Stephen Timms Portrait

Stephen Timms

Labour - East Ham

First elected: 9th June 1994


Offenders (Day of Release from Detention) Bill
1st Feb 2023 - 8th Feb 2023
Motor Vehicles (Compulsory Insurance) Bill
15th Dec 2021 - 5th Jan 2022
Committee on the Future Relationship with the European Union
11th Sep 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Committee on Exiting the European Union
11th Sep 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Committee on the Future Relationship with the European Union
31st Oct 2016 - 3rd May 2017
Committee on Exiting the European Union
31st Oct 2016 - 3rd May 2017
Education, Skills and the Economy Sub-Committee
1st Feb 2016 - 31st Oct 2016
Education Committee
1st Feb 2016 - 31st Oct 2016
Shadow Minister (Work and Pensions)
8th Oct 2010 - 18th Sep 2015
Shadow Minister (Digital Britain)
12th May 2010 - 8th Oct 2010
Shadow Financial Secretary
12th May 2010 - 8th Oct 2010
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Innovation and Skills) (Digital Britain) (also HM Treasury)
6th Aug 2009 - 6th May 2010
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury) (also in the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills)
5th Oct 2008 - 6th May 2010
Tax Law Rewrite Bills (Joint Committee)
12th Jan 2009 - 6th May 2010
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions) (Employment and Welfare Reform)
25th Jan 2008 - 5th Oct 2008
Minister of State (Department for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform) (Competitiveness)
2nd Jul 2007 - 25th Jan 2008
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
5th May 2006 - 28th Jun 2007
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
10th May 2005 - 5th May 2006
Public Accounts Committee
18th Oct 2004 - 12th Jul 2005
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
30th Sep 2004 - 10th May 2005
Minister of State (e-Commerce & Competitiveness)
29th May 2002 - 9th Sep 2004
Minister of State (Education and Skills) (Schools)
11th Jun 2001 - 28th May 2002
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
29th Jul 1999 - 7th Jun 2001
Public Accounts Committee
3rd Nov 1999 - 11th May 2001
Minister of State (Department of Social Security)
1st Jan 1999 - 29th Jul 1999
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Social Security)
28th Jul 1998 - 30th Dec 1998
Treasury Committee
15th Jan 1996 - 21st Mar 1997
Consolidation etc. Bills (Joint Committee)
27th Jun 1994 - 21st Mar 1997
Building Societies Act 1986 (Amendment) Bill
1st Jan 1929 - 1st Feb 1929


Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Stephen Timms has voted in 787 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Stephen Timms Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Guy Opperman (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
(38 debate interactions)
Rishi Sunak (Conservative)
Prime Minister, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, and Minister for the Union
(30 debate interactions)
Thérèse Coffey (Conservative)
(29 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Department for Work and Pensions
(210 debate contributions)
HM Treasury
(62 debate contributions)
Home Office
(46 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Stephen Timms's debates

East Ham Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petition Debates Contributed

People with a lifelong illness should not be subject to regular reviews for eligibility for the Personal Independence Payment (PIP) or Employment and Support Allowance (ESA). People suffering lifelong conditions should not have to prove they are still ill every couple of years.

The Government should remove the requirement for people claiming disability benefits, such as the Personal Independence Payment (PIP), to have to go through an assessment process. Claims should be based solely on evidence from medical professionals, such as a letter from a GP or consultant.

We want the Government to conduct a full review of the PIP process. This should look at DWP policy and the performance of ATOS and Capita, which conduct the health assessments for applicants. We believe the current process is inherently unethical and biased, and needs a complete overhaul.

The Government should bring forward legislation to allow assisted dying for adults who are terminally ill and have mental capacity. It should be permitted subject to strict upfront safeguards, assessed by two doctors independently, and self-administered by the dying person.

Government should support vulnerable children & #endchildfoodpoverty by implementing 3 recommendations from the National Food Strategy to expand access to Free School Meals, provide meals & activities during holidays to stop holiday hunger & increase the value of and expand the Healthy Start scheme


Latest EDMs signed by Stephen Timms

15th April 2024
Stephen Timms signed this EDM as the primary signatory on Tuesday 26th March 2024

Baha'i, Iran

Tabled by: Stephen Timms (Labour - East Ham)
That this House notes reports in February 2024 of an attack on a Bahai educational gathering in a private home in the Iranian town of Ghaemshar; understands that those in attendance were students at the informal, but remarkable, Bahai Institute for Higher Education, which facilitates degree level study for Bahais …
8 signatures
(Most recent: 20 Apr 2024)
Signatures by party:
Scottish National Party: 3
Labour: 2
Independent: 1
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
Conservative: 1
20th February 2024
Stephen Timms signed this EDM as a sponsor on Wednesday 21st February 2024

Household Support Fund (No. 2)

