting time targets.

The clinically-led review of standards was announced by the Prime Minister in June 2018. The review is considering the appropriateness of operational standards for physical and mental health relating to planned, unplanned urgent or emergency care, as well as cancer. In the interest of patient safety, we are committed to ensuring that any changes to waiting time standards are based on clinical evidence.

The National Health Service Long Term Plan provides a platform upon which innovative models of patient care can and are being developed. In that context, the NHS National Medical Director has been working with the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges, Healthwatch England and many others to consider what matters most to patients, on the clinical issues with the current target regime, and what NHS staff believe will help them provide the best quality care for patients.

The review will report its interim findings in the spring of 2019, after which any recommended changes arising from the Clinical Standards Review will be carefully tested across the NHS and be subject to a rigorous approach before they are implemented.  Any changes should, and will, only seek to further strengthen current operational standards.

Any changes to the NHS Constitution will be consulted on as is legally required. NHS waiting time targets are national standards and apply to all regions of the NHS.

11th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment he has made of the accessibility of services for treating lymphoedema in (a) the North East and (b) England.

No specific assessment of the availability of lymphoedema services has been made. The commissioning of services for the treatment and care of lymphoedema patients is a local matter.

People with lymphoedema can usually be managed through routine access to primary or secondary care services. A range of guidance is available for the diagnosis, treatment and care for people with lymphoedema. This includes an international consensus document on best practice and guidance from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence.

Further information can be found at the following links:

www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ipg588

www.woundsinternational.com/resources/details/bioimpedance-analysis-in-the-assessment-of-lymphoedema-diagnosis-and-management

11th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent steps his Department has taken to improve early diagnosis of lymphoedema.

No specific assessment of the availability of lymphoedema services has been made. The commissioning of services for the treatment and care of lymphoedema patients is a local matter.

People with lymphoedema can usually be managed through routine access to primary or secondary care services. A range of guidance is available for the diagnosis, treatment and care for people with lymphoedema. This includes an international consensus document on best practice and guidance from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence.

Further information can be found at the following links:

www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ipg588

www.woundsinternational.com/resources/details/bioimpedance-analysis-in-the-assessment-of-lymphoedema-diagnosis-and-management

29th Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to improve the outcomes of pancreatic cancer diagnoses in line with the NHS England 2015 cancer strategy.

The 2015 cancer strategy set ambitions for higher survival and improved patient experience and quality of life for all cancer patients, including pancreatic cancer patients. The NHS Long Term Plan takes forward those ambitions, stating that by 2028 three in four cancers will be diagnosed at an early stage and 55,000 more people will survive their cancer for five years or more.

Over the last two years, NHS England have allocated over £200 million funding through their Cancer Alliances for earlier diagnosis and personalised care. In addition, £130 million funding has been invested in over 80 new or replacement linear accelerators in the modernisation of radiotherapy services.

NHS England will shortly be introducing a Faster Diagnostic Standard of 28 days for all cancer patients, including those with pancreatic cancer, which when taken together with the 62-day referral to treatment standard, will mean that all patients should expect to start their treatment within 34 days of diagnosis. This is a maximum, and trusts should continue to treat patients more quickly particularly where there is a strong clinical need.

14th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will take steps to increase the level of real term funding for mental health services in England.

We are taking steps to increase the level of real term funding for mental health services in England. We have increased spending on mental health to a record £11.6 billion in 2016/17 and this is planned to rise to £11.86 billion for in 2017/18.

The Mental Health Investment Standard requires all clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) to increase funding for mental health by at least as much as the overall increase to their funding allocations. 85% of CCGs achieved the Investment Standard in 2016/17 and from 2018/19 all CCGs will be required to meet it.

14th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of the number of people who have received mental health treatment from South Tees NHS Trust since 2010.

This information is not collected in the format requested.

14th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what estimate his Department has made of the number of patients receiving treatment for arthritis in (a) South Tees NHS Trust, (b) the North East and (c) England.

No specific estimate has been made. The majority of patients receiving treatment for rheumatoid arthritis are managed in outpatient settings where data collection is not mandated.

14th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what estimate his Department has made of the number of full-time practising GPs in (a) South Tees NHS Trust, (b) the North East and (c) England for each of the last five years for which figures are available.

The requested information is shown in the table below. The table shows data for general practitioner (GP) full-time equivalent figures for NHS South Tees Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG), NHS England North (Cumbria and North East) and England, for each of the years in question. Prior to 2015, the locum headcounts were not recorded.

Year

All GPs Full-Time Equivalent

All GPs (Excluding Registrars, Retainers and Locums) Full-Time Equivalent

England

NHS England North (Cumbria and North East)

NHS South Tees CCG

England

NHS England North (Cumbria and North East)

NHS South Tees CCG

March 2017

33,921

1,679

156

28,092

1,544

145

September 2016

34,495

1,837

154

28,458

1,724

142

September 2015

34,592

1,910

165

29,229

1,774

150

September 2014

32,628

2,160

180

September 2013

32,075

2,143

189

16th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what estimate he has made of the number of people diagnosed with an eating disorder in (a) South Tees NHS Trust, (b) the North East and (c) England.

The information is not held in the format requested.

16th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what estimate he has made of the proportion of people (a) under and (b) over 19 years old with an eating disorder who receive NICE guideline approved treatment within four weeks.

The information is not held in the format requested.

16th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what steps he is taking to improve NHS timescales for diagnosing children with autism.

Diagnosing autism in children can involve a range of observations over time and a number of different professionals. The time taken to formulate a diagnosis will not be the same in all cases.

There are concerns in some local areas that the length of time some children have had to wait for an assessment for autism to begin is longer than the three months recommended by the National Institute for Care and Health Excellence (NICE) guidelines from a referral to a first appointment. Whilst local clinical commissioning groups have been working to bring down the waits in line with the NICE guidelines, to date there has been no national collection of waiting times data.

The Government is taking steps to rectify this and NHS Digital have confirmed they will be collecting and recording waiting times from referral for suspected autism to a first appointment within the Mental Health Services Data Set from April 2018. This will mean that each area can be held to account in real time and action can be taken to support them when waiting times are increasing.

An indicative timeline for the development of care pathways was set out in the Five Year Forward View for Mental Health. The precise timetable for the establishment of a care pathway for autism will be confirmed by NHS England in due course.

7th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment he has made of the effect of the non-availability of Lithyronine on the NHS on patients who have previously being prescribed that drug.

NHS England’s consultation on draft guidance for clinical commissioning groups on a range of items that should not routinely be prescribed in primary care ended on 21 October.

We would not want to pre-empt any outcome following NHS England’s analysis of the responses it has received. However, we are assured that as part of issuing the final guidance, careful consideration will be given by NHS England to the responses to the consultation, both to ensure that particular groups of people are not disproportionately affected and that principles of best practice on clinical prescribing are adhered to – including guidance on the usage of liothyronine.

Further information can be found at the following link:

https://www.engage.england.nhs.uk/consultation/items-routinely-prescribed/

7th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of the UK leaving the EU on the price of medication sold online by third parties.

The Government is assessing the potential implications of the United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the European Union across the medicines supply chain. While we cannot pre-judge the outcome of the negotiations, our aim is to ensure that patients in the UK and across the EU will continue to be able to access the best and most innovative medicines and be assured that their safety is protected through the strongest regulatory framework and sharing of data.

7th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what steps his Department is taking to ensure Lithyronine sold by third parties meets legal requirements and its safe sale for patients to use.

Liothyronine is a licensed medicine used for the treatment of hypothyroidism, an underactive thyroid gland. Licensed medicines must meet standards of safety, quality and efficacy. Each batch of medicine must be tested before release for sale. The manufacturer, importer and distributors must also be licensed. Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA), the United Kingdom competent authority for medicines, license medicines, their manufacture, importation and distribution and conduct inspections of sites of operation for compliance with good practice standards.

Prescribers may, on their own personal responsibility, also prescribe an unlicensed medicine to meet the special clinical needs of their individual patient where those needs cannot be met by an available licensed medicine. Manufacturers, importers and distributors of unlicensed medicine are also licensed and inspected by MHRA. Importers must notify MHRA of the intention to import an unlicensed medicine. These notifications are assessed by MHRA for known safety or quality issues and objections to import may be raised if prohibitive issues are identified. Unlicensed Liothyronine has been manufactured and imported for UK patients.

A prescriber or patient that suspects that their medicine is defective or is causing a side effect may report this to MHRA through the Yellow Card Scheme for reporting suspected Adverse Drug Reactions from across the whole UK and includes all medicines.

7th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, if he will bring forward legislative proposals to prohibit smoking on the grounds of hospitals, health centres and other NHS buildings in England.

The Department supports the implementation of smokefree policies across all hospitals in England. The Government published the Tobacco Control Plan on 18 July 2017, which outlines the ambition of achieving a smokefree National Health Service estate by 2020. There are no plans for new legislation.

12th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, if he will make an assessment of the effect of the closure of Marske Medical Centre on the costs of travel for patients who must travel further to access GP services.

