John Healey Portrait

John Healey

Labour - Wentworth and Dearne

Shadow Secretary of State for Defence

(since April 2020)
1 APPG membership (as of 29 Dec 2021)
Transatlantic Trade
Shadow Secretary of State for Housing
9th Jan 2018 - 6th Apr 2020
Shadow Secretary of State for Housing
7th Oct 2016 - 9th Jan 2018
Shadow Minister (Communities and Local Government) (Housing and Planning)
14th Sep 2015 - 27th Jun 2016
Shadow Secretary of State for Health
8th Oct 2010 - 7th Oct 2011
Shadow Minister (Housing)
12th May 2010 - 8th Oct 2010
Minister of State (Department for Communities and Local Government) (Housing)
5th Jun 2009 - 6th May 2010
Speaker's Committee on the Electoral Commission
2nd Nov 2007 - 12th Oct 2009
Minister of State (Department of Communities and Local Government) (Local Government)
29th Jun 2007 - 5th Jun 2009
Tax Law Rewrite Bills (Joint Committee)
20th Dec 2004 - 12th Jan 2009
Public Accounts Committee
20th Jul 2005 - 19th Nov 2007
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
10th May 2005 - 28th Jun 2007
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
30th May 2002 - 10th May 2005
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education and Skills)
11th Jun 2001 - 30th May 2002
Employment Sub-committee
23rd Jul 1997 - 29th Nov 1999
Education & Employment
14th Jul 1997 - 29th Nov 1999


Department Event
Monday 21st February 2022
14:30
Ministry of Defence
Oral questions - Main Chamber
21 Feb 2022, 2:30 p.m.
Defence (including Topical Questions)
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Note: This event involves a Department with which this person is linked, and does not guarantee their actual attendance.
Division Votes
Tuesday 11th January 2022
Household Energy Bills: VAT
voted Aye - in line with the party majority
One of 168 Labour Aye votes vs 0 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 229 Noes - 319
Speeches
Monday 10th January 2022
Oral Answers to Questions
Today’s US-Russia talks in Geneva start a critical week of dialogue over Ukraine. I assure the Secretary of State that …
Written Answers
Friday 14th January 2022
National Flagship
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, on what date the Committee for the National Flagship is expected to …
Early Day Motions
Wednesday 18th March 2015
WENTWORTH WOODHOUSE IN ROTHERHAM, SOUTH YORKSHIRE
That this House commends the current plans to secure the future of one of the grandest stately homes in England, …
Bills
Tuesday 2nd July 2013
Letting Agents (Competition, Choice and Standards) Bill 2013-14
A Bill to establish a national mandatory licensing scheme for letting and managing agents, with established standards and redress for …
MP Financial Interests
Saturday 11th January 2020
2. (a) Support linked to an MP but received by a local party organisation or indirectly via a central party organisation
Name of donor: Community Union
Address of donor: 465c Caledonian Road, London N7 9AX
Amount of donation or nature and …
EDM signed
Monday 17th July 2017
SOCIAL SECURITY
That an humble Address be presented to Her Majesty, praying that the Loans for Mortgage Interest Regulations 2017 (S.1., 2017, …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, John Healey has voted in 295 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All John Healey Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Ben Wallace (Conservative)
Secretary of State for Defence
(59 debate interactions)
Jeremy Quin (Conservative)
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
(12 debate interactions)
Kevan Jones (Labour)
(11 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Ministry of Defence
(80 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(25 debate contributions)
Department for International Trade
(2 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all John Healey's debates

Wentworth and Dearne Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petitions with highest Wentworth and Dearne signature proportion
John Healey has not participated in any petition debates

Latest EDMs signed by John Healey

17th July 2017
John Healey signed this EDM as a sponsor on Monday 17th July 2017

SOCIAL SECURITY

Tabled by: Jeremy Corbyn (Independent - Islington North)
That an humble Address be presented to Her Majesty, praying that the Loans for Mortgage Interest Regulations 2017 (S.1., 2017, No. 725), dated 5 July 2017, a copy of which was laid before this House on 6 July, be annulled.
50 signatures
(Most recent: 15 Mar 2018)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 43
Independent: 4
Scottish National Party: 2
Green Party: 1
6th March 2017
John Healey signed this EDM as a sponsor on Monday 6th March 2017

SOCIAL SECURITY

Tabled by: Jeremy Corbyn (Independent - Islington North)
That an humble Address be presented to Her Majesty, praying that the Universal Credit (Housing Costs Element for claimants aged 18 to 21) (Amendment) Regulations 2017 (S.I., 2017, No. 252), dated 2 March 2017, a copy of which was laid before this House on 3 March, be annulled.
86 signatures
(Most recent: 20 Apr 2017)
Signatures by party:
Scottish National Party: 53
Labour: 26
Independent: 5
Social Democratic & Labour Party: 2
Liberal Democrat: 1
Green Party: 1
View All John Healey's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by John Healey, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


3 Urgent Questions tabled by John Healey

Tuesday 21st September 2021
Tuesday 10th November 2020
Thursday 16th July 2020

John Healey has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

2 Bills introduced by John Healey


A Bill to establish a national mandatory licensing scheme for letting and managing agents, with established standards and redress for landlords, tenants and leaseholders, and prohibition of letting and management agent fees; to enable local authorities to administer and enforce the scheme; to require that tenants, landlords and leaseholders have written agreements; and to empower local authorities, either alone or in partnership, to trade as letting and managing agents.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 2nd July 2013

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to make provision to introduce leave, pay and allowance arrangements for parents of children born to surrogate mothers equal to those available to parents whose children are born to them; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 17th April 2012

John Healey has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


582 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
4th Jan 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the £5 million boost for armed forces charities announced by the Government on 6 September 2021, how much and what proportion of that funding has been distributed to armed forces charities; how many of those charities have received additional funding from that £5 million; and how much each of those charities has received.

The £5 million additional funding for Armed Forces charities is being delivered via the Armed Forces Covenant Fund Trust through an open competition. Applications opened on 13 December 2021 and will close on 17 January 2022. Applications will be assessed after this date and the successful charities will be notified in due course. Charities who wish to submit applications can do so via https://covenantfund.org.uk/.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
6th Dec 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what estimate he has made of the number of former service personnel sleeping rough each year since 2010.

Current evidence does not show that veterans are more likely to become homeless or sleep rough than the general population.

Less than 1% (0.9%) of households sleeping rough and seeking government support in England in 2020/21 have at least one household member who has served in the Armed Forces.

The government has put support in place to help veterans to access housing. The government has produced new guidance for Local Authorities to ensure veterans are not disadvantaged by their service when applying for social housing, as well as removing the local connection test to assist the transition into civilian accommodation.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
1st Dec 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many Government contracts there have been where Departments have sought and (a) received and (b) not received assurances regarding contractor’s tax affairs, by Department, since 2014-15.

This information is not held centrally.

Michael Ellis
Paymaster General
2nd Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the figures published by his Department in January 2019 on Population projections: UK armed forces veterans residing in Great Britain 2016 to 2018, whether he plans to publish more recent figures.

For the first time, a question was added to the England and Wales census asking respondents if they have previously served in the UK Armed Forces. A range of new statistics on the veteran population will be published by the Office for National Statistics once the data collected from the census is analysed, including the total number of veterans residing in England and Wales. In Scotland, the census will be carried out in 2022, and will also include a question asking respondents whether they have previously served. In Northern Ireland, the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency (NISRA) will collect data on the total number of veterans in Northern Ireland and the 11 Local Government Districts.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
13th May 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to page 41 of his Department’s Integrated Review 2021, how many critical vulnerabilities in the cyber systems of the public sector has the National Cyber Security Centre addressed as at 13 May 2021.

It is for each public sector organisation to remediate vulnerabilities in their systems and this information is not held centrally. This is achieved through activities such as designing systems to be secure, regularly patching, continuous monitoring, security testing and vulnerability disclosure programmes. The NCSC and Cabinet Office provide expert advice and guidance to help public sector organisations address critical vulnerabilities.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
12th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what assessment he has made of recent trends in the rate of unemployment among veterans.

Veterans offer a vast range of skills and talent to civilian employers and the Government recognises that having a job is one of the key foundations for those leaving the Armed Forces to transition into civilian life. This is why the Government is taking a number of steps to support veterans into employment such as making it easier to join the Civil Service and introducing a national insurance tax break for their employers. The MOD’s Careers Transition Partnership supports Service leavers entering the job market. Of the 2018/19 UK regular service leavers who used a CTP service, and reported their employment outcomes, 86% were employed, 8% economically inactive, and 6% unemployed six months after using the service.

12th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps his Department is taking to help prevent suicide among veterans.

In January 2019, the Government published the first Cross-Government Suicide Prevention Workplan, which sets out an ambitious programme across national and local government and the NHS. This includes actions being taken forward by MoD and NHS England for veterans and armed service personnel. The Government has committed to publishing an updated workplan and progress report against the National Strategy, expected in Spring 2021.

The majority of veterans successfully access mental health programmes available to the general population through the NHS, however for those veterans who need extra support, the NHS in England offers bespoke and specialist mental health services, which benefit from over £10m investment per year. Recent months have seen the rollout of the new NHS England High Intensity Service, which will provide further specialist care for veterans with acute mental health needs or who are in a mental health crisis. The Government has also provided £6 million in funding to support 100 service charities during the Covid-19 pandemic, including charities supporting veterans with their mental health.

12th Mar 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 10 March 2020 to Question 25623 on Grenfell Tower Inquiry: Public Appointments, if he will place in the Library a copy of the contract entered into with the search company appointed to recruit a replacement panel member.

As part of the Government transparency agenda, it is a legal requirement for central Government Departments to publish all awarded contracts over £10,000 in value on the Contracts Finder website. Once a contract for this recruitment has been finalised and signed it will be published in the usual way.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
10th Mar 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 10 March 2020 to Question 25623 on Grenfell Tower Inquiry: Public Appointments, which search company has been engaged to identify a shortlist of candidates; and by what date that company has been asked to return a shortlist.

Further announcements will be made in the usual way.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
10th Mar 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 10 March 2020 to Question 25623, if he has set a deadline for a replacement panel member to be appointed.

Further announcements will be made in the usual way.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
5th Mar 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, when a new panel member will be appointed to the Grenfell Tower inquiry; and what discussions he has with people affected by the Grenfell Tower fire on that appointment.

In February, the Prime Minister, as Sponsor Minister for the Grenfell Tower Inquiry, wrote to the Inquiry Chair to confirm his intention to appoint a replacement panel member. He also confirmed that Cabinet Office officials would engage a search company to identify a shortlist of candidates.

As soon as a suitable new panel member has been identified, the Prime Minister will write to the Inquiry Chair to seek his consent to the appointment as required by the Inquiries Act. The successful candidate will be announced once the process has been completed so they start work as soon as possible.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
3rd Feb 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 3 February 2020 to Question 8952 on Public Appointments: Standards, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of the due diligence process for appointments to the panels of statutory public inquiries following the resignation of Benita Mehra from her role as a panel member on the Grenfell Tower Inquiry.

Due diligence and consideration of conflicts of interest are important parts of any appointment process. The Inquiries Act 2005 sets out the suitability and impartiality requirements of inquiry panel appointments. Appointments to statutory public inquiries are made in accordance with the Act.



Oliver Dowden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
28th Jan 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of the due diligence process for public appointments following the resignation of Benita Mehra from her role as a panel member on the Grenfell Tower Inquiry.

Ms Mehra's appointment was not a public appointment. She was appointed to the panel of a statutory public inquiry in line with the Inquiries Act 2005.

Oliver Dowden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
24th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions his Department has had with the Scandinavian governments on the potential for upper-stage rocket debris from UK launches to land on their sovereign territory.

There is no expectation that upper stage debris from any UK launch will affect the sovereign territory of any Scandinavian country.

The Government has held discussions with all countries to the north of the British Isles which may hold an interest in, or whose territory may be affected by, space launch activities undertaken from the UK.

Where there is a possibility of UK-based launch companies seeking to deposit launch vehicle debris (whether this is from the vehicle's upper stage or otherwise) in another state's territorial waters or Exclusive Economic Zone, the government intends to obtain consent from the affected countries.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans his Department has to use OneWeb to enhance the UK’s space capabilities.

With an increasing number of global players developing Low Earth Orbit Satellite constellations, OneWeb enables the UK to be at the forefront of rapidly evolving Space technology and helps the UK project its influence internationally through a global asset.

OneWeb will help grow UK-based capabilities in the satellite technology value chain by creating opportunities for high-value manufacturing, launch capability, and space data applications.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
13th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent progress has been made on the creation of a satellite navigation system.

This Government has made clear its ambitions in space through a new ministerial level National Space Council and by developing a Space Strategy to bring long term strategic and commercial benefits for the UK. The Government recognises the contribution the space sector makes to our economy, national security, global influence and in helping the nation to tackle the COVID crisis.

The GNSS programme is currently in its Engineering Design and Development Phase to research and understand what would best suit the UK's requirements. The programme is taking the appropriate time to investigate the requirements, design specifications and costs as fully as possible. This includes assessing value for money, scope for innovation, new markets and how much a system could meet the UK's assured positioning navigation and timing requirements as part of an ambitious new space strategy.

The programme has recently proceeded with a number of technical contracts from April to September to deliver key engineering work whilst protecting skills and technical GNSS sector jobs.

A project led by the Cabinet Office is developing the UK's positioning navigation and timing (PNT) requirements, bringing together expertise from across Whitehall, industry and the PNT community to consider requirements across military, civil and Critical National Infrastructure sectors.

In addition to other technologies, a UK GNSS capability could form part of the mix of solutions needed.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
22nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment she has made of the impact of graphics processing unit scalping on UK (a) competition policy and (b) businesses.

Under UK competition law, responsibility for investigating anticompetitive practices falls to the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA), the UK’s competition authority. The government has ensured that the CMA has significant powers and expertise to investigate anti-competitive practices, and as an independent authority, the CMA has discretion to investigate competition cases which, according to its prioritisation principles, it considers most appropriate. The CMA may also carry out detailed examinations of why particular markets may not be working well and take remedial action to address features of markets which restrict competition.

GPUs are used for a number of applications and supply has been impacted by an ongoing global shortage. The current shortage is due to a confluence of unexpected events, including unprecedented pandemic-driven shifts in demand within a global market. HMG recognises the severity of the current chip shortage, the widespread international ramifications and the difficulties it has created for a number of UK firms and individuals. HMG are engaging affected UK sectors and key international partners to identify any available domestic or international mitigations.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
25th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to Question 130636 tabled on December 16 2020, if he will extend the adjusted calculation for early education entitlement funding, used during the autumn 2020 term, into spring 2021 in line with the extension to the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme.

We have provided unprecedented support to early years providers throughout the COVID-19 outbreak through block-buying childcare places and schemes, including furlough. Childminders are also eligible to receive support from the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme, which has been extended until the end of April 2021: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/claim-a-grant-through-the-self-employment-income-support-scheme.

The government will continue to support families with their childcare costs. My right hon. Friend, the Chancellor of the Exchequer, announced on 25 November an extra £44 million for 2021-22, for local authorities to increase hourly rates paid to childcare providers for the government’s free childcare entitlement offers.

On 17 December 2020, the government announced a return to funding early years settings on the basis on attendance.

We will fund local authorities in the 2021 spring term based on their January 2021 census. If attendance rises after the census is taken, we will top-up councils to up to 85% of their January 2020 census level, where a local authority can provide evidence for increased attendance during the spring term. This will give local authorities additional financial confidence to pay providers for increasing attendance later in the spring term. The early years local authority survey continues on a weekly basis. The following link has more information on the use of Early Years Dedicated Schools Grant in spring 2021: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/dedicated-schools-grant-dsg-2020-to-2021/dsg-technical-note-2020-to-2021.

In line with the existing and unchanged statutory guidance, local authorities should ensure that providers are not penalised for short-term absences of children (for example, sickness, arriving late or leaving early, or a family emergency) through withdrawing funding, but use their discretion where absence is recurring or for extended periods, taking into account the reason for the absence and the impact on the provider.

We stay in regular contact with the early years sector, including on this subject. We will be closely monitoring both parental take-up of places and the capacity and responses of providers.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
25th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to Question 130635 tabled on 16 December 2020, what assessment he has made of the financial effect on childminders of reintroducing the method of calculating early years entitlement funding that was in place before the covid-19 outbreak.

We have provided unprecedented support to early years providers throughout the COVID-19 outbreak through block-buying childcare places and schemes, including furlough. Childminders are also eligible to receive support from the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme, which has been extended until the end of April 2021: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/claim-a-grant-through-the-self-employment-income-support-scheme.

The government will continue to support families with their childcare costs. My right hon. Friend, the Chancellor of the Exchequer, announced on 25 November an extra £44 million for 2021-22, for local authorities to increase hourly rates paid to childcare providers for the government’s free childcare entitlement offers.

On 17 December 2020, the government announced a return to funding early years settings on the basis on attendance.

We will fund local authorities in the 2021 spring term based on their January 2021 census. If attendance rises after the census is taken, we will top-up councils to up to 85% of their January 2020 census level, where a local authority can provide evidence for increased attendance during the spring term. This will give local authorities additional financial confidence to pay providers for increasing attendance later in the spring term. The early years local authority survey continues on a weekly basis. The following link has more information on the use of Early Years Dedicated Schools Grant in spring 2021: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/dedicated-schools-grant-dsg-2020-to-2021/dsg-technical-note-2020-to-2021.

In line with the existing and unchanged statutory guidance, local authorities should ensure that providers are not penalised for short-term absences of children (for example, sickness, arriving late or leaving early, or a family emergency) through withdrawing funding, but use their discretion where absence is recurring or for extended periods, taking into account the reason for the absence and the impact on the provider.

We stay in regular contact with the early years sector, including on this subject. We will be closely monitoring both parental take-up of places and the capacity and responses of providers.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
16th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the financial effect on childminders of re-introducing the method of calculating early years entitlement funding that was in place before the covid-19 outbreak.

We have provided unprecedented support to early years providers throughout the COVID-19 outbreak through block-buying childcare places and schemes including furlough. Childminders are also eligible to receive support from the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme, which has been extended until the end of April 2021: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/claim-a-grant-through-the-self-employment-income-support-scheme.

Whilst we recognise childcare attendance has been affected by the COVID-19 outbreak, we saw attendance rise over the autumn term from 482,000 on 10 September to 759,000 on 17 December. On 17 December 2020, the government therefore announced a return to funding early years settings on the basis on attendance. In line with the existing and unchanged statutory guidance local authorities should ensure that providers are not penalised for short-term absences of children, for example sickness, arriving late or leaving early, or a family emergency through withdrawing funding, but use their discretion where absence is recurring or for extended periods taking into account the reason for the absence and the impact on the provider.

We stay in regular contact with the early years sector, including on this subject. We will be closely monitoring both parental take-up of places and the capacity and responses of providers.

The government will continue to support families with their childcare costs. My right hon. Friend, the Chancellor of the Exchequer, announced on 25 November an extra £44 million for the 2021-22 financial year, for local authorities to increase hourly rates paid to childcare providers for the government’s free childcare entitlement offers.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
16th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will extend the adjusted calculation for the early education entitlement funding, used during the autumn 2020 term, into spring 2021, in line with the extension to the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme.

We recognise childcare attendance has been affected by the COVID-19 outbreak; we saw attendance rise over the autumn term from 482,000 on 10 September to 759,000 on 17 December 2020. On 17 December 2020, the government therefore announced a return to funding early years settings on the basis on attendance. In line with the existing and unchanged statutory guidance (https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/use-of-free-early-education-entitlements-funding-during-the-coronavirus-outbreak/use-of-free-early-education-entitlements-funding-during-coronavirus-covid-19), local authorities should ensure that providers are not penalised for short-term absences of children, (for example, sickness, arriving late or leaving early, or a family emergency through withdrawing funding), but use their discretion where absence is recurring or for extended periods, taking into account the reason for the absence and the impact on the provider.

We will fund local authorities in the 2021 spring term based on their January 2021 census. If attendance rises after the census is taken, we will top-up councils to up to 85% of their January 2020 census level, where a local authority can provide evidence for increased attendance during the spring term. This will give local authorities additional financial confidence to pay providers for increasing attendance later in the spring term.

We stay in regular contact with the early years sector and have heard from them already on this subject. We publish regular official statistics on attendance in early years settings (https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/attendance-in-education-and-early-years-settings-during-the-coronavirus-covid-19-outbreak) and the next release is due on Tuesday 2 February. We will be closely monitoring both parental take-up of places and the capacity and responses of providers.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
16th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, which local authorities do not pay early education entitlement funding in full to childminders.

Our guidance makes clear how we expect local authorities to fund early years entitlement places during the COVID-19 outbreak. Local authorities should only take a different approach from that set out in guidance if they have good reasons for doing so, their approach is fair and equitable, and they communicate this clearly to their providers. Further information on this guidance is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/use-of-free-early-education-entitlements-funding-during-the-coronavirus-outbreak/use-of-free-early-education-entitlements-funding-during-coronavirus-covid-19.

Through our regular contact with local authorities, it is apparent that the vast majority have been compliant with our funding guidance throughout the COVID-19 outbreak.

Childminder funding can be more complex than funding for group-based providers. This is because unlike nurseries, which typically offer a fairly consistent number of childcare places, the number and age of children cared for by a childminder can vary significantly throughout the year and from one year to another. This means that childminders may move in and out of offering the government’s early years entitlements depending on the children they are caring for at any given time.

For this reason, we know that some local authorities fund their childminders on a case-by-case basis in the interests of value for money and propriety. This ensures that they are not paying providers who might not otherwise have been offering entitlement places.

We do not currently hold data on the number of local authorities taking tailored approaches to childminder funding. This is due to the highly variable nature of this provision, and that fact that arrangements may vary within a single local authority based on the individual circumstances of each childminder.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
28th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the average housing costs were for full-time students in England in each of the last 10 years.

The government measures student housing costs periodically but does not collect data annually. The Student Income and Expenditure Survey in 2014/15 reported average housing costs of £4,151 for full-time undergraduates who incurred those costs. The Student Income and Expenditure Survey in 2011/12 reported average housing costs of £3,628 for full-time undergraduates who incurred them.

The student finance system contributes towards undergraduate students’ living costs at University, with the most support available for students from the lowest income families. The government increased maximum loans for living costs by 2.8% for the current academic year, 2019/20, to £8,944 for students living away from home and studying outside London with a further 2.9% increase to £9,203 for 2020/21. Higher rates of loan are available for students living away from home and studying in London.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
28th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent assessment he has made of the extent to which maintenance loans cover the cost of housing for students in England.

The government measures student housing costs periodically but does not collect data annually. The Student Income and Expenditure Survey in 2014/15 reported average housing costs of £4,151 for full-time undergraduates who incurred those costs. The Student Income and Expenditure Survey in 2011/12 reported average housing costs of £3,628 for full-time undergraduates who incurred them.

The student finance system contributes towards undergraduate students’ living costs at University, with the most support available for students from the lowest income families. The government increased maximum loans for living costs by 2.8% for the current academic year, 2019/20, to £8,944 for students living away from home and studying outside London with a further 2.9% increase to £9,203 for 2020/21. Higher rates of loan are available for students living away from home and studying in London.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
24th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what the UK’s financial commitment is to the EU’s Copernicus Earth programme in the (a) 2021-22 financial year and (b) each financial year to 2024-25.

The UK Government has welcomed the agreement in principle for the UK to continue to participate in the Copernicus component of the EU Space Programme as a third country for 2021-2027.

Formal participation will only begin once the Protocol I to the Trade and Cooperation Agreement is adopted.

Once this has taken place the UK’s financial commitment will be reported in Defra’s accounts.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
19th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 30 June 2020 to Question 64852 on the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991, on what date the Government commissioned research by Middlesex University into dog attacks is planned to be published.

Middlesex University’s draft report on measures to reduce dog attacks and promote responsible ownership was submitted to Defra in March this year. The report is currently being peer reviewed and will be finalised in light of peer review comments. Our intention is to publish the final report later this year.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
3rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what forms of smokeless coal will be permissible under changes proposed in the Air quality: using cleaner fuels for domestic burning consultation response, published 21 February 2020.

As stated in the Government Response published on 21 February, we want to see a move from bituminous coal to less polluting fuels in the domestic setting. We will facilitate this transition by only allowing the sale of smokeless coal (or anthracite) and low sulphur manufactured solid fuels for the purpose of domestic combustion.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
28th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many and what proportion of planning outcomes for new housing developments were in accordance with Environment Agency flood risk advice, by region, in each of the last 10 years.

This is a devolved matter and the information provided therefore relates to England only.

As a statutory consultee in development planning, the Environment Agency (EA) advises local planning authorities and developers on how to enable climate resilient development and identify opportunities to protect and enhance the environment.

The EA provides advice on all development proposals in areas that are at (i) medium or high risk of flooding from rivers or the sea (other than minor development) (ii) within 20 metres of a Main River, (iii) within an area with critical drainage problems (other than minor development).

The EA does not make the final decision on local planning approvals and local planning authorities are responsible and accountable for approving proposals for new development in their local areas. In the majority of cases the EA’s flood risk advice is taken on board by local planning authorities.

Environment Agency performance influencing planning applications that included new homes where decisions were decided in line with our advice 2011/12-2018/19 split by Environment Agency operational hub.

Year

11-Dec

Dec-13

13/14

14/15

15/16

16/17

17/18

18/19

Grand Total

North – new homes with recorded planning decisions

3195

10539

13276

12610

8035

7934

6166

4161

65916

North - Number of new homes involved with over-ruled / partially over-ruled decisions

0

649

112

597

3

152

58

11

1582

North - % of new homes determined in line with EA flood risk advice

100.0%

93.8%

99.2%

95.3%

100.0%

98.1%

99.1%

99.7%

97.6%

South East - new homes with recorded planning decisions

14912

35251

18237

26961

21498

13872

10924

10812

152467

South East - Number of new homes involved with over-ruled / partially over-ruled decisions

11

353

1072

639

26

220

42

89

2452

South East - % of new homes determined in line with EA flood risk advice

99.9%

99.0%

94.1%

97.6%

99.9%

98.4%

99.6%

99.2%

98.4%

West and Central - new homes with recorded planning decisions

28360

20194

27105

37364

36599

20289

17598

8051

195560

West and Central - Number of new homes involved with over-ruled and partially over-ruled decisions

113

449

120

102

154

65

58

29

1090

West and Central - % of new homes determined in line with EA flood risk advice

99.6%

97.8%

99.6%

99.7%

99.6%

99.7%

99.7%

99.6%

99.4%

Environment Agency national performance influencing planning applications that included new homes where decisions were decided in line with our advice 2011/12-2018/19

Year

11-Dec

Dec-13

13/14

14/15

15/16

16/17

17/18

18/19

Grand Total

Total new homes with recorded planning decisions

46467

65984

58618

76935

66132

42095

34688

23024

413943

Total new homes involved with over-ruled / partially over-ruled decisions

124

1451

1304

1338

183

437

158

129

5124

Average % of new homes determined in line with EA flood risk advice

99.7%

97.8%

97.8%

98.3%

99.7%

99.0%

99.5%

99.4%

98.8%

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
28th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many and what proportion of applications for the development of new homes had planning outcomes in accordance with Environment Agency advice on flood risk, by region, in each of the last 10 years.

This is a devolved matter and the information provided therefore relates to England only.

As a statutory consultee in development planning, the Environment Agency (EA) advises local planning authorities and developers on how to enable climate resilient development and identify opportunities to protect and enhance the environment.

The EA provides advice on all development proposals in areas that are at (i) medium or high risk of flooding from rivers or the sea (other than minor development) (ii) within 20 metres of a Main River, (iii) within an area with critical drainage problems (other than minor development).

The EA does not make the final decision on local planning approvals and local planning authorities are responsible and accountable for approving proposals for new development in their local areas. In the majority of cases the EA’s flood risk advice is taken on board by local planning authorities.

Environment Agency performance influencing planning applications that included new homes where decisions were decided in line with our advice 2011/12-2018/19 split by Environment Agency operational hub.

Year

11-Dec

Dec-13

13/14

14/15

15/16

16/17

17/18

18/19

Grand Total

North – new homes with recorded planning decisions

3195

10539

13276

12610

8035

7934

6166

4161

65916

North - Number of new homes involved with over-ruled / partially over-ruled decisions

0

649

112

597

3

152

58

11

1582

North - % of new homes determined in line with EA flood risk advice

100.0%

93.8%

99.2%

95.3%

100.0%

98.1%

99.1%

99.7%

97.6%

South East - new homes with recorded planning decisions

14912

35251

18237

26961

21498

13872

10924

10812

152467

South East - Number of new homes involved with over-ruled / partially over-ruled decisions

11

353

1072

639

26

220

42

89

2452

South East - % of new homes determined in line with EA flood risk advice

99.9%

99.0%

94.1%

97.6%

99.9%

98.4%

99.6%

99.2%

98.4%

West and Central - new homes with recorded planning decisions

28360

20194

27105

37364

36599

20289

17598

8051

195560

West and Central - Number of new homes involved with over-ruled and partially over-ruled decisions

113

449

120

102

154

65

58

29

1090

West and Central - % of new homes determined in line with EA flood risk advice

99.6%

97.8%

99.6%

99.7%

99.6%

99.7%

99.7%

99.6%

99.4%

Environment Agency national performance influencing planning applications that included new homes where decisions were decided in line with our advice 2011/12-2018/19

Year

11-Dec

Dec-13

13/14

14/15

15/16

16/17

17/18

18/19

Grand Total

Total new homes with recorded planning decisions

46467

65984

58618

76935

66132

42095

34688

23024

413943

Total new homes involved with over-ruled / partially over-ruled decisions

124

1451

1304

1338

183

437

158

129

5124

Average % of new homes determined in line with EA flood risk advice

99.7%

97.8%

97.8%

98.3%

99.7%

99.0%

99.5%

99.4%

98.8%

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
19th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 15 November 2021 to Question 74893, how much HS2 Ltd spent to acquire the 609 residential properties through Statutory and Discretionary Schemes.

To date, HS2 Ltd has spent £199,179,925 on all acquisitions for Phase 2b. This figure is based on purchase price only of land and property acquisitions between 2014 and the end of October 2021 acquired through statutory and discretionary schemes. HS2 Ltd does not record how many residential properties have been acquired, as a property can have mixed usage.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
19th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 15 November 2021 to Question 74893, how many residential properties were acquired through Statutory Discretion Schemes by constituency.

To date, HS2 Ltd has spent £199,179,925 on all acquisitions for Phase 2b. This figure is based on purchase price only of land and property acquisitions between 2014 and the end of October 2021 acquired through statutory and discretionary schemes. HS2 Ltd does not record how many residential properties have been acquired, as a property can have mixed usage.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
15th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of July 14 2021 to Question 29790 on High Speed Two: Compulsory Purchase, how many residential properties have been compulsory purchased by HS2 Ltd as part of plans to construct HS2 2b.