Tabled by: Ian Byrne (Labour - Liverpool, West Derby)
That this House expresses deep concern that the UK Government has not committed to extending the Household Support Fund (HSF) beyond March 2024; notes that via this fund the Government has invested significantly in local crisis support as a response to the cost-of-living crisis; further notes that more than £2 …
36 signatures
(Most recent: 6 Mar 2024)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 29
Independent: 4
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
Green Party: 1
Scottish National Party: 1
View All Stephen Timms's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Stephen Timms, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


1 Urgent Question tabled by Stephen Timms

3 Adjournment Debates led by Stephen Timms

Thursday 15th July 2021
Thursday 11th February 2021

Stephen Timms has not introduced any legislation before Parliament


Latest 50 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
4 Other Department Questions
12th Jul 2022
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what assessment she has made of the extent to which large employers refer to socioeconomic background data of applicants to inform their recruitment and progression policies.

This Government believes the circumstances of one's birth should not determine life outcomes. The Social Mobility Commission (SMC), an independent body sponsored by the Equality Hub in the Cabinet Office, works to achieve this aim.

The SMC published research in June 2020 that examined how people from disadvantaged backgrounds have fared within the apprenticeship system. In keeping with the findings from this research, the SMC's employer engagement team produced a practical toolkit for employers, training providers and apprenticeship practitioners to increase the socio-economic diversity of apprenticeship starts.

This includes guidance on how employers can collect the socio-economic background data of their applicants in order to understand where barriers may exist, which interventions can support socio-economic inclusion and how to monitor progress.

The SMC's employer engagement team works with employers of varying size across multiple sectors to create more inclusive and diverse socio-economic workforces, drawing on research and engagement with employers and industry trade bodies to develop practical guidance for employers.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
12th Jul 2022
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, whether her Department has commissioned research on the socioeconomic background data for (a) work experience schemes, (b) apprenticeships and (c) entry-level applicants held by large employers.

This Government believes the circumstances of one's birth should not determine life outcomes. The Social Mobility Commission (SMC), an independent body sponsored by the Equality Hub in the Cabinet Office, works to achieve this aim.

The SMC published research in June 2020 that examined how people from disadvantaged backgrounds have fared within the apprenticeship system. In keeping with the findings from this research, the SMC's employer engagement team produced a practical toolkit for employers, training providers and apprenticeship practitioners to increase the socio-economic diversity of apprenticeship starts.

This includes guidance on how employers can collect the socio-economic background data of their applicants in order to understand where barriers may exist, which interventions can support socio-economic inclusion and how to monitor progress.

The SMC's employer engagement team works with employers of varying size across multiple sectors to create more inclusive and diverse socio-economic workforces, drawing on research and engagement with employers and industry trade bodies to develop practical guidance for employers.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
14th Mar 2022
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what progress she has made in identifying funding to extend the time limits for Equality Act claims from three to six months; and if he will make a statement.

The Government continues to look closely at extending the time limit for bringing Equality Act 2010 based cases to employment tribunal.

This decision, however, must take account of wider impacts across the justice system. We recognise that the pandemic has put additional pressure on the entire courts and tribunal service, particularly the employment tribunal, and that restoring its existing levels of service needs to be the priority before additional loading is added.

While the time limit for bringing an Equality Act based claim to employment tribunal remains at three months, tribunals have the discretion to provide extensions where they consider it ‘just and equitable’ to do so.

Kemi Badenoch
President of the Board of Trade
14th Jul 2021
What plans he has to identify potential sources of finance to tackle climate-related loss and damage ahead of COP26.

I am taking a pragmatic approach to ensure that we increase overall finance moving to climate action, from both the public and private sector. Obviously, the 100 billion dollars a year promised by developed countries to support developing nations must be delivered and we also need to scale up finance for adaptation.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
11th Nov 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether he plans to convene a Government taskforce to increase the number of ethnic minority-led businesses in public procurement.

UK public procurement policy is to award contracts on the basis of value for money, which means the optimum combination of cost and quality over the lifetime of the project. Public sector procurers are required to assess value for money from the perspective of the contracting authority, using criteria linked to the subject matter of the contract, including compliance with the published specification.

A Social Value model launched on 1 January 2021 (PPN 06/20), which is applicable to central Government departments, requires contracts to be assessed on a range of priority outcomes, where it is relevant and proportionate to do so, including improving accessibility to government contracts by a range of types of organisations, including minority ethnic owned businesses. This new approach will mean more opportunities for SMEs and social enterprises to win Government contracts by demonstrating the full extent of the value they would generate

As we look towards the future, we now have an opportunity to develop and implement a new procurement regime. The Procurement Bill contains proposals to further simplify the procurement process and make it easier for all companies to bid. The changes that are proposed are designed to benefit businesses of all sizes throughout the whole economy, including ethnic minority businesses; this includes measures that will reduce barriers to entry including establishing a single transparency platform so that bidders only have to submit their core credentials once, and making reforms to procurement frameworks so that suppliers are not locked out.

11th Nov 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether he has made an assessment of the potential barriers to minority ethnic owned businesses accessing Government contracts.