South Tees Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) made the decision to close Marske Medical Practice after four unsuccessful attempts find a new provider for the service. The practice therefore closed on 30 June 2017. The CCG continues to support patients following the closure and the great majority of them have re-registered with nearby practices, which have increased staffing levels to manage demand.

At this stage the CCG has not assessed travel costs for patients who may need to travel further to see their general practitioner.

12th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the commissioning process for primary medical care services under circumstances where no prospective providers come forward.

NHS England has a statutory responsibility to ensure that all patients have access to high-quality primary medical care services and enters into contractual arrangements with a range of general practitioner providers to secure those services for the population of England.

The commissioning process to secure services includes, where necessary, approaches to stimulate the provider market. These include engaging with patients and the public, and hosting provider events, working with professional representative groups and other key stakeholders. Options available to commissioners include:

- Procurement through an Alternative Provider Medical Services contract, which allow the widest range of providers to bid for delivery;

- Re-procurement through General Medical Services or Personal Medical Services contracts, which are contracts that can only be held by general practitioners or wider members of the National Health Service family; and

- List dispersal in the case of generally small practices where there is reasonable provision from neighbouring practices.

12th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment he has made of the effect of the closure of Marske Medical Centre on waiting times for primary medical care services at neighbouring practices.

NHS England is in close contact with the local practices who are registering patients from Marske Medical Practice and have been asked to identify if there are any concerns or issues with capacity since the closure of Marske Medical Centre. The majority of practices are reporting no impact on appointment availability. In some cases, practices have taken on additional clinical staff to manage the increased workload.

13th Apr 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment he has made of the effect of introduction of QALYS into the appraisal of highly specialised technologies (HST); and if he will take steps to ensure that future HST drugs for ultra-rare diseases are not denied reimbursement.

The changes to the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence’s Highly Specialised Technologies methods are intended to introduce a fairer, more transparent framework for the evaluation of technologies for very rare diseases that will enable truly transformative new drugs for patients to be made available where companies are willing to set prices that fairly reflect the added benefit they bring.

13th Apr 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what funding his Department makes available for minor ailments services provided by community pharmacies by service.

Minor ailments services are commissioned locally, based on the needs of local areas.

Minor ailments services are already commissioned by clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) across many parts of the country and ultimately NHS England will encourage all CCGs to adopt this joined-up approach by April 2018, building on the experience of the urgent and emergency care vanguard projects to achieve this at scale.

13th Apr 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, if he will make new funding available for NHS England for commissioning new advanced services under the Community Pharmacy Contractual Framework in 2017-18.

The Community Pharmacy Contractual Framework for 2016/17 and 2017/18 was announced in October 2016. This includes a new advanced service, the NHS Urgent Medicine Supply Advanced Service pilot scheme.

13th Apr 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment he has made of the implication for his policies of the Community Pharmacy Forward View published by the Pharmaceutical Services Negotiating Committee in August 2016; and if he will take steps to implement that Committee's recommendations.

The Government welcomed the publication of the Community Pharmacy Forward View, and its ambitions for a service that is more service and clinically-focussed and contributes more to public health improvements.

13th Apr 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, if he will make it his policy to protect NHS funding for enzyme replacement therapy during the course of the 2015 Parliament.

NHS England funds enzyme replacement therapies for eight lysosomal storage disorders. All of these drugs are high cost in nature and, for some, there is still an emerging clinical evidence base.

It is good practice to ensure that National Health Service funds are spent in the most cost-effective way and for NHS England to review the continuing use of these therapies, and to develop clinical commissioning policies as appropriate.

The development of any clinical commissioning policies would be undertaken through NHS England’s usual processes and would be subject to public consultation.

13th Apr 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, if he will make it his policy to protect NHS funding for enzyme replacement therapy.

NHS England funds enzyme replacement therapies for eight lysosomal storage disorders. All of these drugs are high cost in nature and, for some, there is still an emerging clinical evidence base.

It is good practice to ensure that National Health Service funds are spent in the most cost-effective way and for NHS England to review the continuing use of these therapies, and to develop clinical commissioning policies as appropriate.

The development of any clinical commissioning policies would be undertaken through NHS England’s usual processes and would be subject to public consultation.

28th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of the report by Bliss, entitled Neonatal care and admissions variation in the provisions for the parents of babies receiving neonatal care; and if he will take steps to reduce those variations.

This Government is committed to improving maternity and neonatal care. In November 2015 my Rt. hon. Friend the Secretary of State announced a national ambition to halve the number of neonatal deaths, stillbirths, maternal deaths and brain injuries occurring during or soon after birth by 2030. The Department is working closely with NHS England to make progress on the ambition and implement the NHS England led Maternity Transformation Programme, a programme set up to deliver the National Maternity Review’s recommendations, outlined in the report Better Births.

The Better Births publication set out the vision for maternity services across England. It also outlined that a dedicated review of neonatal services should be taken forward in light of the overall maternity review findings. Within that context, and linked to NHS England’s Maternity Transformation Programme, the Neonatal Critical Care Clinical Reference Group, chaired by Professor Neil Marlow, is carrying out a review of neonatal services. That review is ongoing and will report in September 2017 but it has acknowledged that adequate support and facilities for parents are integral to the provision of centred care.

The review has completed its data gathering stage and will be working with Bliss and other stakeholders to develop recommendations for service improvement, including the support and facilities for parents.

6th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment he has made of the effect on the mental, physical and general health of users of social media platforms of online abusive content.

We have made significant assessments of existing research and evidence on the effects of people, especially children and young people, of using social media platforms of online abusive content.

Research has shown that the increasing time children and young people spend online may impact their social and emotional well-being. Tackling the full impact of social media platforms on the lives and mental health of its users requires a cross-Government approach working collaboratively across sectors and with the online media organisations. We are therefore working with other Government Departments including the Department of Education and the Department of Culture Media and Sport, the latter of which governs the UK Council for Child and Internet Safety, which has set up a Digital Resilience Working Group.

However, we believe not enough research is available in this area which is why, following the Chief Medical Officer's recommendation, we have commissioned a new prevalence study of mental ill health in 2-19 year olds. This is the first since 2004 and the first to include cyber bullying and social media. It is due to report in 2018.

24th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment he has made of the level of regional disparity in successful funding applications for Exogen Ultrasound Bone Healing System treatment for NHS patients.

Responsibility for commissioning and funding treatment using the Exogen Ultrasound Bone Healing System lies with local clinical commissioning groups (CCGs).

Information on funding applications for this treatment is not collected centrally and no assessment has been made of any regional disparity in successful funding applications.

CCGs are expected to take account of guidance from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence and the health needs and priorities of their local populations, when determining the range and level of services they provide.

24th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many applications for funding for treatment by the Exogen Ultrasound Bone Healing System have been approved for NHS patients in (a) South Tees NHS Trust, (b) the North East and (c) England since May 2015.

Responsibility for commissioning and funding treatment using the Exogen Ultrasound Bone Healing System lies with local clinical commissioning groups (CCGs).

Information on funding applications for this treatment is not collected centrally and no assessment has been made of any regional disparity in successful funding applications.

CCGs are expected to take account of guidance from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence and the health needs and priorities of their local populations, when determining the range and level of services they provide.

24th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, if he will take steps to ensure that Exogen Ultrasound Bone Healing System treatment is funded by the NHS for repairs and fusions of joints rather than just for larger bones.

Responsibility for commissioning and funding treatment using the Exogen Ultrasound Bone Healing System lies with local clinical commissioning groups (CCGs).

Information on funding applications for this treatment is not collected centrally and no assessment has been made of any regional disparity in successful funding applications.

CCGs are expected to take account of guidance from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence and the health needs and priorities of their local populations, when determining the range and level of services they provide.

12th Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment he has made of the effect of fees charged by medical professionals for death certification on those liable for such fees who are on low incomes.

There is no fee payable for completing the Medical Certificate of Cause of Death (MCCD).

When a patient dies it is the statutory duty of the doctor who has attended the patient in the last illness to issue an MCCD.

12th Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what estimate his Department has made of the fees paid to medical professionals for death certifications in (a) the North East and (b) England in each of the past five years.

There is no fee payable for completing the Medical Certificate of Cause of Death (MCCD).

When a patient dies it is the statutory duty of the doctor who has attended the patient in the last illness to issue an MCCD.

20th Jul 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, if he will review processes for handling deaths of persons subject to deprivation of liberty safeguards, and their effect on (a) members of the family of the deceased, (b) police services and (c) the role of care providers.

We have asked the Law Commission to review the deprivation of liberty safeguards. As part of this review, the Law Commission is considering the role of coroners in investigating all deaths of people subject to deprivation of liberty safeguards. We expect its final report and recommendations to be published in December.

11th Jul 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many people were diagnosed with cancer as a result of exposure to acetaldehyde in the (a) North East and (b) UK in the latest period for which figures are available.

Information concerning the number of people diagnosed with cancer as a result of exposure to acetaldehyde is not available.