HS2 Ltd is yet to deposit a Hybrid Bill for Phase 2b, and therefore has not acquired any properties on that part of the route under Compulsory Purchase powers. However, the company has confirmed that, as of October 2021, it has acquired 609 properties through Statutory and Discretionary Schemes. These are properties that have been acquired at the previous owners’ request.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
24th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether legal agreements have been signed by private sector partners to help ensure UK rocket launches are consistent with climate change emissions reduction targets.

All applicants for a launch or spaceport licence under the Space Industry Act 2018 are required to submit an assessment of environmental effects. The spaceflight regulator will take account of these assessments and the Government’s environmental objectives when deciding licence applications and setting licence conditions. The Government will set environmental objectives for the regulator, including minimising emissions contributing to climate change resulting from spaceflight activities.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
23rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 10 February 2021 to Question HL12641 on Electric Vehicles: Charging Points, in which local authority areas the 3,800 chargepoints funded by the On-Street Residential Chargepoint Scheme have been installed; and how many of the potential 7,200 charging device installations have been funded from his Department’s doubling of funding to that scheme.

The doubling of funding for the ORCS to £20 million announced in May last year by the Transport Secretary will allow local authorities to install up to 7,200 charging devices, making charging at home and overnight easier for those without an off-street parking space.

The attached document details the local authorities which have received grant awards under the On-Street Residential Chargepoint Scheme, to date. In financial year 2020/21 almost 2,000 chargepoints were approved under the On-Street Residential Chargepoint Scheme (ORCS). ORCS is a demand-led fund open to all UK local authorities. As the Scheme moves into financial year 2021/22, amendments have been made, taking into account local authority feedback and the experience of previous years, in order to improve access to funding for as many local authorities as possible.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
4th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many armed forces champions are in post in each job centre district; and how many of those districts are without an armed forces champion.

DWP has 50 Armed Forces Champions, with at least one in each of our 37 Jobcentre Plus Districts. In addition, there are 11 Armed Forces Leads at group level.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
4th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many kickstart positions were (a) advertised and (b) filled in the defence sector during 2021.

We do not centrally collate information regarding jobs filled or advertised in the defence sector.

To encourage young people to apply for them, Kickstart jobs are categorised by the nature of the role rather than the sector of the employer. This means for example, that a defence-sector administrative job would be categorised as ‘administrative’ not ‘defence’. The most recently published statistics are published here: https://questions-statements.parliament.uk/written-questions/detail/2021-12-06/87676

Although care is taken when processing and analysing Kickstart applications, referrals and starts, the data collected might be subject to the inaccuracies inherent in any large-scale recording system which has been developed quickly. The management information presented here has not been subjected to the usual standard of quality assurance associated with official statistics, but is provided in the interests of transparency. Work is ongoing to improve the quality of information available for the programme.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
6th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether she plans to fund more than 100 Armed Forces Champions posts in job centres to support former service personnel to find work.

DWP is determined to provide veterans and other members of the armed forces community with the help and support they need and deserve. Our support to help veterans into jobs is unwavering with 84% gaining employment within 6 months of discharge – higher than the employment rate of the wider population.

To help deliver a better service, and to respond to feedback we had had from armed forces charities and other organisations, we introduced a new Armed Forces Champions model in April 2021. It provides for 50 Armed Forces Champions alongside 11 Group Leads at managerial level.

At least one Armed Forces Champion will be allocated to each Jobcentre Plus District. Their appointments mean for the first time jobcentres are providing help directly to veterans and others where additional support to access and progress in work is needed. Resources in the new network are targeted where there are particularly high levels of demand, for example in garrison towns, and where work linked to the armed forces will form a significant part of that done in individual jobcentres.

Officials in the Department have discussed the new model with a number of armed forces stakeholders and overall feedback has been positive. We continue to monitor and evaluate our new approach but have no plans to increase the number of champions.

In addition to the Armed Forces Champions roles, all DWP Work Coaches are trained to provide veterans and others with the help and support they need.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
14th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the oral contribution by Baroness Stedman-Scott on 15 June 2021, House of Lords, Official Report, column 1765, if she will provide the (a) locations and (b) DWP districts of the job centres that have an Armed Forces Champion supporting veterans seeking employment.

For the first time there will be a dedicated armed forces role at middle management level in each of the 11 Jobcentre Plus Groups. The 11 group leads are forming a virtual network and will be responsible for building capability and sharing best practice across the network. They will also be pro-active in liaising with the Army, Royal Navy and Royal Air Force on both recruitment and resettlement.

These Armed Forces Champions Leads will oversee 50 Armed Forces Champions across the Jobcentre Plus network (including at least one in each of the 37 Jobcentre Plus Districts), who will have specific responsibilities for supporting members of the Armed Forces Community as part of their job. Again, for the first time, this involves a front line role personally handling some claims, supporting veterans into work and helping resolve complex cases where necessary. Their specific jobcentre location is not a factor in their ability to deliver this service as their responsibilities are district wide.

Recruitment to these roles is largely complete and the Department expects all of the roles to be filled by the end of July. All of the 11 Leads are in post and all Armed Forces Champions will be in each district by the end of July. Currently 48 have been appointed across 35 Districts, with the final two to be in post by the end of the month.

There are also many staff across the DWP network based in individual Jobcentre offices who will be the local ‘expert’ on Armed Forces issues, and the Department is continually working to build capability across the Jobcentre Plus network.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
14th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment she has made of trends in the number of veterans claiming universal credit in the most recent period for which figures are available.

Currently we do not record as part of our official statistic the number of Universal Credit claimants who are veterans. With Universal Credit, claimants will have an initial interview with their Work Coach as part of the application process. This discussion will cover their career history and skills and qualifications etc, which identifies those claimants who are veterans and ensures appropriate support is offered.

The Department is also continuing to look at what other opportunities might be available to better identify and record data on veterans on the Universal Credit system and has regular conversations with the Ministry of Defence (MOD). This is part of a much wider piece of work involving a number of Departments, including the MOD and the Office for Veterans’ Affairs, to improve the collection and use of data relating to veterans.

DWP is proud to provide vital and significant support to veterans which recognises their particular needs and circumstances, including through Armed Forces Champions in each Jobcentre Plus District. For example, early voluntary entry to the Work and Health Programme, and using Service Medical Board evidence where we can so a severely disabled person does not have to undergo additional examinations for Employment and Support Allowance and Universal Credit purposes. We are also able to signpost veterans to other organisations for further support where appropriate.

The department is a supporter of the Armed Forces Covenant which helps ensure members of the armed forces community have access to government support in a number of areas, including:

  • Starting a new career
  • Access to healthcare
  • Education and family well-being
  • Having a home
  • Financial assistance
  • Discounted services, including travel
Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
3rd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many on-site inspections of businesses have been carried out by the Health and Safety Executive relating to covid-19 since 1 January 2020 to date, by (a) week and (b) local authority area.

The number of proactive site inspections that have been carried out which have addressed Covid-19 issues is not readily identifiable.

The majority of Covid-19 related site inspections have arisen from the investigation of a concern raised by workers or a member of the public. In April 2020, the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) introduced a change to its recording system to identify visits that addressed a concern relating to Covid-19. Hence, it is not possible to identify site visits made before then. In addition to the numbers below, where a concern is not specifically related to Covid-19 but such issues are identified, then action will be taken to address them.

HSE does not record the date of an investigation visit in an easily retrievable format. The table below identifies the numbers of visits based upon the month in which the visit report was created on their operational database.

Date

Number of site visits

April

15

May

48

June

1

Grand Total

64

The following table provides site visits by Local Authority:

Site Local Authority

Site Visits

Mid Devon

5

Canterbury

4

Glasgow UA

3

Medway Towns UA

3

Wellingborough

2

Hull City UA

2

Flintshire UA

2

City of Westminster

2

Brentwood

2

Burnley

2

Midlothian UA

2

Thanet

2

East Ayrshire UA

2

Surrey Heath

1

Brighton & Hove UA

1

Torbay UA

1

Plymouth UA

1

Sevenoaks

1

Manchester

1

Kingston-upon-Thames

1

Greenwich

1

Corby

1

Folkstone and Hythe

1

Portsmouth UA

1

Tower Hamlets

1

Aberdeen City UA

1

Reading

1

Maidstone

1

Not Applicable

1

Bradford

1

Bristol UA

1

Tonbridge & Malling

1

North Ayrshire UA

1

North Lanarkshire UA

1

Cardiff UA

1

Guildford

1

Waltham Forest

1

Kensington & Chelsea

1

South Lanarkshire UA

1

Newcastle-upon-Tyne

1

West Lothian UA

1

Leicester UA

1

York

1

Northampton

1

NB: the above data was extracted from an operational database on 4th June 2020 and is subject to change e.g. due to the delay between a site visit and recording the information into the database.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
23rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps she has taken to (a) protect public-facing universal credit and jobcentre staff and (b) limit their social interaction since 16 March 2020.

DWP has always followed Public Health England guidelines on social distancing. As of 24th March, Jobcentres are only offering face-to-face appointments – conducted in accordance with PHE guidelines on social distancing - for the small number of claimants who would otherwise not be able to receive support. This helps us to continue to deliver our critical services whilst keeping our customers and staff safe.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
23rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps his Department is taking to provide (a) phone and (b) online appointments for new universal credit claimants.

We have temporarily suspended the requirement for face-to-face Jobcentre Plus appointments for all claimants in Universal Credit, Job Seekers’ Allowance (JSA), Employment Support Allowance (ESA) and Income Support. Advances for all new UC claimants are now available online / via phone, with no requirement to attend a job centre.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
23rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether new universal credit claimants have been required to attend in-person appointments after a phone assessment since 16 March 2020.

We have temporarily suspended the requirement for face-to-face Jobcentre Plus appointments for all claimants in Universal Credit, Job Seekers’ Allowance (JSA), Employment Support Allowance (ESA) and Income Support. Advances for all new UC claimants are now available online / via phone, with no requirement to attend a job centre.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
23rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many universal credit claimants have been asked to attend in-person appointments with the imposition of sanctions if they failed to attend since 16 March 2020.

As both the Prime Minister and Chancellor have made clear, the Government will do whatever it takes to support people affected by COVID 19 and we have been clear in our intention that everyone should be supported to do the right thing.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
23rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what information her Department holds on the average (a) journey time and (b) distance universal credit claimants have made to attend in-person appointments in the latest period for which figures are available.

This information is not collected.

Since the introduction of Universal Credit, claimants have been supported by a more flexible approach to contact, with much greater use of digital and telephone channels. This enables claimants to continue to engage with the Department, receive appropriate support and satisfy the conditions of their personalised Claimant Commitment, without having to always attend an appointment in person.

Claimants can also access free telephony and web support through the Citizen’s Advice Help to Claim service.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
20th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps he is taking to ensure limited social interaction in relation to appointments for new universal credit claimants since 16 March 2020.

DWP has always followed Public Health England guidelines on social distancing. As of 24th March, Jobcentres are only offering face-to-face appointments – conducted in accordance with PHE guidelines on social distancing - for the small number of claimants who would otherwise not be able to receive support. This helps us to continue to deliver our critical services whilst keeping our customers and staff safe.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
11th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if he will publish the caseload statistics for local housing allowance for each broad rental market area in each of the last three years.

We will place a copy of a document in the library which shows the caseload statistics of Local Housing Allowance claimants in Universal Credit and Housing Benefit for each broad rental market area in each of the last three years.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
14th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if he will maintain targeted affordability funding for local housing allowance from April 2020.

The written ministerial statement laid on Monday announced that the freeze to local housing allowance (LHA) will end and rates will increase by 1.7% from April 2020. Targeted Affordability Funding (TAF) was introduced in recognition that the impact of the freeze may have different effects across the country. As the freeze has ended, there will be no TAF. For individuals who may require more support, Discretionary Housing Payments are available.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
14th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Written Statement of 13 January 2020, Welfare Update, what estimate he has made of the proportion of properties in each broad rental market area that will be affordable to local housing allowance claimants from April 2020.

In response to COVID-19, this Department has increased Local Housing Allowance (LHA) rates to the 30th percentile of local market rents from April for Universal Credit and Housing Benefit claimants, giving additional financial support for private renters.

This means that 30% of properties in each broad rental market area (BRMA) in England, Scotland and Wales are within the LHA rate with the exception of 15 rates in central and inner London where the national maximum caps continue to apply. The national caps have also been increased and are now based on the Outer London LHA rate plus 20%.

The proportion of properties in central and inner London that are within the LHA rate are set out below:

BRMA

Room

1 Bed

2 Bed

3 Bed

4 Bed

Central London

30%

less than 5%

less than 5%

less than 5%

less than 5%

Inner East London

30%

15%-20%

25%-30%

15%-20%

30%

Inner North London

30%

15%-20%

20%-25%

15%-20%

20%-25%

Inner South East London

30%

30%

30%

30%

30%

Inner South West London

30%

25%-30%

30%

25%-30%

20%-25%

Inner West London

30%

30%

30%

25%-30%

30%

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
22nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when Afghan refugees in the UK and housed in bridging hotels will be offered the covid-19 vaccine; and what proportion of Afghan refugees have received (a) a single dose and (b) two doses of the vaccine.

We have provided £3 million to the National Health Service to support an enhanced healthcare offer for people and their families arriving through Afghan resettlement schemes. The NHS was asked to ensure individuals were offered COVID-19 vaccination in line with national guidelines. Vaccinations are being offered to individuals in all 72 bridging hotel sites.

Information on the proportion of refugees who have received a single and two doses of the vaccine is not available, as general practice data does not record whether individuals have been resettled through the Afghan resettlement scheme.

Maggie Throup
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
17th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will issue clear guidance to care providers on the use of the Infection Control Fund to pay care home workers their normal wage in the event that they need to stay at home and self-isolate.

Since May 2020 the Government has made an Infection Control Fund available to support adult social care providers take measures to reduce COVID-19 transmission. One of the purposes of this fund is to enable care providers to pay care home workers their full wage in the event they need to self-isolate.

The Department has provided guidance to providers which is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/adult-social-care-infection-control-and-testing-fund

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
17th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of care providers using funding from the Infection Control Fund to pay care home workers their normal wage in the event that they need to stay at home and self-isolate.

Since May 2020 the Government has made an Infection Control Fund available to support adult social care providers take measures to reduce COVID-19 transmission. One of the purposes of this fund is to enable care providers to pay care home workers their full wage in the event they need to self-isolate.

The Department has provided guidance to providers which is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/adult-social-care-infection-control-and-testing-fund

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
17th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of care home workers receiving their normal wage in the event that they need to stay at home and self-isolate.

Since May 2020 the Government has made an Infection Control Fund available to support adult social care providers take measures to reduce COVID-19 transmission. One of the purposes of this fund is to enable care providers to pay care home workers their full wage in the event they need to self-isolate.

The Department has provided guidance to providers which is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/adult-social-care-infection-control-and-testing-fund

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
17th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of using the Infection Control Fund to support care home workers who need to stay at home and self-isolate.

Since May 2020 the Government has made an Infection Control Fund available to support adult social care providers take measures to reduce COVID-19 transmission. One of the purposes of this fund is to enable care providers to pay care home workers their full wage in the event they need to self-isolate.

The Department has provided guidance to providers which is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/adult-social-care-infection-control-and-testing-fund

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
14th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 14 December 2021 to Question 90329 on Nuclear Weapons: Proliferation, which recommendations in the Stockholm Initiative for Nuclear Disarmament her Department does not support.

The UK supports the Stockholm Initiative for Nuclear Disarmament and agrees with the principles behind its recommendations. The UK has made significant progress in fulfilling certain recommendations including in reducing our nuclear arsenal to the minimum credible level and reducing the role of nuclear weapons in our security policies. However, the Integrated Review set out the current deteriorating strategic security environment which limits further unilateral action from the UK at this time. In this context, the UK cannot further reduce our arsenal or the role our nuclear weapons play in our policies and doctrine, nor can we tighten our negative security assurances. Our NPT national report highlights the UK's continued commitment to the long-term goal of a world without nuclear weapons and our work to facilitate progress towards nuclear disarmament.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
9th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how many UK officials will be attending the 2022 Non-Proliferation Treaty Review Conference.

The UK's delegation at the 2022 Review Conference of the Treaty on the Non Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons will be led by the UK's Permanent Representative to the Conference on Disarmament. Delegations this year will be limited in number because of restrictions related to the Covid pandemic.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
17th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what steps her Department is taking to help ensure that Afghans who are (a) not eligible under the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy and (b) at risk of harm from the Taliban in Afghanistan are given assistance before the Afghan Citizens' Resettlement Scheme opens.

We have committed to provide £286 million in humanitarian and development support and continue to explore the best ways to provide support to the Afghan people. The Prime Minister's Special Representative for the Afghan Transition, Sir Simon Gass, and Chargé d'Affaires of the UK Mission to Afghanistan in Doha, Dr Martin Longden, travelled to Afghanistan on 5 October to hold talks with the Taliban. Sir Simon and Dr Longden stressed the need to ensure continued safe passage for those who wish to leave the country and respect human rights, including the rights of minorities and women and girls.

During Op PITTING we were able to get approval for evacuation of a number of Afghan nationals, to whom the Home Secretary agreed to grant Leave Outside the Rules to enter the UK, in addition to the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy contingent and British nationals. These people were identified as being particularly at risk and not all were able to leave before the end of the Operation. Providing assistance to those individuals eligible for HMG support remains our priority.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of the implications of the takeover of Kabul by the Taliban for the security of the UK and its allies.

One of our key objectives is to stop Afghanistan from again becoming a base for terrorist attacks around the world, to reduce the threat to the UK and the international community. We will work with our allies and use all the levers at our disposal to achieve this.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
20th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office, what steps he has taken to further the development of international (a) norms, (b) rules and (c) principles on responsible behaviours in space in each of the last six months.

In December 2020, the United Nations General Assembly adopted a UK-led resolution on "Reducing Space Threat through norms, rules and principles of responsible behaviour". The resolution called for States to study space threats and contribute their ideas to the United Nations Secretary-General by 3 May 2021. The United Kingdom submitted its views which can be found on the website of the United Nations Office for Disarmament Affairs, https://www.un.org/disarmament/topics/outerspace-sg-report-outer-space-2021/.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
24th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of (a) 10 November 2021 to Question 68120 on Ministry of Defence: Fines and (b) 19 November 2021 to Question 75808 on Government Departments: Fines, what information his Department holds on remedial actions imposed by his Department on (i) the Ministry of Defence and (ii) other Government Departments, in the latest period for which data is available.

The Treasury answered UIN 68120 on 10 November 2021 confirming that the department does not hold a central record of the remedial actions that have historically been taken, and such actions can take many forms.

The Minister for Defense Procurement’s answers of 9th and 10th November (to questions UIN 68119 and 68120) explained the actions taken in respect of the cases reported in the department’s annual reports and accounts, and explained the reasons why these were reportable. Other Government departments will report fines in their annual reports and accounts in a similar manner.

Fines imposed by the Treasury on other government departments are considered fruitless payment, a form of loss. Managing Public Money directs departments to report fruitless payments in the Loss Statement of the Parliamentary Accountability section of their annual report and accounts.

Departments are in the process of laying and publishing annual reports and accounts for the 2020-21 period. Annual reports and accounts for central government departments for 2018-19, 2019-20 and 2020-21 are linked in the Central Government Department’s annual reports and accounts central landing page.

Simon Clarke
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
16th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many fines have been issued by his Department to other Government departments in each year since 2010 for accountancy misconduct; and what the value of each fine was.

Government entities are required to produce annual reports and accounts in accordance with the Financial Reporting Manual, which adapts and interprets UK adopted International Financial Reporting Standards for the UK public sector context and sets out how to account for the use of resources. The annual reports and accounts are independently audited by the Comptroller and Auditor General (C&AG), supported by the National Audit Office (NAO), to offer assurance that the underlying transactions have appropriate parliamentary authority and that the accounts have been properly prepared and are free of material misstatements.

The C&AG may qualify his opinion should the findings of the audit suggest that there has not been appropriate parliamentary authority, that the accounts have not been properly prepared or that they are materially misstated. Such matters are drawn to the attention of the Public Accounts Committee which may call the Accounting Officer to account for the findings of the audit. HM Treasury does not issue fines or penalties over the quality of financial reporting as audited by the C&AG.

However, as set out in the Consolidated Budgeting Guidance, the budgeting framework allows for The Chief Secretary to consider further remedial action to incentivise good financial management and penalise actions that break certain rules or actions that fall below expectations. This may include asking the NAO to investigate the value for money that the department achieves, conducting a financial management review, reducing delegated authorities, removing access to Budget Exchange and/or making deductions to administration budgets. In all cases, the Treasury retains the right to apply whatever penalties are appropriate to incentivise good financial management and value for money. The Treasury does not hold a central record of the remedial actions that have historically been taken.

Simon Clarke
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the financial impact on savers with a National Savings and Investments (NS&I) account after the reduction of the premium bond prize fund rate from 1.4 per cent to 1 per cent in December 2020.

In setting interest rates for its products, NS&I must balance the interests of savers, taxpayers and the broader financial services sector.

With unprecedented Government funding requirements in 2020 due to Covid-19 pandemic measures and amid significant uncertainty and volatility in the retail savings market, NS&I experienced unprecedented upside pressures on its Net Financing. In the first six months of 2020-21, NS&I raised a total of £38.3 billion of Net Financing for the Government, so a decision was taken to reduce the Premium Bond rates to mitigate the risk of NS&I exceeding its £35 billion (+/- £5 billion) Net Financing target.

More broadly, it is important that Government takes into account taxpayer value considerations when making financing decisions. With gilt yields at low levels for the majority of the past year, the Government financing raised through NS&I has been more expensive than that raised through gilt issuance.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
29th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will take steps to provide self-employed workers with 80 per cent of their profits prior to the start of the covid-19 outbreak in the fourth Self-Employed Income Support Scheme grant.

The Government recognises the importance of supporting the self-employed during the COVID-19 outbreak. The Self-Employment Income Support Scheme (SEISS) provides generous support to self-employed people who meet the eligibility criteria.

There will be a fourth SEISS grant covering February to April 2021. Further details on the SEISS, including the fourth grant, will be announced on 3 March.

15th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 13 October 2020 to Question 100891, how many and what proportion of brewers produce (a) less than 2,100 hectolitres per year and (b) between 2,100 and 5,000 hectolitres per year.

Further information about small breweries will be published with the technical consultation on Small Brewers Relief this Autumn.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
8th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the value is of the small breweries relief to breweries producing (a) 3,000 hectolitres, (b) 4,000 hectolitres and (c) 5,000 hectolitres of beer each year.

Small Brewers producing less than 5,000 hectolitres per year are currently entitled to a 50% reduction in the rate of duty charged on their beer. The value of the relief to an individual Brewer will depend on the strength of the beer produced. At an average strength of 4% this would reduce a Brewer’s beer duty bill by £114,480 on 3,000 hectolitres, £152,640 on 4,000 hectolitres, and £190.800 on 5,000 hectolitres per annum.

HMRC publishes annual statistics on Small Brewers Relief, this includes the number of people claiming the relief and the total cost of the relief. Information on the total cost of the relief by production volume is not readily available. The latest publication of annual tax relief data for Small Brewers Relief can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/main-tax-expenditures-and-structural-reliefs.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
10th Feb 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent assessment he has made of the economic effect of small breweries relief on small brewers.

We are conducting a review of Small Brewers Relief, and further announcements about this will be made in due course.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
4th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the letter from the Minister for Resettlement of 29 October 2021, how many Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy eligible Afghans are being housed temporarily at each bridging hotel.

There are currently over 12,000 Afghan evacuees in bridging hotel accommodation at the present time.

Our current estate includes approximately 84 hotels and over 12,000 individuals – some of whom are British Nationals and some of whom are Afghans who may be eligible for ARAP or the ACRS.

The numbers in hotels is contingent on offers of support from local authorities, so we urge all Honourable members to speak to their local authorities about what more they can offer.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
4th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many Afghans who (a) are and (b) are not eligible for the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy are being housed in bridging hotels as of 4 January 2022, by local authority.

There are currently over 12,000 Afghan evacuees in bridging hotel accommodation at the present time.

Our current estate includes approximately 84 hotels and over 12,000 individuals – some of whom are British Nationals and some of whom are Afghans who may be eligible for ARAP or the ACRS.

The numbers in hotels is contingent on offers of support from local authorities, so we urge all Honourable members to speak to their local authorities about what more they can offer.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
15th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the Statement of Changes to the Immigration Rules, HC 913, published on 14 December 2021, whether changes made to the eligibility under the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy scheme will apply retrospectively to Afghans who have been relocated to the UK already under the ARAP scheme.

The clarifications to the eligibility criteria for Category 4 of the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy (ARAP) will not apply retrospectively to Afghans who have already been relocated in the UK under the ARAP scheme. They will apply to any ARAP eligibility decisions made on or after 1600 hours on 14 December 2021.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
15th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when the Afghan Citizen Resettlement Scheme will open.

We are working across Government and with partners such as UNHCR to design the Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme (ACRS), amidst a complex and changing picture. We are committed to working in step with the international community to get this right, and we will set out more details soon.

Eligible people will be prioritised and referred for resettlement to the UK as set out in the policy statement published on gov.uk on 13 September, available at www.gov.uk/government/publications/afghanistan-resettlement-and-immigration-policy-statement as explained in my letter to colleagues on 23rd December 2021.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
3rd Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, on what date her Department received the request from the Kenyan Government for mutual legal assistance in relation to the killing of Agnes Wanjiru; and when she plans to respond to that request.

As a matter of longstanding policy, the Home Office neither confirms nor denies the existence of mutual legal assistance requests.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Home Office) (Security)
30th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much funding per Afghan resettled in the UK will be provided to local authorities for resettlement under the (a) Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy and (b) Afghan Citizens' Resettlement Scheme.

Councils who support people through the Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme (ACRS) or Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy (ARAP) scheme will receive £20,520 per person, over 3 years, for resettlement and integration costs. Local councils and health partners who resettle families will also receive up to £4,500 per child for education, £850 to cover English language provision for adults requiring this support and £2,600 to cover healthcare.

A further £20 million of flexible funding will be made available to support local authorities with higher cost bases with any additional costs in the provision of services. In addition, the previously announced Afghan Housing Costs Fund will increase from £5 million to £17 million and run for 2 extra years to help local authorities provide housing and give certainty that funding will be available in the future.

The ACRS scheme is not currently open.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
22nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will publish the policy guidance on covid-19 vaccination and isolation in relation to the housing of Afghan refugees in bridging hotels.

Covid-19 vaccination and isolation policy guidance is the responsibility of the Department for Health and Social Care.

The Home Office ensures that the accommodation of those evacuated from Afghanistan in bridging hotels is compliant with these policies.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
5th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many Afghans her Department estimates to process through the Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme before March 2022.

Through the Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme (ACRS), the UK will relocate up to 20,000 people at risk, including women and girls and minority groups, so they can rebuild their lives in safety.

The scheme is not yet open and remains under development. However, the first to be resettled through this scheme will be some of those who arrived in the UK under the evacuation programme, which included individuals who were considered to be at particular risk – including women’s rights activists, prosecutors and journalists.

Further information on the eligibility, prioritisation and referral of people for the ACRS is set out in the policy statement published on gov.uk on 13 September, available at www.gov.uk/government/publications/afghanistan-resettlement-and-immigration-policy-statement.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
3rd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when she plans to respond to the letters from the hon. Member for Wentworth and Dearne of 15 September 2021 and 18 October 2021 on support for Afghan personnel in the UK as part of Operation War Welcome.

The Minister of State for Justice and Minister for Afghan Resettlement will respond shortly.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
2nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many and what proportion of people resettled under the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy have been provided with permanent housing.

We are working at pace with local authorities to source appropriate accommodation for Afghan families who were evacuated to the UK.

Over 300 local authorities have made offers of accommodation. The process of matching homes to families requires careful attention to detail but we are working to move people as quickly as possible when properties become available.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 13 September 2021 to Question 44194, on Afghanistan: Refugees, whether applicants to the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy scheme that are already in the UK will be settled before the Afghan citizens' resettlement scheme opens.

The Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme (ACRS) is separate from, and in addition to, the Afghanistan Relocation and Assistance Policy (ARAP). Whilst the ACRS is not yet open, some of those who arrived in the UK under the evacuation programme, which prioritised individuals who were considered to be at particular risk will be the first to be resettled under the ACRS. Officials are working urgently to stand up the remaining elements of the scheme, amid the complex and changing picture.

Further information on both the ARAP and the ACRS is set out in the policy statement published on gov.uk on 13 September, available at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/afghanistan-resettlement-and-immigration-policy-statement/afghanistan-resettlement-and-immigration-policy-statement-accessible-version#afghan-relocations-and-assistance-policy

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
21st Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when her Department plans to (a) open the Afghan Citizen Resettlement Scheme and (b) publish the eligibility criteria for that scheme.

Through the Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme (ACRS) the UK will relocate up to 20,000 people at risk, including women and girls and minority groups, so they can rebuild their lives in safety.

The first to be resettled through this scheme will be those who arrived in the UK under the evacuation programme, which included individuals who were considered to be at particular risk – including women’s rights activists, prosecutors and journalists.

We are working urgently to stand up the remaining elements of the scheme, amid the complex and changing picture. We are working closely across government and with NGOs, charities, local authorities and civil society groups to ensure support is provided to people who are resettled through this route.

Further information on the eligibility, prioritisation and referral of people for the ACRS is set out in the policy statement published on gov.uk on 13 September, available at www.gov.uk/government/publications/afghanistan-resettlement-and-immigration-policy-statement.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
7th Sep 2021
To ask the Home Department, how many successful Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy applicants and their families that are in the UK have (a) been allocated housing and (b) are still waiting to be allocated housing.

The Afghan citizens’ resettlement scheme (ACRS) will provide protection for people at risk identified as in need.

The government has committed to welcome around 5,000 people in the first year and up to 20,000 over the coming years. We will work with the United Nations and aid agencies to identify those we should help.

The scheme is not yet open yet, further details will be announced in due course.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
21st Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what support for housing the Government is providing to those relocated to the UK under the Afghan Relocation and Assistance Policy.

The Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy (ARAP) launched on 1 April 2021. Under the policy, any current or former locally employed staff who are assessed to be under serious threat to life are offered priority relocation to the UK regardless of their employment status, rank or role, or length of time served. Since 1 April, the Home Office has relocated former Afghan staff and their families in the UK, including those relocated as part of HMG’s evacuation from Afghanistan. The overwhelming majority of those approved by the ARAP scheme have now been evacuated and the scheme remains open for anyone who is eligible.

We are working closely with local authorities to ensure that those relocated to the UK under ARAP are fully supported.