UK public procurement policy is to award contracts on the basis of value for money, which means the optimum combination of cost and quality over the lifetime of the project. Public sector procurers are required to assess value for money from the perspective of the contracting authority, using criteria linked to the subject matter of the contract, including compliance with the published specification.

A Social Value model launched on 1 January 2021 (PPN 06/20), which is applicable to central Government departments, requires contracts to be assessed on a range of priority outcomes, where it is relevant and proportionate to do so, including improving accessibility to government contracts by a range of types of organisations, including minority ethnic owned businesses. This new approach will mean more opportunities for SMEs and social enterprises to win Government contracts by demonstrating the full extent of the value they would generate

As we look towards the future, we now have an opportunity to develop and implement a new procurement regime. The Procurement Bill contains proposals to further simplify the procurement process and make it easier for all companies to bid. The changes that are proposed are designed to benefit businesses of all sizes throughout the whole economy, including ethnic minority businesses; this includes measures that will reduce barriers to entry including establishing a single transparency platform so that bidders only have to submit their core credentials once, and making reforms to procurement frameworks so that suppliers are not locked out.

10th Oct 2022
To ask the Prime Minister, with reference to the Intelligence and Security Committee of Parliament Annual Report 2019–2021, published on 10 December 2021, HC 877, whether she plans to update the Memorandum of Understanding between the Prime Minister and the Intelligence and Security Committee.

I refer the Rt Hon. Member to the written statement issued on 10 December 2021 by the previous Prime Minister (UIN HCWS464). The Government remains confident that the current Memorandum of Understanding with the Committee is sufficient to allow for robust oversight of the Agencies and wider Intelligence Community.

21st Jul 2022
To ask the Prime Minister, pursuant to the Answer of 20 July 2022 to Question 37423 on Employment and with reference to the Answer to the Question from the Rt hon. Member for Holborn and St Pancras at Prime Minister's Questions on 20 July 2022, Official Report, column 951, whether he plans to correct the record in respect of his statement that there are more people in paid employment than at any time in the history of this country; and if he will make a statement.

I am proud of this Government’s record in protecting jobs and supporting employment across the country. As I leave Office, latest labour market statistics speak to the resilience of the UK economy: I am happy to clarify that we have a record number of employees on payrolls, unemployment close to its lowest point since 1974, and youth unemployment at a record low.

This resilience is, in no small part, thanks to the extraordinary interventions we made during the pandemic to protect over 14.6 million jobs through furlough and our self-employment income support scheme. It is because of these interventions, and the delivery of the fastest vaccine rollout in Europe, that we oversaw the fastest economic growth in the G7 last year.

15th Jul 2022
To ask the Prime Minister, what assessment he has made of the circumstances in which making a Ministerial Correction in Hansard is appropriate.

As I have previously noted, my answer of 23 June 2022 to PQ 18053, and my letter of 26 April 2022 to the Liaison Committee (a copy of which was placed in the Library of the House), clarified my previous answers. Corrections and clarifications can be made in a number of ways.

I note the Procedure Committee is looking into these processes in more depth, and the Government looks forward to engaging with its inquiry.

15th Jul 2022
To ask the Prime Minister, pursuant to his Answer of 14 July 2022 to Question 33662 on Employment, for what reason he has not corrected the record with a Ministerial Correction in the Official Report in respect of oral contributions on the level of employment in the UK.

As I have previously noted, my answer of 23 June 2022 to PQ 18053, and my letter of 26 April 2022 to the Liaison Committee (a copy of which was placed in the Library of the House), clarified my previous answers. Corrections and clarifications can be made in a number of ways.

I note the Procedure Committee is looking into these processes in more depth, and the Government looks forward to engaging with its inquiry.

11th Jul 2022
To ask the Prime Minister, pursuant to the Answer of 23 June 2022 to Question 18053 on total UK employment levels, what plans he has to correct the record, with a Ministerial Correction in the Official Report, in respect of oral contributions of (a) 24 November 2021, Official Report, column 344, (b) 5 January 2022, Official Report, column 11, (c) 5 January 2022, Official Report, column 14, (d) 5 January 2022, Official Report, column 15, (e) 12 January 2022, Official Report, columns 567-8, (f) 19 January 2022, Official Report, column 323, (g) 2 February 2022, Official Report, columns 268-9, (h) 23 February 2022, Official Report, column 314 and (i) 20 April 2022, Official Report, column 155.

My answer of 23 June 2022 to PQ 18053, and my letter of 26 April 2022 to the Liaison Committee (a copy of which was placed in the Library of the House), clarified my previous answers about employment levels in the UK.

5th Jul 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of the Procurement Bill on procurement opportunities for ethnic minority business owners.

The Procurement Bill contains proposals to simplify the procurement process and make it easier for all companies to bid rather than specific groups. The changes that are proposed are designed in particular to benefit businesses of all sizes throughout the whole economy, including ethnic minority businesses; this includes measures that will reduce barriers to entry including establishing a single transparency platform so that bidders only have to submit their core credentials once, and making reforms to procurement frameworks so that suppliers are not locked out.