24th May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many people received a kidney transplant in Teesside in each year since 2010; and how many of those people were from BAME backgrounds.

English Parliamentary Constituency Statistics for organ donation and blood donation are published by NHS Blood and Transplant (NHSBT) and updated annually online at:

http://www.nhsbt.nhs.uk/partnering-with-nhsbt/council-statistics/

Teesside residents who received deceased donor kidney transplants between 1 April 2010 to 31 March 2016

Year

White

Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME)

2010/11

15

less than 5

2011/12

12

less than 5

2012/13

11

0

2013/14

15

less than 5

2014/15

8

less than 5

2015/16

15

0

Source: NHS Blood and Transplant

Teesside residents who received living donor kidney transplants between 1 April 2010 to 31 March 2016

Year

White

Black, Asian and Minorty Ethnic (BAME)

2010/11

7

0

2011/12

12

0

2012/13

11

less than 5

2013/14

7

less than 5

2014/15

10

0

2015/16

15

0

Source: NHS Blood and Transplant

Notes:

1. Teesside defined as the four unitary authorities of Middlesbrough, Hartlepool, Stockton-on-Tees and Redcar and Cleveland.

2. To protect patient confidentiality, NHSBT cannot provide figures less than 5 for each year.

People from a BAME background are more likely to need an organ transplant than people from white communities, as they are more susceptible to illnesses such as hypertension, diabetes and certain forms of hepatitis. As only a small percentage of deceased donors are from BAME backgrounds, this can delay a suitable kidney match being found and BAME people will often wait a year longer for a kidney transplant than people from white backgrounds.

In July 2012 the Department officially launched the National BAME Transplant Alliance (NBTA). This group was established to coordinate the work of BAME organisations working within these communities. The goal of the NBTA is to increase the number of people from a BAME background on the bone marrow and organ donation registers, increasing the individuals who consent to be donors and consequently increasing the number of bone marrow and organ transplants for people from a BAME background. The aim is also to address the persistent inequalities people from a BAME background face when trying to find a suitable bone marrow or organ donor

24th May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what the average waiting time on the organ waiting list for a kidney transplant was for people in Teesside in each year from 2010; and what that average such waiting time was for people from BAME backgrounds in that area in each of those years.

Information on waiting times is provided by NHS Blood and Transplant (NHSBT). This is provided by transplant centre rather than area.

Patients in Teesside who require a kidney transplant are likely to be referred to the Newcastle Transplant Centre, where the average waiting time for a kidney transplant is 583 days. This is lower than the national average of 979 days. These averages are based on patients registered from 1 April 2009 to 31 March 2012.

NHSBT does not hold waiting time figures broken down by ethnicity for each transplant unit.

Note:

The average is drawn from a median formula.

24th May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what the average cost to the NHS was of supporting a patient on dialysis in (a) England and (b) Teesside in each year since 2010.

The information requested for Teesside is not available. However, such information as is available is shown in the table below and is from reference costs, which are the average unit cost to National Health Service trusts and foundation trusts of providing defined services in a given financial year. Reference costs are published annually, with most recently available data being for 2014-15.

Reference costs for acute care are published by healthcare resource group (HRG), which are standard groupings of similar treatments that use similar resources. The HRGs in the table below describe renal dialysis activity for the treatment of chronic kidney disease and acute kidney injury.

Unit cost to NHS hospitals of renal dialysis activity for the treatment of chronic kidney disease and acute kidney injury1 in England and Teesside2, 2010-11 to 2014-15

Unit cost per activity (£)

England

South Tees Hospital NHS Foundation Trust3

2010-11

Renal dialysis for chronic kidney disease

128

93

2011-12

Renal dialysis for chronic kidney disease

128

145

2012-13

Renal dialysis for chronic kidney disease

127

165

Renal dialysis for acute kidney injury

681

2013-14

Renal dialysis for chronic kidney disease

130

155

Renal dialysis for acute kidney injury

631

2014-15

Renal dialysis for chronic kidney disease

131

176

Renal dialysis for acute kidney injury

680

Source: Reference costs, Department of Health

Notes:

  1. The following HRGs are included in the table:

2010-11

LD01A Hospital Haemodialysis/Filtration with access via haemodialysis catheter 19 years and over

LD01B Hospital Haemodialysis/Filtration with access via haemodialysis catheter 18 years and under

LD02A Hospital Haemodialysis/Filtration with access via arteriovenous fistula or graft 19 years and over

LD02B Hospital Haemodialysis/Filtration with access via arteriovenous fistula or graft 18 years and under

LD03A Hospital Haemodialysis/Filtration with access via haemodialysis catheter with blood borne virus 19 years and over

LD03B Hospital Haemodialysis/Filtration with access via haemodialysis catheter with blood borne virus 18 years and under

LD04A Hospital Haemodialysis/Filtration with access via arteriovenous fistula or graft with blood borne virus 19 years and over

LD04B Hospital Haemodialysis/Filtration with access via arteriovenous fistula or graft with blood borne virus 18 years and under

LD05A Satellite Haemodialysis/Filtration with access via haemodialysis catheter 19 years and over

LD05B Satellite Haemodialysis/Filtration with access via haemodialysis catheter 18 years and under

LD06A Satellite Haemodialysis/Filtration with access via arteriovenous fistula or graft 19 years and over

LD06B Satellite Haemodialysis/Filtration with access via arteriovenous fistula or graft 18 years and under

LD07A Satellite Haemodialysis/Filtration with access via haemodialysis catheter with blood borne virus 19 years and over

LD08A Satellite Haemodialysis/Filtration with access via arteriovenous fistula or graft with blood borne virus 19 years and over

LD09A Home Haemodialysis/Filtration with access via haemodialysis catheter 19 years and over

LD09B Home Haemodialysis/Filtration with access via haemodialysis catheter 18 years and under

LD10A Home Haemodialysis/Filtration with access via arteriovenous fistula or graft 19 years and over

LD10B Home Haemodialysis/Filtration with access via arteriovenous fistula or graft 18 years and under

LD11A Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis 19 years and over

LD11B Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis 18 years and under

LD12A Automated Peritoneal Dialysis 19 years and over

LD12B Automated Peritoneal Dialysis 18 years and under

2011-12

Removed from 2010-11

LD03B Hospital Haemodialysis/Filtration with access via haemodialysis catheter with blood borne virus 18 years and under

Added in 2011-12

LD13A Assisted Automated Peritoneal Dialysis, 19 years and over

2012-13

Added in 2012-13

LD07B Satellite Haemodialysis or Filtration, with Access via Haemodialysis Catheter, with Blood-borne Virus, 18 years and under

LD08B Satellite Haemodialysis or Filtration, with Access via Arteriovenous Fistula or Graft, with Blood-borne Virus, 18 years and under

LD13B Assisted Automated Peritoneal Dialysis, 18 years and under

LE01A Haemodialysis for Acute Kidney Injury, 19 years and over

LE01B Haemodialysis for Acute Kidney Injury, 18 years and under

LE02A Peritoneal Dialysis for Acute Kidney Injury, 19 years and over

LE02B Peritoneal Dialysis for Acute Kidney Injury, 18 years and under

2013-14

Removed from 2013-14

LD04B Hospital Haemodialysis/Filtration with access via arteriovenous fistula or graft with blood borne virus 18 years and under

LD07B Satellite Haemodialysis or Filtration, with Access via Haemodialysis Catheter, with Blood-borne Virus, 18 years and under

LD08B Satellite Haemodialysis or Filtration, with Access via Arteriovenous Fistula or Graft, with Blood-borne Virus, 18 years and under

2014-15

Removed from 2014-15

LE02B Peritoneal Dialysis for Acute Kidney Injury, 18 years and under

  1. In 1974 the County Borough of Teesside was abolished. The former historic county of Teesside is locally used to refer to the north east of England around the urban centre of Middlesbrough.

  1. In answering this question we used data for the two trusts within Teesside, North Tees and Hartlepool NHS Foundation Trust and South Tees Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. North Tees and Hartlepool NHS Foundation Trust had no data to answer this question.

  1. For each HRG or other currency in the reference cost collection, NHS hospital trusts submit a unit cost and amount of activity undertaken.
24th May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what the average cost to the NHS has been of providing a kidney transplant in (a) England and (b) Teesside in each year from 2010.

The information requested for Teeside is not available. However, such information as is available is shown in the table below and is from reference costs, which are the average unit cost to National Health Service trusts and foundation trusts of providing defined services in a given financial year. Reference costs are published annually, with most recently available data being for 2014-15.

Reference costs for acute care are published by healthcare resource group (HRG), which are standard groupings of similar treatments that use similar resources. The HRGs in the table below describe the average cost of providing a kidney transplant in a hospital setting.