The ARAP programme provides a funding package to resource local authorities who come forward with offers of housing to resettle Afghan staff and their families, enabling delivery of integration support for families and further support on employment, welfare benefits, and access to health, education, and other local services. This is to the value of £10,500 for every Afghan welcomed for up to a year, and also includes their family members who make the journey with them.    MHCLG have recently announced a new Afghan LES Housing Costs Fund of £5 million, to support.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
21st Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what financial support is available to people relocated to the UK under the Afghan Relocation and Assistance Policy.

The Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy (ARAP) launched on 1 April 2021. Under the policy, any current or former locally employed staff who are assessed to be under serious threat to life are offered priority relocation to the UK regardless of their employment status, rank or role, or length of time served. Since 1 April, the Home Office has relocated former Afghan staff and their families in the UK, including those relocated as part of HMG’s evacuation from Afghanistan. The overwhelming majority of those approved by the ARAP scheme have now been evacuated and the scheme remains open for anyone who is eligible.

We are working closely with local authorities to ensure that those relocated to the UK under ARAP are fully supported.

The ARAP programme provides a funding package to resource local authorities who come forward with offers of housing to resettle Afghan staff and their families, enabling delivery of integration support for families and further support on employment, welfare benefits, and access to health, education, and other local services. This is to the value of £10,500 for every Afghan welcomed for up to a year, and also includes their family members who make the journey with them.    MHCLG have recently announced a new Afghan LES Housing Costs Fund of £5 million, to support.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
26th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the oral contribution of the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State of the Home Department of 25 May 2021, column 82WH, how many provider properties under the Asylum Dispersal Scheme her Department has inspected by region in each year since 2010.

As well as the many tens of thousands of property inspections carried out by our providers, 2,525 property inspections were carried out by Home Office staff in 2019/20. Routine Home Office inspections were paused towards the end of the year due to the emerging Covid-19 crisis but have now recommenced in line with coronavirus guidelines.

Data on the number of properties the Home Office has inspected since 2010 by area is not held in a reportable format and can only be provided at disproportionate cost by examination of individual inspection records.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
26th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the oral contribution of the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State of the Home Department of 25 May 2021, column 81WH on the Asylum Dispersal System, how many inspections her Department conducted of provider properties for the Asylum Dispersal Scheme in 2019-20.

As well as the many tens of thousands of property inspections carried out by our providers, 2,525 property inspections were carried out by Home Office staff in 2019/20. Routine Home Office inspections were paused towards the end of the year due to the emerging Covid-19 crisis but have now recommenced in line with coronavirus guidelines.

Data on the number of properties the Home Office has inspected since 2010 by area is not held in a reportable format and can only be provided at disproportionate cost by examination of individual inspection records.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
26th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the oral contribution of the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State of the Home Department of 25 May 2021, column 81WH on the Asylum Dispersal Scheme, if she will publish the 40 local authorities which have adopted the voluntary dispersal agreements but have providers unable to find suitable properties for the Asylum Dispersal System.

The latest published Immigration Statistics detail the number of asylum seekers accommodated in each local authority area. These statistics can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/asylum-and-resettlement-datasets#asylum-support (opens in a new tab) Data is published on a quarterly basis, with the latest information published 27 May 2021.

The Home Office does not publish a breakdown of these statistics which disaggregates the number of asylum seekers accommodated in dispersal accommodation for the first time in each quarter in each of the last two years, by local authority. These figures are not available in a reportable format and to provide the information could only be done at disproportionate cost.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
26th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the oral contribution of the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State of the Home Department of 25 May 2021, column 81WH on the Asylum Dispersal System, if she will publish a list of the local authorities which have adopted voluntary dispersal agreements.

The latest published Immigration Statistics detail the number of asylum seekers accommodated in each local authority area. These statistics can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/asylum-and-resettlement-datasets#asylum-support (opens in a new tab) Data is published on a quarterly basis, with the latest information published 27 May 2021.

The Home Office does not publish a breakdown of these statistics which disaggregates the number of asylum seekers accommodated in dispersal accommodation for the first time in each quarter in each of the last two years, by local authority. These figures are not available in a reportable format and to provide the information could only be done at disproportionate cost.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
5th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the Grenfell Tower Inquiry phase 1 report, which Department is responsible for implementing the recommendations in that report; what the implementation status is of each such recommendation; and what the planned timescale is for implementing each of those recommendations.

The Home Office is working collaboratively with the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government, the Fire and Rescue Sector and all relevant stakeholders to deliver Grenfell Tower Inquiry phase 1 recommendations with quality, pace and ambition.

The Government published an update on delivery on 21 January and continues to make progress. As announced in the Queen’s Speech, we will shortly introduce a Fire Safety Bill, a necessary first step towards implementation of the Inquiry’s recommendations

11th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 19 January 2022 to Question 96770 on Kickstart Scheme: Defence, how many kickstart positions were (a) advertised and (b) filled in the Ministry of Defence during 2021.

The requested information is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
11th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, if he will publish the (a) names and (b) roles of the people sitting on the Committee for the National Flagship.

Members of the National Flagship Aesthetics panel will be selected by myself on the basis of acknowledged relevant expertise. No members have yet been appointed to the panel, or individual roles agreed. It is anticipated that the panel will convene and complete its assessment during Spring 2022.

Ben Wallace
Secretary of State for Defence
11th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, on what date the Committee for the National Flagship is expected to begin the formal process of assessing submitted designs for the National Flagship; and when he expects that Committee's assessment to be complete.

Members of the National Flagship Aesthetics panel will be selected by myself on the basis of acknowledged relevant expertise. No members have yet been appointed to the panel, or individual roles agreed. It is anticipated that the panel will convene and complete its assessment during Spring 2022.

Ben Wallace
Secretary of State for Defence
11th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, when he plans to publish the Defence Arctic Strategy as announced on 30 September 2018.

The Ministry of Defence plans to publish the Defence High North Strategy in the spring.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
6th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many and what proportion of ARAP applications received by his Department in each month (a) have been processed with a final decision given and (b) await a decision on eligibility, before the new eligibility criteria were introduced on 14 December 2021.

We owe a debt of gratitude to all Afghan nationals who risked their lives working alongside UK forces. As such, the ARAP Scheme has been one of the most generous relocation programmes in the world. It is not time-limited and will endure, facilitating the relocation of eligible Afghans and their families, from third countries if possible.

Due to constraints on accessible data, the information requested is only available from October onwards and can be found in the table below:

Month

Applications Received

Eligibility Decisions Made

October

5,998

706

November

4,636

1,450

December

2,631

803

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
4th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether his Department plans to set targets for the use of UK steel in (a) Fleet Solid Support Ships, (b) Tempest, (c) Type 32 Frigates, (d) Type 83 Destroyers and (e) other contracts tendered by his Department.

Steel is procured in accordance with Cabinet Office guidelines. Many defence programmes require specialised steels that are not manufactured in the UK; nevertheless, we encourage the sourcing of UK steel wherever it is technically and commercially feasible.

Steel for our major defence programmes is generally sourced by our prime contractors from a range of UK and international suppliers. This Government is committed to creating the right conditions in the UK for a competitive and sustainable steel industry. It publishes its future pipeline for steel requirements, together with data on how Departments are complying with steel procurement guidance. This enables UK steel manufacturers to better plan and bid for Government contracts.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
4th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether his Department has targets for the proportion of UK steel used on the (a) Ajax, (b) Boxer, (c) Astute, (d) Dreadnought, (e) Type 26 Frigate and (f) Type 31 Frigate programmes.

Steel is procured in accordance with Cabinet Office guidelines. Many defence programmes require specialised steels that are not manufactured in the UK; nevertheless, we encourage the sourcing of UK steel wherever it is technically and commercially feasible.

Steel for our major defence programmes is generally sourced by our prime contractors from a range of UK and international suppliers. This Government is committed to creating the right conditions in the UK for a competitive and sustainable steel industry. It publishes its future pipeline for steel requirements, together with data on how Departments are complying with steel procurement guidance. This enables UK steel manufacturers to better plan and bid for Government contracts.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
4th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many of the 7,100 Armed Forces personnel on standby for resilience tasks have received their covid-19 booster jab.

Every member of the Armed Forces has been offered vaccination and boosters when sufficient time has elapsed since their second vaccine dose.

40% of Service personnel have been boosted thus far. Uptake broadly matches the general population.

We continue to encourage all Service personnel to get boosted at the first opportunity.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
4th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many armed forces personnel who have been deployed to help the NHS (a) alleviate winter pressures and (b) support covid-19 vaccine programme have received their covid-19 booster jab.

As at 7 Jan 2022, there are 1,792 Armed Forces personnel deployed to alleviate winter pressures. Of these, 71% have received a COVID-19 booster jab. 939 personnel are deployed in support of the COVID-19 vaccination programme and 66% have received a booster jab.

The rates of booster uptake amongst the winter resilience force are ahead of the wider Defence population and those of similar age groups within the general population, and we continue to work to improve rates of uptake to ensure that every person in Defence takes up their offer of receiving a booster when they are eligible.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
4th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether armed forces personnel deployed to support care homes are included within the current mandatory vaccination regime for care home staff.

It is mandatory for all Service personnel deploying to patient-facing hospital or care home roles to be up to date with all applicable COVID-19 vaccinations/boosters. As at 5 January 2022, there are no military personnel currently deployed in support of care homes.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
4th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many trained regular army soldiers there were in each of the Army's regiments and corps in each year since 2010.

The number of trained Regular Soldiers as at 1 April, each year from 2017 to 2021, broken down by Arm/Service, is shown in the table below. Information for years 2010 - 2016 has already been provided as part of a previous parliamentary question and can be found at the following link: https://questions-statements.parliament.uk/written-questions/detail/2016-09-15/46584

Arm/Service

1 Apr 2017

1 Apr 2018

1 Apr 2019

1 Apr 2020

1 Apr 2021

Total

75,619

74,070

71,869

70,445

73,446

Staff

704

715

723

726

752

Household Cavalry/Royal Armoured Corps

4,486

4,399

4,313

4,241

4,431

Royal Regiment of Artillery

5,922

5,727

5,466

5,228

5,506

Corps of Royal Engineers

7,245

7,092

6,892

6,689

7,500

Royal Corps of Signals

5,658

5,739

5,623

5,433

5,676

Infantry

19,018

18,053

17,121

17,057

18,023

Army Air Corps

1,628

1,591

1,502

1,510

1,542

Royal Army Chaplain’s Department

131

126

118

117

120

The Royal Logistic Corps

10,448

10,406

10,140

9,982

9,941

Royal Army Medical Corps

2,950

3,024

3,008

3,060

3,095

Corps of Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers

7,464

7,309

7,275

7,012

7,358

Adjutant Generals Corps Staff & Personnel Support

3,223

3,218

3,107

2,958

3,033

Adjutant Generals Corps Royal Military Police

1,509

1,463

1,437

1,355

1,320

Adjutant Generals Corps Military Provost Service

175

178

165

149

141

Adjutant General’s Corps Educational and Training

274

275

285

280

302

Adjutant General’s Corps Army Legal Services Branch

99

99

88

89

91

Royal Army Veterinary Corps

354

353

341

337

350

Small Arms School Corps

147

146

143

142

142

Royal Army Dental Corps

227

212

201

188

182

Intelligence Corps

1,693

1,676

1,648

1,618

1,689

Royal Army Physical Training Corps

443

435

429

433

435

Queen Alexandra’s Royal Army Nursing Corps

871

880

913

927

949

Royal Corps of Army Music

697

690

674

675

646

Senior Soldier Continuity Posts

247

242

249

219

213

Source: Analysis Army

Notes/Caveats:

1. Figures are for the Trade Trained Regular Army only and therefore exclude Gurkhas, Full Time Reserve Service, Mobilised Reserves, Army Reserve and all other Reserves, but includes those personnel that have transferred from GURTAM to UKTAP.

2. Figures represent personnel's Arm/Service, regardless of the Unit they are serving in.

3. At any one situation date in the above table, there are less than circa 20 people who according to the Joint Personnel Administration System (JPA), do not have a known Arm/Service attributed to them. Whilst they are included in the total, they have not been included in the breakdown.

4. All Officers of Paid Rank Colonel and above are included in Staff, regardless of previous Arm/Service.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
4th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many highly skilled jobs (a) in total and (b) at Rolls Royce's Filton facility will be created as a result of the agreement between the UK and Japanese Governments to develop a joint jet engine demonstrator.

The UK is delighted to work with Japan, a close and highly capable partner, on plans to develop a combat air engine demonstrator. Work on the joint engine demonstrator will kickstart early this year, with the UK initially investing £30 million in planning, digital designs and innovative manufacturing developments. A further £200 million of UK funding is expected to go towards developing a full-scale demonstrator power system, supporting hundreds of highly skilled jobs, including many at Rolls-Royce’s Filton facility in Bristol.

Rolls Royce have indicated that the first stage of this work is expected to support up to 50 jobs, to establish the demonstrator design requirements and associated collaboration arrangements. The total number of highly skilled jobs at the Filton facility will be subject to the output of this phase but is expected to increase from 2023.

The demonstrator will support the broader FCAS programme, which already employs over 2,000 highly skilled personnel including engineers and programmers. The FCAS programme entered the Concept and Assessment Phase last year and our industry partners are increasing their recruitment of highly skilled personnel to support this work. The development of innovative technologies critical to the future of the Defence aerospace industry will bring together some of the very best design and manufacturing engineers, programme managers, and commercial specialists in the UK Defence industry.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
16th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the Statement of changes to the Immigration Rules published on 14 December 2021, HC 913, if she will make a comparative assessment of roles that meet eligibility requirements for the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy scheme under (a) the criteria of furthering the UK’s military and national security objectives and (b) previous ARAP criteria for assistance to locally employed staff.

The amendments to the immigration rules, as laid by the Home Secretary, are intended to ensure greater clarity and consistency for potential applicants, and that ARAP policy is reflected accurately. As such, there has been no substantive change in the ARAP eligibility criteria. Furthermore, the amended immigration rules will not apply retrospectively, and as such only applicants that have not yet undergone eligibility assessments will be assessed under the new rules.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
15th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many individual Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy applicants have been relocated to the UK each month since April 2021.

The Afghan Relocation and Assistance Policy (ARAP) has been one of the most generous in the world, under which circa.1,300 Locally Employed Staff (LES) and others who supported the UK mission in Afghanistan have been relocated to the UK since April 2021, with a large proportion being evacuated on over 100 RAF flights as part of Operation PITTING.

We owe a debt of gratitude to all Afghan nationals who risked their lives working alongside UK forces. For this reason, the ARAP scheme is not time-limited and will endure, facilitating the relocation of eligible Afghans and their families, from third countries if possible.

As at 16 December 2021, the number of ARAP eligible principles relocated by month is shown in the table below:

April

0

May

1

June

24

July

188

August (inc Op PITTING)

981

September

11

October

30

November

70

December

47

Total

1,352

As at 16 December 2021 the overall total of ARAP eligible people (families and dependants) who have been relocated to the UK since April 2021 is:

Prior to Op PITTING

1,978

During Op PITTING

Approximately 5,000

Since Op PITTING

674

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
15th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many Afghans with confirmed eligibility for assistance through the ARAP scheme remain in Afghanistan.

As at 16 December 2021, of the 311 ARAP-eligible principals who we were not able to evacuate before the end of OP PITTING; 165 are currently known to be in Afghanistan. The ARAP scheme is not time limited, and we continue to receive and approve applications to the scheme. All those who worked for Her Majesty's Government (HMG) in qualifying roles remain eligible. In addition, those who worked in meaningful enabling roles alongside HMG in extraordinary and unconventional contexts will also be considered. Efforts to support all eligible Afghans and to help them to come to the UK are continuing.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
15th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the Statement of Changes to the Immigration Rules, HC 913, published on 14 December 2021, how many successful Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy scheme applicants now in the UK would have been (a) successful and (b) unsuccessful under the new eligibility criteria for the ARAP scheme.

The amendments to the immigration rules, as laid by the Home Secretary, are intended to ensure that the ARAP policy is correctly reflected in those rules and to ensure greater clarity and consistency for potential applicants. The amended eligibility criteria will not apply retrospectively, and as such only applicants that have not yet undergone eligibility assessments will be assessed under the new criteria.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
14th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether his Department has provided data on armed forces personnel to Kenyan authorities in relation to the investigation into the death of Agnes Wanjiru.

It would be inappropriate to comment on the details of an ongoing police investigation in another jurisdiction. The Ministry of Defence continues to support the Kenyan authorities in respect of their inquiries into the death of Ms Wanjiru.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
14th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether the establishment of the new Land Regional Hub in Germany will require purchasing of land in Germany.

The Ministry of Defence has no current plans to purchase land in Germany.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
14th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 10 December 2021 to Question 88654, what specific costs were entailed in the £2.1 billion spent removing the British Army’s footprint from Germany.

The drawdown of troops permanently based in Germany since 2010 has cost £2.1 billion and has returned 20,000 service personnel and their families as well as civil servants, contractors and support teams to the UK. The Ministry of Defence considers that this drawdown continues to support the most advantageous basing laydown of our personnel.

The rebasing of personnel from Germany should not be confused with the decision in the Integrated Review to maintain a stock of equipment in Germany to allow more rapid deployment of land forces into the European theatre if necessary. This forward basing of equipment was largely already in place to support the training facility in Sennelager that was retained during the drawdown of the garrison. Support to this facility will require, on current plans, an additional 19 troops to be based in Germany from April 2022.

The breakdown of the £2.1 billion is as follows:

  • £1.8 billion under the Army Basing Programme (ABP). This represents the cost of providing new or refurbished living and technical accommodation for units that returned from Germany, along with the associated moving costs. This included the provision of c.1,400 new family homes and thousands of new single living bed spaces as well as investment in local infrastructure.

  • £293 million under the BORONA Programme. This represents the cost of initial unit moves which took place between 2010-2015, including the move of HQ ARRC from Rhine Garrison to the UK.
James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
14th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many troops will be deployed in Germany as part of the new Land Regional Hub.

We are planning for 19 additional troops to be deployed to Germany from April 2022 to deliver the forward basing of armoured vehicles and exercising troops as a part of the Land Regional Hub.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
14th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 10 December 2021 to Question 88654 on Germany: Army and with reference to page 158 of his Department's Annual Report and Accounts 2013-14, whether the £1.5 billion loss from impairment charges for land and buildings resulting from the early withdrawal of Forces from Germany is included in the £2.1 billion spent removing the British Army’s footprint from Germany.

Any loss from impairment charges for land and buildings is not included in the £2.1 billion spent in relocating British Army units from Germany.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
13th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the cost has been of maintaining the seven month deployment of the Carrier Strike Group to the Indo-Pacific to date.

The additional operating cost of deploying the Carrier Strike Group is currently estimated at £74 million, this covers any costs incurred above what those personnel and capabilities deployed would usually cost to defence, for example fuel costs, operational allowances, and other incidental costs. Further work is ongoing to refine those cost estimates and provide a final figure.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
13th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 22 November 2021 to Question 76577, on Merlin Helicopters: Expenditure, whether the incorrect recording of Merlin component lives leading to the fruitless payment of £20.995 million is related to the loss of Merlin Helicopter engineering record cards referred to in the fruitless payments section on page 160 of the Ministry of Defence Annual Reports and Accounts 2011-12 resulting in a fruitless payment of £564,000.

The two fruitless payments covered in these Annual Report and Accounts (ARAc) entries relate to separate events. The fruitless payment of £20.995 million, referenced in the Department's ARAc financial year (FY) 2014-15, reflect additional costs incurred under the Integrated Merlin Operational Support contract including a period of reduced aircraft availability in delivery of the Merlin Capability Sustainment Programme. There were underlying issues with some aspects of data and asset management on this platform within the Department leading to additional costs under the support contract and as a result of limiting availability of aircraft for a capability sustainment programme.

The £0.564 million fruitless payment covered in the FY2011-12 ARAc relates to the same Operational Support Contract. The payment was for additional costs that were incurred by the supplier due to the loss within the Ministry of Defence of a number of Engineering Record Cards. Component lives and the consumption of these lives as well as records of modification, repair and overhaul, were recorded on the cards. Without this information, worst case assumptions (penalty lives) had to be made about the life of components in order to be assured that the aircraft remained safe, which increased the need for maintenance and replacement parts.

The Department has since reviewed and improved its procedures, including the use of new record-keeping software, to avoid further such costs arising.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
13th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with what countries the carrier strike group has had (a) engagements and (b) military exercises to date; and what those engagements and military exercises were.

The table below sets out the countries and/or overseas territories that the UK Carrier Strike Group has interacted with during the 2021 deployment. This also includes activity undertaken by our Integrated Partners, the Netherlands and United States.

Country/ Overseas Territory

Engagement

Military Exercise

Australia

N/A

Passing Exercise (PASSEX), air interaction, Exercise BERSAMA GOLD. (Five Powers Defence Arrangements Exercise hosted by Malaysia with participants from Australia, Malaysia, New Zealand, Singapore and the UK.) Maritime Partnership Exercise (with US and Japan). Press Release

Bahrain

Participation in the CDS-led Dragon Group. Press Release

N/A

Bangladesh

Port Visit to Chattogram. Press Release

PASSEX with the Bangladeshi Navy, training with Bangladesh Special Forces. Press Release

British Indian Ocean Territory

Port Visit to Diego Garcia.

N/A

Brunei

Port Visit to Bandar Seri Begawan.

N/A

Cambodia

Virtual Defence Engagement.

N/A

Canada

N/A

Exercise PACIFIC CROWN (Pacific Ocean) South China Sea navigation in company.

Cyprus

Port Visit to Limassol and Larnaca.

N/A

Djibouti

Port Visit to Djibouti and support to Allied Appreciation Fly Past. Press Release

N/A

Egypt

Port Visit to Alexandria, Defence Engagement.

N/A

France

N/A

Exercises Atlantic Trident (North Atlantic) and Gallic Strike (Mediterranean). Press Release

Georgia

Port Visit to Batumi.

At sea PASSEX with the Georgian Navy.

Gibraltar

Port Visit and hosted reception at sea.

N/A

Greece

Port Visit to Piraeus and Souda.

N/A

Guam

Port visit to Guam.

N/A

India

Port Visit to Goa and Mumbai. Defence Engagement

Maritime Participation Exercise in the Indian Ocean. Press Release Exercise Konkan Shakti. Press Release

Indonesia

Port visit to Jakarta and Virtual Defence Engagement.

At sea PASSEX with the Indonesian Navy.

Iraq

Participation in the CDS-led Dragon Group.

N/A

Israel

Port Visit to Haifa.

Exercise Falcon Strike and Exercise Tri-Lightning (both in the Mediterranean).

Italy

Port Visit to Augusta, Messina and Taranto. Defence Engagement, including a trilateral meeting between the UK, Italy and Turkey which was hosted by the Secretary of State for Defence. Press Release Co Host – North Atlantic Council Defence Engagement.

Exercise Falcon Strike, transit in western Mediterranean. Press Release Cross Deck of F35 between ITS CAVOUR and HMS QUEEN ELIZABETH. Press Release

Japan

Port visits to Sasebo, Yokosuka, Funakoshi. Reception and capability demonstration.

Exercise PACIFIC CROWN (Pacific Ocean), quad carrier exercise (with two carriers from the USA, one from Japan and HMS Queen Elizabeth), South China Sea navigation in company. Maritime Partnership Exercise (with US and Australia). Passing Exercise in Indian Ocean. Press Release Press Release

Jordan

Port Visit to Aqaba and participation in the CDS-led Dragon Group.

16 Air Assault Brigade Joint Theatre Entry Exercise. Press Release

Kenya

Port Visit to Mombasa. Defence Engagement supported by the Minister for the Armed Forces.

Exercise with Kenyan Armed Forces. Press Release

Kuwait

Participation in the CDS-led Dragon Group.

N/A

Malaysia

N/A

PASSEX, Exercise BERSAMA GOLD.

Malta

Port Visit to Valletta.

N/A

Montenegro

Port visit to Bar, Reception and Capability Demonstration. Defence Engagement, including an event led by Minister of State (Lords). Press Release Press Release

N/A

Netherlands

Integrated Partner.

Integrated Partner.

New Zealand

Not Applicable.

South China Sea Transit in company, Exercise BERSAMA GOLD.

Oman

Port Visit to Duqm and Muscat which included Defence Engagement led by the Secretary of State for Defence. Press Release Participation in the CDS-led Dragon Group.

Exercise KHANJAR OMAN and Maritime exercises with the Omani military. Press Release

Pakistan

Port Visit to Karachi.

Bilateral training exercise with the Pakistani Navy.

Portugal

Port Visit to Lisbon.

N/A

Qatar

Participation in the CDS-led Dragon Group.

N/A

Republic of Korea

Defence Engagement - at sea reception and capability demonstration.

Search and rescue exercise. Press Release

Romania

Port Visit to Constanta.

N/A

Saudi Arabia

Port Visit to Jeddah and Participation in the CDS-led Dragon Group.

At sea PASSEX with the Royal Saudi Navy.

Singapore

Port visit to Sembawang. Reception and capability demonstration.

PASSEX including some limited air exercising, participation in Exercise BERSAMA GOLD. Press Release Press Release

Spain

Port Visit to Alicante, Cartagena, Palma, Barcelona, La Coruna, and Rota.

F-35B Participation in Tactical Leadership programme (TLP).

Sri Lanka

Port Visit to Colombo.

Search and Rescue Exercise with the Sri Lankan Navy.

Thailand

Virtual Defence Engagement.

Co-ordinated maritime manoeuvres. Press Release

Turkey

Port Visit to Istanbul, with Defence Engagement, including a trilateral meeting between the UK, Italy and Turkey which was hosted by the Secretary of State for Defence. Press Release Press Release

N/A

United Arab Emirates

Participation in the CDS-led Dragon Group.

Air support to Advanced Training and Leadership Course (ATLC).

Ukraine

Port Visit to Odessa, with Defence Engagement led by the Minister for Defence Procurement. Press Release

At sea PASSEX with the Ukrainian Navy.

United States of America

Integrated Partner.

Further to being an Integrated Partner, the Carrier Strike Group interacted with additional US assets in dual, tri and quad carrier exercises. Press Release Press Release

Vietnam

Port Visit to Da Nang and virtual Defence Engagement.

At sea PASSEX with the Vietnamese Navy.

NATO*

At-sea NATO Ambassadorial visit, hosted by the Minister for Defence Procurement, and capability demonstrations. Press Release

Exercise Steadfast Defender (North Atlantic), Standing NATO Maritime Group 2 - Operation Sea Guardian (Mediterranean). Press Release Press Release

*Whilst not a country, assets from the UK Carrier Strike Group also participated in NATO-led military exercises and engagements.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
13th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to his Oral contribution of 2 November 2020, Official Report, column 5, if he will reinstate his practice of placing in the Library of the House updates on a weekly basis of the military aid to the civil authorities tasks that are being fulfilled.

We will publish details of Military Aid to the Civil Authorities (MACA) tasks on a fortnightly basis beginning in January 2022. These updates will be placed in the Library of the House.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
10th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what vehicle is intended to replace the AS90 artillery capability when the AS90 retires.

The process for the identification of the mobile Fires platform, the successor to the AS90, is well underway, but not yet complete. A number of solutions remain under consideration but it would be inappropriate to comment on these until this process is complete.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
10th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the total cost of the Mobile Fires Programme is and if the programme will remain on budget.

The Mobile Fires Platform (the principal project within the Close Fires Programme) remains in the Concept phase. It is, therefore, too early to understand the whole life cost of the Programme.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
10th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, when does he expect the Mobile Fires Programme to reach initial operational capability.

On current plans, an Initial Operating Capability for the Mobile Fires Platform will be achieved in 2029.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
9th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what estimate he has made of the number of Armed Forces personnel who have experienced symptoms and side effects typically associated with Long Covid after testing negative for covid-19; and how many personnel are experiencing those symptoms as of 9 December 2021.

As of 9 December 2021, there were 219 UK Armed Forces personnel whose medical records indicated on-going COVID symptoms and post-COVID syndrome. It is not possible to identify from military medical records how many of these personnel had previously tested negative for COVID-19.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
9th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of the Stockholm Initiative for Nuclear Disarmament.

The United Kingdom's nuclear deterrent will remain essential for as long as the global security environment demands. However, the UK is fully committed to the long-term goal of a world without nuclear weapons. The UK supports the Stockholm Initiative for Nuclear Disarmament, and we value their leadership in this area. Although we do not agree with all of their recommendations, the UK has constructive engagement with Sweden and a broad range of international partners on disarmament issues.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
9th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, when he last spoke to his counterparts in Russia and China on the NPT Review Conference taking place in January 2022.

The Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO) is the lead Government department for matters relating to the Treaty on the NonProliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) and preparations for the Review Conference including relevant discussions between States party to the Treaty.

Ministry of Defence officials regularly support FCDO engagement on this topic. They have regular engagement with their Russian and Chinese counterparts on the NPT through the P5 process; including during the recent P5 Process Paris Conference on 2-3 December.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
9th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many staff in his Department are working on issues of non-proliferation and nuclear disarmament as of 9 December 2021.

The Counter Proliferation and Arms Control Centre (CPACC), a joint unit drawing on expertise from the Ministry of Defence (MOD), the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office, the Department for International Trade and the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, leads on the UK approach to issues of non-proliferation and nuclear disarmament. Five MOD officials work on nuclear disarmament and counter proliferation issues within CPACC. Within the Defence Nuclear Organisation and Atomic Weapons Establishment, a further 44 officials work on research into arms control verification and monitoring for nuclear tests. These full-time roles are supported by nuclear policy officials, geographic and thematic policy advisors, intelligence analysts and technical experts from the wider MOD and across Government.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
9th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, on what dates he last met the Prime Minister to discuss the matter of the 2022 Review Conference of the Parties to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons.

The Defence Secretary has regular meetings with the Prime Minister on a range of nuclear policy issues. However, the right hon. Member may find it helpful to note that the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office is the lead Government department for matters relating to the Treaty on the NonProliferation of Nuclear Weapons and preparations for the Review Conference.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
9th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the Written Statement of 9 December 2021, HCWS 461 on Deployment of UK military engineers to Poland, how many UK military engineers are being deployed to Poland to support the Polish armed forces.

We are deploying a Squadron of Royal Engineers to Poland, numbering approximately 140 personnel.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
7th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 22 November 2021 to Question 79285 on Ministry of Defence: Staff, what the average cost to his Department is of employing a civilian personnel including (a) basic pay, (b) employer National Insurance and (c) pension.

The Department reports a median of the total remuneration of civilian staff as part of the Accountability Report - Pay Multiples analysis included in our Annual Report and Accounts (ARAc). Figures reflect the median remuneration values for civilians included in our response to Question 79285 with the addition of employer National Insurance and Pension contributions. The 2020-21 median civilian remuneration will be disclosed in the 2020-21 ARAc which is subject to final review and approval and will be published shortly.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
7th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 7 December 2021 to Question 83247, on what date did he last have discussions with counterparts in the countries that make up the Joint Expeditionary Force on the security implications of climate change in the Arctic region.