19th Apr 2022
To ask the Prime Minister, with reference to his oral evidence to the Liaison Committee of 30 March 2022 and his acknowledgment that previous assertions that employment is higher than before the covid-19 outbreak had been incorrect, what plans he has to correct the record in relation to assertions in the House of Commons on (a) 24 November 2021, Official Report, column 344, (b) 5 January 2022, Official Report, columns 11, 14 and 15, (c) 12 January 2022, Official Report, column 568, (d) 19 January 2022, Official Report, column 323, (e) 2 February 2022, Official Report, columns 268 to 269 and (f) 23 February 2022, Official Report, column 314.

During my appearance before the Liaison Committee I committed to respond in writing on a number of issues that were raised with me. I will arrange for a copy of the letter to be placed in the House of Commons Library.

24th Jan 2022
To ask the Prime Minister, when he plans to respond to Question 83228, tabled on 29 November 2021 by the right Hon. Member for East Ham, regarding Inequalities in Health Alliance: Correspondence.

I answered the Hon. Member’s question on 2 December. My office has since been informed that a system error with Parliamentary systems meant that it was not published in the Official Record. My reply was as follows: ‘My Office has no record of receiving this letter.’ I have asked my Office to contact the organisation to see if they can re-send the correspondence, and ensure they have the correct address for any future correspondence.

6th Jan 2022
To ask the Prime Minister, with reference to his oral contribution of 5 January 2022, Official Report, column 11, if he will set out the evidential basis for his statement that there are now record numbers of people in work, 420,000 more than there were before the pandemic began.

Looking at the payroll employment measure of people in work, the most recent statistical release shows there were 29.4 million people in work in November 2021 – 424,000 more than in February 2020 and a new record high, compared with the previous high of 29.175 million in October 2021.

(Source: Office for National Statistics, Earnings and employment from Pay As You Earn Real Time Information, UK: December 2021, December 2021).

https://www.ons.gov.uk/employmentandlabourmarket/peopleinwork/earningsandworkinghours/bulletins/earningsandemploymentfrompayasyouearnrealtimeinformationuk/latest

29th Nov 2021
To ask the Prime Minister, what plans he has to respond to the letter dated 15 September 2021 from the Inequalities in Health Alliance on a cross-Government strategy to tackle health inequality.

I answered the Hon. Member’s question on 2 December. My office has since been informed that a system error with Parliamentary systems meant that it was not published in the Official Record. My reply was as follows: ‘My Office has no record of receiving this letter.’ I have asked my Office to contact the organisation to see if they can re-send the correspondence, and ensure they have the correct address for any future correspondence.

11th May 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what estimate he has made of the change in the population of London since the beginning of the covid-19 pandemic; and if he will make a statement.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have, therefore, asked the Authority to respond.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
19th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, whether she has plans to ensure that outsourced staff in the public sector receive (a) at least the Living Wage and (b) certainty over hours of work.

All employers, including the public sector, are responsible for paying the correct minimum wage to their staff. The vast majority of responsible employers make sure they get it right.

The Government takes enforcing the minimum wage seriously. We are clear that anyone entitled to be paid the minimum wage should receive it and take robust enforcement action against employers who do not pay their staff correctly. 

The Government is also supporting the Workers (Predictable Terms and Conditions) Bill, which will give qualifying workers the right to request a more predictable working pattern.

Kevin Hollinrake
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
19th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, whether she has plans to ensure every public sector employee receives at least the Living Wage.

All employers, including the public sector, are responsible for paying the correct minimum wage to their staff. The vast majority of responsible employers make sure they get it right.

The Government takes enforcing the minimum wage seriously. We are clear that anyone entitled to be paid the minimum wage should receive it and take robust enforcement action against employers who do not pay their staff correctly.

Kevin Hollinrake
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
9th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what assessment she has made of the potential merits of offering repayment matching to households that are unable to afford their energy bills.

The Government understands the challenges that are posed by cost of living pressures that includes energy bills and the impact of debt. However, energy prices have fallen significantly with the price cap more than halving from £4,279 at the start of this year to £1,834 since the start of October.

This coincides with the £900 cost of living payment being provided by the Government across 2023/24, which has increased from the £650 provided the previous year. The Government continues to closely monitor energy prices and will keep support schemes under review.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
15th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what his planned timetable is for consulting on options for a new approach to consumer protection in energy markets after April 2024.

As set out in the Autumn statement, the Government is working with consumer groups and industry to explore the best approach to consumer protection from April 2024, as part of wider retail market reforms.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
20th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, if he will make an estimate of the number of disabled people who were no longer eligible for the Warm Home Discount scheme following changes to eligibility criteria in winter 2022-23.