Unit cost to NHS hospitals of providing a kidney transplant1 for England and Teesside2, 2010-11 to 2014-15

England

South Tees Hospital NHS Foundation Trust3

Pre-Transplant (£)

Transplant (£)

Post-Transplant (£)

Pre-Transplant (£)

Transplant (£)

Post-Transplant (£)

2010-11

947

16,228

381

N/A

N/A

N/A

2011-12

342

15,714

188

N/A

N/A

N/A

2012-13

406

15,774

260

115

N/A

120

2013-14

702

13,841

191

89

N/A

95

2014-15

400

12,398

211

76

N/A

116

Source: Reference costs, Department of Health

Notes:

  1. The following HRGs are included in the table:

2010-11 and 2011-12

LA01A Kidney Transplant 19 years and over from Cadaver non-Heart beating donor

LA01B Kidney Transplant 18 years and under from Cadaver non-Heart beating donor

LA02A Kidney Transplant 19 years and over from Cadaver Heart beating donor

LA02B Kidney Transplant 18 years and under from Cadaver Heart beating donor

LA03A Kidney Transplant 19 years and over from Live donor

LA03B Kidney Transplant 18 years and under from Live donor

LB46Z Live Donation of Kidney

LA10Z Live Kidney donor screening

LA11Z Kidney pre-transplantation work-up of live donor

LA12A Kidney pre-transplantation work-up of recipient 19 years and over

LA13A Examination for post-transplantation of Kidney of recipient 19 years and over

LA14Z Examination for post-transplantation of Kidney of live donor

2012-13 to 2014-15

LA01A Kidney Transplant 19 years and over from Cadaver non-Heart beating donor

LA01B Kidney Transplant 18 years and under from Cadaver non-Heart beating donor

LA02A Kidney Transplant 19 years and over from Cadaver Heart beating donor

LA02B Kidney Transplant 18 years and under from Cadaver Heart beating donor

LA03A Kidney Transplant 19 years and over from Live donor

LA03B Kidney Transplant 18 years and under from Live donor

LB46Z Live Donation of Kidney

LA10Z Live Kidney donor screening

LA11Z Kidney pre-transplantation work-up of live donor

LA12A Kidney pre-transplantation work-up of recipient 19 years and over

LA13A Examination for post-transplantation of Kidney of recipient 19 years and over

LA13B Examination for Post-Transplantation of Kidney of Recipient 18 years and under

LA14Z Examination for post-transplantation of Kidney of live donor

  1. In 1974 the County Borough of Teesside was abolished. The former historic county of Teesside is locally used to refer to the north east of England around the urban centre of Middlesbrough.

  1. In answering this question we used data for the two trusts within Teesside, North Tees and Hartlepool NHS Foundation Trust and South Tees Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. North Tees and Hartlepool NHS Foundation Trust had no data to answer this question, and from 2012-13 South Tees Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust began kidney transplant activity.

  1. For each HRG or other currency in the reference cost collection, NHS hospital trusts submit a unit cost and amount of activity undertaken.
27th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what information his Department holds on the socio-economic groups to which those deciding to have a termination of pregnancy after the 20 week scan of a neural tube defect-affected pregnancy belong.

Information on the socio-economic group for women having abortions is not collected centrally.

In 2014, 442 abortions were performed because of neural tube defects; 34% of these were performed at 20 weeks gestation or over.

27th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what proportion of pregnancies affected by neural tube defects are terminated after the 20 week scan.

Information on the socio-economic group for women having abortions is not collected centrally.

In 2014, 442 abortions were performed because of neural tube defects; 34% of these were performed at 20 weeks gestation or over.

27th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what meetings Ministers in his Department has had with industry since publication of the blood folate results in the National Diet and Nutrition Survey on 20 March 2015.

Details of all Ministerial meetings with external stakeholders are published quarterly in arrears on the GOV.UK website. This information is available at:

www.gov.uk/government/collections/ministerial-gifts-hospitality-overseas-travel-and-meetings

27th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, if he will make an assessment of the potential benefits for public health and the economy of introducing a birth defects prevention month and a folic acid awareness week similar to those operating in the United States of America.

We do not have any plans to introduce a birth defects prevention month and a folic acid awareness week similar to those operating in the United States of America.

In November 2015 the Government announced a national ambition to halve by 2030 the rates of stillbirths, neonatal and maternal deaths and brain injuries occurring during or soon after birth. On 7 March 2016 we launched Sign up to Safety - ‘Spotlight on Maternity,’ a guidance document that asks all trusts with maternity services to commit publically to placing a spotlight on maternity and to contributing towards achieving the Government’s national ambition.

We are looking at all aspects of preconception health to make sure every child gets the best start in life.

27th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what estimate he has made of the proportion of pregnancies that are unplanned.

There is no data that assesses whether a pregnancy is unplanned. However, the findings from the third National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles published in the Lancet in November 2013 estimated that 16.2% of pregnancies are unplanned.

The full article can be found at:

http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(13)62035-8/abstract

20th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what research his Department has commissioned on the causes and consequences of neural tube defect-affected pregnancies.

The Department has not recently commissioned specific research on the causes and consequences of neural tube defect-affected pregnancies.

The Department funds the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR). A pilot randomised controlled trial led by researchers at the NIHR Biomedical Research Centre at Great Ormond Street Hospital and University College London suggests that women at risk of having children with neural tube defects may be able to reduce this risk by taking inositol (Vitamin B8) as well as folic acid during pregnancy. The findings were published in February in the British Journal of Nutrition.

19th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what recent discussions Ministers of his Department have had with counterparts in non-EU states on policies and steps to reduce the number of neural tube defect-affected pregnancies.

We are not aware that any Ministers have attended any formal meetings with countries outside the European Union member states where policies on reducing the number of neural tube affected pregnancies have been discussed.

19th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, by what date he expects that the population of England will be covered by the National Congenital Anomaly and Rare Disease Registration Service.

Public Health England achieved complete national coverage for the National Congenital Anomalies and Rare Disease Registration Service in April 2016.

19th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what comparative information his Department holds on the rate of pregnancies affected by neural tube defects in the UK and in other EU member states.

The prevalence of neural tube defects in live births, fetal deaths (over 20 weeks’ gestation) and terminations of pregnancy for fetal anomaly in 2012 in the British Isles Network of Congenital Anomaly Registers, registers (covering 36% of the births in England and Wales) was 12.5 per 10,000 births (source: Congenital anomaly statistics 2012, England and Wales (2014)).

In European Surveillance of Congenital Anomalies registries (covering 25.8% of the births in the United Kingdom) the prevalence of neural tube defects in 2012 for the UK was 12.53 neural tube defects per 10,000 births. By comparison, other European Union member states ranged from 1.75 per 10,000 births to 17.37 per 10,000 births. Differences in total prevalence rates may reflect a number of factors including genetic and environmental differences.

Data on prevalence is available at:

http://www.eurocat-network.eu/AccessPrevalenceData/PrevalenceTables

18th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, whether the postcodes for the addresses of mothers of babies born with congenital abnormalities are available on the British Isles Network of Congenital Anomaly Registers.

The National Congenital Anomaly and Rare Disease Registration Service (NCARDRS) is operated by Public Health England. NCARDRS has legal permission to collect patient identifiable data without the need for individual consent. As part of this dataset, patient postcodes for individuals resident in England are recorded on the NCARDRS congenital anomaly database. Protection of individual patient data is paramount and release of this data, including postcode data, is strictly controlled.

18th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what procedures are in place to monitor the take-up of advice on NHS websites on prevention of spina bifida.

Information on the number of live births affected by congenital abnormalities including spina bifida, hydrocephalus and anencephaly has been collected by the British Isles Network of Congenital Anomaly Registers and is currently available for the years 2009–2012 at:

http://www.binocar.org/publications/reports

There are no current mechanisms in place for monitoring the take-up of advice given on the NHS Choices website about preventing spina bifida.

18th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many live births of children affected by (a) spina bifida, (b) hydrocephaly and (c) anencephaly there have been in each of the last five years.

Information on the number of live births affected by congenital abnormalities including spina bifida, hydrocephalus and anencephaly has been collected by the British Isles Network of Congenital Anomaly Registers and is currently available for the years 2009–2012 at:

http://www.binocar.org/publications/reports

There are no current mechanisms in place for monitoring the take-up of advice given on the NHS Choices website about preventing spina bifida.

13th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what steps he is taking to ensure the improved performance of the North East Ambulance NHS Trust in meeting its response time targets.

We expect all National Health Service ambulance trusts, including the North East Ambulance Service NHS Foundation Trust, to take action to ensure they meet the response time targets, and that commissioners oversee and support this process.

Ambulance services are facing unprecedented demand, delivering over 2,800 more emergency journeys every day compared to 2010 and still continue to respond to the majority of life-threatening cases in under eight minutes.

The Department continues to work closely with NHS England and NHS Improvement to monitor and support performance across all ambulance trusts in 2016-17. In the longer term, NHS England’s Urgent and Emergency Care Review will aim to tackle the root causes of the increasing demand on urgent and emergency care services.

21st Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what steps his Department is taking to promote awareness across NHS trusts in England of preventative measures to reduce the risk of atrial fibrillation-related strokes.