The Defence Secretary's collective discussion on the security implications of climate change in the Artic with his counterparts in the countries that make up the Joint Expeditionary Force (JEF) was on 20 October at a meeting of Northern Group Defence Ministers (all members of the JEF are also members of the Northern Group).

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
7th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many interviews have been conducted by Kenyan authorities with (a) current and (b) former UK armed forces personnel in relation to the death of Agnes Wanjiru.

It would be inappropriate to comment on the details of an ongoing police investigation in another jurisdiction. The Ministry of Defence continues to support the Kenyan authorities in respect of their inquiries into the death of Ms Wanjiru.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
6th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the oral contribution of the Prime Minister of 19 November 2020, Official Report, column 499, what progress he has made on establishing a unit to ensure value for money from his Department's spending settlement.

In addition to the changes we have made through the Ministry of Defence's (MOD) Approach to Investment Decisions (MAID), we continue to strengthen both our strategy and delivery structures and processes. This will enhance our ability to monitor and evaluate delivery against our priority outcomes, including value for money, and respond to delivery issues.

MOD will continue to report on delivery via the Government's planning and performance framework.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
6th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many armed forces personnel and their families received an initial assessment by the Defence Medical Services in each year since 2010.

All Armed Forces candidates are medically assessed to determine suitability for service entry. Once in service, personnel receive primary healthcare from the Defence Medical Services.

The Defence Medical Information Capability Programme (DMICP) is the source of electronic, integrated healthcare records for the Armed Forces and entitled military dependants. Searches of DMICP Read codes are used to produce various statistical data about Defence healthcare. However, DMICP searches cannot determine when all individuals had an 'initial assessment' in a Defence Primary Care pathway. Consequently, the information required to answer the question is not held in the format requested.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
2nd Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 2 December 2021 to Question 83229 on Army: Reorganisation, what estimate he has made of the total planned strength of the infantry by 2024-25.

The total planned strength of the infantry by 2025-25 will be c.19,400.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
29th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether the army restructure will result in the closure of any British armed forces bases overseas.

There are no plans to close any British Armed Forces overseas bases as a result of Future Soldier.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
29th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of the army restructure on the number of personnel in the infantry.

The small reduction in the size of the Army will ensure a force that will be more effectively matched to current and future threats. The significant reorganisation of force structures and re-balancing between arms and services will result in a small reduction in the numbers of the Infantry. There will be no redundancies to military personnel and the workforce will be re-apportioned to other roles in the Army.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
29th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 10 of the Future Soldier Guide, when he expects the Force Mental Health team to be established within the Field Army.

The new high readiness Force Mental Health Team is planned to be established by November 2023, but its formation and some delivery will begin as soon as personnel become available. There will be two new teams, one within each of two new Multi-Role Medical Regiments, consisting of Mental Health Nurses with access to an on-call Psychiatrist.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
29th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, if he will publish a list of armed forces bases in (a) England, (b) Scotland, (c) Wales and (d) Northern Ireland that will close in the next 24 months.

A list of all Ministry of Defence (MOD) assets for sale and those coming up for sale are published on the Defence Disposal Database, which can be accessed via the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/disposal-database-house-of-commons-report

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
29th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 23 of the Future Soldier Guide, which body within his Department will lead the development of the Mercury procurement concept.

The Army will lead the development of the Mercury project.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
29th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether he plans to publish the Armed Forces Family Strategy by the end of 2021.

The Ministry of Defence intends to publish the Armed Forces Families Strategy in December 2021.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
29th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to his oral contribution of 25 November 2021, Official Report, column 492, if he will make a statement on progress made on Morpheus.

MORPHEUS will deliver a major part of the next generation of Communication and Information Systems for forces operating in the Land Tactical Environment, inclusive of The Royal Marines and elements of the Royal Air Force.

The MORPHEUS Evolve to Open (EvO) Transition Partner contract, placed with General Dynamics Mission Systems UK (GDMS (UK)) in 2017, aims to deliver the foundation of the agreed MOD digital communications strategy. The initial programme was due to complete before April 2021 but this has not been achieved. A temporary (no cost to MOD) contract extension has been agreed with GDMS (UK) while full consideration is given to the best route to achieve Defence’s objectives to deliver capabilities appropriate for an increasingly digital Land environment.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
29th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how much and what proportion of his Department's £6.6 billion research and development budget will be spent on the army.

Over the four-year period (2021-2024) of the Spending Review, the Army has been allocated a Research & Development (R&D) budget totalling £729 million. This represents 11% of Defence's £6.6 billion R&D budget. However, it is important to note that R&D is often commissioned centrally to provide support to multiple Front Line Commands (FLCs) or that funding allocated to other FLCs provides Defence-wide benefits to more than one Service.

One example is the centrally commissioned Science and Technology programme, that has commissioned new projects on Artificial Intelligence (£59 million), Machine Speed Command and Control (£23 million), Digital Battlespace (£22 million) and Novel Electronics and Computing (£8 million), all of which will generate benefits for the Army if realised. Another example is the £150 million Gamechanger project on Directed Energy Weapons commissioned by Defence Innovation. This will provide a number of demonstrators including Ground Based Air Defence and Counter-UAS, projects that again if successful would provide benefit to the Army.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
29th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to his oral contribution of 25 November 2021, Official Report, column 484, if he will publish details of the planned investment in industry and estate for each nation.

The Ministry of Defence provides regular updates on our expenditure by nation and region with industry and commerce; these are available through gov.uk.

Over the next 10 years the Army is investing £5.853 billion Capital Expenditure and £12.130 billion Resource Expenditure in support of delivering a modernised Army and Training Estate, to support the delivery of the UK’s military capabilities.

However providing detailed future expenditure per region would be to pre-judge prospective competitions and their outcomes.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
29th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to his oral contribution of 25 November 2021, Official Report, column 483, when the new deep recce strike brigade combat team will be (a) equipped and (b) operational.

The regiments that will comprise the 1st Deep Recce Strike Brigade Combat Team (BCT) are already equipped and operational; they will be brought together through the merger of 1st Artillery Brigade and 1st Armoured Infantry Brigade in Summer 2022. The Integrated Review has set the Armed Forces on a course of transformation to meet the threats of the future and as part of this process equipment will be retired and, as appropriate, replaced.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
29th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many individual Afghan Locally Employed Staff were relocated to the UK under the Afghan Relocation and Assistance Policy in each month since April 2021.

The Afghan Relocation and Assistance Policy (ARAP) has been one of the most generous in the world, under which circa.1,300 Locally Employed Staff (LES) have been relocated to the UK since April 2021, with a large proportion being evacuated on over 100 RAF flights as part of Operation PITTING.

We owe a debt of gratitude to all Afghan nationals who risked their lives working alongside UK forces. For this reason, the ARAP scheme is not time-limited and will endure, facilitating the relocation of eligible Afghans and their families, from third countries if possible.

ARAP eligible principles, including some designated as Category 4, relocated by month are in the table below. This does not include families or dependants:

April

0

May

1

June

24

July

188

August (inc Op PITTING)

981

September

11

October

30

November

70

Total

1,305

The overall total of Afghans (including families and dependants) who have been relocated to the UK since April 2021 is:

Prior to Op PITTING

1,978

During Op PITTING

Approximately 5,000

Since Op PITTING

514

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
29th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 8 of the Future Soldier Guide, what steps his Department taking to help ensure that opportunities for promoting through the ranks of the Armed Forces are increased.

The British Army is taking many steps to ensure the increase of promotion opportunities for its personnel. For example, the delivery of Single Officer Terms of Service means Senior Soldier Entry officers will no longer have a rank ceiling. Furthermore, Terms and Conditions of Service (TACOS) policy development is delivering increased flexibility to transfer within the Regular Army and across the whole force, whilst also removing barriers to ensure more personnel filter into qualifying zones for promotion.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
29th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the oral contribution of the Secretary of State for Defence of 25 November 2021, Official Report, column 483, if he will publish a list of his planned network of regional hubs.

Land Regional Hubs will be established as part of the wider Defence Global Hub concept that will support the delivery of regional Military Strategic Objectives. The Army will capitalise on our pre-existing network of overseas bases in Oman, Kenya, Brunei, Belize and Germany, integrating with and augmenting the existing global network for Defence.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
29th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to his oral contribution of 25 November 2021, Official Report, column 485, when the new reserve brigade based in York will (a) open and (b) be fully recruited.

The reformed 19th Brigade will be established in 2022. It will be specifically designed to command and force generate Army Reserve combat units which are already part of the Army's structure. Headquarters staff, based in York, will be selected for, and take up their posts in line with normal Army procedures.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
29th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to his oral contribution of 25 November 2021, Official Report, column 484, what estimate he has made of the number of Army personnel that will be based in each nation.

Whilst there are exact figures known for the Devolved Nations, the exact figures for England are not held. For consistency, we have therefore rounded all personnel figures to the nearest 100.

Current Structure

Future Soldier Structure

No. of major units

No. of Personnel (Regular)

% of the Army (Regular)

No. of Personnel (Reserve)

% of the Army (Reserve)

No. of major units

No. of Personnel (Regular)

% of the Army (Regular)

No. of Personnel (Reserve)

% of the Army (Reserve)

Scotland

6

4,185

5.1%

3,404

11%

7

3,984

5.5%

3,404

11%

England

114

c71,400

86%

c23,400

77%

109

c61,500

84%

c23,400

77%

Wales

2

1,419

1.7%

1,670

5%

3

1,715

2.4%

1,670

5%

Northern Ireland

3

1,604

1.9%

2,047

7%

3

1,434

2%

2,047

7%

Additionally, the British Army currently has c3,800 Regular personnel (c5.3% of overall Regular workforce) based overseas. This includes 3 x Major Units (2 x Bns in Cyprus and 1 x Bn in Brunei).

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
29th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what discussions he has had with his counterparts in the countries that make up the Joint Expeditionary Force on the security implications of climate change in the Arctic region.

I regularly discuss regional security issues, including the implications of climate change in the Arctic and High North, with my counterparts from the countries that make up the Joint Expeditionary Force - collectively as the JEF, but also bilaterally and in the Northern Group format.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
29th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 20 of the Future Soldier Guide, when the Defence BattleLab is planned to be established.

The Defence Battlelab reached initial operating capability in March 2021 with completion of the phase one build comprising of a core workshop and supporting facilities. The Defence Battlelab will reach full operating capability in early 2022 with the completion of the phase two building, comprising of office spaces, conferencing facilities and other capabilities designed to support Defence collaboration with industry for innovation.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
29th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 23 of the Future Soldier Guide, when he plans to publish the Land Industrial Strategy.

The Land Industrial Strategy continues to be refined following engagement with industry and academia. It will be published as soon as possible.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
29th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the oral contribution of the Secretary of State for Defence of 25 November 2021, Official Report, column 487, what assessment he has made of what those capability gaps will be.

The Integrated Review has set the Armed Forces on a course of transformation to meet the threats of the future. As part of this process equipment will be retired and, as appropriate, replaced. There is also the constant process of monitoring and development of technology to ensure that our threat assessment remains appropriate. Defence conducts environmental Capability Audits annually with the force being tested against a range of scenarios.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
24th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what assessment he has made of the potential security implications of climate change on the sub-Saharan region of Africa.

I refer the right hon.Member to the answer I gave him on 3 November 2021 to Question 64538.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
24th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what assessment has he made of the UK's icebreaker ship strength to protect UK interests in the Arctic.

As the Defence Command paper made clear, the High North and maintaining security in the defence of the North Atlantic remains of great importance to the UK.

The Royal Navy has the capability to project force using a variety of assets in the High North and Arctic, dependent on the location, season and threat, including Littoral capabilities. It has one purpose-built Ice Patrol Ship (HMS Protector) and two ice strengthened survey vessels (HMS Echo and HMS Enterprise).

As announced in the 2021 Defence Command Paper, we will develop a new Multi-Role Ocean Surveillance capability to better understand the High North underwater environment, protect our underwater CNI and improve our ability to detect threats in the North Atlantic. The Defence Command Paper also announced major investments in a new generation of Anti-Submarine Warfare frigates and support shipping, enabling us to project UK forces into the High North and Arctic, and ensuring our freedom to operate in the North Atlantic.

The UK Defence Contribution in the High North will outline the range of capabilities the UK has and is developing to ensure we continue to be able to protect UK interests in this key region.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
24th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what discussions has he had with counterparts in (a) NATO and (b) the Arctic Council in the last 12 months on the security implications of climate change on the Arctic region.

The UK agrees with NATO’s aim to be the leading international organisation in understanding, mitigating against and adapting to the impacts of climate change on security. In 2021 the UK and NATO Allies negotiated and agreed a NATO Agenda on Climate Change and Security and accompanying Action Plan, which contain concrete actions to tackle the implications of climate change on Alliance security. The Defence Secretary discussed this further with NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg during COP26. The UK also greatly values its role as a state observer to the Arctic Council. As the Arctic Council does not discuss matters of military security, the Defence Secretary has not engaged with the Council on the security implications of climate change on the Arctic region. The Defence Secretary routinely discusses a range of security matters with his counterparts in most of the Arctic States, including how we can work with Allies and partners to ensure the Arctic remains a region characterised by high cooperation and low tensions.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
24th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, on what date the current contract with Risk Management Ltd for running the Career Transition Partnership ends; and whether he plans to extend that contract to 2025.

The contract was awarded in 2015 to Right Management Ltd for a total of 10 years, which includes two potential options to extend (six years + two years + two years format). The first option to extend was exercised in September 2021 and has extended the contract for two years to September 2023. Relet preparations and stakeholder engagement are ongoing and a decision on exercising the further extension option to 2025 will be made in due course.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
24th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the forecast total cost is of the Vanguard class submarine Life Extension Programme.

As the Dreadnought Class submarine programme progresses, we continue to review life extension options to ensure the Vanguard Class submarines continue to operate safely during the phased transition from the Vanguard Class to the Dreadnought Class. The associated costs will be linked to the operational programme, information on which is withheld as disclosure would, or would be likely to, prejudice the capability, effectiveness or security of the Armed Forces.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
23rd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 17 November 2021 to Question 76573 on Afghanistan: Refugees, how many Afghans with confirmed eligibility for relocation to the UK under the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy are in Afghanistan as of 23 November 2021.

Of the 311 ARAP-eligible principals who we were not able to evacuate before the end of OP PITTING, 166 are currently known to be in Afghanistan. The ARAP scheme is not time limited, and we continue to receive and approve applications to the scheme. All those who worked for HMG in qualifying roles remain eligible. In addition, those who worked in meaningful enabling roles alongside HMG in extraordinary and unconventional contexts will also be considered. Efforts to support all eligible Afghans and to help them to come to the UK are continuing.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
23rd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, when he expects all armed forces leavers to have received their veterans ID card.

I refer the right hon. Member to the answer I gave on 20 September 2021 to Question 47041 to the hon. Member for Portsmouth South (Stephen Morgan).

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
23rd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many and what proportion of armed forces service leavers have received their veterans ID card.

I refer the right hon. Member to the answer I gave on 20 September 2021 to Question 47041 to the hon. Member for Portsmouth South (Stephen Morgan).

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
22nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many civilian personnel in his Department have left on average in each year since 2015.

All data for civilian personnel leaving the Civil Service is published on Gov.UK in the Biannual Civilian Personnel Report on the below link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/mod-biannual-civilian-personnel-statisticsindex

Data prior to 2018 can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/mod-civilian-personnel-quarterly-statistics-index

Tables 4 or 5 will show a total exit value for each 12-month period, including detailed breakdown by TLB and Organisation or Reason for Leaving. These tables also list exit rate for overall totals if the Honourable Member is seeking to understand the Turnover Rate (Average Strength in a listed 12 month period divided by totals exits within that period).

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
22nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how much his Department has paid out in bonuses to civilian personnel in each year since 2010.

All non-consolidated performance related pay (NCPRP) for each year is published here: MOD non-consolidated performance related pay - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk). The figures in the below table represent the core MOD and exclude arms length bodies and trading funds.

Year

Total Bonus spend

2010-11

£42,224,617

2011-12

£26,975,320

2012-13

£24,371,479

2013-14

£22,781,283

2014-15

£16,168,134

2015-16

£17,315,730

2016-17

£11,051,511

2017-18

£16,264,835

2018-19

£12,081,258

Due to the Covid-19 pandemic, the 2019-20 and 2020-21 figures are not currently held. The publications from the Cabinet Office have been delayed and are expected to be published in early 2022.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
22nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 18 November 2021 to Question 74892, what the location is of the High Reach vehicle that the Scottish Fire and Rescue service can provide to tackle high-rise fires at HMNB Clyde.

All high-rise buildings at HMNB Clyde are equipped with modern Fire Safety Systems which are designed to detect a fire in its early stages and provide an alarm throughout the building. It is MOD policy to evacuate buildings on the sounding of the fire alarm and this is regularly practised and recorded. The Fire alarm system is connected to a central control room who dispatch the on-site DFR FRS to the scene of the alarm. Therefore, the DFR FRS are expected to arrive at any incident at an early stage and to utilise internal access to commence firefighting activity. Internal fire-fighting is the primary and preferred option in tackling a fire.

Firefighting crews will always seek to use early intervention and the preferred option of internal firefighting actions, which would reduce the requirement to pitch any ladder for external access.

The number and of types of appliances, equipment and personnel attending any incident is determined by the Scottish Fire and Rescue Service (SFRS) and initial Incident Commander on the scene, based on the specifics of the incident. The High Reach vehicle, a Rosenbauer aerial ladder platform, is not closely proximate to the base but could be requested from its standing location at Falkirk Community Fire Station.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
22nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the total value is of his Department's contract to sell the retired Sentinel R1 fleet to the US.

The Defence Equipment Sales Authority has sold the retired Sentinel R1 fleet of five aircraft to a US consortium of three companies, Springfield Air, Raytheon US and Bombardier. The aircraft are not currently in an airworthy condition and the potential receipt to defence will depend upon the ability of the consortium to regenerate and fly at least one aircraft.

I am withholding the value of the sale as it may prejudice commercial interests.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
22nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many UK F-35B aircraft are stationed on (a) HMS Queen Elizabeth and (b) HMS Prince of Wales.

HMS QUEEN ELIZABETH embarked 18 F-35Bs for the Carrier Strike Group 2021 operational deployment in two squadrons: eight from the UK's 617 Squadron RAF and 10 from the US Marine Corps squadron VMFA-211. However, one UK F-35B was lost on 17 November 2021 and therefore seven UK F-35B remain currently embarked.

The Lightning Force deployed to HMS PRINCE OF WALES in mid-September 2021, with 207 Squadron undertaking a period of intensive Carrier Qualification training. HMS PRINCE OF WALES is currently alongside in her home port of Portsmouth with all aircraft disembarked.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
22nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many Type 45 Destroyers have undergone work to upgrade their propulsion system through the Power Improvement Project; and when does he expect all Type 45s to have received that upgrade.

One Type 45 Destroyer, HMS DAUNTLESS, has undergone work under the Power Improvement Project (PIP). HMS DAUNTLESS is currently at the Cammell Laird shipyard in Birkenhead where equipment is being set to work following installation. The next phase of the programme will see HMS DAUNTLESS undertake a rigorous trials programme in harbour and subsequently at sea. It is expected that all six Type 45 Destroyers will have completed their PIP conversions by 2028.

The programme is dependent on the availability of ships to undertake the upgrade, balanced against the Royal Navy's current and future operational commitments. For these reasons we do not comment in detail on the future PIP timelines. PIP conversions are planned to take into account the regular Upkeep cycle to maximise overall class availability and meet the readiness profile required to meet Defence outputs.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
22nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 19 November 2021 to Question 75807, Ministry of Defence: Fines, if he will provide details of the (a) 36 contracts his Department approved retrospectively and (b) total value of each of those contracts.

It will take time to collate the information needed to answer the right hon. Member's question. I will write to him in due course.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
22nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer 17 November 2021 to Question 73729, on Army: Costs, what recent estimate he has made of the average cost to his Department of employing a civilian personnel; and what estimate he has made of that cost in each year between 2016-17 and 2020-21.

The Department reports a median of the total remuneration of civilian staff as part of the Accountability Report - Pay Multiples analysis included in our Annual Report and Accounts. The following reflects an extract from the published Annual Report and Accounts (ARAc) from 2016-17 to 2019-20. The 2020-21 ARAc is subject to final review and approval and will be published shortly.

2019-20

2018-19

2017-18

2016-17

Median total remuneration of civilian staff

31,392.86

30,192.96

29,828.00

29,188.47

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
22nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, when he plans to publish his Department's annual report and accounts for 2020-21.

The Annual Report and Accounts for 2020-21 are currently being staffed for final approval within the Department and will be published as soon as this activity has completed.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
18th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what estimate he has made of the length of time that the British Army’s RWMIK Land Rovers will remain in service.

The Land Rover R-WMIK Out of Service Date is 2030.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
17th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many (a) Hunt Class, (b) Sandown Class, (c) Scimtar Class, (d) Archer Class and (e) River Class ships the Royal Fleet Auxiliary has in service.

The Royal Navy currently has 34 ships in service within the Classes requested. However, these are all based within the Royal Navy fleet rather than the Royal Fleet Auxiliary as requested in the right hon. Member's question.

Hunt Class - 6

HMS BROCKLESBY

HMS CATTISTOCK

HMS CHIDDINGFOLD

HMS HURWORTH

HMS LEDBURY

HMS MIDDLETON

Sandown Class - 5

HMS BANGOR

HMS GRIMSBY

HMS PEMBROKE

HMS PENZANCE

HMS SHOREHAM

Scimitar Class - 2

HMS SABRE

HMS SCIMITAR

Archer Class - 13

HMS ARCHER

HMS BITER

HMS BLAZER

HMS CHARGER

HMS DASHER

HMS EXAMPLE

HMS EXPLORER

HMS EXPRESS

HMS PUNCHER

HMS RAIDER

HMS RANGER

HMS TRACKER

HMS TRUMPETER

River Class - 8

HMS TYNE

HMS MERSEY

HMS SEVERN

HMS FORTH

HMS MEDWAY

HMS SPEY

HMS TAMAR

HMS TRENT

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
17th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 172 of his Department's Annual Reports and Accounts 2014-15, how an incorrect recording of Merlin aircraft component lives resulted in a fruitless payment of £20,995 million.

The fruitless payment of £20.995 million referenced in the Department’s Annual Report and Accounts 214-15 reflected additional costs incurred under the Integrated Merlin Operational Support contract including a period of reduced aircraft availability in delivery of the Merlin Capability Sustainment Programme. There were underlying issues with some aspects of data and asset management on this platform within the Department leading to additional costs under the support contract and as a result of limiting availability of aircraft for a capability sustainment programme.

The Ministry of Defence subsequently undertook a thorough review of Merlin procedures and engineering and asset management software, in order to automate the application of data recording and significantly reduce the risk of incorrect data entry. Additional training and quality assurance checks were also introduced to assure the integrity of recorded data.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
17th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to his Written Ministerial Statement on 15 November 2021, HCWS389 on Afghan Relocations Assistance Policy Data Breach Investigation - Update, whether any further data breaches occurred, connected to the ARAP scheme, beyond the three confirmed.

No further data breaches connected to the ARAP Scheme have been identified, beyond the three confirmed in the Written Ministerial Statement, laid by the Defence Secretary on 15 November 2021. Procedures have been changed in order to prevent similar incidents occurring again.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
17th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many Afghans nationals have been relocated to the UK under the ARAP scheme since the end of Operation Pitting on 28 August 2021.

375 ARAP eligible individuals have been relocated to the UK. Our commitment to those who are eligible under ARAP, and the process to deliver it, is not time-limited and will endure. The scheme remains open and we are working with international partners to establish routes for all those eligible for ARAP to relocate to the UK since 28 August 2021.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
17th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many applicants to the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy programme are still in Afghanistan.

The ARAP scheme is not time limited and remains open. As such we continue to receive a high volume of applications to the scheme, and it is not possible to quantify how many of those will ultimately meet the eligibility criteria. We do not attempt to collate data on current location until eligibility is confirmed. All those who worked for HMG in qualifying roles remain eligible. In addition, those who worked in meaningful enabling roles alongside HMG in extraordinary and unconventional contexts will also be considered. Efforts to support all eligible Afghans and to help them to come to the UK are continuing.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
16th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 9 November 2021 to Question 68119, on Ministry of Defence: Fines, what specific contract was given by his Department retrospectively.

The fine detailed in Question 68119 related to approvals of some 36 contracts over a number of years up to 2016 covering a range of infrastructure activities and locations. The Department notified HM-Treasury (HMT) as soon as the matter was identified, and retrospective approval was sought. A detailed review was also undertaken in 2016 resulting in the implementation of improvements to approval processes in the Defence Infrastructure Organisation (DIO) and no further fines for such process failures have been incurred since.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
15th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 2 November 2021 to Question 68118 on Clyde Naval Base: High Rise Flats, what the maximum height is of the ladders used by firefighting crews at HMNB Clyde to tackle high rise fires.

The Defence Fire crew has available to them a 13.5 metre ladder for external access up to the 3rd floor. For external access above the 3rd floor, the Scottish Fire and Rescue Service have the capability to provide a High Reach vehicle capable of reaching the upper floors and roof.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
12th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what recent estimate he has made of the average cost to the British Army of employing an infantry soldier; and what estimate he has made of that cost in each year 2016-17 to 2020-21.

Average cost (Basic Pay/ Employer National Insurance/ Pension) of an Infantry soldier in the Other Ranks of the British Army:

Financial Year Ending

31 Mar 2017

31 Mar 2018

31 Mar 2019

31 Mar 2020

31 Mar 2021

Infantry (Other Ranks)

£41,673.70

£41,800.57

£42,698.39

£46,232.94

£47,352.40

Source: Defence Statistics (Cost-Modelling)

Notes/Caveats:

  1. The Average Cost in the table above represents Basic Pay/ Employer National Insurance/ Pension only and does not include other costs such as those associated with recruitment, training, clothing, stock consumption, infrastructure, or medical/dental care.
  2. The Basic Pay includes X-Factor payments.
  3. The Employer National Insurance would be 0% for some of the populations (I.e., general population under the age of 21 and apprentices under the age of 25).
  4. The Average Cost was determined using the Joint Personnel Administration (JPA) data. The mean average across the Infantry soldiers was calculated using the mean average of every Infantry soldier’s pay records to create a monthly estimate, which was then multiplied by 12 to obtain a yearly estimate.
  5. The Financial Year for statistical purposes runs from 1 April to 31 March.
Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
8th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to paragraph 2.11 of the National Audit Office report, Improving the performance of major equipment contracts, published June 2021, what costs his Department has incurred as a result of plans to upgrade the Type 23 frigates due to delays in procurement of the Type 26 and Type 31e frigates.

The Type 23 frigate class is continually being updated and upgraded to meet new threats or to replace obsolete technology.

The work has provided greater resilience in the transition of Type 26 and Type 31 into service. Furthermore, options are continually being developed to consider extending some ships that have already had significant investment while removing those that require extensive investment such as HMS MONMOUTH and HMS MONTROSE.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
8th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 145 of his Department's annual report and accounts 2019-2020, for what reason the project to procure a new information system was terminated with a loss of £4 million.

Constructive Loss - Advance Notification: Cessation of a project to procure a new information system (IS) (£4.059 million)

The loss value relates to capital investment expenditure on the development of a new IS focussed on specialist ISR capabilities system between 2014-15 to 2016-17.

The project was paused while other options were investigated and it was ultimately decided not to pursue the project further noting that due to the rapid pace and change in technology in the area covered by the project, the previous development work was now out of date.

The decision to 'pause' the project was therefore in practical terms one of cessation which has led to a constructive loss. Accounting action was taken during 2019-20 to impair the full balance of £4.059 million.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
8th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to paragraph 2.11 of the NAO report entitled Improving the performance of major equipment contracts, published on 24 June 2021, what costs were incurred in upgrading the Type 23 frigates caused by delays in procurement of the Type 26 and Type 31e frigates.

I refer the right hon. Member to the answer I gave him on 15 November in response to question 71268.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
3rd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the letter from the Minister for Afghan Resettlement on 29 October 2021, if he will name the third sector partners his Department are working with to provide pastoral care to people under the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy in the UK.

Networks that currently exist to support the Armed Forces Community have specific service-related knowledge, skills and experience which may allow them to provide support to Afghans with experience of serving alongside the British Armed Forces. Third sector partners within those networks are able to support Afghans in a variety of ways depending on the scope of their charitable objects and we will be drawing on all these partners to provide this support. Until these processes are established we would not wish to publicly name these charities in order to avoid raising expectations before a delivery mechanism is in place.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
3rd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the letter from the Minister for Afghan Resettlement on 29 October 2021, if he will list the (a) dates officials from his Department visited bridging hotels housing personnel under the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy and (b) names of those hotels.

During the period of 27 September to 9 October 2021 personnel from the Ministry of Defence visited over 80 hotels to speak to personnel recently arrived from Afghanistan. For security reasons it would be inappropriate to provide further details regarding these hotels or their locations.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
3rd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, on what date did remediation work to remove the flammable cladding from HMS Nelson begin.

One high rise building at HMS Nelson is currently undergoing remediation works and the external wall system is being removed. This work commenced in February 2021.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
3rd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 2 November 2021 to Question 65371, if he will publish each of the fire risk assessments for the 27 high rise buildings with combustible components in the external walls.

All 27 buildings have a current Fire Risk Assessment in place and remain legally compliant for continued occupation. However, we will not publish the individual fire risk assessments as to do so would compromise the security of MOD infrastructure and personnel

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
3rd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 2 November 2021 to Question 65371, what information has been given to the residents of each of the 27 high rise buildings with combustible components in the external walls about the fire safety of their block.

The high rise buildings across the Defence estate with external wall systems that do not conform to updated Government guidance have all been subjected to annually reviewed and assured Fire Risk Assessments.

Personnel who occupy the buildings have been kept informed through briefings, instructions and/or the posting of the Fire Risk Assessments in the affected blocks.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
3rd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 1 November 2021 to Question 62586 on Ministry of Defence: Staff, if he will list the (a) names of the people on the Defence Safety and Environment Committee and (b) dates on which that committee has met since January 2021.