As households previously applied through their suppliers, who set their own application processes and eligibility criteria and selected successful applicants each year, the Government has not been able to assess how many households are no longer eligible.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
13th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of reversing the changes to Warm Home Discount scheme eligibility that exclude disabled people.

The Warm Home Discount was reformed in England and Wales to maximise the proportion of households in fuel poverty receiving rebates. The Government estimated that 54% of those receiving rebates will be those with a long-term illness or disability, compared to 35% of the general population and 47% of those in fuel poverty having a long-term illness or disability.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
9th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, whether the Government had discussions on the threats posed by AI-generated child sexual abuse material at the AI Safety Summit of 1 and 2 November 2023.

The UK believes that the global risks posed by frontier AI are increasingly urgent, including risks to online safety. That is why the summit programme included a roundtable discussion on risks from the integration of frontier AI into society.

The Government has already passed legislation to protect children online. The world-leading Online Safety Act contains robust duties for companies to address AI-generated CSEA material. All services will be required to proactively tackle that content, preventing users from encountering it, and removing it immediately if it does appear.

Additionally, existing criminal law, such as the Protection of Children’s Act 1978 captures and criminalises a wide range of behaviours which extend to AI-generated CSEA material.

Saqib Bhatti
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
1st Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, what assessment she has made of the effectiveness of the 2014 Digital Inclusion Strategy; and whether she plans to update that strategy.

The Department for Science, Innovation and Technology is committed to closing the digital divide and meeting the government’s commitment that nobody should be left behind in the digital age.The 2014 Digital Inclusion Strategy, and the four pillars it sets out, remains as relevant today as it was when published. These principles were further echoed in the Government’s UK Digital Strategy published in 2022, and our vision to enable everyone from across the UK to benefit from all that digital innovation can offer.

The Department has further considered the 2014 Digital Inclusion Strategy following the House of Lords Communications and Digital Committee’s report on digital exclusion and cost of living and will formally respond to that Committee’s recommendations for the publication of a new digital inclusion strategy this month.

18th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, whether the term crime in the Data Protection and Digital Information Bill includes fraud and scams.

Tackling fraud requires a unified and co-ordinated response from government, law enforcement and the private sector to better protect the public and businesses from fraud, reduce the impact of fraud on victims, and increase the disruption and prosecution of fraudsters. This is why we will shortly publish a new strategy to address the threat of fraud.

The Data Protection and Digital Information Bill, which is currently before Parliament will make it easier for businesses to process personal data in order to tackle all types of crime, including fraud and other types of economic crime. When the Bill is commenced, they will be able to rely on a new lawful ground of ‘recognised legitimate interests’ under the UK GDPR to process personal data for these purposes. Unlike the current legislation, this will not require businesses to do a detailed assessment of the potential impact of the processing on the rights of individuals, which may affect the speed at which intelligence information relating to suspected fraud is shared.

Reforms in the Economic Crime and Corporate Transparency Bill will also enable businesses, in certain situations, to share information more easily for the purposes of preventing, investigating or detecting economic crime by disapplying civil liability for breaches of confidentiality for firms who share information to combat economic crime.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
17th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, what assessment she has made with Cabinet colleagues of the potential impact of the Data Protection and Digital Information Bill on the scope for businesses to share data in order to reduce fraud; and if she will make a statement.

Tackling fraud requires a unified and co-ordinated response from government, law enforcement and the private sector to better protect the public and businesses from fraud, reduce the impact of fraud on victims, and increase the disruption and prosecution of fraudsters. This is why we will shortly publish a new strategy to address the threat of fraud.

The Data Protection and Digital Information Bill, which is currently before Parliament will make it easier for businesses to process personal data in order to tackle all types of crime, including fraud and other types of economic crime. When the Bill is commenced, they will be able to rely on a new lawful ground of ‘recognised legitimate interests’ under the UK GDPR to process personal data for these purposes. Unlike the current legislation, this will not require businesses to do a detailed assessment of the potential impact of the processing on the rights of individuals, which may affect the speed at which intelligence information relating to suspected fraud is shared.

Reforms in the Economic Crime and Corporate Transparency Bill will also enable businesses, in certain situations, to share information more easily for the purposes of preventing, investigating or detecting economic crime by disapplying civil liability for breaches of confidentiality for firms who share information to combat economic crime.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
2nd Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, whether she has had recent discussions with the Competition and Markets Authority on mid-contract price increases on (a) mobile and (b) broadband contracts.

This is clearly a very difficult time for families up and down the country who are struggling to pay their bills as a result of the global rise in the cost of living.

On 23 January, the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport met with Chief Executives from major broadband and mobile providers at which she asked them to consider carefully the need, at this time, for above inflation price increases and highlighted the impact they may have on those already struggling to pay their bills.

In addition, Ofcom, the telecoms regulator, has rules in its General Conditions which ensure that any price increases which may occur during the length of the contract are clear, transparent and prominent at the point of sale.

Both the Competition and Markets Authority and Ofcom are independent. The government engages regularly with Ofcom on matters relating to affordability of communication services, and we continue to carefully monitor retail pricing in the sector.