Public Health England’s (PHE) programme on ‘Stroke and vascular dementia prevention for people with atrial fibrillation’ works with key stakeholders to increase prioritisation for the prevention of atrial fibrillation related strokes.


PHE’s National Cardiovascular Intelligence Network contributed to the development of atrial fibrillation intelligence packs to help commissioners to identify where improvements can be made to reduce the risk of stroke by improving the detection and treatment of atrial fibrillation.


The NHS Health Checks best practice guidance recommends that a pulse check is carried out as part of the process of taking a blood pressure reading and those individuals who are found to have an irregular pulse rhythm should be referred to a general practitioner for further investigation.


Recent research shows that, due to the NHS Health Check and appropriate clinical treatment, 2,500 people will have avoided a major cardiovascular event such as heart attack or stroke over the last five years.


To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department are taking to reduce patient waiting lists for mental health services in England.

The Government published Achieving Better Access to Mental Health Services by 2020 in autumn 2014.

The publication was backed by -

- £80 million of funding in 2015-16 to deliver:

­ Treatment within six weeks for 75% of people referred to the Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) programme, with 95% of people being treated within 18 weeks (introduced in April 2015); and

­ Treatment within two weeks for more than 50% of people experiencing a first episode of psychosis (introduced in April 2016).

The National Health Service is currently exceeding its mental health access standards.

For IAPT, as at November 2017, of those people completing treatment, 89.1% of people waited less than six weeks (exceeding the 75% target) and of those people completing treatment, 98.8% of people waited less than 18 weeks (exceeding the 95% target).

For Early Intervention in Psychosis, as at January 2017, the NHS is exceeding the target with 69.3% of patients starting treatment within two weeks.

For Eating Disorders – The Department is investing £30 million a year to 2020 to support clinical commissioning groups in developing and enhancing eating disorder services for children and young people so that by 2020/21, 95% of young people in need of an eating disorders service will be seen within four weeks, and one week in urgent cases. The NHS is on track to meet this standard. As at Q3 (October-December 2017) 76.9% of patients started urgent treatment within one week and 83.1% of patients started routine treatment within four weeks.

10th Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, if he will make it his policy to prevent any Minister or official of HM Government from (a) using accommodation, (b) attending any event at a Dorchester Collection hotel until (i) the Dorchester Collection is no longer under ownership of the Brunei Investment Agency or (b) he is satisfied that Brunei has a legal system that protects universal human rights.

​As I stated in the Westminster Hall debate on Brunei on 10 April, the British Government does not support calls for an economic boycott. This includes the Brunei Investment Agency-owned businesses, including the Dorchester Hotel in London. We believe that open and honest discussions best support our efforts to encourage Brunei to uphold its international human rights obligations, and to respect individual freedoms.

22nd Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what representations he has made to the Government of Democratic Republic of Congo on working conditions for children involved in the mining of cobalt.

The UK is concerned about working conditions for children involved in the mining of cobalt in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC).

The DRC is a Foreign and Commonwealth Office Human Rights Priority Country. We will continue to encourage the DRC Government to take concrete steps to improve respect for human rights. Through our existing and future programming in DRC, we hope to eradicate child labour in the mines in the long term.

DFID is working to tackle the root causes of child labour in the mining sector in the DRC. DFID collaborates closely with other Government Departments and through a European Partnership for Responsible Minerals. We provide funding to the Carter Center in the DRC to improve transparency and governance of the sector. DFID DRC is also working with other international partners to consider how we might tackle the issues in the cobalt supply chain in future programme design.

22nd Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what representations he has made to the Democratic Republic of Congo on upholding Article 32.1 of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child.

The UK actively encourages countries to uphold Article 32.1 of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child. The UK was among the main sponsors of the annual resolution at the Human Rights Council on the Rights of the Child in March 2017 and we are already working on the Rights of the Child Resolution ahead of the Human Rights Council session in March 2018. The UK actively encourages International Labour Organisation (ILO) member states, including the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), to fulfil their ILO obligations and work towards ratifying and meeting the provisions of the core ILO conventions. This includes ILO conventions relating to child labour.

20th Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what discussions he has had with officials (a) of the European Commission, (b) the EU member states and (c) of the European Parliament on the regulation of social media operators.

The Foreign Secretary, my Rt Hon. Friend the Member for Uxbridge and South Ruislip (Mr Johnson) has had no such discussions.

24th Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what discussions his Department has had with HM Treasury on the potential effect of the UK leaving the EU on the economy.

The Government's view is that the UK will be stronger, safer and better off remaining in a reformed EU.

The Chancellor, my Rt Hon. Friend the Member for Tatton, has announced that the Treasury will publish a comprehensive analysis of the long-term economic costs and benefits of EU membership and the risks associated with an exit.

23rd Mar 2017
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will make it his policy to encourage retailers to abolish charges for customers using card payments for transactions.

Merchants currently pay a merchant service charge to process all card transactions. Part of this covers the fees that a merchant acquirer can be charged by a card issuing bank for processing transactions known as interchange fees. The Interchange Fee Regulation (IFR), which came into force in December 2015, caps the fees that could be passed on to consumers from merchants in the form of higher prices at 0.2% and 0.3% for debit and credit cards respectively.

The Government has been clear that it would like to see merchants passing on these savings to their customers so that they continue to benefit from the interchange fee caps.

From January 2018, the Payment Services Directive 2 introduces a ban on surcharging which means that retailers will no longer be able to charge consumers to use payment instruments for which interchange fees are regulated, which includes the majority of consumer debit and credit cards.

18th Jan 2017
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps he is taking to ensure the appropriate administration of payments of child benefit in circumstances where there are disputes relating to which parent receives payment.

Where there are disputes relating to which parent receives payment of Child Benefit, HM Revenue and Customs will consider each claim in line with its guidance, which is available at: https://www.gov.uk/hmrc-internal-manuals/child-benefit-technical-manual/cbtm08030

The GOV.UK website also provides advice for people involved in these cases at: https://www.gov.uk/child-benefit-child-lives-with-someone-else

14th Oct 2016
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of the timeframe to implement the Apprenticeship Levy; and what steps he is taking to ensure that businesses affected by the levy are given adequate time to make adjustments.

From April 2017 the government will introduce a levy to fund the step change needed to achieve 3 million apprenticeship starts and an uplift in their quality by 2020. The systems required to implement this in time for April 2017 are on track and are being tested on a regular basis. This includes progress by both HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC), with regards to the collection of the levy, and from the Skills Funding Agency who are building the digital accounts for employers to access levy funds.

The Department for Education has issued guidance for employers regarding the apprenticeship levy. Further guidance, confirming the funding policy, will be published shortly. HMRC has also issued guidance to software developers to ensure that employers’ payroll systems are ready for the apprenticeship levy and will publish further guidance for employers in December.

The government have been working with employers and training providers since the concept of the apprenticeship levy was introduced to ensure that it works for them. These conversations have played a major part in shaping how the apprenticeship levy will work and we will continue these discussions to assist employers and providers as they prepare for the introduction of the levy.

13th Sep 2016
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps he is taking to ensure that Teesside is not disadvantaged by the withdrawal of EU funding when the UK leaves the EU.

To ensure stability and certainty in the period leading up to our departure from the EU, the Chancellor has announced that structural and investment fund projects in the UK that are signed before the Autumn Statement will be guaranteed. In addition, projects where UK organisations bid directly and competitively for EU funding, such as Horizon 2020 funded projects, will be guaranteed by the UK Government if the bids are won before our departure.

Leaving the EU means we will want to take our own decisions about how to deliver the policy objectives previously targeted by EU funding. Over the coming months, we will consult closely with stakeholders to review all EU funding schemes in the round, to ensure that any ongoing funding commitments best serve the UK‘s national interest, while ensuring appropriate investor certainty.

13th Nov 2015
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether the Enterprise Investment Scheme, Venture Capital Trust, tax relief or Seed Enterprise Investment Scheme have offered low-risk investment opportunities in energy generation; and what his Department's definition of low-risk is in this context.

The purpose of the tax-advantaged venture capital schemes is to provide funding to smaller, higher-risk companies that would otherwise struggle to access finance to develop and grow. To target the schemes at these companies, and to ensure investment is not crowded out by low-risk investment opportunities, the schemes exclude certain activities from qualifying for investment under the schemes.


The list of excluded activities is updated as necessary to exclude activities that are able to access finance from the market and which may therefore be regarded as lower risk. These include asset-backed activities, such as property dealing and development, leasing of assets or exploiting acquired copyrights, general financial and professional services, and financing activities that can divert the tax reliefs to non-qualifying activities. For these activities, a lack of proven track record is unlikely to affect the company’s ability to access finance. In addition, such activities are likely to have collateral against which loans can be secured.


In recent years, the Government has been concerned about the disproportionate amount of tax-advantaged investment in certain energy generation activities. Their asset-backed nature makes it easier for these activities to access mainstream finance. Therefore the Government has taken several steps to exclude certain types of energy generation from the schemes, including in 2012, 2014 and 2015.


The Government keeps all tax-advantaged venture capital schemes under review, and makes changes where necessary to ensure the schemes remain well-targeted and effective.