The members of the Defence Safety and Environment Committee (DSEC) are:

  • David Williams (Permanent Secretary)
  • Laurence Lee (2nd Permanent Secretary)
  • Admiral Sir Tim Fraser (Vice Chief of the Defence Staff)
  • Air Marshal Richard Knighton (Deputy Chief of Defence Staff (Military Capability))
  • Admiral Sir Ben Key (First Sea Lord)
  • General Sir Mark-Carleton Smith (Chief of the General Staff)
  • Air Chief Marshal Sir Mike Wigston (Chief of Air the Staff)
  • General Sir Patrick Sanders (Commander UK Strategic Command)
  • Vanessa Nicholls (Director General Nuclear)
  • Sir Simon Bollom (Chief Executive Defence Equipment and Support)
  • Graham Dalton (Chief Executive Defence Infrastructure Organisation)
  • Lt General James Swift (Chief of Defence People)
  • Mike Baker (Chief Operating Officer)
  • Doug Umbers (Chief Executive Defence Science and Technology Laboratory)
  • Ian Booth (Chief Executive Submarine Delivery Agency)
  • David King (Director Health Safety and Environmental Protection)
  • James Clare (Director Climate Change and Sustainability)
  • Tim Steeds (Non-Executive Director)
  • Lt General (Retd) Richard Nugee (Non-Executive Director)

The DSEC meets four times per year and has so far met on 25 March, 29 July and 7 September in 2021. It will next meet on 1 December 2021.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
3rd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 2 November 2021 to Question 64537, if he will list the (a) names of the people who sit on the Joint Requirements Oversight Committee and (b) dates of their meetings since 30 March 2021.

The Joint Requirement Oversight Committee (JROC) is chaired by the Vice Chief of Defence Staff with representatives from across Head Office and each of the Military Commands at Director General level or military equivalent rank. Since the 30 March 2021, the board has met twice on 27 September and 2 November and plans to meet twice again on 25 November and 9 December this calendar year.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
3rd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 2 November 2021 to Question 65371, if he provide details on the appropriate measures required by the Defence Fire Safety Regulator and Defence Infrastructure Organisation in each of the 27 high rise buildings with combustible components in the external walls.

The high rise buildings across the Defence estate with external wall systems that do not conform to Government guidance have all been subjected to annually reviewed and assured Fire Risk Assessments and remain legally compliant for continued occupation.

The appropriate mitigations may include regular testing of the automatic fire detection and alarm system, emergency lighting, regular inspection by barrack inspection teams and Fire Risk specialists, a simultaneous evacuation strategy and regular fire drills. Second party audits to monitor fire system maintenance are also being carried out.

Personnel who occupy the buildings have been kept informed through briefings, instructions and/or the posting of the Fire Risk Assessments in the affected blocks.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
3rd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the letter from the Minister for Afghan Resettlement on 29 October 2021, how many properties his Department has made available to accommodate Afghan personnel in the UK; and how many Afghan families have been housed in those properties.

To date, the Ministry of Defence (MOD) has made 551 properties available, in three tranches, for lease to Local Authorities to assist with housing Afghan families. Currently, Local Authorities have signed 26 leases on properties with the MOD. 59 more leases are being negotiated and an interest has been expressed in a further 13.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
2nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 108 of his Department's Annual Report and Accounts 2013 to 2014 and page 172 of his Department's Annual Report and Accounts 2014 to 2015, if for what reasons his Department was fined (a) £31.6 million and (b) £1 million by HM Treasury.

ARAc 2013-14 - £31.6 million Fine from HMT

There were no fines of this value reported in the MOD ARAc 2013-2014 publication. A fine of this amount however was reported in the MOD ARAc for 2015-16 and it is this entry that we assume is being referenced in the question.

This fine related to instances where the Department had not appropriately sought nor gained necessary approval from HM-Treasury prior to the placement of some contracts. As a result of this procedural failure, HM Treasury imposed a £31.6million fine upon the Department. The Department undertook extensive action to address the procedural weaknesses, no further fines of this nature have been imposed upon Defence in the subsequent years.

ARAc 2014-15 - £1 million Fine from HMT

This HM Treasury fine was imposed for failures by the Department to seek assurance from a number of high-paid off-payroll appointees that they were paying the correct tax and National Insurance. This relates to procedural failures to seek assurance as part of the onboarding process for off-payroll staff to confirm the arrangements in place for those individuals to pay income tax and national insurance. The Department has implemented revised processes for the management of off-payroll employees including the new responsibilities placed on employers by changes to IR35 legislation. As a result, no further fines of this type have been imposed since.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
2nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how much was spent by Defence Equipment and Support on consultants each year between 2010-11 and 2013-14.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave him on 25 October 2021 to Question 59709.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
2nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether the armed forces personnel housed in the 27 high rise buildings with flammable cladding have been informed of the increased fire safety risk.

The high rise buildings across the Defence estate with external wall systems that do not conform to updated Government guidance have all been subjected to annually reviewed and assured Fire Risk Assessments.

Personnel who occupy the buildings have been kept informed through briefings, instructions and/or the posting of the Fire Risk Assessments in the affected blocks.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
2nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what additional safety measures have been put in place in the 27 high rise armed forces accommodation buildings in response to the presence of flammable cladding.

All high rise buildings currently occupied on the Defence estate which have been identified as having combustible external wall systems, have a current Fire Risk Assessment (FRA) in place and remain legally compliant for continued occupation.

The requirements of each FRA varies between buildings but they would include requirements such as regular testing of the automatic fire detection and alarm system, emergency lighting, regular inspection by barrack inspection teams and Fire Risk specialists a simultaneous evacuation strategy and regular fire drills.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
2nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what equipment do firefighting crews at HMNB Clyde have to tackle high-rise tower block fires.

The detection of a fire by the building fire safety systems allow Firefighters to provide an early intervention to an incident, therefore internal firefighting is likely to be the technique adopted (dependent on the Incident Commander's Operational Assessment). This would be achieved using standard firefighting equipment carried on the Structural Fire Vehicle, such as breathing apparatus, vehicle hose reels, branches and 70 and 45mm hoses.

Firefighting crews further utilise the internal fire safety systems within the building such as dry/wet risers and Firefighting Shafts/Stairwells. There is always close cooperation between the Defence Fire Service and the civilian Scottish Fire and Rescue Service who can attend any incident through standing processes as required.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
2nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the average length of time taken is for an Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy application to be processed.

The time taken to process individual Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy (ARAP) applications varies enormously on a case by case basis. A dedicated casework team at PJHQ continues to work closely with applicants to support them throughout the application process and to help bring their case to a timely conclusion.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
2nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy applications his Department has yet to process.

The Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy (ARAP) is one of the most generous schemes of its type in the world. Since its inception in April 2021, more than 88,000 applications have been received. This number is far higher than the total number of Afghans who ever worked for the UK. Processing those applications and determining eligibility is a very high priority and I have directed significant additional resource to this task.

As of 30 October, all of the 60,000 applications received prior to 31 August, have been reviewed and processing by the eligibility team is under way. Many of these are not appropriate for the ARAP scheme and we are redirecting those to the appropriate alternative mechanism where possible. In other cases, employment checks or verification of information requiring third party input is in progress. This group of applications continues to be our highest priority.

Since 1 September, more than 28,000 additional applications have been received, and we continue to receive them at a rate of over 100 per day. These applications are our next priority for processing; around 3,000 of them are currently being processed.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
2nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many high rise buildings on the defence estate have had flammable cladding removed from them since June 2017.

One high rise building at HMS Nelson is currently undergoing remediation works and the external wall system is being removed.

All high rise buildings currently occupied on the defence estate which have been identified as having combustible external wall systems, have a current Fire Risk Assessment in place and remain legally compliant for continued occupation. Work continues to investigate and provide remediation where appropriate.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
2nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many fines have been imposed on his Department by HM Treasury (a) above £300,000 and (b) below the accounts reporting threshold of £300,000 since 2010.

During the period stated, two fines have been imposed upon the Department by HM Treasury. These were both over the £300,000 reportable threshold and are therefore included in the relevant Annual Report and Accounts, the details of which have already been provided in the answer I gave to the right hon. Member on 9 November 2021 to Question 68119 .

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
1st Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many Afghans and their families who are eligible for relocation to the UK through the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy have been relocated to the UK since the end of Operation Pitting.

The Government is strongly committed to fulfilling its responsibilities to current and former Locally Employed Staff (LES) in Afghanistan and the MOD-administered Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy (ARAP) scheme is one of the most generous in the world.  Around 2,000 people were relocated under the ARAP scheme before the start of Op PITTING with a further 5,000 evacuated during the operation itself. Subsequent to the cessation of Op PITTING 118 ARAP eligible individuals have been relocated to the UK. Our commitment to those who are eligible under ARAP, and the process to deliver it, is not time-limited and will endure. The scheme remains open and we are working with international partners to establish routes for all those eligible for ARAP to relocate to the UK.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
1st Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 23 of his Department’s Climate Change and Sustainability Strategic Approach published on 30 March 2021, what discussions he has had with his counterpart in NATO on further cooperation on (a) adapting to and (b) mitigating against the effects of climate change in each of the last 12 months.

It is clear that the UK and NATO share the same ambition to reduce military emissions, adapt military capability, and recognise that climate change is a threat multiplier. These were the focus of both the Defence Secretary and the NATO Secretary General’s comments at a COP26 Round Table side-event.

To deliver against this shared intent will require further discussions across all our allies and partners at all levels to ensure a coherent approach. As part of the forward looking NATO 2030 initiative, agreed by Alliance Leaders in June, the UK and its NATO Allies have agreed to significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions from military activities and installations without impairing personnel safety, operational effectiveness and our deterrence and defence posture.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
1st Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 22 of his Department’s Climate Change and Sustainability Strategic Approach published on 30 March 2021, what progress he has made on developing a set of defence climate assumptions for capability development.

Work is ongoing to deliver the activities covered in the strategic approach published in March. Our capability development processes already consider a broad set of environmental factors from the Development Concepts and Doctrine Centre research and analysis into climate change trends, and the implications from such, as part of their Global Strategic Trends (GST) series; to the Joint Requirements Oversight Committee now considering climate change and sustainability factors in the requirements setting.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
1st Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, when he plans to publish the refresh to the National Shipbuilding Strategy.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave him on 9 September 2021 to Question 43387.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
28th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many of the Senior Leadership Group of Defence Equipment & Support were paid over £70,000 in each year since 2010.

The Defence Equipment and Support (DE&S) Senior Leadership Group (SLG) structure was established in 2017 to reflect changes to DE&S pay arrangements since becoming a Bespoke Trading Entity. The number of substantive DE&S Civilian SLG personnel who were paid over £70,000 since 2017 is set out in the table below:

As at Date

Number of staff being paid over £70,000

1 April 2017

123

1 April 2018

112

1 April 2019

103

1 April 2020

115

1 April 2021

106

Notes:

  1. Pay is defined as salary, plus regular/fixed allowances.
  2. These figures do not include DE&S staff who were on temporary promotion into Senior Leadership Group roles.
  3. The decrease in figures from April 2017 to April 2018 is due to SLG members moving from DE&S on the formation of the Submarine Delivery Agency.

Military personnel are excluded from these figures as they are not employed directly by DE&S and are subject to the Armed Forces' Pay Review Body.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
28th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, if he will publish the average salary increase for a member of staff at Defence Equipment & Support in each year since 2010.

Based on available information, the average salary increases since performance year 2015 (the year when DE&S became a Bespoke Trading Entity), across all civilian grades is set out in the table below:

Implementation date

Average Salary Increase %

2021[see note 1]

0.09%

2020

2.25%

2019

2.00%

2018

2.20%

2017

2.30%

2016

1.35%

2015

2.00%

Note 1: In line with the Spending Review announcements made by the Chancellor of the Exchequer and the communication issued by the Government Chief People Officer in November 2020, the majority of DE&S civil servants received no salary increase in 2021. However, 1,294 DE&S civil servants received an average salary increase of 1.24%. These increases were either: in line with increases in the National Living Wage; or an increase of £250 where eligible employees were earning less than £24,000 (as at 31 March 2021); or were a tapered increase of up to £250 for those earning less than £24,249 to maintain differentials.

Military personnel are excluded from these figures as they are not employed directly by DE&S and are subject to the Armed Forces' Pay Review Body.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
28th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to Answer of 25 October 2021 to Question 56123 on Ministry of Defence: Buildings, what estimate he has made of when work will begin on removing the flammable cladding from the 27 high rise buildings on the defence estate that currently have combustible cladding on the exterior of the structure; and what the timeframe is for that work to be completed.

MOD has identified 27 high rise buildings (defined as being 6 floors or over) that have an external walling system that contains combustible components.

Investigative works are ongoing and remediation plans established for all buildings. Only one building is fully clad and removal of partial cladding may or may not be appropriate. Remediation plans already being enacted in respect of MHCLG guidance include internal works to improve fire compartmentation.

The first building to complete remediation will be at HMS Nelson and will have replacement cladding, internal compartmentation and new fire doors with work scheduled to finish by March 2022.

When remediation of the remaining buildings will complete is subject to ongoing work.

Defence Fire and Rescue (DFR) have provided advice on how to operate the buildings to enable them to be safe to occupy. DFR, the Defence Fire Safety Regulator (DFSR) and Defence Infrastructure Organisation (DIO) have agreed that occupation of the buildings can continue while the appropriate measures are implemented subject to maintaining and adhering to the conditions within the buildings Fire Risk Assessments. Fire Risk Assessments for these buildings are reassessed every year.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
28th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to Answer of 25 October 2021 to Question 56123 on Ministry of Defence: Buildings, how many armed forces personnel and their families are living in buildings with flammable cladding on the exterior of the structure that serve as forces accommodation.

No Service Families live in high rise buildings (6 floors or over) that have been confirmed as having an external wall system that contains combustible components.

The number of armed forces personnel who are accommodated in those Single Living Accommodation (SLA) buildings which have been confirmed as having an external wall system containing combustible components are shown in the following table. This information has been provided by the individual Front Line Commands.

Number of Buildings

Location

Number of Armed Forces Personnel (as of 29/10/2021)

22

HMNB Clyde

2440

1

Hyde Park Barracks

206

1

Royal Centre for Defence Medicine, Birmingham

180

2

HMS Nelson

200

1

HMS Drake

370

All of the above buildings are 6 floors or above.

MOD has also identified a further 728 low rise buildings that may potentially have an external walling system that contains combustible materials. The list of buildings in scope is being verified, specialist consultants contracted to provide additional support and an industry partner is being commissioned to progress investigative works.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
28th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, if he will publish the bonus pay box markings for the Senior Leadership Group of Defence Equipment & Support covering each of the last four years showing the percentage bonus payments awarded against each grade.

The bonus pay box markings, for the last four years, for the civilian Senior Leadership Group of Defence Equipment & Support can be found within the tables below:

2017 Performance Award

SCS * Level

Rating 1

Rating 2

Rating 3

Rating 4

Rating 5

3*

50%

37.5%

25%

0%

0%

2*

50%

37.5%

25%

0%

0%

1*

£10,400

£8,800

£4,750

£0

£0

2018 Performance Award

SLG * Level

Rating 1

Rating 2

Rating 3

Rating 4

Rating 5

3*

40%

30%

20%

0%

0%

2*

40%

30%

20%

0%

0%

1*

24%

18%

12%

0%

0%

2019 Performance Award

SLG * Level

Rating 1

Rating 2

Rating 3

Rating 4

Rating 5

3*

29.70%

22.20%

14.80%

0%

0%

2*

29.70%

22.20%

14.80%

0%

0%

1*

17.80%

13.30%

8.90%

0%

0%

2020 Performance Award

SLG * Level

Rating 1

Rating 2

Rating 3

Rating 4

Rating 5

3*

10%

10%

10%

0%

0%

2*

10%

10%

10%

0%

0%

1*

10%

10%

10%

0%

0%

Notes:

Performance awards for 2017 were based on a percentage of base salary for Senior Civil Servants (SCS) at 3 and 2 Star level; and a fixed monetary amount for 1 Star level.

Performance awards for 2021 have not been provided as these are yet to be paid at Executive 3 and 2 Star level and are currently under consideration.

Military personnel are excluded from these figures as they are not employed directly by DE&S and are subject to the Armed Forces' Pay Review Body.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
28th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to Answer of 25 October 2021 to Question 56123 on Ministry of Defence: Buildings, what the locations are of the 27 high rise buildings on the defence estate that currently have flammable cladding on the exterior of the building.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave him on 1 November 2021 to Parliamentary Question 64541.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
28th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to Answer of 25 October 2021 to Question 56123 on Ministry of Defence: Buildings, how many of the 27 high rise buildings on the defence estate are currently undergoing work to remove the flammable cladding from the building exterior.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave him on Monday 1 November 2021 to Question 64543.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
27th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what estimate he has made of the costs associated with decommissioning the retired nuclear submarines housed at Devonport.

As set out in the United Kingdom's future nuclear deterrent: the 2020 update to Parliament, we continue to develop the submarine dismantling techniques necessary to meet all safety and sustainability standards and establish the long-term solution that provides best value for the taxpayer. Our commitment to the safe, secure, environmentally sound and cost-effective defueling and dismantling of all our decommissioned nuclear submarines as soon as practicably possible remains undiminished.

A demonstrator submarine is being used to define and refine the dismantling process. At Rosyth, initial dismantling, through the removal of low-level radioactive waste from the first two submarines, Swiftsure and Resolution, has been successfully and safely completed. As the unique approach is developed, work continues with the removal of low-level radioactive waste from a third submarine, Revenge. We expect to have a fully developed process for steady state submarine dismantling ready by 2026. As the demonstrator programme progresses, the outcomes will provide more certainty in the future costs to dismantle the Devonport-based submarines. It is not MOD policy to pre-announce the funding of its projects for reasons of protecting commercial interests.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
27th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what steps his Department has taken to decommission the retired nuclear submarines housed at Devonport.

As set out in the United Kingdom's future nuclear deterrent: the 2020 update to Parliament, we continue to develop the submarine dismantling techniques necessary to meet all safety and sustainability standards and establish the long-term solution that provides best value for the taxpayer. Our commitment to the safe, secure, environmentally sound and cost-effective defueling and dismantling of all our decommissioned nuclear submarines as soon as practicably possible remains undiminished.

A demonstrator submarine is being used to define and refine the dismantling process. At Rosyth, initial dismantling, through the removal of low-level radioactive waste from the first two submarines, Swiftsure and Resolution, has been successfully and safely completed. As the unique approach is developed, work continues with the removal of low-level radioactive waste from a third submarine, Revenge. We expect to have a fully developed process for steady state submarine dismantling ready by 2026. As the demonstrator programme progresses, the outcomes will provide more certainty in the future costs to dismantle the Devonport-based submarines. It is not MOD policy to pre-announce the funding of its projects for reasons of protecting commercial interests.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
27th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, when officials in his Department were made aware of the presence of flammable cladding on buildings in the Defence Estate.

Ministry of Defence Officials were first made aware that one Single Living Accommodation block at HMS Nelson was not compliant with Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government guidance on cladding in July 2019.

The Grenfell Tower fire occurred on 14 June 2017. In response to the concerns about building cladding and following advice from MHCLG, the Ministry of Defence (MOD) surveyed the defence estate to establish if any MOD-owned sleeping accommodation blocks over 18m in height were clad with Aluminium Composite Material (ACM) during July-August 2017. This found that MOD had no buildings that met the criteria or that were clad with ACM.

In December 2018, the MHCLG issued an updated Advice Note which changed and extended the requirement, recommending that all buildings with any external cladding at a height in excess of 18m and containing residential accommodation should be assessed to ascertain the type of cladding used.

All relevant buildings on the Defence Estate were re-surveyed (surveys completed in July 2019), which identified 28 buildings (subsequently reduced to 27 buildings) which had cladding and required further investigation as there was no evidence to confirm the external wall systems had a BR135 classification that was required under MHCLG Advice Note 14 to determine that the external wall system is safe.

As part of this process Ministry of Defence Officials were first made aware that one Single Living Accommodation block at HMS Nelson was not compliant with MHCLG guidance on cladding in July 2019.

In November 2019, Defence Fire and Rescue (DFR), the Defence Fire Safety Regulator (DFSR) and Defence Infrastructure Organisation (DIO) agreed that the 28 buildings identified should have the cladding removed, and letters notifying of the risk and need for removal were sent to the relevant Heads of Establishments in December 2019. DFR provided advice on how to operate the buildings to enable them to be safe to occupy. DFR, DFSR and DIO agreed that occupation of the buildings could continue until the appropriate measures were implemented subject to maintaining and adhering to the conditions within the buildings Fire Risk Assessments. Subsequent advice from Fire Engineering Specialists confirmed that the buildings and cladding could be assessed to determine if the cladding needed to be removed.

In Jan 2020 a consolidated advice note was issued by MHCLG, which advised all buildings containing sleeping accommodation (at any height) with external cladding should be assessed.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
27th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many buildings on the Defence Estate that currently have flammable cladding fixed to them are (a) Service Living Accommodation and (b) Service Family Accommodation.

27 high rise buildings (defined as being six floors and over) have been confirmed as having an external walling system that contains combustible components. All 27 are Single Living Accommodation.

MOD has also identified a further 728 low rise buildings that may potentially have an external walling system that contains combustible insulation, of which 188 are SFA and 567 are SLA which includes RFCA and training facilities. The list of buildings in scope is being verified and investigative works progressed.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
27th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, if he will list the locations of buildings on the defence estate that have flammable cladding.

There are 27 high rise buildings (defined as being of six floors or over) on the defence estate that have currently been confirmed as having an external wall system that contains combustible components. These are shown in the table below:

Number of buildings

Location

22

HMNB Clyde

1

Hyde Park Barracks

1

Royal Centre for Defence Medicine, Birmingham

2

HMS Nelson

1

HMS Drake

MOD has also identified a further 728 low rise buildings that may potentially have an external walling system that contains combustible insulation. Investigative work is ongoing.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
27th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many buildings on the defence estate with flammable cladding are undergoing work to safely remove the cladding from the building.

The Ministry of Defence is carrying out remedial work, or investigating remedial options, on 27 high rise buildings (defined as being six floors and over) confirmed as having an external wall system that contains combustible components.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
27th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 22 of his Department’s Climate Change and Sustainability Strategic Approach, published on 30 March 2021, what progress he has made on developing a set of defence climate assumptions for capability development.

Work is ongoing to deliver the activities covered in the strategic approach. Our capability development processes already consider a broad set of environmental factors from the Development Concepts and Doctrine Centre research and analysis into climate change trends, and the implications from such, as part of their Global Strategic Trends series; to the Joint Requirements Oversight Committee now considering climate change and sustainability factors in the requirements setting.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
27th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, when he was made aware of the presence of flammable cladding on buildings in the Defence Estate.

The Grenfell Tower fire occurred on 14 June 2017. In response to concerns about building cladding and following advice from MHCLG, the Ministry of Defence (MOD) surveyed the defence estate to establish if any MOD-owned sleeping accommodation blocks over 18m in height were clad with Aluminium Composite Material (ACM) during July-August 2017. This found that MOD had no buildings that met the criteria or that were clad with ACM.

In December 2018, the MHCLG issued an updated Advice Note which changed and extended the requirement, recommending that all buildings with any external cladding at a height in excess of 18m and containing residential accommodation should be assessed to ascertain the type of cladding used.

All relevant buildings on the Defence Estate were re-surveyed (surveys completed in July 2019), which identified 28 buildings (subsequently reduced to 27 buildings) which had an external wall system that contains combustible components and required further investigation as there was no evidence to confirm a BR135 classification that was required under MHCLG Advice Note 14 to determine that the external wall system is safe.

As part of this process MOD Officials were first made aware that one Single Living Accommodation (SLA) block at HMS Nelson was not compliant with MHCLG guidance on cladding in July 2019. A Ministerial Submission was sent to all Defence Ministers, including the then Secretary of State for Defence on 18 July 2019, making them aware that one SLA block at HMS Nelson was not compliant with MHCLG guidance on cladding.

In November 2019, Defence Fire and Rescue (DFR), the Defence Fire Safety Regulator (DFSR) and Defence Infrastructure Organisation (DIO) agreed that the 28 buildings identified should have remediation work including removal of cladding, and letters notifying the risk and need for removal were sent to the relevant Heads of Establishments in December 2019. DFR provided advice on how to operate the buildings to enable them to be safe to occupy. DFR, DFSR and DIO agreed that occupation of the buildings could continue until the appropriate measures were implemented subject to maintaining and adhering to the conditions within the buildings’ Fire Risk Assessments.

Subsequent advice from external Fire Engineering Specialists has since advised that the buildings and cladding should be re-assessed to determine if the cladding needs to be removed.

As per consolidated advice issued by MHCLG in Jan 2020, all buildings containing sleeping accommodation (at any height) with external cladding are also being assessed.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
27th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what assessment he has made of the impact of climate change on trends in the level of violent extremism and terrorism in the Sahel.

The Department's publication, 'Global Strategic Trends' published at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/global-strategic-trends addresses security threats arising from climatic change in the Sahel, including those from extremism and terrorism. We keep under review such threats to the UK and its allies. It is ever more important that we use COP 26 as the opportunity to secure meaningful commitments from nations to address the causes of climate change.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
27th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 23 of his Department’s Climate Change and Sustainability Strategic Approach, published on 30 March 2021, what discussions he has had with his counterparts in NATO in the last 12 months on further cooperation on adapting to and mitigating against the effects of climate change.

The UK believes that NATO should aim to be the leading international organisation in understanding, mitigating against and adapting to the impacts of climate change on security. This year the UK and its NATO Allies agreed on a NATO Agenda on Climate Change and Security and accompanying Action Plan, which have concrete actions to tackle the implications of climate change on Alliance security. That plan has regularly been the subject of discussion between NATO Defence Ministers over the last 12 months, and I am delighted that NATO Secretary General, Jens Stoltenberg, attended COP26 in Glasgow at the invitation of the Prime Minister.

As part of the forward looking NATO 2030 initiative, agreed by Alliance Leaders in June, the UK and its NATO Allies have agreed to significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions from military activities and installations without impairing personnel safety, operational effectiveness and our deterrence and defence posture. These NATO initiatives reflect UK defence ambitions as set out in the Climate Change and Sustainability Strategic Approach, released in March this year.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
25th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what discussions he has had with the Gulf Cooperation Council on the security situation in Yemen.

The Defence Secretary regularly speaks to his counterparts in GCC member countries on regional security matters including the situation in Yemen.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
25th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what assessment he has made of the effect of the conflict in Yemen on the security of the UK's interests in that region.

The ongoing conflict and humanitarian crisis in Yemen pose risks to regional stability and to UK interests. Cross-border attacks from Yemen into Saudi Arabia are a significant concern. Terrorist and militia groups are also able to exploit the instability caused by the conflict.

To bring about long-term stability in Yemen, an inclusive political settlement is needed. The UK fully supports the peace process led by the UN Special Envoy, Hans Grunberg.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
25th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many UK troops have been stationed in Oman in each year from 2015.

We cannot disclose the information you have requested as it would prejudice the relationship between the United Kingdom and another State.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
25th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what steps his Department has taken to increase the security for UK civilian shipping in the Gulf of Aden.

The UK is committed to ensuring security and freedom of navigation for UK civilian shipping, including in the Gulf of Aden. The UK has a long-established maritime presence in the Gulf and Indian Ocean, including a forward based frigate operating from the UK's maritime base in Bahrain, and the development of an advanced facility at Duqm. The UK also participates in maritime security operations in the region, including through the Combined Maritime Forces and the International Maritime Security Construct. The MOD communicates the latest security advice and updates to commercial shipping via the United Kingdom Maritime Trade Operations.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
25th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 15 of the Defence Command Paper, published 22 March 2021, what plans he has to increase the number of defence attachés to Oman.

None. There are no current plans to expand the Defence Section in Oman.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
25th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 22 of his Department’s Climate Change and Sustainability Strategic Approach published on 30 March 2021, how many test and trial sites have been established on the tenanted estate.

Following consultations with DEFRA over their proposed Environmental Land Management (ELMs) scheme, MOD has identified two dedicated test and trial site locations at Catterick and Salisbury Plain East. This will involve 20 farmers at both sites (40 in total) .

Subject to confirmation of funding and final approval from both MOD and DEFRA, the trial is planned to commence before the end of 2021 and conclude by February 2023.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
25th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 22 of his Department’s Climate Change and Sustainability Strategic Approach published on 30 March 2021, when he plans to announce the new policy on standards for new builds for the defence estate.

In order to deliver a new policy on standards for new builds on the defence estate considerable research is needed to ensure the most appropriate solutions are chosen. Work is currently underway to deliver the evidence needed to support the delivery of net zero policy in respect of new builds. This work includes the capability to conduct whole life carbon assessment which is needed to ensure sound infrastructure investment decisions are made and which will need to be implemented in order for any new standards to be fully effective. Pending this Defence continues to monitor and review the operation of its policy in this respect to ensure that all measures that can be taken in order to meet the net zero ambition are taken into consideration.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
25th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 21 of his Department’s Climate Change and Sustainability Strategic Approach published on 30 March 2021, whether the defence-wide consultation on future disaggregation of carbon targets has been opened.

Work is ongoing to deliver all of the activities covered in the strategic approach with delivery plans working to the timelines set out in the Initial Action Plan. Defence Carbon Targets for estate and domestic business travel emissions are set through the Government Greening Commitments which will be disaggregated between Commands for financial year 2022-23.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
25th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 21 of his Department’s Climate Change and Sustainability Strategic Approach published on 30 March 2021, when his Department plans to appoint a sustainability non-executive director.

Lt Gen (Rtd) Nugee was appointed as the Non-Executive Director with a particular focus on Climate Change and Sustainability on 1 March 2021.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
25th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 21 of his Department’s Climate Change and Sustainability Strategic Approach published on 30 March 2021, what progress he has made in establishing an adequately resourced head office team whose activities are governed at the highest levels of defence and who oversee delivery of the strategic approach and a future implementation plan; and who will lead that team.

The new Director of Climate Change and Sustainability was formally appointed in September 2021 and the majority of the directorate have been appointed and should be in post this year. The Terms of Reference of the MOD's Defence Safety and Environment Committee, chaired by the Permanent Secretary, have been amended to better reflect the significance of climate change and sustainability.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
25th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 16 of his Department’s Climate Change and Sustainability Strategic Approach published on 30 March 2021, what steps he has taken to change defence’s land management practices to protect the environment to ensure carbon offset and improve biodiversity and environmental resilience to climate change.

Work is ongoing to deliver all of the activities covered in the strategic approach with delivery plans working to the timelines set out in the Initial Action Plan. The MOD is currently undertaking a phased Natural Capital assessment to better understand the existing assets and potential for the defence estate to sequester carbon and enhance biodiversity.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
25th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 15 of his Department’s Climate Change and Sustainability Strategic Approach published on 30 March 2021, what carbon targets have been set across defence organisations.

Work is ongoing to deliver all of the activities covered in the strategic approach with delivery plans working to the timelines set out in the Initial Action Plan. Defence Carbon Targets for estate and domestic business travel emissions are currently set through the Government Greening Commitments.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
25th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 14 of his Department’s Climate Change and Sustainability Strategic Approach published on 30 March 2021, what steps he has taken to improve medial planning to ensure that defence adapts its understanding of the different psychological, disease and injury risks resulting from climate change.

Climate change presents a number of risks. Severe weather events, for example, could threaten the health of Service personnel on operations and cause widespread destruction and humanitarian crises. Heat injury among Service personnel has been a Defence Medical Services (DMS) research and policy focus for some time and will continue to be so.