16th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department plans to commence a withdrawal from the Energy Charter Treaty in the event that the modernisation package negotiated in 2022 is not approved; and if he will make a statement.

The UK has been a strong advocate for ECT modernisation. At the Energy Charter Conference on 22 November, the decision to adopt the modernised Treaty was postponed. The UK has been closely monitoring the situation surrounding the Energy Charter Treaty’s modernisation process, including the positions taken by other Contracting Parties, and will continue to do so.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
12th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will take steps to provide additional funding to (a) children's hospices and (b) palliative care charities when the non-domestic Energy Bill Relief Scheme ends in March 2023.

HM Treasury is currently conducting a review of the Energy Bill Relief Scheme and evidence from care providers is included in that review. The Government cannot confirm which sectors will receive further support after 31st March 2023 until the end of the review, which will report by the end of this year.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
29th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department plans to establish a garment supply chain adjudicator.

Last year the Government reaffirmed its commitment to continue engaging with the enforcement bodies and industry partners to strengthen our understanding of the garment trade. We will continue to review this issue and consider options to drive up standards.

Kevin Hollinrake
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
15th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the London Chamber of Commerce and Industry’s report entitled Ethnic Diversity in Business: Removing barriers impeding business success, published on 12 May 2022, what assessment he has made of the report’s finding that entrepreneurs from ethnic minority backgrounds are held back by stereotyping and outdated perceptions; and if he will make a statement.

The Government is aware of the challenges faced by ethnic minority businesses and is taking action to support them. The British Business Bank’s Alone Together report (2020) found access to finance is a major barrier for ethnic minority entrepreneurs. We are working with stakeholders to agree interventions to improve access to finance. Since its launch (2012) the Start Up Loans programme has issued around 20% of its loans to Black, Asian, and Ethnic-minority business.

The Government are also delivering actions set out in the Inclusive Britain report (2022), which aim to support ethnic minority entrepreneurs. Ministers regularly engage with ethnic minority business leaders and networks to better understand the issues facing them.

Kevin Hollinrake
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
14th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions he has had with venture capital industry representatives on tackling funding gaps for minority ethnic-owned businesses; and if he will make a statement.

The Government recognises the challenges in accessing finance faced by minority-ethnic owned businesses and has reflected that in the British Business Bank’s objective to identify and help to reduce imbalances in access to finance. The Bank’s latest Annual Report highlights that in 2020/21, 21% of Start Up Loans were provided to founders from Black, Asian and other minority ethnic backgrounds.

Ministers regularly engage with ethnic minority business leaders and representative organisations including through the Ethnic Minority Business Group. Access to finance has been regularly raised and we will continue to discuss this with VC industry representatives and ethnic minority businesses.

Kevin Hollinrake
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
31st Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans he has to introduce obligatory pay gap reporting with respect to ethnic minority employees.

The Government responded to the Commission on Race and Ethnic Disparities’ report and recommendations with the “Inclusive Britain” report which was published in March 2022. In this report, Government set out that ethnicity pay reporting will be voluntary and we will not be legislating for mandatory ethnicity pay reporting at this stage.

Kevin Hollinrake
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
31st Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans he has to increase the rate of income replacement for maternity, paternity, and parental leave.

My Rt. Hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions is currently conducting his statutory annual review of state pensions and benefits rates, this includes statutory parental payments such as maternity and paternity pay. The outcome of that review will be announced in due course.

Kevin Hollinrake
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
20th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Written Statement of 11 May 2022, HCWS1, on Low-income Workers: Exclusivity Clauses, whether he plans to undertake a consultation in advance of publishing the employment status guidance; and when he plans to publish that guidance.

The Government is committed to publishing employment status guidance in due course. It will make it easier for individuals and businesses to understand which employment rights apply to them, enhancing worker protections whilst maintaining flexibility and ensuring a level playing field within the labour market. The Government will continue to work closely with stakeholders to ensure the employment status framework is fit for purpose.

20th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to his letter of 25 March 2021 to the Chair of the Environmental Audit Select Committee, whether he has reached a conclusion in considering the idea of establishing a Garment Trade Adjudicator; and if he will make a statement.

In the response to the single enforcement body consultation published last year, the Government reaffirmed its commitment to continue to engage with the enforcement bodies and industry partners to strengthen our understanding of levels of non-compliance across the garment trade. We will continue to review this issue and consider options to drive up standards across the sector.

31st Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of making Scope 3 emissions reporting mandatory, rather than voluntary, in the TCFD regulation for UK businesses; and if he will make a statement.

In January 2022, the Companies (Strategic Report) (Climate-related Financial Disclosure) Regulations 2022 were made in Parliament. These Regulations require climate-related financial disclosures from certain UK-registered companies.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of a long-term target for floating wind platforms in securing economic benefits and UK supply chain growth.