11th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate he has made of the number migrants working in the UK on Tier 2 skilled worker visas who have had their indefinite leave to remain removed due to exceeding the 20-day annual limit on unpaid leave from work in each of the last five years for which figures are available.

Tier 2 migrants who have indefinite leave to remain are not subject to any leave conditions, so cannot have it removed due to undertaking more than four weeks of unpaid leave.

11th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate he has made of the number migrants working in the UK on Tier 2 skilled worker visas who have had their indefinite leave to remain removed due to exceeding the 20-day annual limit on unpaid leave from work where strike absence was taken in each of the last five years for which figures are available.

Tier 2 migrants who have indefinite leave to remain are not subject to any leave conditions, so cannot have it removed due to undertaking more than four weeks of unpaid leave.

13th Apr 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she is taking to ensure that the decision-making process for asylum claims takes full account of the extent of abuse and torture which applicants may have endured.

All members of staff who make decisions in asylum receive training on international and domestic law and safeguarding issues supplemented by a mentoring programme with an experienced caseworker that can last up to 6 months. Within the training there are specific sections that detail torture and Medico Legal Reports and how they should be used and analysed in asylum claims.

The Home Office are working closely with Freedom from Torture and other key partners to review and make further improvements to the decision making process and training relating to asylum claims involving survivors of abuse and torture.

9th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what her policy is on social media platforms which operate in the UK but are based in the US reporting communications sent via their service which might pertain to an imminent threat to national security of the UK to the FBI rather than to a UK security agency.

We believe that companies such as social media platforms should proactively prevent their services from being abused by terrorists and other individuals who pose a threat to our national security by detecting and removing terrorist material. Where such material indicates there is an imminent threat to UK national security, they should report that content to our law enforcement or security and intelligence agencies. Ministers and officials continually raise these issues with social media platforms who are based abroad.

The UK Government is already doing what it can to identify and disrupt terrorist and extremist abuse of the internet. Since 2010, the police Counter Terrorism Internet Referral Unit (CTIRU) has worked with industry to secure the removal of over 250,000 pieces of terrorist content. Industry cooperation with CTIRU has significantly improved leading to faster and more consistent removal of referred content. CTIRU have established relationships with over 300 Communication Service Providers of differing sizes and removals at the request of CTIRU have increased from around 60 items a month in 2010, when CTIRU was first established, to on average of over 8000 a month in 2016. These arrangements mean that where companies take action this removes access to terrorist and extremist content from the whole platform, not just for users accessing it from within a particular jurisdiction, and therefore has a world-wide benefit.

However, although industry have taken some positive steps to address this issue, the internet is still being used to recruit, radicalise, incite and inspire and Governments cannot tackle this alone. Industry has both a social responsibility to tackle this threat and the technical expertise necessary to do so.

Ben Wallace
Secretary of State for Defence
9th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will bring forward legislative proposals to require operators of social media platforms to report communications sent via their service which could reasonably be interpreted as containing content which pertains to an imminent threat to the national security of the UK to the Metropolitan Police Counter Terrorism Command.

We believe that companies such as social media platforms should proactively prevent their services from being abused by terrorists and other individuals who pose a threat to our national security by detecting and removing terrorist material. Where such material indicates there is an imminent threat to UK national security, they should report that content to our law enforcement or security and intelligence agencies. Ministers and officials continually raise these issues with social media platforms who are based abroad.

The UK Government is already doing what it can to identify and disrupt terrorist and extremist abuse of the internet. Since 2010, the police Counter Terrorism Internet Referral Unit (CTIRU) has worked with industry to secure the removal of over 250,000 pieces of terrorist content. Industry cooperation with CTIRU has significantly improved leading to faster and more consistent removal of referred content. CTIRU have established relationships with over 300 Communication Service Providers of differing sizes and removals at the request of CTIRU have increased from around 60 items a month in 2010, when CTIRU was first established, to on average of over 8000 a month in 2016. These arrangements mean that where companies take action this removes access to terrorist and extremist content from the whole platform, not just for users accessing it from within a particular jurisdiction, and therefore has a world-wide benefit.

However, although industry have taken some positive steps to address this issue, the internet is still being used to recruit, radicalise, incite and inspire and Governments cannot tackle this alone. Industry has both a social responsibility to tackle this threat and the technical expertise necessary to do so.

Ben Wallace
Secretary of State for Defence
9th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will bring forward legislative proposals to require operators of social media platforms to report communications sent via their service which are either indecent images or videos of children or messages which would lead to the sexual grooming of a child to a relevant police force.

It is right that all social media platforms put appropriate mechanisms in place to prevent the abuse of their legitimate platforms and services by those who would do children harm. In the UK, the UK Council for Child Internet Safety brings together parents, charities, industry and government to respond to issues of online safety, including child sexual abuse. In 2015, the UK Council for Child Internet Safety (UKCCIS) published a practical guide for providers of social media and interactive services.

The guide has examples of good practice from leading technology companies (e.g. Twitter, Facebook, YouTube), and advice from NGOs and other online child safety experts. Its purpose is to encourage businesses to think about “safety by design” to help make their platforms safer for children and young people under 18. That guidance covers the steps to identify and deal with child sexual abuse content or illegal sexual contact. A number of social media companies are also members of the EU ICT Coalition. This is a European industry initiative to make members’ platforms safer for users. Members self-declare how they meet the guiding principles, and are subject to a review by an external auditor. These principles include child abuse and/or illegal contact.

22nd Feb 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of whether Cleveland Police conducted any surveillance under the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000 during Operation Sacristy in such a way as to have potentially compromised that investigation.

Operation Sacristy was an investigation that was conducted independently of the Home Office involving a number of organisations and agencies, including the Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC). As such we cannot provide specific detail on this operation.

The Office of Surveillance Commissioners oversee the use of surveillance powers by public authorities under the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
21st Feb 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what measures were in place to ensure that members of the Cleveland Police Authority were required to declare any relevant business interests arising from procurement or outsourcing partnership arrangements instigated by Cleveland Police prior to Operation Sacristy.

The responsibilities in respect of financial management of police authorities and, since their creation by the Police Reform and Social Responsibility Act 2012, local policing bodies are set out in legislation and financial Codes of Practice.

Prior to the creation of Police and Crime Commissioners, Police Authorities were required to adhere to the Code of Practice on Financial Management for policing, which was issued in October 2000 under Section 39 of the Police Act 1996. This Code set out the requirements and obligations of police authorities and has since been withdrawn.

The Financial Management Code of Practice (FMCP), published in October 2013, provides clarity around the financial governance arrangements within the police in England and Wales. It sets out the responsibilities of the Chief Finance Officer of the PCC and of the Chief Constable who each have a personal fiduciary duty by virtue of their appointment as the person responsible for proper financial administration under the Police Reform and Social Responsibility Act 2011. This includes requirements and formal powers to safeguard lawfulness and propriety in expenditure.

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/252720/fm_code_of_practice.pdf

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
21st Feb 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what measures were in place to ensure that members of the Cleveland Police Authority did not benefit financially from any procurement or outsourcing partnership arrangements instigated by Cleveland Police prior to Operation Sacristy.

The responsibilities in respect of financial management of police authorities and, since their creation by the Police Reform and Social Responsibility Act 2012, local policing bodies are set out in legislation and financial Codes of Practice.

Prior to the creation of Police and Crime Commissioners, Police Authorities were required to adhere to the Code of Practice on Financial Management for policing, which was issued in October 2000 under Section 39 of the Police Act 1996. This Code set out the requirements and obligations of police authorities and has since been withdrawn.

The Financial Management Code of Practice (FMCP), published in October 2013, provides clarity around the financial governance arrangements within the police in England and Wales. It sets out the responsibilities of the Chief Finance Officer of the PCC and of the Chief Constable who each have a personal fiduciary duty by virtue of their appointment as the person responsible for proper financial administration under the Police Reform and Social Responsibility Act 2011. This includes requirements and formal powers to safeguard lawfulness and propriety in expenditure.

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/252720/fm_code_of_practice.pdf

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
21st Feb 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the effectiveness of the anti-corruption strategies that Cleveland Police had in place in accordance with the ACPO police integrity model prior to Operation Sacristy.

Operation Sacristy was an investigation that was conducted independently of the Home Office involving a number of organisations and agencies, including the Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC). As such we cannot provide specific detail on this operation or its terms of reference.

In 2014 Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary (HMIC) reported on the extent to which Cleveland Police Force had put in place arrangements to ensure its workforce acts with integrity as part of its Police Integrity and Corruption Programme available at:

https://www.justiceinspectorates.gov.uk/hmic/wp-content/uploads/cleveland-crime-and-integrity.pdf

HMIC produced further findings as part of its 2016 Legitimacy programme, which included an assessment of how well the force ensures that its workforce behaves ethically and lawfully. The 2016 Cleveland report is available: https://www.justiceinspectorates.gov.uk/hmic/wp-content/uploads/peel-police-legitimacy-2016-cleveland.pdf

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
21st Feb 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the effectiveness of Operation Sacristy in (a) identifying instances of corruption in Cleveland Police and (b) preventing future such corruption.