Increasing DMS involvement in Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Relief operations will require clinical skills different to those in warfighting. DMS training is continually being enhanced to address these changing requirements.

Senior DMS clinicians and academics offer advice throughout the planning and delivery phases of military operations and exercises, to ensure that medical planning can adapt. The Joint Medical Operational Planners course is mandatory training for medical planners. It is constantly reviewed to ensure current understanding of the environments to which personnel deploy.

A Military Global Health Engagement course is also provided to DMS personnel. We collaborate with partner nations to ensure a broad awareness of emerging global health issues.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
25th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 14 of his Department’s Climate Change and Sustainability Strategic Approach published on 30 March 2021, how much of the £6.6 billion allocated to defence R&D over the next four years he plans to spend on improving suitability and equipping the armed forces for a climate-changed world between +2⁰ and 4⁰C.

Work is ongoing to deliver all of the activities covered in the strategic approach with delivery plans working to the timelines set out in the Initial Action Plan. The impact of Climate Change is being considered within these activities and includes spend looking at "improving suitability and equipping the armed forces for a climate-changed world between +2⁰ and 4⁰C" across a range of capabilities and Defence Lines of Development. Due to the disaggregation of this funding, it is not possible to state exactly how much of the £6.6billion R&D budget is allocated specifically to this task.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
25th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 22 October 2021 to Question 58730 on Ministry of Defence: Training, what the 81,306 civil servants in his Department that have received their refresher training for information security is as a proportion of total number of his Department's civil servants required to undergo the training.

It is taking time to collate the information needed to respond to the hon. Member's question, I will write to him when it is available.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
25th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 15 of his Department’s Climate Change and Sustainability Strategic Approach published on 30 March 2021, what target his Department has set for all defence buildings to be built to a net zero emissions standard.

Following the recent publication of the Climate Change and Sustainability Strategic Approach and Strategy for Defence Infrastructure, Defence is considering how best to move forward with Defence building standards to meet the lowest practical level of carbon emission.

As an important first step, we have already introduced new standards for Service Family Accommodation, Single Living Accommodation and Offices, that reflect forthcoming changes to Building Regulations based upon interim targets for carbon emissions. Defence will continue to work towards our ambition to achieve net zero emissions buildings pending further research on what measures would be most effective and appropriate to deliver net zero building standards.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
25th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 14 of his Department’s Climate Change and Sustainability Strategic Approach published on 30 March 2021, what steps his Department has taken to improve the self-sufficiency of UK bases and camps on operational deployments.

The Ministry of Defence is developing tailored site decarbonisation plans which incorporate renewable energy generation and storage in order to build resilience.

This follows the successful collaboration with the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy and their Modern Energy Partners (MEP) Initiative which saw a number of pilot projects taken forward across the UK Defence estate.

Defence continues to learn from our experience of building self-sufficiency into UK bases to apply to potential future overseas Camps and deliver this in line with the Strategic Approach.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
25th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 13 of his Department’s Climate Change and Sustainability Strategic Approach published on 30 March 2021, what steps he has taken to implement a climate lens into force development processes.

Climate change is routinely considered throughout our force development process, from horizon scanning and wargaming, through to setting the requirements for major programmes. This ensures that we can anticipate and adapt to the challenges, and requirements, of a changing climate.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
25th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 20 of his Department’s Climate Change and Sustainability Strategic Approach published on 30 March 2021, whether discussions have taken place between his officials and suppliers to identify ways to reduce emissions in the supply chain.

The Department has regular engagements with its suppliers to build wider understanding on Defence’s approach to Net Zero, its current emission footprint and quantification methodology. Discussions are ongoing with the Defence supply chain to assess extant decarbonisation opportunities.

Defence is able to evaluate the contribution suppliers make to sustainability as part of the competitive tender process under the Government's Social Value policy. As part of the cross Government approach, with effect from 30 September this year, the Ministry of Defence requires suppliers to publish their 'net zero' commitment as part of their carbon reduction plan as a pre-requisite to being able to bid for procurements advertised under the Public Contract Regulations. Very active consideration is being given to extend this to apply to procurements conducted under the Defence and Security Public Contract Regulations.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
20th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how much was spent by Defence Equipment and Support on consultants in each year since 2010.

Details of annual expenditure on consultants (covering such areas as project management, organisational design, finance and legal) by Defence Equipment and Support (DE&S) have been set out in the DE&S Annual Report and Accounts (ARAC) since financial year 2014/15, when DE&S was established as a Bespoke Trading Entity. Prior to 2014/15, DE&S consultancy costs were not identified separately from the Equipment Plan.

The DE&S ARAC for the financial year 2020/21 will be published in due course, following completion of the approvals process. The DE&S ARAC index can be accessed on gov.uk via the following link: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/defence-equipment-support-annual-report-and-accounts-index.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
19th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 18 October 2021 to Question 52414, how many and what proportion of his Department's staff have received their refresher training for information security.

All Ministry of Defence (MOD) personnel are required to undertake initial and refresher training to ensure they can recognise threats to security and can respond appropriately. The mandated training is the Defence Information Management Passport (DIMP) online course, which must be retaken every three years, and annual attendance at a General Security Threat Brief (this covers all elements of protective security and includes information and cyber security).

In the period 1 February 2021 (when Version six was introduced) to 4 October 2021, a total of 81,306 MOD staff completed or refreshed their DIMP in accordance with the three-yearly cycle. Completion data is not held by grade within the Defence Learning Environment. Longer term training records will be held locally by business units, but collating this information would involve going out to all sites across MOD, and this would incur disproportionate cost.

General Security Threat Briefs are delivered locally, and no data regarding attendance is held centrally. Again, collating this information would involve going out to all sites across MOD, and this would incur disproportionate cost.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
19th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what year he estimates the (a) Type 26, (b) Type 31 and (c) Type 32 will enter service.

For details on Type 26 and Type 31, I refer the Rt Hon. Member to the answer given by my noble Friend, the Minister of State at the Ministry of Defence (Baroness Goldie), on 9 March 2021 to Question HL13634 in the House of Lords and the answer I gave to the Rt Hon. Member for North Durham on 5 March 2021 to Question 22374.

Type 32 remains in the conceptual phase, however on current projected plans, the expected in-service date is in the early 2030s.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
19th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, in which year each Royal Navy Type 23 frigate will be retired.

As the Rt Hon. Member is aware HMS Monmouth was decommissioned in June 2021, on current plans the remainder of the class will be incrementally retired before the last exit from service in 2035.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
19th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to his oral contribution of 21 September 2021, Official Report, column 151, whether he will offer a Privy Council briefing on the security situation on the ground in Afghanistan.

The Secretary of State will offer a briefing on Privy Council terms and has asked officials to make the necessary arrangements.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
18th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many medical and dental professionals were employed by the (a) British Army, (b) Royal Navy and (c) RAF in each year since 2015.

For the years requested, the tables below provide the number of trained and trade trained (Army) Medical and Dental Officers in the UK Regular Armed Forces.

Medical Officers

1 April 2015

1 April 2016

1 April 2017

1 April 2018

1 April 2019

1 April 2020

1 April 2021

Royal Navy/Royal Marines

260

250

260

260

290

280

280

Army

560

540

560

540

520

550

560

RAF

230

200

210

200

210

200

210

Dental Officers

1 April 2015

1 April 2016

1 April 2017

1 April 2018

1 April 2019

1 April 2020

1 April 2021

Royal Navy/Royal Marines

50

50

40

40

40

40

40

Army

110

100

100

100

90

90

80

RAF

40

40

40

40

30

30

30

UK Regulars are full-time Service personnel, including Nursing Services, excluding Full Time Reserve Service personnel, Gurkhas, mobilised Reservists, Military Provost Guarding Service, Locally Engaged Personnel, and Non-Regular Permanent Service. Figures are comprised of Medical Officers and Dental Officers. They do not include Nursing Officers or Other Ranks in medical or dental trades.

Trained strength comprises military personnel who have completed Phase 1 and 2 training for Royal Navy/Royal Marines and the RAF. Following the change in definition of trained strength for the Army, from 1 October 2016, trained strength for the Army comprises of personnel who have completed Phase 1 training. Trade trained strength relates to the Army only and includes personnel who have passed Phase 2 training.

Figures have been rounded to the nearest 10, though numbers ending in a 5 have been rounded to the nearest multiple of 20 to prevent the systematic bias caused by always rounding numbers upwards.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
18th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether the ASRAAM Sustainment programme has entered service on the (a) Typhoons and (b) F-35 IIs.

The ASRAAM sustainment programme continues to be delivered within Complex Weapons Portfolio contract price. On current plans, the resultant ASRAAM Block 6 standard is due to enter service on Typhoon in 2022 and F-35 Lightning II in 2024.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
18th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether his Department has incurred any extra costs as a result of the delay to the in-service date of the ASRAAM Sustainment Programme.

The ASRAAM sustainment programme continues to be delivered within Complex Weapons Portfolio contract price. On current plans, the resultant ASRAAM Block 6 standard is due to enter service on Typhoon in 2022 and F-35 Lightning II in 2024.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
18th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how much funding was allocated to medical and dental services for the armed forces in each year since 2015.

The Headquarters of the Defence Medical Services (HQ DMS) is responsible for healthcare to the Armed Forces. The HQ DMS Higher Level Budget allocation for Financial Years 2015-2016 to 2021-2022 is provided in the table below.

Financial Year

£ million

2015-16

499.57

2016-17

505.54

2017-18

482.91

2018-19

473.94

2019-20

499.15

2020-21

501.52

2021-22

522.69

There is other expenditure on healthcare by the single Services that is not accounted for centrally. This information could not be provided in the time available so I will write to the hon. Member.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 158 of his Department's Annual Report and Accounts 2013 to 2014, what the constructive loss of £860,000,000 for impairment charges for certain non-current assets and current asset inventory resulting from inventory impairment exercise conducted in year relate to.

The Ministry of Defence Accounts had been subject to a National Audit Office (NAO) audit qualification in the years prior to 2013-14 due to failures to demonstrate adequate consideration of potential impairments of non-current and current asset inventory holdings. As a result, an extensive exercise was undertaken during 2013-14 of all such holdings which identified both historic and current year events that gave rise to accounting impairments.

For example, the then planned earlier retirement of Tornado necessitated an impairment as it was considered that not all asset holdings would now be fully utilised prior to end of service life. It was also identified that a number of other programme holdings were in surplus relative to usage profile whilst a smaller number had suffered damage or technical obsolescence limiting or precluding future use. The value of these assets therefore needed to be impaired to reflect their realistic useful value to MOD. The overall value of these impairment adjustments being £860 million.

As part of the activity, a business as usual process was also established to ensure enduring consideration and recognition of impairment. The full details of the exercise and conclusions reached were subject to internal audit review and then submitted to the NAO who conducted further testing, the result of which was the audit qualification was lifted.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
22nd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many (a) individual Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy (ARAP) applicants and (b) ARAP applicants including their families, have been relocated to the UK each week since 28 August 2021.

Since the conclusion of Operation PITTING on 28 August, we have relocated 27 ARAP eligible individuals to the UK. 29 dependants have accompanied these individuals as permitted by the policy.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
22nd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, if he will publish (a) the number of open Military Aid to Civil Authorities (MACA) requests, (b) the number of personnel committed and on standby for MACA requests and (c) details of those MACA requests.

As of 11 October there were 20 open Military Aid to Civil Authorities (MACA) tasks; further information on these tasks is included in the attached table. Those tasks with zero Defence personnel assigned in the table relate to the use of the Defence Estate by other authorities and no Defence personnel are specifically dedicated to the execution of the MACA. In addition to those personnel assigned in the table, 4,000 troops are held at readiness to further support a range of resilience operations at the request of the civil authorities.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
21st Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what proportion of civil servants in his Department have completed (a) initial and (b) annual refresher training for information security, by grade.

All Ministry of Defence (MOD) personnel are required to undertake initial and refresher training to ensure they can recognise threats to security and can respond appropriately. The mandated training is the Defence Information Management Passport (DIMP) online course, which must be retaken every three years, and annual attendance at a General Security Threat Brief (this covers all elements of protective security and includes information and cyber security).

In the period 1 February 2021 (when Version six was introduced) to 4 October 2021, a total of 81,306 MOD staff completed or refreshed their DIMP in accordance with the three-yearly cycle. Completion data is not held by grade within the Defence Learning Environment. Longer term training records will be held locally by business units, but collating this information would involve going out to all sites across MOD, and this would incur disproportionate cost.

General Security Threat Briefs are delivered locally, and no data regarding attendance is held centrally. Again, collating this information would involve going out to all sites across MOD, and this would incur disproportionate cost.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
21st Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, when he will publish the National Space Strategy.

The National Space Strategy was published on 27 September 2021.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
10th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether he has had discussions with Cabinet colleagues on potential use of the armed forces to transport seasonal flu vaccines in the event that the shortage of HGV drivers continues.

The Armed Forces provide support to the civil authorities where a situation goes beyond the capacity and/or capability of local authorities and other agencies, through a process known as Military Aid Civil Authorities (MACA) process. The Secretary of State for Defence has had discussions with Cabinet Colleagues around Defence’s role in winter resilience, however, at present, there has been no MACA requests for the Armed Forces to transport seasonal flu vaccines in the event that the shortage of HGV drivers continues.

Ben Wallace
Secretary of State for Defence
9th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many Afghans, eligible under the Afghan Relocation and Assistance Policy, have been evacuated to the UK since 28 August 2021.

Since the conclusion of Operation PITTING on 28 August no further evacuation flights have been conducted, however we are aware that some individuals who are eligible for relocation under the Afghan Relocation and Assistance Policy (ARAP) have left the country by their own means.

The ARAP scheme is not time-limited and remains open to all current and former Locally Employed Staff (LES) who worked for the UK Government in Afghanistan. We are working to facilitate the continued relocation of ARAP eligible individuals and their dependants, from third countries if possible. To date, two individuals have been relocated to the UK. We will continue to do all we can to support those Afghans who have supported us, and we are clear that the Taliban must ensure safe passage for these people out of Afghanistan.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
9th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the oral contribution of the Minister for Defence Procurement of 8 June 2021, Official Report, column 823, on the Ajax Programme, how many projects the Senior Responsible Owner referred to is responsible for.

As I stated in my written statement on 6 September, we have identified the need for a full time, dedicated Senior Responsible Owner for AJAX who will preferably be able to see the project through to completion and a short-list of candidates is currently under consideration.

The current Senior Responsible Owner (SRO) for the Armoured Cavalry Programme (including AJAX) is the Army's Director Support. This position oversees in-service land equipment and was previously also SRO for the Armoured Infantry Programme, including the Warrior Capability Sustainment Programme.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
7th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many individual Afghan Locally Employed Staff were relocated to the UK under the Afghan Relocation and Assistance Policy in each month since April 2021.

The Afghan Relocation and Assistance Policy (ARAP) has been one of the most generous in the world, under which circa.1,200 Locally Employed Staff (LES) have been relocated to the UK since April 2021, with a large proportion being evacuated on over 100 RAF flights as part of Operation PITTING.

We owe a debt of gratitude to all Afghan nationals who risked their lives working alongside UK forces. For this reason the ARAP scheme is not time-limited and will endure, facilitating the relocation of Afghan LES and their families, from third countries if possible.

LES individuals relocated by month:

April

0

May

1

June

24

July

188

August (inc. Operation PITTING)

981

The figures given above do not include accompanying family members.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
6th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, when he plan to publish the refresh of the National Shipbuilding Strategy.

We will publish the Refresh to the National Shipbuilding Strategy later this year.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
6th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether his Department has put plans in place to utilise the armed forces to ensure the timely delivery of seasonal flu vaccines to GPs in the event that the shortage of HGV drivers continues.

The provision of vaccines around the UK is the responsibility of the Department for Health and Social Care, Defence has not been asked to provide support to the vaccination programme this winter. The Armed Forces can provide support to the civil authorities at their request where a situation goes beyond the capacity and/or capability of local authorities and other agencies under the Military Aid to Civil Authorities process.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
6th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy applications were received up to the period 1 April 2021 to 31 July 2021; and how many of those applications were subsequently rejected.

From the 1 April 2021 to 31 July 2021 approximately 6,500 completed, credible applications for relocation to the UK under the Afghan Relocation and Assistance Policy (ARAP) were received.

Following rigorous security and employment checks, eligibility decisions were made and approximately 3,500 applicants were rejected as a result of employment history, security concerns, and other complex factors.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many Afghan armed forces soldiers were evacuated from Afghanistan to the UK since the start of Operation Pitting on 13 August 2021.

Throughout the 14 days of Operation Pitting, over 100 RAF flights relocated many thousands of people to the UK, including Afghan nationals who were employed by Her Majesty's Government to work alongside UK forces in Afghanistan. These individuals and their families were eligible for relocation to the UK under the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy (ARAP).

Regrettably, we were not able to evacuate all those we wanted to. We owe a debt of gratitude to all Afghan armed forces soldiers who put their lives at risk working alongside UK forces in Afghanistan, and recognise the threat they may now face from the Taliban due to their ties to the UK. For this reason, the Home Office is working quickly to establish the details of the Afghan Citizens' Resettlement Scheme (ACRS). This scheme will provide protection for those identified as most at risk, such as women and girls. The Government has committed to take around 5,000 refugees in the first year and up to 20,000 over the coming years.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether the intelligence used by his Department to assess the strength and capacity of the Afghan Armed Forces was (a) collected by the UK Government's national security team and military commanders or (b) based upon an assessment made by the US intelligence agencies.

We do not disclose publicly the sources of our intelligence.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what plans his Department has for integrating former Afghan armed forces soldiers currently in the UK into the UK armed forces.

The Prime Minister has directed that the whole of Government work collectively to deliver the best possible start to life in the UK for Afghan evacuees. Defence will leverage the unique bonds of fellowship within the Armed Forces and veterans' community to ensure that those Afghan evacuees who trained with or served alongside the UK Armed Forces are appropriately supported as they build their new life in the UK. This will complement and augment the wider cross-Government integration work being conducted under Op WARM WELCOME and will ensure that we look after those who looked out for us.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what support his Department is providing to Afghan armed forces soldiers in the UK.

The Prime Minister has directed that the whole of Government work collectively to deliver the best possible start to life in the UK for Afghan evacuees. Defence will leverage the unique bonds of fellowship within the Armed Forces and veterans' community to ensure that those Afghan evacuees who trained with or served alongside the UK Armed Forces are appropriately supported as they build their new life in the UK. This will complement and augment the wider cross-Government integration work being conducted under Op WARM WELCOME and will ensure that we look after those who looked out for us.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether any special housing arrangements will be made for the family of Afghans currently studying at Royal Military Academy Sandhurst to ensure that family members are not separated when they are relocated to the UK.

Work is underway across the whole of Government to ensure the Afghans who stood side by side with us in conflict, their families and those at highest risk who have been evacuated, are supported as they now rebuild their lives in the UK. This includes Afghans who are currently studying on professional military training courses in the UK. Defence is working with partners across Government to re-house those evacuated in the best way possible, which in some case includes a number of vacant homes which are normally used by Service families.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what steps the Government has taken to provide safe passage to the UK for Afghan special forces.

We owe a debt of gratitude to those who put their lives at risk working alongside UK forces in Afghanistan, and believe that nobody's life should be put at risk because they supported the UK Government. For this reason, the ARAP scheme will remain open for those who worked with the UK in Afghanistan, including Afghan special forces, and we will facilitate relocation, from third countries if possible, for those eligible.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
18th Aug 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, for what reasons a £54 million contract for the Provision of Worldwide Linguistic Services in Support of UK MoD Operations – 700032337 was closed on 16 August 2021; and whether a supplier has been found.

The reason the contract was closed on 16 August 2021 was due to the drawdown and subsequent ending of Operation TORAL, which amounted to around 67% of the total contract value of £54 million. Following legal advice, the contract was closed and a new contract for the revised requirement is being procured under the Crown Commercial Services Language Services Framework (RM6141) Lot 5m.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
18th Aug 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the Answer of 26 November 2020 to Question HL10461 on Armed Forces: Families, when he plans to publish the new UK Armed Forces families strategy.

Following consideration of the recommendations made by Andrew Selous MP in his independent report, and engagement with stakeholders across Government, the Devolved Administrations and the charitable sector, it is anticipated that the new UK Armed Forces Families Strategy will be published this autumn.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
18th Aug 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the letter from the Minister for Defence People and Veterans to the Rt hon. Member for Wentworth and Dearne on 30 July 2021, how many Royal Navy personnel have applied for compensation for mesothelioma in each year since 2016.

The Number of Royal Navy personnel who have applied for compensation for mesothelioma in each year since 2016 can be found in the table below:

Financial Year

Royal Navy Personnel

2016 -17

94

2017 -18

63

2018 -19

55

2019 - 20

72

2020 - 21

70

2021 – 23 Aug 2021

27

Total

381

All claims for mesothelioma during 2016-17 and 2017-18 were made after a diagnosis had already been confirmed. From 2018 to date some claims for compensation have been made where, upon investigation, the formal diagnosis is not mesothelioma.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
22nd Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether his Department is paying for ongoing safety tests for the Ajax programme following vibration linked concerns raised in recent trials.

The Ministry of Defence is paying for the ongoing Millbrook noise and vibration tests and trials on the Ajax programme.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
22nd Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what estimate he has made of the amount of social value investment made by General Dynamics UK in the wider UK economy as a result of the Ajax programme contract.

The Ajax programme represents the biggest single order for a UK armoured vehicle in over 20 years. The project supports approximately 4,100 jobs across more than 230 UK suppliers. The social value including in relation to jobs and skills is therefore insignificant.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
22nd Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the oral contribution of the Commander of the Field Army during the meeting of the Defence Select Committee on 20 July 2021, what contingency plans his Department has developed in the event that Ajax does not come into service by 2025.

As both I and the Commander of the Field Army outlined on 20 July 2021, contingency planning is a constant process. Should there be a significant delay beyond the scheduled FOC, the Department will be able to mitigate any gap through a range of ground-mounted and alternative reconnaissance capabilities.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
22nd Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, when (a) Ministers and (b) officials in his Department were first informed of the vibration linked issues surrounding the Ajax programme.

On 9 November 2020 my office was informed that Ajax training had been paused due to a safety concern relating to noise. I requested a formal submission (which was received on 13 November 2020) which made reference to vibration.

The timelines related to Noise and Vibration are being investigated as part of the ongoing Health and Safety Review and I refer the Rt hon. Gentleman to the Written Ministerial statement dated the 6 September 2021.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
21st Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what proportion of Royal Air Force aircraft are flying beyond their initial design service life.

The RAF does not fly its aircraft beyond the recommended lifetime of the main airframe for safety reasons.

However, to ensure we get the maximum benefit from the investment in our aircraft fleets and that they remain fit for continued frontline service in an increasingly technological and dangerous world, it is routine for aircraft fleets to be subject to upgrades and life extension programmes.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
21st Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what estimate he has made of the number of locally employed staff and their family members eligible for assistance under the Afghan Relocation and Assistance Policy.

The number of Afghans brought to the UK under the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy (ARAP) since it was established in April is now double the number anticipated this year, and the scheme will remain open indefinitely to those who are eligible.

For this reason, the number of locally employed staff and their families eligible for assistance under the ARAP continues to grow as we continue to receive and assess applications.

Operation PITTING was the largest UK military evacuation since the Second World War. Throughout its duration, many thousands of British nationals and their families, Afghan former UK staff and their families, and many highly vulnerable Afghan people were brought out of the country on over 100 RAF flights.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
21st Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many data breaches from his Department were recorded each year since 2010.

This data describes breaches with an incident type of loss or theft of physical documents recorded by the Ministry of Defence (MOD). From January 2010 to July 2021 there were 520 incidents, of which 163 were recorded as subsequently found. This figure includes incidents such as an inability to account for documents (as opposed to confirmed losses), losses within MOD establishments, and documents lost in the post beyond the control of the MOD. This data does not include cases which are still open, as it would not be appropriate to comment while they are still under investigation by the MOD.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what were the total constructive losses to his Department for the termination of Project Hydrus in 2010.

Following the decision not to proceed with construction activities on Project Hydrus, the final write off cost for the termination of the project was £117.7 million and components valued at £71 million were incorporated into the joint UK/French hydrodynamic capability established under the TEUTATES Treaty.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what was the total constructive loss to his Department for the early withdrawal of five Royal Navy and three Royal Fleet Auxiliary vessels in 2011-12.

Ministry of Defence financial records are only retained for a period of seven years. In line with accounting procedures in force at the time, only Royal Fleet Auxiliary (RFA) LARGS BAY would have been treated as a constructive loss as it was sold. All other vessels withdrawn during this period were decommissioned.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what was the total constructive loss to his Department of the early withdrawal of the Harrier fleet.

As reported in the Ministry of Defence (MOD) Annual Report and Accounts 2014/15, the total constructive loss resulting from the withdrawal from service of the Harrier fleet was £1,120,917,000.

The MOD Annual Report and Accounts 2014/15 can be accessed via the following link:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/482894/19_MOD_ARAc_combined_at_02_Dec_2015_for_web.pdf

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many and what proportion of armed forces service leavers have received their veterans ID card.

A Veterans ID card has been automatically issued as standard to all Service leavers from December 2018. 36,091 such cards have been issued up to July 2021.

The Government remains committed to developing an online digital verification tool that will securely and easily allow veterans to verify their service. A delivery date will be confirmed in due course.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many locally employed staff have been processed under the updated Afghan Relocated and Assisted Policy since 1 June 2021.

We have significantly accelerated the pace of relocations under the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy (ARAP) in line with the military drawdown. Since the 1st June 572 people, former Afghan locally employed staff and their families, have been relocated to the UK. The MOD is working with the Home Office and a range of Government departments to ensure their successful resettlement.

This now takes the total number of people from Afghanistan relocated to the UK under the ARAP and the previous Ex-Gratia Policy to nearly 2,000.

Our commitment to those who are eligible under the ARAP, and the process to deliver it, is not time-limited and will endure beyond the military presence in Afghanistan.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the total constructive losses were to his Department for the reduction in the number of Challenger 2 tanks, driver training tanks and Challenger Armoured Repair and Recovery vehicles in 2011-12.

A constructive loss of £253,810,000 was reported as an advanced notification in the Ministry of Defence Annual Report and Accounts 2014/15, as a result of the reduction in the number of Challenger 2 tanks, driver training tanks and Challenger Armoured Repair and Recovery vehicles. The loss has not yet been closed and is therefore subject to revision depending on the final outcome of the disposal process for the vehicles in question.

The MOD Annual Report and Accounts 2014/15 can be accessed via the following link:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/482894/19_MOD_ARAc_combined_at_02_Dec_2015_for_web.pdf

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what were the total constructive losses to his Department for the cancellation of Project Soothsayer.

The total constructive loss resulting from the cancellation of Project Soothsayer was £87.952 million. The Ministry of Defence Annual Report and Accounts 2016/17 reported that £50.552 million had been classed as a constructive loss associated with contract termination, while £37.4 million was reported as an extra contractual payment.

The Ministry of Defence Annual Report and Accounts 2016/17 can be accessed via the following link:

(https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/629769/MoD_AR16-17_gov_Web-Optimised.pdf)

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what were the total constructive losses to his Department for the reduction in the numbers of the Sentry aircraft fleet in 2012-13.

The Ministry of Defence Annual Report and Accounts 2013/14 reported a total constructive loss of £64,050,000 resulting from a reduction in the number of Sentry aircraft as an advance notification from 2012/13. This related to a single aircraft, which was subsequently utilised for ground-based training and project purposes. As such, it was deemed to no longer qualify as a constructive loss but as an impairment.

The MOD Annual Report and Accounts 2013/14 can be accessed via the following link:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/381064/MOD_AR13-14_webversion.pdf

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what were the total constructive losses to his Department for the reduction in the stockpile of Storm Operational Missiles in 2011-12.

I assume that the right hon. Member is referring to Storm Shadow missiles.

The Ministry of Defence Annual Report and Accounts 2012-13 reported a total constructive loss of £173.1 million resulting from a reduction in the stockpile of Storm Shadow missiles as an advance notification from 2011-12. This reflected the original decision to dispose of a number of missiles. However, this decision was subsequently reversed, and these missiles were never physically disposed of. No constructive loss is therefore deemed to have occurred.

The MOD Annual Report and Accounts 2012-13 can be accessed via the following link:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/222874/MOD_AR13_clean.pdf

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
16th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, (a) how many projects received funding from the Defence Innovation Fund in 2020/21 and (b) what was the total amount spent on those projects by his Department.

59 Projects received funding from the Defence Innovation Fund in 2020-21. The total amount spent on these projects was around £70 million.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
16th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many armed forces personnel were deployed on UK-led peacekeeping missions in 2020.

Throughout 2020, the UK maintained a United Nations peacekeeping deployment of a maximum of 600 personnel. This includes the deployment of contingent troops to UN Missions in Cyprus, Somalia, the drawdown from South Sudan, the commencement of operations in Mali, and the deployment of individual Military Staff Officers to seven UN Missions.

UN Peacekeeping Mission

Pledged troop commitment

Duration of deployment in 2020

United Nations Force in Cyprus (UNFICYP)

c. 250

Jan - Dec

United Nations Support Office in Somalia (UNSOS)

c. 10

Jan – Dec

United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS)

c. 300

Jan – Mar

United Nations Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in Mali (MINUSMA)

c. 300

Dec

Military Staff Officers

c. 30

Jan - Dec

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
16th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what was the total net expenditure on (a) research and (b) development by his Department in financial years 2019/20 and 2020/21.

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) produces an annual 'Research and development expenditure by the UK government' publication which provides detail of research and development expenditure for UK government Departments including the Ministry of Defence (MOD). The ONS publication reviews research and development expenditure in detail and presents the net expenditure broken down into 'Research' and 'Development' spend respectively. The latest release of this publication covers financial year 2019/20 expenditure and can be found here: Research and development expenditure by the UK government - Office for National Statistics (ons.gov.uk)

As outlined in the ONS publication, MOD's net expenditure in 2019/20 on Research was £647 million and on Development was £370 million.

The detail of the Ministry of Defence's net research and development expenditure for 2020/21 will be published by the ONS in April 2022. MOD's audited Annual Report and Accounts, which will include total R&D spend in financial year 2020/21, will be published in September.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
16th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether the Ministry of Defence requires that actions taken by the United States from bases in the UK be governed by UK interpretations of international law.

Any US operation from a base in the UK is considered on a case by case basis, and this includes the legal basis for any proposed activity. Though it would be inappropriate to comment on the specifics of operations, use of a base in the UK is permitted based on any proposed activity being in accordance with UK law and the UK's interpretation of relevant international law.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
16th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, (a) what methodology the Ministry of Defence uses to calculate casualty damage estimates for UK lethal strikes and (b) whether that methodology is the same as that used to assess strikes in which the UK has provided assistance.