The Government set an ambitious target of 1GW of floating offshore wind by 2030 last year as part of the wider 40GW by 2030 offshore wind target, and is committed to ensuring the UK captures the economic benefits of deploying such technology.

We are committed to developing a strong supply chain for floating offshore wind in parallel with growing deployment and are working with industry and other stakeholders on this.

Floating offshore wind projects will be eligible to bid in the next Contract for Difference (CfD) allocation round, which will open in December 2021. Our approach to the next CfD allocation round will provide the foundation for investment in a sustainable, competitive UK based supply chain from which we will learn to help plan our future approach and the feasible scale of ramp up of deployment, building on the success of fixed bottom wind, which has this year delivered supply chain investments in blades, monopiles and transition pieces, creating and safeguarding over 1,800 direct jobs by 2030.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department is taking to help secure the potential benefits of the supply chain position of the UK’s lead in floating wind technology.

The Government set an ambitious target of 1GW of floating offshore wind by 2030, last year as part of the wider 40GW by 2030 offshore wind target. This will stimulate development in projects and investment in the supply chain.

As part of the Government’s £1 billion Net Zero Innovation Portfolio fund, announced in my Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Minister’s Ten Point Plan, we are supporting innovation through the Floating Offshore Wind Demonstration Programme. This aims to support development and demonstration of state of the art technologies and products in the future offshore wind industry.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
20th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many people started receiving (a) statutory paternity pay and (b) shared parental pay in each quarter since April 2015.

The Government is committed to supporting working parents. In 2015, we introduced Shared Parental Leave and Pay which gives eligible parents much more flexibility and choice in how they share care for their new child between them in the first year. The scheme is in addition to the Government’s 2-week Paternity Leave and Pay policy and gives fathers and partners access to up to 50 weeks of leave and 37 weeks of pay.

Take-up of Shared Parental Leave and Pay has been broadly in line with our initial estimates, which anticipated that a cultural change like this would take time to bed-in.

Table 1 below shows the number of individuals in receipt of Statutory Paternity Pay and Statutory Shared Parental Pay based on the month that the claim was first made.

Table 1: Individuals in receipt of Statutory Paternity Pay and Statutory Shared Parental Pay based on the month that the claim was first made by quarter, 2015/16 to 2019/20

Statutory Paternity Pay (month first claimed)

Statutory Shared Parental Pay (month first claimed)

Q1 15/16

51,900

1,200

Q2 15/16

55,000

1,400

Q3 15/16

52,200

1,500

Q4 15/16

54,200

1,900

Q1 16/17

55,100

2,000

Q2 16/17

56,200

2,000

Q3 16/17

52,900

1,700

Q4 16/17

54,000

2,000

Q1 17/18

51,400

2,100

Q2 17/18

55,500

2,200

Q3 17/18

52,600

1,900

Q4 17/18

51,200

1,900

Q1 18/19

48,300

2,300

Q2 18/19

50,300

2,600

Q3 18/19

47,600

2,200

Q4 18/19

54,000

2,400

Q1 19/20

50,800

2,900

Q2 19/20

53,100

3,500

Q3 19/20

50,400

2,400

  1. Data collected uses HMRC Real Time Information (RTI) and was extracted in March 2020. RTI is subject to revision or updates.
  2. Figures have been rounded to the nearest hundred.
  3. For the 2015-16 tax year, those receiving Additional Statutory Paternity Pay (ASPP) for children born before 6 April 2015 cannot be distinguished from those claiming ShPP within RTI data.

Data based on the month first claimed means that an individual who first claims statutory payment in a given month (i.e. had not claimed it in the previous month) and continues receiving statutory pay for multiple months would only be counted in the first month.

6th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when she plans to reduce the age of entitlement to the National Living Wage to 21; and if she will make a statement.

The Government has announced that in April 2020 the National Living Wage (NLW) will increase by 6.2 per cent to £8.72 for those aged 25 and over. The Government has also announced inflation-beating increases in the National Minimum Wage (NMW) rates for younger workers and apprentices of between 4.6 per cent and 6.5 per cent.

My rt. hon. Friend Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer has pledged that the National Living Wage will increase further, reaching two-thirds of median earnings by 2024, providing economic conditions allow. The Government also plans to expand the reach of the National Living Wage, bringing down the eligibility threshold first to age 23 in 2021 and then to 21 by 2024.

13th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what percentage of the National Heritage Lottery Fund’s grants were awarded to local churches, chapels and meeting houses open for worship, excluding cathedrals, in financial years (a) 2017-18, (b) 2018-19, (c) 2019-20, (d) 2020-21, (e) 2021-22 and (f) 2022-23.

The UK’s places of worship are a major recipient of funding from the National Lottery Heritage Fund. Churches of various sizes and denominations have benefited from National Lottery investment, ensuring that those who care for them can continue to share the significant and cherished heritage they represent with local residents and visitors alike.

In 2017–18, 13% of National Lottery Heritage Funding was awarded to local churches, chapels, and meeting-houses excluding cathedrals. In 2018–19, 15% of funding was awarded in this way. In 2019–20, 9% of funding was awarded in this way. In 2020–21, 5% of funding was awarded in this way. In 2021–22, 8% of funding was awarded in this way. In 2022–23, 8% of funding was awarded in this way.

5th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, how much funding has been provided by the National Lottery Heritage Fund and its predecessor bodies to Christian places of worship excluding cathedrals in (a) England, (b) Scotland, (c) Wales and (d) Northern Ireland in each of the last five financial years.

Since the financial year 2018-19, a total of £99,701,003 has been awarded by the National Lottery Heritage Fund to Christian places of worship across the UK which are not cathedrals. The annual breakdown is as follows, with a more detailed breakdown included in the table below.

  • In 2018-19, £42 million was provided to England, £1.4 million to Scotland, £1.7 million to Wales and £900,000 to Northern Ireland.

  • In 2019-20, £20 million was provided to England, £360,000 to Scotland, £1.2 million to Wales and £1.7 million Northern Ireland.

  • In 2020-21, £7 million was provided to England, £240,000 to Scotland, £380,000 to Wales and £109,000 to Northern Ireland.

  • In 2021-22, £11.3 million was provided to England, £140,000 to Wales and £200,000 to Northern Ireland.

  • In 2022-23, £9.3 million was provided to England, £20,000 to Scotland, £1.4 million to Wales and £611,000 to Northern Ireland.

2018-2019

2019-2020

2020-2021

2021-2022

2022-2023

Grand Total

England

£41,968,119

£20,307,609

£6,870,591

£11,266,819

£9,337,623

£89,750,761

Wales

£1,725,000

£1,151,900

£370,700

£137,701

£1,133,727

£4,519,028

Scotland

£1,360,000

£350,900

£243,700

£0

£20,318

£1,974,918

Northern Ireland

£866,800

£1,650,900

£109,300

£218,568

£610,728

£3,456,296

Grand Total

£45,919,919

£23,461,309

£7,594,291

£11,623,088

£11,102,396

£99,701,003

This information can be found on the National Lottery database, a publicly available source of National Lottery data.

3rd May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, how much funding has been provided by the Listed Places of Worship Grants Scheme to Christian places of worship other than cathedrals in (a) the United Kingdom, (b) England, (c) Scotland, (d) Wales and (e) Northern Ireland in each of the last five financial years.

Since the financial year 2018-19, a total of £145,008,534 has been provided through the Listed Places of Worship Grants Scheme to Christian places of worship across the UK which are not cathedrals. The annual breakdown is as follows:

  • In 2018-19, £27,492,816 was provided to England, £2,376,216 to Scotland, £1,045,648 to Wales and £1,524,146 to Northern Ireland.

  • In 2019-20, £28,418,267 was provided to England, £2,828,133 to Scotland, £1,041,038 to Wales and £1,928,120 to Northern Ireland.

  • In 2020-21, £21,874,083 was provided to England, £1,563,280 to Scotland, £1,154,037 to Wales and £1,309,810 to Northern Ireland.

  • In 2021-22, £22,422,595 was provided to England, £1,617,947 to Scotland, £726,675 to Wales and £787,620 to Northern Ireland.

  • In 2022-23, £23,698,179 was provided to England, £1,235,955 to Scotland, £978,360 to Wales and £985,601 to Northern Ireland.

3rd May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, how much funding has been provided by Historic England to Christian places of worship other than cathedrals in each of the last five financial years.

Historic England has provided funding to Christian places of worship, other than cathedrals, through a number of different programmes over the last five financial years.

These include the following:

  • The COVID-19 Emergency Heritage At Risk Fund granted £5,754,330 in 2020 to Christian places of worship not classified as cathedrals.

  • The COVID-19 Grants for Programmes of Major Works gave £8,088,287 for Round 1 in 2020-21 and £9,740,031 for Round 2 in 2021-22 to Christian places of worship.

Historic England has also provided public funding over the last five years to Christian places of worship for Support Officer posts. These grants are given to dioceses and denominational bodies to provide local support, training and encouragement to congregations with responsibility for historic places of worship. In 2017-18 Historic England granted £692,000, in 2018-19 £564,000, in 2019-20 £484,800, in 2020-21 £236,800 and in 2021-22 £375,150. These figures represent Historic England’s commitment to building capacity and resilience for places of worship.

2nd May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, with reference to the £100 million funding for local charities and community organisations announced in the Spring Budget 2023, when her Department plans to publish proposals for the use of that funding; and if she will make a statement.

As announced in the recent Spring Budget, the government will provide over £100 million of support for charities and community organisations in England. This will be targeted towards those organisations most at risk, due to increased demand from vulnerable groups and higher delivery costs, as well as providing investment in energy efficiency.

Work is underway to finalise the delivery time frame and eligibility criteria. Further details will be announced as soon as possible - these will be published on gov.uk and a statement made to the House as appropriate.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)