Operation Sacristy was an investigation that was conducted independently of the Home Office involving a number of organisations and agencies, including the Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC). As such we cannot provide specific detail on this operation or its terms of reference.

In 2014 Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary (HMIC) reported on the extent to which Cleveland Police Force had put in place arrangements to ensure its workforce acts with integrity as part of its Police Integrity and Corruption Programme available at:

https://www.justiceinspectorates.gov.uk/hmic/wp-content/uploads/cleveland-crime-and-integrity.pdf

HMIC produced further findings as part of its 2016 Legitimacy programme, which included an assessment of how well the force ensures that its workforce behaves ethically and lawfully. The 2016 Cleveland report is available: https://www.justiceinspectorates.gov.uk/hmic/wp-content/uploads/peel-police-legitimacy-2016-cleveland.pdf

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
21st Feb 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what discussions have taken place between HM Inspectorate of Constabulary and the Chief Constable of Cleveland Police on the terms of reference for Operation Sacristy; and what representations she has received on potential concerns raised by the Chief Constable of Cleveland Police on those terms of reference during those negotiations.

Operation Sacristy was an investigation that was conducted independently of the Home Office involving a number of organisations and agencies, including the Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC). As such we cannot provide specific detail on this operation or its terms of reference.

In 2014 Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary (HMIC) reported on the extent to which Cleveland Police Force had put in place arrangements to ensure its workforce acts with integrity as part of its Police Integrity and Corruption Programme available at:

https://www.justiceinspectorates.gov.uk/hmic/wp-content/uploads/cleveland-crime-and-integrity.pdf

HMIC produced further findings as part of its 2016 Legitimacy programme, which included an assessment of how well the force ensures that its workforce behaves ethically and lawfully. The 2016 Cleveland report is available: https://www.justiceinspectorates.gov.uk/hmic/wp-content/uploads/peel-police-legitimacy-2016-cleveland.pdf

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
21st Feb 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she has taken to ensure that (a) evidence was not destroyed and (b) witnesses were not intimidated by members of Cleveland Police during Operation Sacristy.

We do not comment on operational decisions by forces investigating crime and therefore cannot provide specific detail on this operation. The management of witnesses during any investigation by a law enforcement agency should be compliant with the Victims Code (2015) and Witness Charter (2013), this ensures a minimum level of service to all victims and witnesses.

Where intimidation is identified, measures can be taken in accordance with the Victims’ Code and Witness Charter to mitigate risk. Where the risk to a victim or witness is deemed serious and ongoing, management may be provided by the UK Protected Persons Service (UKPPS). The UKPPS can neither confirm nor deny individuals as protected persons to preserve their anonymity and safety.

Operational decisions in relation to the retention of evidence by law enforcement agencies is governed by the Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984 and Criminal Procedure and Investigations Act 1996.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
21st Feb 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department took to protect witnesses during the Operation Sacristy investigation into corruption allegations at Cleveland Police Authority.

We do not comment on operational decisions by forces investigating crime and therefore cannot provide specific detail on this operation. The management of witnesses during any investigation by a law enforcement agency should be compliant with the Victims Code (2015) and Witness Charter (2013), this ensures a minimum level of service to all victims and witnesses.

Where intimidation is identified, measures can be taken in accordance with the Victims’ Code and Witness Charter to mitigate risk. Where the risk to a victim or witness is deemed serious and ongoing, management may be provided by the UK Protected Persons Service (UKPPS). The UKPPS can neither confirm nor deny individuals as protected persons to preserve their anonymity and safety.

Operational decisions in relation to the retention of evidence by law enforcement agencies is governed by the Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984 and Criminal Procedure and Investigations Act 1996.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
17th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many family visitor visas have been refused in each year since 2010 on account of reasonable doubt that the applicant for such a visa will leave the UK at the end of the visa period.

I am sorry but the Home Office does not hold the specific information in the format you have requested.

In order to determine the number of refusals for the reasons you have stated, the department would have to interrogate individual case records, at disproportionate cost.

17th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she is taking to ensure that the family visitor visa application process is clear and comprehensible to people using that process.

The Home Office website contains detailed guidance for customers on the process of applying for a visa.

Customer service is a key priority for UK Visas and Immigration, and the efficiency and effectiveness of the visa application process is kept under regular review, including by the Independent Chief Inspector of Borders and Immigration. Feedback from customers and partners assists us in continuously improving the services we offer. For example, during 2016 we rolled out a new and more intuitive online visa application process, Access UK.

17th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what criteria are used to determine whether an applicant is likely to leave the UK by the end-date of a family visitor visa.

Applications for a visa to travel to the UK to visit family are considered on their merits, in accordance with the requirements set out in Appendix V to the Immigration Rules, taking into account the information and supporting documents provided in the application.

It is for the applicant to satisfy the decision maker that they meet those requirements, including that they are a genuine visitor. A genuine visitor is a person who will leave the UK at the end of the visit, will not live in the UK for extended periods or make the UK their main home, has sufficient funds for their support during the visit and who intends to undertake permitted visit activities and not prohibited activities. The assessment of the genuineness of a visitor relates to the particular factors of the individual application, but may include the applicant’s personal and economic ties to their country of residence.

14th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many meetings Ministers of her Department have had with social media companies to discuss harmful online content since May 2015.

Home Office Ministers routinely meet with a range of stakeholders, including social media companies, to discuss action to protect people from harmful online content. Ministers also meet social media companies on specific issues such as online hate crime and extremism.

In addition, they attend meetings of the UK Council for Child Internet Safety (UKCCIS), which brings together industry, law enforcement, academia, charities, parenting groups and government departments and meets on a regular basis.

14th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many police cautions have been issued for offences under (a) section 127 of the Communications Act 2003 and (b) section 1 of the Malicious Communications Act 1988.

Information going back to 2005 on police cautions for these offences has been published here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/criminal-justice-system-statistics-quarterly-december-2015

Data stretching further back is held by the Ministry of Justice, which is the department responsible for police caution figures.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
14th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what representations she has received from women's groups on the problems associated with harmful speech on the internet.

The Home Office routinely meets with women’s groups to discuss a range of issues around ending violence against women and girls, including problems associated with harmful speech on the internet. The Government continues to work closely with social media companies and other relevant stakeholders and experts to make sure they are doing all they can to protect those who use their platforms.

18th Jul 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department is taking to tackle online abuse on social media.

The Criminal Justice Act 2015 strengthened two existing communications offences: section 1 of the Malicious Communications Act 1988, and section 127 of the Communications Act 2003 which can now be used to prosecute misuse of social media. The police now have longer to investigate either offence, and the maximum penalty for the former has been increased to two years imprisonment.

We have introduced a new law to make ‘revenge porn’ a specific criminal offence. Those convicted will face a maximum sentence of 2 years in prison. We have already seen convictions under this legislation and will continue to monitor its effectiveness.

To improve police capability, the Home Office has allocated £4.6m of the Police Transformation Fund to begin the critical work of setting up a comprehensive programme of digital transformation across policing. This money will help provide a step-change in digital capability, funding police led programmes that will work to equip forces with the tools to effectively police a digital age and protect victims of digital crime.

We are also working with the College of Policing to drive improvements in police capability to investigate and prosecute online Violence against Women and Girls offences. For example, we have introduced an ‘online flag’ allowing police forces to record instances of crimes such as stalking and harassment taking place online.

We are driving work through the UK Council for Child Internet Safety (UKCCIS) to keep children and young people safe online. UKCCIS brings together industry, law enforcement, academia, charities and parenting groups to help to keep children and young people safe online.

4th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many (a) nurseries and (b) primary schools there are on Armed Forces bases in the UK.

The requested information is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

23rd Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what steps he is taking to ensure the welfare of regimental animals in the armed forces; and if he will make it his policy to ensure that regimental animals are properly looked after once they have left active service.

There are currently nine regimental mascots within Her Majesty's Armed Forces, all of them in the Army. Like all animals employed within Defence, each regimental mascot is provided with food, bedding, veterinary services and reasonable accommodation. Professional veterinary advice is provided in relation to each animal's health and welfare needs and each is subject to annual inspection by a veterinary officer. All mascots are cared for by the regiments they serve. Most serve until they are deceased, however for those that do retire, a suitable home is found.

17th Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what recent assessment he has made of the trends in the levels of penalties charged by private parking operators.

In order to access Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency data, parking operators must belong to one of two trade bodies, the British Parking Association (BPA) or the International Parking Community (IPC). Both the BPA and the IPC cap the maximum penalty a private parking operator can apply at £100, with a mandatory 40 per cent reduction if payment is received within two weeks of a Parking Charge Notice being issued.

The Government supports Sir Greg Knights’ Parking (Code of Practice) Bill, which seeks to create a single code of practice for the parking industry. Should the Bill pass, there will be an opportunity to consider obligations on private parking operators, including the maximum level of penalty they can charge.