The UK Ministry of Defence, along with many other strategic partners and nations, has adopted a Collateral Damage Estimation (CDE) policy and standard methodology to demonstrate due diligence and compliance with the Law of Armed Conflict. In line with the UK Manual of the Law of Armed Conflict, in the conduct of military operations, constant care shall be taken to spare the civilian population, civilians and civilian objects. The UK expects all nations to operate in accordance with applicable international law and UK assistance would not be provided to those who do not.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
16th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the Chief of Defence Staff Directive on Embedded Personnel 2/16, what definition his Department uses to define significant support in the context ​of assistance provided during lethal operations by UK personnel embedded in partner forces.

All UK Armed Forces embedded with our allies on operations remain subject to UK law wherever they are deployed. Embedded personnel receive a comprehensive pre-deployment briefing that covers what they may or may not do during operations and which follows Government intent. Should they be asked to undertake action outwith that set out in their pre-deployment briefing they are able to reach back to UK command for legal and policy advice.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
16th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many additional agreements the Government has entered into in respect of the US Military’s use of RAF Menwith Hill, aside from the NATO Status of Forces Agreement of 1951; and whether those agreements govern the US’s use of the facilities at the base to support military operations overseas.

The United States (US) military's use of RAF Menwith Hill is enabled through the NATO Status of Forces Agreement (1951), the Visiting Forces Act (1952) and UK/US Cost Sharing Agreement (1973).

Under these arrangements, at the consent of the UK Government, the United States has the use of certain bases in the United Kingdom. The services and facilities at these sites, including RAF Menwith Hill, are predominantly provided by the US Air Force; therefore the US are given the responsibility to operationally run these sites.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
16th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what percentage of Ministry of Defence procurement spending went to UK (a) small and (b) medium-sized enterprises in financial years 2019/20 and 2020/21.

In financial year 2019/20, the Department spent £4.515 billion directly and indirectly with Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises, accounting for 21.3% of our procurement spend. The figures for financial year 2020/21 are due to be published by the Government early next year.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
14th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what assessment he has made of the effect a covid-19 outbreak in the Carrier Strike Group 21 on future port visits.

The Carrier Strike Group 21 is carefully monitored and embarked personnel undergo regular routine testing for Covid-19. We maintain open and transparent dialogue with our Allies and partners on our plans for port visits, which remain under review in line with operational and other requirements.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
14th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what assessment he has made of the effect a covid-19 outbreak in the Carrier Strike Group 21 on cross-deck activities.

The Carrier Strike Group 21 is carefully monitored and embarked personnel undergo regular routine testing for Covid-19. Cross deck activity is kept to a minimum, in line with operational requirements, and is authorised on the judgement of the CSG Commander.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
14th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether crew from partner navies involved in the Carrier Strike Group 21 have been allowed crew off-ship during port visits during the covid-19 outbreak.

Shore leave for the crews of the Carrier Strike Group 21 integrated escorts, the USS The Sullivans, and HNLMS Evertsen, is a matter of national policy and a decision for the Commanding Officer of their Ships. The crew of HNLMS Evertsen did disembark from their Ship on a port visit to Constanza, likewise, the crew of USS The Sullivans in Cyprus. The USMC embarked in HMS QUEEN ELIZABETH abide by the Ship’s regulations.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
14th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, (a) when and (b) by whom was the decision made to allow the crew of HMS Queen Elizabeth off-ship during port visits during the covid-19 outbreak.

Port visits are planned in advance as part of each deployment and while they remain subject to change depending on operational and other requirements, they are important for logistics resupply and the welfare of the crew.

For the Carrier Strike Group 2021 deployment the Commanding Officer of each ship, in consultation with the Commander of the Strike Group, and PJHQ where required, carefully consider the Covid-19 situation at each destination and take into account HMG travel advice published on the gov.uk website and local guidance before allowing the crew off the ship during port visits.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
8th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how much money his Department spent on developing a Veterans ID Card since 2019.

Development costs prior to April 2019 cannot be disaggregated from wider budgets. The estimated cost of delivering the first phase of the Veterans' ID Card to Service leavers in the period from April 2019 to May 2020 was £376,000. From May 2020, a contract change meant the costs of delivering ID Cards to Service leavers moved from a discrete budget to a core contract; it will take time to obtain accurate figures for the costs incurred by the first phase since May 2020 and I will write to the hon. Member in due course.

Delivery of the second phase of the scheme, to those who left the Services before December 2018, is delayed. The cost of development is entirely within core business and cannot be disaggregated from wider budgets.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
7th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 6 July 2021 to Question 23054, how many armed forces personnel deployed overseas in the past 12 months have tested positive for covid-19.

In the year to 11 June 2021, 965 Armed Forces personnel had a positive COVID-19 test result entered on their medical record in an overseas location.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
6th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many claimants to the Gurkha Pension Scheme (a) reside in the UK and (b) did not transfer to the Armed Forces Pension Scheme through the Gurkha Offer to Transfer.

The information is not held in the format requested.

This is because an individual claimant may be resident in the UK, but elected to be paid through one of the pay offices, Dharan, Pokhara, Kathmandu, to a Nepalese bank account for tax purposes, and therefore have a non-UK address recorded on the Far East & Nepal Administration Scheme (FENAS).

In addition, FENAS would also include individuals who have voted to transfer to the Armed Forces Pension Scheme (AFPS) but have not yet reached their 60th birthday and therefore continue to be paid their immediate Gurkha Pension until they move to AFPS75 at age 60.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
6th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what information his Department holds on how many Gurkha veterans are resident in the UK.

Neither the MOD nor the Home Office keep records on the location of Gurkha veterans.

The Department for Work and Pensions, who are responsible for the payment of Universal Credit, do not keep records on whether claimants are Gurkha veterans.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
6th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what information his Department holds on how many former Gurkhas living in the UK are in receipt of universal credit.

Neither the MOD nor the Home Office keep records on the location of Gurkha veterans.

The Department for Work and Pensions, who are responsible for the payment of Universal Credit, do not keep records on whether claimants are Gurkha veterans.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
6th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many Gurkha veterans receive a pension through the Armed Forces Pension Scheme after transferring on the Gurkha Offer to Transfer.

The information is not held in the format requested.

The population who elected to transfer to the Armed Forces Pension Schemes (AFPS) under the terms of the Gurkha Offer to Transfer fall into three distinct categories; those at transfer who received an immediate AFPS pension, those who were serving at the time of the Offer to Transfer who subsequently left service as an AFPS member with accrued rights and those who remain as Gurkha Pension Scheme members who will transfer across to AFPS at age 60.

Those members who did not receive an immediate AFPS pension become members of their elected scheme at retirement and are not specifically identified as Gurkhas nor is there a centralised data base where the records can be accurately identified to show how many of these have now left with pension benefits.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
6th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how much his Department has spent on compensation to Royal Navy personnel with mesothelioma in each year since 2016.

It is taking time to collate the required information to answer the hon.Member's Questions. I will write to him when the information is available, and a copy of this letter will be placed in the Library of The House.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
6th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many Royal Navy personnel his Department has paid compensation to for mesothelioma in each year since 2016.

It is taking time to collate the required information to answer the hon.Member's Questions. I will write to him when the information is available, and a copy of this letter will be placed in the Library of The House.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
5th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the oral contribution of the Defence Procurement Minister of 28 June 2021, Official Report, column 21, when will the investigation into the leak of Ministry of Defence documents be concluded; and if he will make a statement.

The investigation has not yet concluded.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
5th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, when he plans to introduce the Veterans ID card.

A veteran does not require a recognition or ID card to prove their status and access veteran related services or discounts. There are a number of ways that Service can be verified, and the lack of a recognition or ID card should not act as a barrier.

The Government remains committed to developing an online digital verification tool, which will make it as easy as possible for veterans to verify their Service. We are working with colleagues across Government to find a solution that is secure and easy to use. A delivery date will be confirmed in due course, along with details of the next phase of the Veterans’ ID card roll-out. Closer to the launch date, information will be released at the following website: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/new-veterans-id-cards-rolled-out-to-service-leavers

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
5th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the timeframe is for the publication of the National Shipbuilding Strategy.

The National Shipbuilding Strategy refresh will be published later this year.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
5th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, if he will list the items stolen from his Department's sites with a value over £500 in the last 12 months.

The Ministry of Defence works hard to detect and deter theft and there are robust processes in place to raise awareness of the need for vigilance in all aspects of security. A Confidential Hotline is the central reporting point for all fraud, theft, suspected theft and financial irregularity. The information requested concerning stolen items over £500, will take time to collate and I will write to the hon. Member.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
2nd Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 1 July 2021 to Question 23049 on Ministry of Defence: Mental Health Services, how many personnel were employed at his Department's Specialist Mental Health Services in each year since 2010.

Specialist mental health services are provided to the UK Armed Forces, including through Departments of Community Mental Health, satellite Mental Health Teams and visiting clinics. In my answer of 1 July 2021 to Question 23049 I provided the number of personnel, a mixture of military and civilian, currently employed in the provision of these services.

Like for like data is only held for the previous three years:

Date

Number of Personnel

July 2018

247

April 2019

235

April 2020

235

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
29th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the oral contribution of the Minister for Defence Procurement of 8 June 2021, Official Report 821, whether the Ajax programme has met its forecast initial operating capability.

As I made clear on 9 June 2021 (Question 10608), the Department will not declare Initial Operating Capability until it is confident there is an acceptable pathway to resolution for noise and vibration issues.

We are fully engaged with the senior management of General Dynamics and working to resolve outstanding issues.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
29th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how much his Department paid in compensation to former Royal Navy personnel for exposure to asbestos in each year since 2016.

Information is not held in the format requested.

Data is not held electronically on how conditions arise, including exposure to Asbestos. It is possible that claimants may attribute certain conditions to Asbestos exposure when submitting a claim. However, the claims process uses medical evidence to assess the condition independent of cause and it is the condition which is recorded.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
29th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many and what proportion of Royal Navy personnel claims in each year since 2016 for compensation for being exposed to asbestos (a) resulted in compensation being paid, (b) were accepted but did not result in compensation being paid to the claimant and (c) were rejected.

Information is not held in the format requested.

Data is not held electronically on how conditions arise, including exposure to Asbestos. It is possible that claimants may attribute certain conditions to Asbestos exposure when submitting a claim. However, the claims process uses medical evidence to assess the condition independent of the cause and it is the condition which is recorded.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
28th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many internal investigations have been launched into missing documents in his Department in each year since 2010.

Due to the 11.5 year scope of the hon.Member's question it will take time to analyse the information held. I will write to him in due course.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
28th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether his departmental IT systems routinely allow officials, advisers and ministers to access private email accounts from their office desktop computers, and department-issue laptop computers and mobile phone devices.

I refer the hon. Member to the Cabinet Office guidance to departments on use of private emails

It is Government policy not to comment on specific technical security controls; however, the incidental personal use of private email accounts from departmental systems is subject to MOD Acceptable Use policy, in spare time.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
28th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether a risk assessment has been carried out on the secure holding of CCTV footage within his Department; and if he will make a statement.

As has been the case under successive Administrations, it is not Government policy to comment on security procedures in Government buildings.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
28th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether any departmental business has been conducted on private email addresses; and what mechanisms are in place to ensure that full records are kept of that business.

I refer the hon. Member to the Cabinet Office guidance to departments on use of private emails

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
28th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many people are employed by his Department’s specialist mental health services.

Specialist mental health services are provided to the UK Armed Forces, including through Departments of Community Mental Health, satellite Mental Health Teams and visiting clinics. 245 personnel, a mixture of civilian and military, are currently employed in the provision of these services.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
28th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what estimate he has made of the number of Armed Forces personnel who (a) are deployed overseas, (b) have tested positive for covid-19 in the past 12 months and (c) have experienced symptoms and side effects typically associated with long-covid after testing negative for the virus.

As at 22 June 2021 we estimate the number of Armed Forces personnel deployed or based overseas is approximately 11,200.

In the year to 11 June 2021, 8,796 Armed Forces personnel in the UK and overseas have had a positive COVID-19 test result entered on their medical record.

We are working with partners across Government to understand the long-term effects of COVID-19. Defence does not currently collect statistics on the criteria as specified

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
21st Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, if he will list the (a) steel products used in the construction of the Type 26 frigate and (b) locations from which each of those steel products is sourced.

The information requested has been obtained from the Prime Contractor (BAE Systems) and is provided in the following table:

Type of steel

Source Country

Thin plate

Sweden

Thick plate > 20mm

UK

Bulb

UK, Spain

Angle Bar

UK

Flat bar

UK, Sweden

IPE beam

Luxemburg, Spain, Germany

Other sections and plates

UK, EU sources

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
11th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, if he will list the contracts awarded by his Department of a value in excess of £50 million since the publication of the Defence and Security Industrial Strategy.

The Ministry of Defence (MOD) has recorded six contracts with a value in excess of £50 million, which have a start date and have been launched after the publication of the Defence and Security Industrial Strategy on 23 March 2021. A list of these contracts is below.

Contract Title*

Challenger 2 Life Extension Programme (Demonstration, Manufacture & Initial In-Service Contract)

Marine Rotating Electrical Machinery

WR21 and MT30 Capability Sustainment Contract (Gas Turbine Engines for Type 45 and Queen Elizabeth Class Ships)

Provision of P-8A Aircraft Support and Training Support

C-17 Synthetic Training Services

*details of one contract has been withheld due to its sensitive nature.

Information about the contracts that we place with industry is available on GOV.uk as part of our MOD Trade, Industry and Contracts statistics: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/defence-trade-and-industry-index.

In addition, MOD contracts worth over £10,000 are published on the Government's Contracts Finder website, which is available on GOV.uk at: https://www.gov.uk/contracts-finder.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
10th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what estimate he has made of projected total cost of project PEGASUS.

The existing approved cost of Project PEGASUS is £634 million. Following a pause to reassess the requirements for the project, it will now run in two phases. Firstly, the delivery of the store capability, which is due to complete by June 2025. The second stage will be the manufacturing capability, and an assessment phase is underway to determine the best value for money solution with a target for delivery of the first unit in 2030.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
10th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, when he expects project PEGASUS to be completed.

The existing approved cost of Project PEGASUS is £634 million. Following a pause to reassess the requirements for the project, it will now run in two phases. Firstly, the delivery of the store capability, which is due to complete by June 2025. The second stage will be the manufacturing capability, and an assessment phase is underway to determine the best value for money solution with a target for delivery of the first unit in 2030.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
10th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what estimate he has made of the projected total cost for MENSA.

The approved cost of Project MENSA, the new-build warhead assembly and disassembly facility at AWE Burghfield, is £1.8 billion.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
10th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether his Department has begun a review into the Dreadnought programme.

Similar to all Defence programmes, the Dreadnought submarine programme is continuously assessed. Despite the effects of Covid-19, the Dreadnought programme remains on track for the First of Class, HMS Dreadnought, to enter service in the early 2030s.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
10th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what recent assessment he has made of the effect of delays to the Dreadnought programme on defence capability; and if he will make a statement.

Similar to all Defence programmes, the Dreadnought submarine programme is continuously assessed. Despite the effects of Covid-19, the Dreadnought programme remains on track for the First of Class, HMS Dreadnought, to enter service in the early 2030s.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
9th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what estimate he has made of the cost to the public purse of the proposed expansion of the cap on the UK's stockpile of nuclear warheads.

As announced in the Integrated Review the UK will move to an overall nuclear weapon stockpile of no more than 260 warheads. This is a stockpile ceiling, not a target, and we will remain deliberately ambiguous about the exact number of warheads in our stockpile to avoid simplifying the calculations of potential adversaries, similarly the precise costs associated with the size of the stockpile will be withheld for National Security reasons.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
9th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, by what date he expects the MENSA project to be fully operational.

The approved delivery date of Project MENSA, the new-build warhead assembly and disassembly facility at AWE Burghfield, is 2023.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
9th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the planned timescale is for the in-service date for the replacement to the Trident Holbrook warhead; and if he will make a statement.

The UK's Replacement Warhead is planned to enter service in the 2030's. I am withholding specific information about in-service dates for the purposes of safeguarding national security.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
9th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what estimate he has made of the cost of refuelling HMS Vanguard.

I am withholding information regarding the completion date of the refuelling of HMS Vanguard as disclosure would, or would be likely to, prejudice the capability, effectiveness or security of our Armed Forces. I am also withholding the estimated cost as its disclosure would prejudice commercial interests.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
9th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, when the refuelling of HMS Vanguard will be completed.

I am withholding information regarding the completion date of the refuelling of HMS Vanguard as disclosure would, or would be likely to, prejudice the capability, effectiveness or security of our Armed Forces. I am also withholding the estimated cost as its disclosure would prejudice commercial interests.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
7th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, when the Ajax programme will reach full operating capability.

Work is ongoing to test the scheduled date for Full Operating Capacity (FOC) of 2025 in order to ensure there is a jointly agreed, risk adjusted schedule between General Dynamics and the Ministry of Defence, which will provide an agreed deliverable date to reach FOC. Any change to the FOC will be published in due course.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
7th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what impact the delay in the Ajax programme will have on the British Army’s capabilities over the next decade.

The current forecast initial operating capability, or IOC, is 30 June 2021, with a 50 per cent confidence, and a 90 per cent confidence for September 2021. To be clear, the Department will not take the programme into IOC until we are confident that we have achieved what we need to achieve at this stage of the vehicle’s development.

I refer the right hon. Gentleman to my responses to his Urgent Question of 8 June 2021, in which I noted issues of concern on the vehicle which needed to be addressed. It is too early to provide an estimate of what impact this may have on the achievement of FOC, on which work is ongoing.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
7th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, if he will commission an internal review into how the personal data of UK Armed Forces personnel was leaked through WhatsApp in June 2021.

The longstanding position of successive Governments is not to comment on UK Special Forces personnel as to do so would put those personnel and operations at risk.

An investigation into this matter is ongoing and is being conducted by the Royal Military Police. Additionally, internal processes are being reviewed as to how this type of data is handled and communicated within the Department.

The individuals affected by the breach, and their families, have been issued operational and personal security advice. Personnel have also been advised to adhere to further security advice provided by the MOD Counter Threat Advisory Team, which is continually updated and easily accessible to all Service personnel regardless of location and accessibility to MOD systems.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
7th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what steps his Department has taken to ensure that the identities of UK Armed Forces personnel are protected after the recent reported data breach through WhatsApp.

The longstanding position of successive Governments is not to comment on UK Special Forces personnel as to do so would put those personnel and operations at risk.

An investigation into this matter is ongoing and is being conducted by the Royal Military Police. Additionally, internal processes are being reviewed as to how this type of data is handled and communicated within the Department.

The individuals affected by the breach, and their families, have been issued operational and personal security advice. Personnel have also been advised to adhere to further security advice provided by the MOD Counter Threat Advisory Team, which is continually updated and easily accessible to all Service personnel regardless of location and accessibility to MOD systems.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
7th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many personnel in the Special Forces have been affected by the recent reported leak of personal data onto WhatsApp groups.

The longstanding position of successive Governments is not to comment on UK Special Forces personnel as to do so would put those personnel and operations at risk.

An investigation into this matter is ongoing and is being conducted by the Royal Military Police. Additionally, internal processes are being reviewed as to how this type of data is handled and communicated within the Department.

The individuals affected by the breach, and their families, have been issued operational and personal security advice. Personnel have also been advised to adhere to further security advice provided by the MOD Counter Threat Advisory Team, which is continually updated and easily accessible to all Service personnel regardless of location and accessibility to MOD systems.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
7th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what recent assessment has he made of the safety and security of personnel in the UK Special Forces after the reported leak of details of 1,182 British soldiers through WhatsApp; and what steps is he taking in response to that data breach.

The longstanding position of successive Governments is not to comment on UK Special Forces personnel as to do so would put those personnel and operations at risk.

An investigation into this matter is ongoing and is being conducted by the Royal Military Police. Additionally, internal processes are being reviewed as to how this type of data is handled and communicated within the Department.

The individuals affected by the breach, and their families, have been issued operational and personal security advice. Personnel have also been advised to adhere to further security advice provided by the MOD Counter Threat Advisory Team, which is continually updated and easily accessible to all Service personnel regardless of location and accessibility to MOD systems.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
7th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what assessment has he made of the potential effect of the reduced 20mph speed limit for the Ajax armoured vehicles to travel safely on the (a) UK’s operational capabilities and (b) protection of UK Forces from drone warfare.

In terms of the vehicle's speed, AJAX is capable of speeds up to 70KPH but an initial limitation of 30KPH was introduced as a control measure for newly qualified Household Cavalry Regiment crews. This is being reviewed and will likely be removed in July.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
26th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the location is of the site used to produce the pressure hull steel used in the production of the Trafalgar class and Vangard class submarines.

The pressure hull steel used in the production of the Vanguard Class of submarine was predominantly sourced from the British Steel Corporation's Dalzell plant in Motherwell, Scotland. Owing to the time that has elapsed since the procurement of steel for the Trafalgar Class submarines, reliable information on the source is not readily available. However, it is likely that the pressure hull steel was produced by UK manufacturers.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
25th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what assessment he has made about the effect of the decision to retire the C130 Hercules by 2023 on the operational capability of the Special Forces.

It has been the longstanding position of successive Governments not to comment on the capabilities of the UK special forces, as to do so would put personnel and operations at risk.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
25th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the average cost to his Department is for each day a Type 45 Destroyer is at sea.

For a Type 45 that has been active throughout a full year (at sea and alongside), an indicative average daily operating cost is £0.126 million.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
25th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to paragraph 7.34 of the Defence in a competitive age Command Paper, CP411, how many personnel will be allocated to the new experimentation battalion.

The Ministry of Defence will prioritise more than £6.6 billion of research, development, and experimentation over the next four years so the Armed Forces can adapt to the threat with advanced technologies. As part of this, 2nd Battalion The Yorkshire Regiment will rerole to become a new prototype warfighting and experimentation battalion. The Army will use spring and early summer 2021 to refine and test the designs, capabilities and structure of its units before making more detailed announcements later this year.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
25th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 56 of the Defence in a competitive age Command Paper, CP411, how many more UK weapons will be integrated onto the Lightning II aircraft; and which regions in the UK will benefit from that decision.

Alongside modifications to the fielded UK Paveway IV precision surface attack weapon, the current Programme of Record will deliver two new UK Weapons onto UK Lightning aircraft. These are the MBDA Meteor Beyond Visual Range Air to Air missile and the SPEAR Capability 3 precision surface attack missile. MBDA state that the Integration of these weapons will benefit their sites in Bolton, Bristol and Stevenage.

Future UK weapons, such as SPEAR Capability 5, will be considered for integration as part of the spiral development of UK Lightning to meet future threats, exploit multi-domain integration and expand utility.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
24th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the Command Paper 411 entitled Defence in a competitive age, published March 2021, which four battalions the new Ranger Regiment will be drawn from.

As referred to in the Command Paper; Defence in a Competitive Age, the new Ranger Regiment will be aligned with the new Divisions of Infantry and initially seeded from the current Specialised Infantry Battalions: 1 SCOTS, 2 PWRR, 2 LANCS and 4 RIFLES.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
24th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence,with reference to the Command Paper 411 entitled Defence in a competitive age, published March 2021, which infantry battalion will be be deleted as part of his Department’s defence plans.

As the Secretary of State said in his statement to the House on 22 March, the new structures planned for the Army will require fewer units. Therefore, 2nd Battalion The Mercian Regiment will be amalgamated with the 1st Battalion to form a new Boxer-mounted battalion.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
24th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, where the (a) national space operations centre and (b) space academy will be located.

Both the National Space Operations Centre and the Space Academy programmes are at an early stage of development. As both programmes mature, analysis will be undertaken against a range of factors to identify the future location for both entities, but no decisions have yet been made.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
21st May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the annual budget for the Defence Cyber Academy is in each financial year between 2021-22 and 2024-25.

The annual budget for the Defence Cyber Academy for financial year (FY) 2021-2022 is £4.47 million. This budget is forecast to increase in FY 2022-23 and again in FY 2023-24.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
21st May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the timeframe is for the establishment of the Defence Cyber Academy.

The Defence Cyber Academy builds upon the existing Defence Cyber School, and will reach Initial Operating Capability in 2023 and Full Operating Capability in 2024. At Initial Operating Capability the Defence Cyber Academy will be able to address the current Ministry of Defence requirement for individual cyber training in full. At Full Operating Capability, all positions in the Defence Cyber Academy will be filled, programmes in place for external engagement, international courses available to allies and partners and a cross-Government Defence and Security skills framework established.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
21st May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, where the Defence Cyber Academy will be located.

The Defence Cyber Academy will be located in Shrivenham, Wiltshire, as part of the UK Defence Academy.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
21st May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, when his Department plans to decide on the number of Lightning II F-35 aircraft to order in addition to those aircraft already ordered.

Following the outcome of the Integrated Review and confirmation that the UK Lightning Force will grow beyond 48 F-35B aircraft, we are undertaking a period of further analysis to evaluate the scale and optimum delivery profile of our second tranche of F-35Bs as well as associated infrastructure and support equipment. Once complete, this activity will inform procurement timelines.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
21st May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what discussions he has had with counterparts in the Scottish Government on the military-commercial uses of future spaceports in Scotland.

The Ministry of Defence works with the UK Space Agency (UKSA) to support the delivery of commercial UK launch. Defence Ministers have not had any contact with Scottish Government counterparts on this subject.

Any engagement on UK spaceports with the Scottish Government would currently be conducted through the UKSA-led programme.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
21st May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, which components of Tempest will be built in (a) Sweden and (b) Italy.

The 3-year Concept & Assessment phase will commence in 2021 with a full business case commitment by 2028 that will include details of applicable production arrangements. The Concept & Assessment phase is vital to the FCAS Programme, as we conduct the work needed to narrow down options and provide supporting evidence. The Programme aims to deliver an Initial Operating Capability by the mid-2030s.

It is too early to say where work will be undertaken, but industrial partners estimate that over 1,800 new STEM jobs have been created in over 300 companies nationwide, sustaining and supporting a sector which employs tens of thousands of workers across the UK. Tempest will exploit our industrial base to create a next generation combat air enterprise. The early preparatory work of the FCAS Technology Initiative and Team Tempest had an aspiration to secure employment for 1,800 people directly supporting the programme. Based on information from our industrial partners we believe that estimate has been exceeded, with over 2,000 people now engaged in Tempest enterprise activities alone.

In December 2020 the UK, Italy and Sweden signed the FCAS trilateral MOU. This enabling MOU signals the start of a long-term partnership that will allow us to begin the critical trilateral R&D work as part of the FCAS Concept and Assessment phase in 2021. It is too early to say where specific components of Tempest will be built.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
21st May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the announcement of a £2 billion investment by his Department in the Future Combat Air System, how many jobs that investment will support over the next (a) five years and (b) decade.

The 3-year Concept & Assessment phase will commence in 2021 with a full business case commitment by 2028 that will include details of applicable production arrangements. The Concept & Assessment phase is vital to the FCAS Programme, as we conduct the work needed to narrow down options and provide supporting evidence. The Programme aims to deliver an Initial Operating Capability by the mid-2030s.

It is too early to say where work will be undertaken, but industrial partners estimate that over 1,800 new STEM jobs have been created in over 300 companies nationwide, sustaining and supporting a sector which employs tens of thousands of workers across the UK. Tempest will exploit our industrial base to create a next generation combat air enterprise. The early preparatory work of the FCAS Technology Initiative and Team Tempest had an aspiration to secure employment for 1,800 people directly supporting the programme. Based on information from our industrial partners we believe that estimate has been exceeded, with over 2,000 people now engaged in Tempest enterprise activities alone.

In December 2020 the UK, Italy and Sweden signed the FCAS trilateral MOU. This enabling MOU signals the start of a long-term partnership that will allow us to begin the critical trilateral R&D work as part of the FCAS Concept and Assessment phase in 2021. It is too early to say where specific components of Tempest will be built.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
21st May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, where the fuselage for Tempest will be built.

The 3-year Concept & Assessment phase will commence in 2021 with a full business case commitment by 2028 that will include details of applicable production arrangements. The Concept & Assessment phase is vital to the FCAS Programme, as we conduct the work needed to narrow down options and provide supporting evidence. The Programme aims to deliver an Initial Operating Capability by the mid-2030s.

It is too early to say where work will be undertaken, but industrial partners estimate that over 1,800 new STEM jobs have been created in over 300 companies nationwide, sustaining and supporting a sector which employs tens of thousands of workers across the UK. Tempest will exploit our industrial base to create a next generation combat air enterprise. The early preparatory work of the FCAS Technology Initiative and Team Tempest had an aspiration to secure employment for 1,800 people directly supporting the programme. Based on information from our industrial partners we believe that estimate has been exceeded, with over 2,000 people now engaged in Tempest enterprise activities alone.

In December 2020 the UK, Italy and Sweden signed the FCAS trilateral MOU. This enabling MOU signals the start of a long-term partnership that will allow us to begin the critical trilateral R&D work as part of the FCAS Concept and Assessment phase in 2021. It is too early to say where specific components of Tempest will be built.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
21st May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, where the wing for Tempest will be built.

The 3-year Concept & Assessment phase will commence in 2021 with a full business case commitment by 2028 that will include details of applicable production arrangements. The Concept & Assessment phase is vital to the FCAS Programme, as we conduct the work needed to narrow down options and provide supporting evidence. The Programme aims to deliver an Initial Operating Capability by the mid-2030s.

It is too early to say where work will be undertaken, but industrial partners estimate that over 1,800 new STEM jobs have been created in over 300 companies nationwide, sustaining and supporting a sector which employs tens of thousands of workers across the UK. Tempest will exploit our industrial base to create a next generation combat air enterprise. The early preparatory work of the FCAS Technology Initiative and Team Tempest had an aspiration to secure employment for 1,800 people directly supporting the programme. Based on information from our industrial partners we believe that estimate has been exceeded, with over 2,000 people now engaged in Tempest enterprise activities alone.

In December 2020 the UK, Italy and Sweden signed the FCAS trilateral MOU. This enabling MOU signals the start of a long-term partnership that will allow us to begin the critical trilateral R&D work as part of the FCAS Concept and Assessment phase in 2021. It is too early to say where specific components of Tempest will be built.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
21st May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, where the engine for Tempest will be built.

The 3-year Concept & Assessment phase will commence in 2021 with a full business case commitment by 2028 that will include details of applicable production arrangements. The Concept & Assessment phase is vital to the FCAS Programme, as we conduct the work needed to narrow down options and provide supporting evidence. The Programme aims to deliver an Initial Operating Capability by the mid-2030s.

It is too early to say where work will be undertaken, but industrial partners estimate that over 1,800 new STEM jobs have been created in over 300 companies nationwide, sustaining and supporting a sector which employs tens of thousands of workers across the UK. Tempest will exploit our industrial base to create a next generation combat air enterprise. The early preparatory work of the FCAS Technology Initiative and Team Tempest had an aspiration to secure employment for 1,800 people directly supporting the programme. Based on information from our industrial partners we believe that estimate has been exceeded, with over 2,000 people now engaged in Tempest enterprise activities alone.

In December 2020 the UK, Italy and Sweden signed the FCAS trilateral MOU. This enabling MOU signals the start of a long-term partnership that will allow us to begin the critical trilateral R&D work as part of the FCAS Concept and Assessment phase in 2021. It is too early to say where specific components of Tempest will be built.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
21st May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 56 of the Government's Defence Command Paper, where the £2 billion allocated by his Department to the Future Combat Air System will be spent.

The 3-year Concept & Assessment phase will commence in 2021 with a full business case commitment by 2028 that will include details of applicable production arrangements. The Concept & Assessment phase is vital to the FCAS Programme, as we conduct the work needed to narrow down options and provide supporting evidence. The Programme aims to deliver an Initial Operating Capability by the mid-2030s.

It is too early to say where work will be undertaken, but industrial partners estimate that over 1,800 new STEM jobs have been created in over 300 companies nationwide, sustaining and supporting a sector which employs tens of thousands of workers across the UK. Tempest will exploit our industrial base to create a next generation combat air enterprise. The early preparatory work of the FCAS Technology Initiative and Team Tempest had an aspiration to secure employment for 1,800 people directly supporting the programme. Based on information from our industrial partners we believe that estimate has been exceeded, with over 2,000 people now engaged in Tempest enterprise activities alone.

In December 2020 the UK, Italy and Sweden signed the FCAS trilateral MOU. This enabling MOU signals the start of a long-term partnership that will allow us to begin the critical trilateral R&D work as part of the FCAS Concept and Assessment phase in 2021. It is too early to say where specific components of Tempest will be built.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
21st May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what specific training will be provided to personnel as part of the new Security Force Assistance Brigade.

The design of the new Security Force Assistance Brigade is under development and the plan for how the Army will reorganise to create this, and other new capabilities, will be announced later in 2021. Detailed programming and balanced decisions about the optimum resourcing and sequencing of this institutional change will follow. As with all our personnel, we will ensure members of this new Brigade are trained and equipped to fulfil their role, operating across the globe to develop the capacity of partners and allies.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
21st May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how much funding will be allocated to the new Security Force Assistance Brigade.

The design of the new Security Force Assistance Brigade is under development and the plan for how the Army will reorganise to create this, and other new capabilities, will be announced later in 2021. Detailed programming and balanced decisions about the optimum resourcing and sequencing of this institutional change will follow. As with all our personnel, we will ensure members of this new Brigade are trained and equipped to fulfil their role, operating across the globe to develop the capacity of partners and allies.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
21st May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many personnel will make up the new Security Force Assistance Brigade.

The design of the new Security Force Assistance Brigade is under development and the plan for how the Army will reorganise to create this, and other new capabilities, will be announced later in 2021. Detailed programming and balanced decisions about the optimum resourcing and sequencing of this institutional change will follow. As with all our personnel, we will ensure members of this new Brigade are trained and equipped to fulfil their role, operating across the globe to develop the capacity of partners and allies.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
21st May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, when his Department plans to deliver the proposed warfighting division.

Warfighting already is, and will remain, the cornerstone of deterrence and the bedrock of the British Army. The plans announced by the Defence Secretary ensure that the Army will continue to have a warfighting division at its heart.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
20th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how much funding his Department has allocated to achieve the goal of launching a British satellite from Scotland by 2022 as announced in November 2020.

The Ministry of Defence is working closely with the UK Space Agency (UKSA) to support the delivery of commercial UK launch. The UKSA is funding a range of industry-led projects to help grow the UK’s spaceflight capabilities.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
20th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the UK’s military spaceports will be used for; and how those spaceports will enhance the UK’s military capabilities.

Defence continues to work with partners across Government, including with the UK Space Agency, to fulfil the Government's ambition to become a meaningful space player. We are supporting the UK Space Agency's Spaceflight Programme which aims to establish commercial vertical and horizontal small satellite launch from UK spaceports from 2022. There is currently no plan for the Government to own any spaceports.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
20th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, where the UK’s military spaceports will be based.

Defence continues to work with partners across Government, including with the UK Space Agency, to fulfil the Government's ambition to become a meaningful space player. We are supporting the UK Space Agency's Spaceflight Programme which aims to establish commercial vertical and horizontal small satellite launch from UK spaceports from 2022. There is currently no plan for the Government to own any spaceports.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
20th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what assessment he has made of the effect of seasonal conditions on the UK's (a) ability to launch space missions and (b) space capabilities.

Defence continues to work with partners across Government, including with the UK Space Agency, to fulfil the Government's ambition to become a meaningful space player. We are supporting the UK Space Agency's Spaceflight Programme which aims to establish commercial vertical and horizontal small satellite launch from UK spaceports from 2022. There is currently no plan for the Government to own any spaceports.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
20th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how much funding his Department has provided to private space companies in each year since 2010; and what assessment he has made of the effect of the defence spending settlement on the funding available for that expenditure.

Information on annual spend to private space companies is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

We will invest an additional £1.4 billion over 10 years on space to support the Integrated Review commitment to make the UK a meaningful space actor. We will support the growth of the UK commercial space sector, and ensure the UK has the capabilities to protect and defend our interests in a more congested and contested space domain.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
20th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many personnel are working in the UK defence space sector as at 20 May 2021.

The UK space sector as a whole directly employed 45,100 people in 2018-19. We do not hold information on how many personnel are working specifically in defence-related functions as part of the UK space sector.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
20th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what estimate he has made of the average amount of training time given to the armed forces reservists each year between 2010 and 2021.

No estimate has been made of the average amount of training time given to Armed Forces reservists. The number of reservists varies throughout each year and, as a result, there is no fixed point in any year at which an average could be calculated.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
20th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, when he plans to publish the Defence Space Strategy.

We aim to publish the Defence Space Strategy after the National Space Strategy later this year.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
20th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many days each of the (a) Type-45 Destroyers and (b) Type 23 Frigates spent at sea between 2015 and 2020.

The information requested is provided in the following tables.

Type 23 Frigates:

FRIGATE

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

ARGYLL

25

0

111

141

101

191

IRON DUKE

85

132

94

0

4

0

KENT

124

67

0

57

172

155

LANCASTER

157

0

0

0

6

144

MONMOUTH

68

113

209

131

37

10

MONTROSE

0

0

41

145

198

227

NORTHUMBERLAND

48

0

0

117

146

154

PORTLAND

107

176

41

0

0

0

RICHMOND

180

73

51

0

11

190

SOMERSET

131

113

95

60

0

0

ST ALBANS

122

136

138

120

77

0

SUTHERLAND

127

127

103

166

103

161

WESTMINSTER

0

0

126

152

131

114

Type 45 Destroyers:

DESTROYER

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

DARING

48

148

85

0

0

0

DAUNTLESS

114

2

0

0

0

29

DIAMOND

27

118

116

99

14

71

DRAGON

69

56

56

145

163

110

DEFENDER

106

115

0

84

183

129

DUNCAN

188

86

107

135

153

0

The normal operating cycle of every ship involves them entering different readiness levels depending on their programmes, periods of refit and Departmental planning requirements. In addition, these figures represent days at sea, and it should be noted that, while deployed away from the UK, ships will spend both days at sea and alongside in ports around the world.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 20 of the Government’s Defence Command Paper, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of a reduction in development aid on his Department’s crisis management approach to prevent and manage crises before they escalate.

The MOD's ability to prepare for and manage crises before they escalate will be strengthened by an increase in defence spending of £24 billion over the next four years.

As the Defence Command Paper sets out, this significant investment will enable the UK to build a more proactive, adaptable, and engaged Armed Forces working with partners to shape the global environment and manage crises. As a force for good the UK remains a global leader in international development and is committed to supporting the world's poorest people.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 16 of the Government’s Defence Command Paper, how much does he plan to increase (a) investment in and (b) deployments to Oman by.

The £23.8 million investment in the UK logistics hub at Duqm port will triple the size of the existing UK base. This investment will help facilitate Royal Navy deployments to the Indian Ocean including the ability to support the UK's two aircraft carriers HMS Queen Elizabeth and HMS Prince of Wales. Work is ongoing to determine the scale and timing of further investments.

The Defence Command Paper committed to increased UK deployments to Oman. We are working through the detail of what this will mean in practice, including with our Omani partners.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many personnel will be allocated to the Space Command announced on 1 April 2021.

At Full Operating Capability, there will be approximately 650 personnel within UK Space Command which will be a a Joint Organisation with personnel from all three single Services and the Civil Service. There will be approximately 250 personnel in the Headquarters and capability development element of UK Space Command. As well as 320 personnel at RAF Fylingdales, 45 personnel in the UK Space Operations Centre and 35 personnel in Space Assurance, Training, Test and Evaluation Unit.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what will the annual budget be for the Space Command announced on 1 April 2021.

The annual budget for UK Space Command for this Financial Year is approximately £51.8 million. This includes the transfer of operating budgets from Air Command of existing RAF Units of RAF Fylingdales and UK Space Operations Centre.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, where will the Space Command announced on 1 April 2021 recruit from; and for what roles will it recruit.

Space Command is a Joint organisation and will have personnel from all three single Services and the Civil Service. UK Space Command personnel will undertake a range of roles to enable assured access to the space domain and space operations; as well as space workforce development (training and growth) and capability development of space domain military equipment programmes. When fully operationally capable, UK Space Command will provide command and control of all of Defence's space capabilities to achieve Defence's and the UK's ambition for space.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, if he will publish the details of defence equipment contracts over a value of £5 million awarded since 1 March 2021.

Defence procurement projects cover an extensive range of equipment, infrastructure, information services and broad service contracts.

With over 500 contracts placed by the Ministry of Defence (MOD) since March 2021, including over 40 contracts with a value over £5 million, specific details concerning equipment contracts could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

The MOD publishes statistics on organisations paid more than £5 million and the levels of expenditure against competitive and non-competitive contracts, although due to the need to verify the information before publication, the next update is not expected until later this year. The most recent publication can be found at the following link: www.gov.uk/government/collections/defence-trade-and-industry-index.

MOD contracts worth over £10,000 are published on the Government's Contracts Finder website at: www.gov.uk/contracts-finder.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the total value of defence equipment contracts awarded by his Department was in (a) March and (b) April 2021.

Defence procurement projects cover an extensive range of equipment, infrastructure, information services and broad service contracts.

With over 500 contracts placed by the Ministry of Defence (MOD) since March 2021, including over 40 contracts with a value over £5 million, specific details concerning equipment contracts could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

The MOD publishes statistics on organisations paid more than £5 million and the levels of expenditure against competitive and non-competitive contracts, although due to the need to verify the information before publication, the next update is not expected until later this year. The most recent publication can be found at the following link: www.gov.uk/government/collections/defence-trade-and-industry-index.

MOD contracts worth over £10,000 are published on the Government's Contracts Finder website at: www.gov.uk/contracts-finder.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 15 of the Government’s Defence Command Paper, what the planned timetable is for increasing the UK’s global network by one third.

We will begin to realise the expansion of the Global Network this year. Thereafter we will grow the network incrementally until the full extent of the expansion, as currently planned, is realised in 2027.

Early gains are to be made in countries where the training burden, particularly the requirement to learn a language, is less or we have suitable candidates with the pre-requisite skills to deploy quickly. The highest priority posts requiring longer training will start to be realised in years two and three, with growth continuing out to 2027.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what investment his Department plans to provide to private space companies to help strengthen the UK’s space industry.

Defence will invest an additional £1.4 billion over 10 years on space in support of the Integrated Review commitment.

We are also working closely with BEIS to develop the UK's first national space strategy that will take an integrated approach and set out how we will support the UK space sector to realise the benefits from this dynamic market.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
17th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what his Department’s strategy is for tackling zero day exploits.

The Ministry of Defence (MOD) takes cyber security and resilience very seriously and is increasing our already substantial investment in this area as a result of the Integrated Review settlement. The MOD conducts a range of activities to ensure its systems are protected against attack. This includes working closely with industry and partners across Government, especially the National Cyber Security Centre. Although the unknown scope and quality of zero-day exploits means that their prevention can never be guaranteed, the MOD takes a proactive approach to identifying and managing threats and vulnerabilities. For security reasons we do not comment on details, as to do so could be useful to potential adversaries.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
17th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what steps his Department is taking to protect (a) critical infrastructure, such as the energy industry and financial services, and (b) physical infrastructure, such as airports and the NHS.

The protection of critical national infrastructure (CNI) in the UK is the responsibility of its owners and operators in collaboration with the Centre for the Protection of Critical National Infrastructure (CPNI), the National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) and Civil Police Forces. Ministry of Defence Police support the protection of UK CNI through the provision of guarding services for a small number of sites.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
17th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what steps the Government is taking to help ensure that (a) tools and (b) weaponry that may be used by the National Cyber Force against British nationals for offensive cyber operations are (i) legitimate and (ii) proportionate; and if he will make a statement.

The UK has rigorous processes in place to ensure that offensive cyber operations are conducted in accordance with domestic and international law. Oversight of National Cyber Force activity is provided by the Investigatory Powers Commissioner's Office and the Intelligence and Security Committee of Parliament.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
17th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what recent assessment he has made of the threat to UK security posed by non-state actors' use of (a) digital communications and (b) social media platforms.

As Her Majesty's Government outlined in the Integrated Review and Defence Command Paper, we recognise hostile cyber activity, by whatever vector, as a top-tier threat to UK interests. We are committed to ensuring that our national security is protected. Working together with partners across Government, the Ministry of Defence monitors non-state activities closely, assesses the risks and takes action to counter them using the full spectrum of national capabilities as appropriate. The Online Safety Bill is testament to our commitment to tackle harmful online content and behaviours, including holding social media platforms to account.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
17th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 41 of the Integrated Review 2021, what the critical vulnerabilities are in the UK's data and digital infrastructure; and what steps his Department is taking to address those vulnerabilities.

Defence Digital has responsibility for remediating vulnerabilities in Ministry of Defence platforms, systems and core digital infrastructure. This is achieved through an extensive programme of activities which includes designing systems to be secure, regularly patching, continuous monitoring, security testing and vulnerability disclosure programmes. In these efforts, we work closely with industry and partners across Government, particularly the National Cyber Security Centre. For security reasons we do not comment on details, as to do so could be useful to our adversaries.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
13th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, when he plans to publish guidance on social value in defence equipment contracts.

The Ministry of Defence (MOD) procurement decision-making processes continue to be based on HM Treasury's Green Book framework. This ensures that all relevant costs and benefits to UK society are considered when undertaking procurement and project appraisal, thereby reflecting the totality of impacts on UK society overall, referred to as social value.

In September 2020, the Cabinet Office published Procurement Policy Note (PPN) 06/20 requiring additional social value benefits to be explicitly evaluated in all central government procurement (where the requirements are relevant and proportionate) rather than just 'considered' as previously required. The Social Value Model set out in the PPN requires a minimum of 10% of the total tender evaluation weighting to be allocated to specific social value criteria.

The application of the Social Value Model has been required from 1 January 2021 for all procurements under the Public Contracts Regulations 2015 this has included a number of tenders conducted by the Ministry of Defence. From the 1st June 2021, the MOD will extend this to include all procurements under the Defence and Security Public Contract Regulations 2011.

The MOD will continue to follow the guidance provided in PPN 06/20, setting out how to take account of social value in the award of contracts by using the Social Value Model. Further information can be accessed on the gov.uk website at: www.gov.uk/government/publications/procurement-policy-note-0620-taking-account-of-social-value-in-the-award-of-central-government-contracts

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
13th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to page 41 of the Integrated Review 2021, what steps have been taken to invest in an integrated education and training system for the UK’s cyber ecosystem to maximise the UK’s cyber capabilities.

As part of the Government's commitment to strengthen the UK's cyber ecosystem, Defence is investing heavily in training and educating our workforce, and making this activity available cross-government where applicable. This includes the development of a Defence Cyber Academy which will significantly increase our current teaching capacity, build stronger links with other bodies including the newly-established UK Cyber Security Council and embed common standards aligned with industry and academia. The development of our people of will be underpinned by the Defence Cyber Competency Framework and supported by a suite of Cyber Virtual Environments on which to train and exercise both internally and externally with our cross-government partners.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
13th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the Integrated Review 2021, what resources his Department has allocated to strengthen security to meet the potential threat of a terrorist attack using CBRN weapons by 2030.

Through the Modernising Defence Programme and now the Integrated Review, the Ministry of Defence (MOD) has committed to invest over £880 million over the next ten years to develop and maintain its counter-Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear (CBRN) capability. Capability development and delivery is focussed on physical protection, medical countermeasures, hazard management, sensing and knowledge management. This commitment has been enabled by over £130 million from the MOD's own science and technology programme over the past four years. The future MOD science and technology capabilities and portfolio are currently being assessed and will continue to support Defence's ability to counter current and emerging threats. The MOD also plans to spend £12 million over the next four years to reduce the risks of such attacks, through the International Biological Security Programme.

CBRN weapon use remains an enduring and growing threat to the UK, our deployed forces and international stability. To counter this threat, we will have capabilities in place that allow us to maintain our political and military freedom of action despite the presence, threat or use of CBRN materials. The MOD must also be prepared to provide counter-CBRN forces to support a UK homeland resilience response to multiple threats and maintain our contingent capability to operate overseas. The United Kingdom's world leading CBRN science and technology capability will continue to play a vital part in maintaining our counter-CBRN operational advantage and in countering current and emerging CBRN threats.

The MOD's capabilities must be viewed within the context of cross Government activity and the Department readily contributes to the United Kingdom's wider counter-CBRN capabilities and activities. These include those of the Counter Proliferation and Arms Control Centre, inter-agency operations in the homeland and overseas and collaboration with our key allies around the world.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
13th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many personnel will be employed by the new National Cyber Force.

We do not comment on exact figures for  national security reasons.  We are investing in our recruitment, including our recruitment pipelines. We are creating dedicated cyber career pathways to build a world-class workforce.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
13th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the Integrated Review, what the workforce requirement is for the Royal Marines in (a) 2021, (b) 2024 and (c) 2030.

No decisions have been made on the future size of the Royal Marines. As the Royal Marines transition into the Future Commando Force and turn to new upgraded and autonomous capabilities, there is the potential for the workforce structure to change in the future.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
13th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what steps his Department has taken to strengthen links with private businesses to improve their cyber defences and capabilities from attacks by hostile state and non-state actors.

The Ministry of Defence (MOD) works with key industry partners in the Defence Cyber Protection Partnership (DCPP) to improve the cyber security and resilience of the defence supply chain. The DCPP Cyber Security Model sets out a proportionate approach to cyber risk in line with the MOD information used by suppliers, and specifies related controls. These controls build on the National Cyber Security Centre's Cyber Essentials scheme, adding higher levels of cyber security depending upon the risk. The process is mandated for all MOD contracts and is followed down the supply chain. In addition, MOD works with other government departments and with industry bodies to highlight the importance of cyber defence and resilience to businesses of all sizes.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
13th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what body will oversee the activities of the National Cyber Force to ensure that it is acting in line with the powers enacted to it under the Investigatory Powers Act 2016.

The UK deploys its cyber capabilities in accordance with national and international law. The Investigatory Powers Commissioner keeps under review the key statutory powers for the conduct of cyber operations, including the activities of the National Cyber Force. Parliamentary oversight is provided by the Intelligence and Security Committee of Parliament.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
13th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what recent discussions has he had with his European counterparts on the Tempest project.

The Integrated Review and Defence Command Paper committed £2billion in funding over the four years to develop a world leading future combat air system, bringing MOD and industry partners together to deliver the technology, skills, and intellectual property needed to stay at the cutting edge.

We are on track to launch the Concept and Assessment phase later this year and continue to target an Initial Operating Capability by the mid-2030’s.

The UK signed a trilateral MOU with Italy and Sweden in December 2020 to enable joint work on the Future Combat Air System.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
13th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what his timetable is for the Tempest project to begin production.

The Integrated Review and Defence Command Paper committed £2billion in funding over the four years to develop a world leading future combat air system, bringing MOD and industry partners together to deliver the technology, skills, and intellectual property needed to stay at the cutting edge.

We are on track to launch the Concept and Assessment phase later this year and continue to target an Initial Operating Capability by the mid-2030’s.

The UK signed a trilateral MOU with Italy and Sweden in December 2020 to enable joint work on the Future Combat Air System.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
13th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many armed forces recruits have enlisted from each parliamentary consistency since 2010.

Not all the information requested is available but that which is can be found in the attached tables.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
13th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many armed forces recruits have been enlisted from each region of the UK since 2010.

Not all the information requested is available but that which is can be found in the attached tables.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
13th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many British Army recruits have been enlisted from each region since 2010.

The attached spreadsheet contains information detailing intake to the UK Regulars by Region for the British Army between 2013-14 and 2019-20 inclusive. Information to cover the period prior to that is not readily available and could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
13th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many British Army recruits have been enlisted from each parliamentary constituency since 2010.

The attached spreadsheet contains information detailing intake to the UK Regulars by Constituency for the British Army between 2013-14 and 2019-20 inclusive. Information to cover the period prior to that is not readily available and could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether he is planning to not announce the headquarters of the national cyber force during local government election purdah.

We have announced that the National Cyber Force HQ will be in the North of England, with the exact location to be confirmed in due course. Further details will not be announced during the pre-election period.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, which Minister in his Department approved the recommendation, as set out in the Capita review of fire risks at Faslane and Coulport naval bases, to reduce fire response services crew by 15 per cent, and if he will place a copy of that report in the Library.

Defence Fire and Rescue has responsibility for oversight of the Defence Fire and Rescue Project contract outsourced to Capita. Capita Fire and Rescue's (CFR's) specific proposals to reduce the level of cover at Faslane and Coulport, following their recent review of fire risks, do not require approval at Ministerial level. The workforce change proposals were endorsed by the Naval Base Commander of HMNB Clyde, and the Scottish Fire and Rescue Service have been extensively consulted. The reduction in firefighter resources from a six person 24/7 watch to a five person 24/7 watch will not impact CFR's ability to respond to an incident effectively.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
17th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 1 February 2021 to Question 143689 and the Prime Minister's statement of 19 November 2020, Official report, column 499, how many staff will be employed by the unit that will ensure value for money for his Department's expenditure.

The Ministry of Defence’s (MOD) Approach to Investment Decisions (MAID) introduced changes to our approvals programmes including adopting the Treasury Green Book 3 Stage Approvals process for all Defence Investment Decisions; placing the Senior Responsible Owner-led programme at the heart of our approach and introducing the Strategic Outline case to promote early engagement and decision making.

We intend to strengthen our mechanisms to challenge delivery and drive value for money. We will report the value gained from this investment through the Government’s planning and performance framework, which will measure progress towards delivering the MOD’s priority outcomes.

Separately, we are also establishing the Secretary of State’s Office for Net Assessment and Challenge to ensure that we keep pace with the rapidly evolving threats we face and ensure that our strategy and force structure delivers sustained strategic advantage for the UK.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
17th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 1 February 2021 to Question 143688 and the Prime Minister's statement of 19 November 2020 , Official Report, column 499, how much funding from the public purse will be allocated to the unit for ensuring value for money from his Department's expenditure.

The Ministry of Defence’s (MOD) Approach to Investment Decisions (MAID) introduced changes to our approvals programmes including adopting the Treasury Green Book 3 Stage Approvals process for all Defence Investment Decisions; placing the Senior Responsible Owner-led programme at the heart of our approach and introducing the Strategic Outline case to promote early engagement and decision making.

We intend to strengthen our mechanisms to challenge delivery and drive value for money. We will report the value gained from this investment through the Government’s planning and performance framework, which will measure progress towards delivering the MOD’s priority outcomes.

Separately, we are also establishing the Secretary of State’s Office for Net Assessment and Challenge to ensure that we keep pace with the rapidly evolving threats we face and ensure that our strategy and force structure delivers sustained strategic advantage for the UK.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
17th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 1 February 2021 to Question 143687 Ministry of Defence: Cost Effectiveness and the Prime Minister's statement of 19 November 2020 on the Integrated Review, Official report, column 499, what powers the unit will have to ensure value for money of his Department's expenditure.

The Ministry of Defence’s (MOD) Approach to Investment Decisions (MAID) introduced changes to our approvals programmes including adopting the Treasury Green Book 3 Stage Approvals process for all Defence Investment Decisions; placing the Senior Responsible Owner-led programme at the heart of our approach and introducing the Strategic Outline case to promote early engagement and decision making.

We intend to strengthen our mechanisms to challenge delivery and drive value for money. We will report the value gained from this investment through the Government’s planning and performance framework, which will measure progress towards delivering the MOD’s priority outcomes.

Separately, we are also establishing the Secretary of State’s Office for Net Assessment and Challenge to ensure that we keep pace with the rapidly evolving threats we face and ensure that our strategy and force structure delivers sustained strategic advantage for the UK.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
17th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 1 February 2021 to Question 143686, what further progress has been made on establishing a unit to ensure that his Department secures value for money from the defence spending settlement.

The Ministry of Defence’s (MOD) Approach to Investment Decisions (MAID) introduced changes to our approvals programmes including adopting the Treasury Green Book 3 Stage Approvals process for all Defence Investment Decisions; placing the Senior Responsible Owner-led programme at the heart of our approach and introducing the Strategic Outline case to promote early engagement and decision making.

We intend to strengthen our mechanisms to challenge delivery and drive value for money. We will report the value gained from this investment through the Government’s planning and performance framework, which will measure progress towards delivering the MOD’s priority outcomes.

Separately, we are also establishing the Secretary of State’s Office for Net Assessment and Challenge to ensure that we keep pace with the rapidly evolving threats we face and ensure that our strategy and force structure delivers sustained strategic advantage for the UK.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
15th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the ratio of pay between an officer and a non-officer was in each year since 2010.

The requested information can be found it the table below:


Ratio of median annual salary (average Officer salary relative to average Other Ranks salary) in each year since 2010:

Date

Other Ranks (OR) to Officer (OF) Pay Ratio (OR : OF)

01/04/2010

1:1.77

01/04/2011

1:1.77

01/04/2012

1:1.77

01/04/2013

1:1.77

01/04/2014

1:1.79

01/04/2015

1:1.77

01/04/2016

1:1.77

01/04/2017

1:1.73

01/04/2018

1:1.70

01/04/2019

1:1.66

01/04/2020

1:1.70

Notes:

1. The median average (mid-point of the distribution of personnel within the rank) salaries provided in this response are calculated from the annual salaries for all Regular Officers and Other Ranks as at 1-April each year. This means that the averages are based on salary at that point in the year, not what each Service person will have been paid in total across the year, which may differ, for example due to pay rate changes and promotions. Where there was a promotion within the month of March, the new rank’s rate of pay was used in the calculation.

2. Median salaries are measured as at 1 April within the financial year. Changes in the medians can therefore reflect both changes in pay rates and changes in the relative distribution of personnel within the rank.

3. The year-on-year change in average pay should not be interpreted as the growth in pay that an average service person will have experienced. The data purely reflects the change in the median salary over time and it would be unrealistic to assume that an individual's pay would follow this path. Many Service personnel also benefit from an annual increment in addition to any rise recommended by the independent Armed Forces Pay Review Body and, for senior officers, the Senior Salaries Review Body

4. The pay structure changed significantly with the introduction of Pay 16 which accounts for the large change in ratio in 2017. A simple comparison of medians between years is not possible.

5. This data uses a different method for calculating the average than the Military Salaries Index (MSI) published in the Quarterly Service Personnel Statistics and are the actual average annual salaries as at April each year.

15th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what comparative assessment he has made of the armed forces pay increase and the projected rate of inflation in 2021-22.

In November 2020 my right hon. Friend the Chancellor of the Exchequer set out, as part of the 2020 Spending Review, the rationale behind a public sector pay pause this year. As outlined in the Secretary of State for Defence's recent letter to the Chair of the Armed Forces' Pay Review Body, covering Pay Round 2021/22, and as detailed in HM Treasury's earlier Economic Evidence to the Pay Review Bodies 2020/21, the pay pause recognises that public sector pay has been shielded from the pandemic's economic effects. It also serves to protect public sector jobs at this time of crisis whilst ensuring fairness between the public and private sectors. As such, no consideration has been given to the effect of a pay pause on average median pay; the household income of Service personnel; or a comparison with projected rates of inflation.

15th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what assessment he has made of the effect of the pay freeze on the household income of armed forces personnel in 2021-22.

In November 2020 my right hon. Friend the Chancellor of the Exchequer set out, as part of the 2020 Spending Review, the rationale behind a public sector pay pause this year. As outlined in the Secretary of State for Defence's recent letter to the Chair of the Armed Forces' Pay Review Body, covering Pay Round 2021/22, and as detailed in HM Treasury's earlier Economic Evidence to the Pay Review Bodies 2020/21, the pay pause recognises that public sector pay has been shielded from the pandemic's economic effects. It also serves to protect public sector jobs at this time of crisis whilst ensuring fairness between the public and private sectors. As such, no consideration has been given to the effect of a pay pause on average median pay; the household income of Service personnel; or a comparison with projected rates of inflation.

15th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the average median pay for armed forces personnel will be in 2021-22.

In November 2020 my right hon. Friend the Chancellor of the Exchequer set out, as part of the 2020 Spending Review, the rationale behind a public sector pay pause this year. As outlined in the Secretary of State for Defence's recent letter to the Chair of the Armed Forces' Pay Review Body, covering Pay Round 2021/22, and as detailed in HM Treasury's earlier Economic Evidence to the Pay Review Bodies 2020/21, the pay pause recognises that public sector pay has been shielded from the pandemic's economic effects. It also serves to protect public sector jobs at this time of crisis whilst ensuring fairness between the public and private sectors. As such, no consideration has been given to the effect of a pay pause on average median pay; the household income of Service personnel; or a comparison with projected rates of inflation.

19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what qualifications are required for a general duty personnel to be selected for vaccinator training.

Prerequisite qualifications for general duty personnel to be selected for vaccinator training is a minimum of two A-levels.

Following selection candidates undergo an enhanced Disclosure and Barring Service check, complete the NHS online training package, which is the same course as the civilian volunteer workforce undertake, followed by a practical training day, prior to commencing vaccination tasks.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many covid-19 vaccination centres have been built by the armed forces.

The armed forces have assisted with the establishment of 60 COVID-19 vaccination centres in Scotland and England.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how long the training is for general duty personnel to become qualified vaccinators.

The training package for general duties personnel to become qualified vaccinators lasts up to four days.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many general duty personnel are currently (a) trained as vaccinators and (b) training to be qualified vaccinators.

As of 23 February Defence has trained 36 general duties personnel to be vaccinators to support the COVID-19 response, with a further 239 undergoing training.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many covid-19 vaccinations the armed forces have carried out since the start of the covid-19 vaccination roll out.

Data on the administration of COVID-19 vaccinations is collated by the Department of Health and Social Care to which Defence does not have access.

The Ministry of Defence does not collect data on vaccinations given by its personnel.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)