Rishi Sunak
Chancellor of the Exchequer
15th Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what steps he is taking to protect vulnerable road users from inappropriate parking penalties in private car parks.

The Government supports Sir Greg Knight's Private Members’ Bill, the Parking (Code of Practice) Bill, which seeks to create an independent code of practice for private parking companies and a single body for parking appeals. If a parking company was to repeatedly break this code, then their access to the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) data would be blocked. This data includes information on the vehicle keeper, so a company blocked from accessing it would be unable to pursue parking charges. I spoke at the Bill’s Third Reading in the Commons to voice the Government’s support and it has now passed to the House of Lords.

Rishi Sunak
Chancellor of the Exchequer
15th Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what recent assessment he has made of trends in the level of use of private parking operators by GP surgeries.

GPs are independent contractors, and are responsible for their own premises, as well as any arrangements they make for providing and managing car parking or other aspects of accessing their estate.

Rishi Sunak
Chancellor of the Exchequer
1st Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, with reference to paragraph 4.88 of Budget 2018 Red Book, what powers the Government plans to confer on the South Tees special economic area.

The South Tees site will be designated as a Special Economic Area which will enable the local retention of additional business rates growth. Redcar and Cleveland Borough Council will continue to collect 50 per cent of all business rates in respect of those properties currently situated within the proposed boundary of the Special Economic Area, in line with the current operation of the Business Rates retention System.

In addition, once the Special Economic Area is established in statute, Redcar and Cleveland Borough Council will retain 100 per cent of all business rates growth obtained within that same area. This additional funding can then be used by the South Tees Development Corporation and Redcar and Cleveland Borough Council to reinvest in local economic growth.

Rishi Sunak
Chancellor of the Exchequer
1st Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, with reference to paragraph 4.88 of Budget 2018 Redbook, whether business rates that will be transferred to the proposed South Tees special economic area will include business rates currently retained by Redcar and Cleveland Borough Council.

The South Tees site will be designated as a Special Economic Area which will enable the local retention of additional business rates growth. Redcar and Cleveland Borough Council will continue to collect 50 per cent of all business rates in respect of those properties currently situated within the proposed boundary of the Special Economic Area, in line with the current operation of the Business Rates retention System.

In addition, once the Special Economic Area is established in statute, Redcar and Cleveland Borough Council will retain 100 per cent of all business rates growth obtained within that same area. This additional funding can then be used by the South Tees Development Corporation and Redcar and Cleveland Borough Council to reinvest in local economic growth.

Rishi Sunak
Chancellor of the Exchequer
29th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, when his Department plans to publish its post-legislative memorandum on the Localism Act 2011.

Work is currently underway on a memorandum setting out the Department’s post-legislative scrutiny assessment of the Localism Act 2011. This will be submitted to the Housing, Communities and Local Government Select Committee and published in due course.

Rishi Sunak
Chancellor of the Exchequer
14th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what estimate his Department has made of the number of people sleeping rough in (a) Redcar and Cleveland, (b) the North East and (c) England for each of the last five years for which figures are available.

Annual rough sleeping counts and estimates data can be found in table 1 of our published live table:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/593685/Rough_Sleeping_Autumn_2016_Final_Tables.xls

This Government is determined to do more to reduce the number of people sleeping rough. We have established a new Rough Sleeping and Homelessness Reduction Taskforce, chaired by the Secretary of State, which will drive forward the implementation of a cross-Government strategy to tackle this issue.

We have allocated over £1 billion through to 2020 to support these efforts including piloting a Housing First approach for some of the most entrenched rough sleepers in the 3 major areas of England – including the Liverpool City Region. We are also implementing the Homelessness Reduction Act, the biggest change to homelessness legislation in decades, which will require councils to provide early support to people at risk of homelessness and rough sleeping.

Marcus Jones
Vice Chamberlain (HM Household) (Whip, House of Commons)
14th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what proportion of local authorities' budgets have been spent on children's services by (a) Redcar and Cleveland Borough Council, (b) local authorities in the North East and (c) local authorities in England in each of the last five years.

Annual expenditure data by each local authority for all services, including children’s services, are published on the Department’s website at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/local-authority-revenue-expenditure-and-financing

Marcus Jones
Vice Chamberlain (HM Household) (Whip, House of Commons)
13th Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what assessment he has made of the deliverability of the recommendations of the independent report, Tees Valley: Opportunity Unlimited, published in June 2016; and what the timetable is for his Department to respond to those recommendations and set out a schedule for the implementation of any recommendations which are accepted.

Government is currently working with Tees Valley Combined Authority on progressing Lord Heseltine's recommendations. The report was debated in Parliament on 15 June.

https://hansard.parliament.uk/Commons/2016-06-5/debates/16061550000002/TeesValleyInwardInvestmentInitiative#contribution-16061550000452

13th Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what steps he is taking to ensure that there is trades union representation on the Shadow Board of the South Tees Mayoral Development Corporation.

The Shadow Board of the South Tees Development Corporation is at an early stage of its development, we have no plans to amend its carefully considered membership at this point.

18th Jul 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what estimate he has made of the number of people rough sleeping in Redcar and Cleveland in each year since 2010.

One person without a home is one too many and we are committed to doing all we can to prevent homelessness. That is why we have increased central investment to tackle homelessness over the next four years to £139 million. This includes a new £10 million fund to support innovative ways to prevent and reduce rough sleeping, and a new £10 million Social Impact Bond to support rough sleepers with the most complex needs. We also announced at Budget £100 million of funding for low-cost move-on accommodation, including for rough sleepers leaving hostels.

DCLG publishes annual statistics on the number of people seen sleeping rough on a single night by local authority. These are available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/homelessness-statistics

Marcus Jones
Vice Chamberlain (HM Household) (Whip, House of Commons)
13th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what assessment he has made of the effect of changes to business rate relief on the charity sector.

The Government is continuing to consider representations, including on business rates reliefs, to inform decisions on reform of the business rates system. The Government has confirmed the review will conclude by the end of the year.

Marcus Jones
Vice Chamberlain (HM Household) (Whip, House of Commons)
23rd Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what recent assessment he has made of the performance of the Troubled Families programme.

As the Prime Minister announced on 22 June, local authorities have just reported final results for the original Troubled Families Programme to us. They show that 99% of families targeted have had their lives turned around. My assessment is that is a great success.

24th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what plans his Department has for the future funding of independent legal advice for (a) parents and (b) kinship carers involved in the child welfare and family justice system after April 2020.

In the Legal Support Action plan published in February 2019 the Government committed to increase the scope for legal aid in family law cases to cover all Special Guardianship Orders in private family law cases; and removing the means test for those with parental responsibility to oppose placement or adoption orders in family law proceedings.

To support those with family law problems who are not in scope for Legal Aid the government is doubling the funding for the Litigants in Person Support Strategy to £3m for the next two years, to ensure those representing themselves in court understand the process and are better supported through it.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
7th Feb 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, if she will commence section 67 of the Serious Crime Act 2015.

The Government is committed to commencing section 67 of the Serious Crime Act 2015 and will do so as soon as possible.

30th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, if she will commence section 281(5) of the Criminal Justice Act 2003 to allow for penalties available under section 32 of the Animal Welfare Act 2006 to come into force.

The government takes animal welfare very seriously and continues to keep the maximum penalties under review.

16th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how much was collected in fines for offences committed under the Animal Welfare Act 2006 in (a) 2014, (b) 2015 and (c) 2016.

The information requested could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

17th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many meetings Ministers of her Department have had with social media companies to discuss harmful online content since May 2015.

Details of ministerial meetings with external companies are published on gov.uk.

18th Jul 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, if she will bring forward plans to consolidate existing legislation on online abuse and malicious communication.

Legislation that can be used to prosecute online abuse and related offences includes the Protection from Harassment Act 1997; the Malicious Communications Act 1988; and the Communications Act 2003. The Criminal Justice and Courts Act 2015 made changes to the relevant offences in these last two Acts which aim to ensure that people who commit them are prosecuted and properly punished.

The Government believes that current legislation is sufficient and does not intend to consolidate existing legislation relating to online abuse and malicious communication.

13th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps his Department takes to assess the risk of re-offending of offenders with learning disabilities before they are moved from in-patient care to care in the community.

When considering whether to discharge offenders detained under the Mental Health Act 1983 from hospital, the Secretary of State or the First-Tier Tribunal (Mental Health) must decide whether the detention criteria in the Act continue to be met. These are whether the person is suffering from a mental disorder of a nature or degree that warrants detention in hospital for treatment; or it is necessary for the health and safety of the patient or for the protection of others that he or she should receive such treatment; or the appropriate medical treatment is available. Decisions are based on advice provided by clinicians. The risk of re-offending by all patients, including those with learning disabilities, may inform their treatment programmes in hospital - for example, tackling drug addiction or reducing violence. The Secretary of State or the Tribunal will also take such risks into account for the purposes of determining the conditions for discharge into the community. Any learning disabilities may also be reflected in the level of care and support that offenders may be offered once they are in the community.

Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner