Caroline Dinenage Portrait

Caroline Dinenage

Conservative - Gosport

First elected: 6th May 2010


Carer’s Leave Bill
2nd Nov 2022 - 9th Nov 2022
Cultural Objects (Protection From Seizure) Bill
9th Nov 2021 - 17th Nov 2021
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
13th Feb 2020 - 16th Sep 2021
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
9th Jan 2018 - 13th Feb 2020
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
14th Jun 2017 - 9th Jan 2018
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
17th Jul 2016 - 14th Jun 2017
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
8th May 2015 - 17th Jul 2016
Minister for Equalities (Department for Education)
8th May 2015 - 17th Jul 2016
Business, Innovation and Skills Committee
5th Nov 2012 - 30th Mar 2015
Science and Technology Committee (Commons)
27th Feb 2012 - 4th Feb 2013
Science and Technology Committee
27th Feb 2012 - 4th Feb 2013
Science, Innovation and Technology Committee
27th Feb 2012 - 4th Feb 2013


Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Caroline Dinenage has voted in 777 divisions, and 2 times against the majority of their Party.

17 Jun 2020 - Health and Personal Social Services - View Vote Context
Caroline Dinenage voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 104 Conservative Aye votes vs 124 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 253 Noes - 136
30 Mar 2022 - Health and Care Bill - View Vote Context
Caroline Dinenage voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 72 Conservative Aye votes vs 175 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 215 Noes - 188
View All Caroline Dinenage Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Jim Shannon (Democratic Unionist Party)
Shadow DUP Spokesperson (Human Rights)
(10 debate interactions)
Chi Onwurah (Labour)
Shadow Minister (Science, Research and Innovation)
(10 debate interactions)
Lindsay Hoyle (Speaker)
(8 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Department of Health and Social Care
(60 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(17 debate contributions)
Department for Education
(13 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
Legislation Debates
Online Safety Act 2023
(3,269 words contributed)
Levelling-up and Regeneration Act 2023
(1,818 words contributed)
Media Bill 2023-24
(1,705 words contributed)
Health and Care Act 2022
(1,460 words contributed)
View All Legislation Debates
View all Caroline Dinenage's debates

Gosport Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petition Debates Contributed

We want the Government to repeal the Dangerous Dogs Act and replace it with legislation that focuses on early intervention to prevent dog bites and tackle dog-related issues regardless of breed or type, based solely on their behaviour.


I believe that the XL bully is a kind, beautiful natured breed that loves children and people in general, and are very loyal and loving pets.


Latest EDMs signed by Caroline Dinenage

Caroline Dinenage has not signed any Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Caroline Dinenage, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Caroline Dinenage has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Caroline Dinenage has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

Caroline Dinenage has not introduced any legislation before Parliament


Latest 50 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
2 Other Department Questions
27th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what steps her Department is taking to help (a) support the online advertising industry and (b) hold discussions with that industry on designing outcomes for the Online Advertising Programme further to the formal consultation that has already taken place.

My Department is committed to supporting a thriving advertising industry and works closely with its representatives to ensure the new reforms planned through the Online Advertising Programme (OAP) are proportionate and coherent.

The OAP is designed to ensure a level playing field for businesses by introducing regulation for the most concerning online advertising harms in order to keep UK internet users safe. Increasing transparency and accountability whilst preserving the current system where it is working will help us drive innovation and sustainable growth in the online advertising market.

Regarding the consultation on the OAP, we continue to engage closely with industry including recent ministerial roundtables with key industry stakeholders to discuss progress. We have also secured a delay to the High Fat, Salt or Sugar restrictions until 9 December 2023, to support the advertising industry further and ensure they are sufficiently prepared ahead of implementation.

We will publish a Government response to the OAP consultation in due course, and will continue to engage the industry on the outcomes of the consultation following publication.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
26th Oct 2022
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what steps her Department is taking to support female entrepreneurs.

We are committed to harnessing the skills, innovation and talents of female entrepreneurs. That’s why this Government launched a Women-Led High-Growth Enterprise Taskforce in May 2022, led by Anne Boden of Starling Bank and with a membership of some of this country’s most successful female entrepreneurs.

It will use its convening power to influence high-growth investors, raise the aspirations of the next generation and work to stimulate regional funding opportunities.

29th Jun 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of providing compensation to infected blood victims before the publication of the full report of the Inquiry.

The Government has accepted there is a moral case for compensation in respect of infected blood and has made interim compensation payments to recognise the urgent need of those registered on the existing support schemes. The Infected Blood Inquiry’s second interim report provides detailed recommendations on the framework for compensation which the Government is carefully considering.

29th Jun 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to recommendation 14 of the Infected Blood Inquiry's Second Interim Report on compensation, published on 5 April 2023, when he plans to appoint a chair to an Arms Length Body to administer the compensation scheme to eligible applicants.

As set out in the debate held on Thursday 22nd June, the setting up of an arms-length body is under consideration by the Government. The complexities and implications of any delivery mechanism must be fully understood ahead of committing to a timetable for appointments.

8th Mar 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, when the Infected Blood Compensation Framework Study will be published to recognised legal representatives and core participants after it is completed on 14 March 2022.

I refer the Hon. Member to the Written Ministerial Statement, HCWS681, made on 15 March.

13th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, if she will take steps to extend eligibility for business improvement funding provided by her Department to the environmental horticulture sector.

Government offers extensive business support, with over 40 accessible offers to businesses, including in the horticulture industry.

Our Business Support Helpline and Growth Hubs provide advice, guidance, and signposting. Help to Grow: Management offers practical support to improve leadership and management capability. Businesses can access government-backed financial support from the British Business Bank.

Support for the edible and ornamental (environmental) horticulture sectors is provided through Defra’s Farming Innovation Programme; all but one of its thematic competitions are in scope for these sectors. The Tree Production Capital Grant funds domestic tree seed and sapling production by supporting expansion, automation, and mechanization.

Kevin Hollinrake
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
27th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, if he will review the eligibility criteria for the Track-2 Carbon Capture and Storage process to ensure that those projects expected to secure a carbon storage licence within a timescale consistent with a 2030 start-up are included.

The Government has set eligibility criteria for Track-2 of its carbon capture, usage and storage (CCUS) programme that prioritise transport and storage (T&S) systems that can be operational by 2030 or earlier.

The Government believes that the possession of a Carbon Dioxide Appraisal and Storage licence is a key indicator for competitiveness in any Track-2 assessment. The expression of interest application window is now closed and we will provide an update in the summer.

We encourage T&S systems not eligible for Track-2 to continue their decarbonisation plans where feasible and we are open to engagement with them.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
27th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether his Department is taking steps to help ensure that (a) communities and businesses in the South of England and (b) national industries are able participate in (i) carbon capture storage and (ii) the production of hydrogen and sustainable aviation and marine fuels.

Carbon capture and storage (CCUS) and low carbon hydrogen, which can be used to create sustainable aviation and marine fuels, offer economic opportunities across the country. In 2030, CCUS and hydrogen could support up to 50,000 and 12,000 jobs, respectively. The Government announced an unprecedented £20bn investment in the early development of CCUS and is supporting hydrogen projects across the UK through the £240m Net Zero Hydrogen Fund, including three in the south of England, and the Hydrogen Production Business Model. Two projects in the south of England have progressed to the next stage of the first electrolytic hydrogen allocation round.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
5th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the number of mathematics graduates required to meet the Government’s ambition to achieve an investment in research and development of 2.4 per cent of GDP by 2027.

In order to sustain the UK’s target of 2.4% research intensity of GDP by 2027, it is estimated the R&D sector will need a minimum of 150,000 additional researchers and technicians between 2021 and 2030. The R&D People & Culture Strategy set out our plan to tackle skills gaps, anticipate future needs in both business and academia, and build the workforce the UK needs. BEIS is working with partners to better understand the skills and workforce needed for research and innovation.

The UK continues to be a world leader in mathematics, and to support mathematics R&D, UKRI has awarded £104 million of additional funding into Mathematical Sciences, over and above EPSRC’s core Mathematical Sciences Theme budget. The additional investment has funded institutes, small and large research grants, fellowships, doctoral studentships, and postdoctoral awards.

10th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if she will make an assessment of the potential merits of introducing a Smart Fund to help ensure creators and performers are remunerated for their work by using funds from sales of electronic devices which copy, store and share creative content.

The Government agrees that creators should be fairly remunerated. The Government is taking forward work to achieve this, including a programme considering the remuneration issues related to music streaming.

DCMS Ministers and officials have been engaging with the Design and Artists Copyright Society (DACS) on their proposals for a Smart Fund. It is encouraging to see proposals from the sector to support creators and fair remuneration. However introducing statutory levies of this nature can present significant challenges, including the risk that costs would be passed to consumers. This is of particular concern in the context of wider cost of living challenges. We encourage DACS to work with the tech industry to explore options for industry-led solutions.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
13th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what discussions her Department has had with HM Treasury on the below inflation rise in early years funding.

Ministers and officials have regular discussions with HM Treasury on matters relating to early years funding.

On 15 March 2023, my right hon. Friend, the Chancellor of the Exchequer announced that the hourly rates for childcare entitlements will be substantially uplifted, on top of the additional investments announced at the 2021 Spending Review.

The department will provide £204 million of additional funding this year, increasing to £288 million by 2024/5, for local authorities to further increase hourly rates paid to childcare providers, with further uplifts to follow each year. This will include an average of 30% increase in the 2 year old rate from September 2023 and means that in 2024, the average hourly rate for 2 year olds will be more than £8 per hour and around £11 per hour for under 2s. The 3 to 4 year old rate will rise by 4% to over £5.50 per hour from September 2023, with further uplifts beyond this.

This funding is in addition to the £4.1 billion that the government will provide by 2027/28 to facilitate the expansion of the new free hours offer. This will ensure all eligible working parents in England will, by September 2025, be able to access 30 hours of free childcare per week, for 38 weeks of the year, from when their child is 9 months old to when they start school.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
3rd Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment she has made of the potential merits of providing an Education, Health and Care Plan for children who (a) are undergoing and (b) have recently undergone cancer treatment.

For a child diagnosed with cancer, it is desirable that they continue to attend school if they are well enough, both to maintain their education and for the benefits of being with their friends. This may not always be possible, either on a short- or long-term basis.

Where a child has additional or different needs to those which can be met in mainstream provision, the child is considered to have a special educational need and disability (SEND). Whether or not a child requires an education, health and care (EHC) plan will depend on the nature of their cancer, its treatment and the child’s ability to access education. All EHC plans are tailored to the needs of the individual child and the 2014 SEND Code of Practice 0 to 25 years, sets out how the assessment of the child’s needs should be conducted. Current legislation means that there is adequate provision for a child with cancer to have an EHC plan if they require it to continue their education, even if this is in a setting outside of their usual school.

Section 19 of the Education Act 1996 places a duty on local authorities to make alternative arrangements for children of statutory school age who cannot attend school for any reason. This should be taken into account as part of the child’s EHC plan assessment and reviews so that they can be provided with suitable education in a setting which balances their educational needs and their health condition. For example, home tutoring for a child vulnerable to infection due to cancer treatment.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
10th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what (a) financial and (b) other steps he is taking to help support nurseries and early years settings in (i) Gosport constituency, (ii) Hampshire and (iii) England facing disruption related to the covid-19 outbreak.

As we take the next steps in living with COVID-19, we remain committed to doing everything possible to protect face-to-face education and care, and keep early years providers open for all children.

At the Spending Review on 27 October 2021, the government announced additional funding of £160 million in the financial years 2022-23, £180 million in 2023-24, and £170 million in 2024-25, as compared to the current financial year. This is for local authorities to increase hourly rates paid to childcare providers. It also reflects cost pressures as well as anticipated changes in the number of eligible children.

The department continues to publish comprehensive guidance to support nurseries and other early years providers in delivering a safe and secure environment for children and staff as we continue to learn to live with COVID-19. This applies to providers across England. This guidance explains the control measures that providers should take to reduce the spread of COVID-19. This includes ensuring good hygiene, maintaining appropriate cleaning regimes, and keeping spaces well-ventilated.

The department has also issued guidance to clarify that providers can use the existing flexibilities on ratios that are set out in the Early Years Foundation Stage statutory framework. This will help manage short-term workforce pressures so long as children continue to be cared for safely.

The government continues to monitor the early years sector for issues, including through engagement with local authorities. These support measures apply to all early years and childcare providers across England.

5th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what plans he has to increase the number of young people studying mathematics at higher education.

Universities are autonomous bodies, independent from government, and they have control over decisions about who to admit to their courses.

Mathematics remains the most popular A level subject and we are committed to increase participation in post-16 mathematics. We introduced reformed A levels which provide a better foundation to study Mathematics courses, including pure Mathematics, at a higher level. We fund the Advanced Mathematics Support Programme which supports schools and colleges to improve the effectiveness of level 3 maths teaching and provides targeted support for students preparing for study at higher education.

We are working with universities and academy trusts to establish a specialist Mathematics school in each region (and a total of 11 nationally). These aim to prepare more of our most mathematically able students to succeed in Mathematics disciplines at top universities.

We strongly believe effective careers guidance and advice is key to supporting young people in their education and career choices.

The government’s Careers Strategy sets out a long-term plan to build a world class careers system to achieve this ambition. The delivery of the Careers Strategy will ensure that science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) encounters, such as with employers and apprenticeships, are built into school career programmes.

The government also supports around 25% of the total PhD population in the UK through grants awarded by UK Research and Innovation (UKRI). Since January 2020, UKRI has awarded £104 million of additional funding into Mathematical Sciences, over and above the Engineering and physical Sciences Research Council’s core Mathematical Sciences Theme budget.

Michelle Donelan
Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology
11th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps his Department is taking to ensure free movement of cultivated plant biodiversity.

UK plant health controls take a risk-based approach informed by the evidence and balance ensuring robust biosecurity with the facilitation of trade. The threat from plant pests and diseases is significant and growing due to globalisation and climate change.

High plant health and biosecurity standards keep harmful pests and diseases, like Xylella fastidiosa, out of the UK, benefiting both the horticultural trade and the environment in the long term. The UK has some of the highest plant health and biosecurity standards in the world, and we have been clear we will not compromise on these standards. They are integral to supporting and protecting the horticultural industry as well as sustaining our food supply and natural environment.

The UK Plant Health Risk Group is continuously reviewing risks to plant biosecurity and identifying actions needed to mitigate the most significant threats. These include keeping our regulatory regime up to date, carrying out focused surveillance and inspections, contingency planning, research, and awareness raising, as well as identifying areas where intervention would not be helpful or justified.

Further, the UK is a member of both:

  • the OECD Seed Schemes which provide harmonised standards for the international trade of seed of regulated plant species for agriculture, and
  • the OECD Forest Seed and Plant Scheme which ensures forest reproductive material (FRM) is produced, controlled and traded according to harmonised standards.

The EU has granted equivalence to the UK for agricultural seed (excluding production of vegetable seed), fruit and vegetable propagating material, and FRM, ensuring these commodities may be marketed in the EU.

The UK Plant Health Information Portal has published Defra guidance to importers and exporters of plant material to support trade facilitation.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
29th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether he plans to consult on the ending of farrowing crates for pigs in context of the EU Commission's announcement of intention to propose legislation in that area.

The Government is committed to exploring the phasing out of farrowing crates, supporting the industry to do so in a way which underpins UK food production and does not have unintended animal welfare or business impacts.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
10th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will make it his policy not to set catch limits for any stocks that are higher than those recommended by scientific advice in fisheries negotiations with the EU, Norway and North East Atlantic coastal states in the next year.

The United Kingdom advocates an approach towards setting Total Allowable Catches (TACs) which is founded on the best available scientific advice and which will maintain or rebuild sustainable fish stocks and fisheries. In addition, for a number of target stocks a further key consideration when setting the TACs is their interaction with other stocks caught in the same mixed fishery.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
10th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will make it his policy to ban bottom trawling and the use of other bottom towed fishing gear in all offshore marine protected areas on a whole-site basis, rather than on a feature-based approach.

Each Marine Protected Area (MPA) protects specific features, whether that is a particular species or a variety of different habitats. We have recently consulted on five candidate Highly Protected Marine Areas (HPMAs). HPMAs would have the highest level of protection in English waters and would take a whole-site approach.

98 MPAs in English inshore waters already have byelaws in place to protect sensitive features from damaging fishing activities and the first four offshore byelaws have now been established. A Call for Evidence on byelaws in 13 more MPAs has recently closed. Byelaws are developed using an evidence-led process to determine what measures are required to protect sites. Site by site assessments are carried out to tailor management measures and to avoid unnecessary restrictions on fishing. Only fishing activities which could damage the protected features of an MPA require management, such as trawling on the seabed. We aim to have protection in place for all our offshore MPAs by 2024.

11th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when his Department plans to bring forward regulations to introduce the compulsory microchipping of owned cats.

Our intention is to introduce a new, single set of microchipping regulations by the end of the year, which will incorporate changes to the Microchipping of Dogs (England) Regulations and add the new requirement for compulsory microchipping of cats.

This is a devolved matter and the information provided therefore relates to England only.

Victoria Prentis
Attorney General
24th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 12 December 2023 to Question 5003 on Motor Vehicles: Exhaust Emissions, what assessment he has made of the potential impact on the UK L-Category sector of the creation of a new vehicle category as a result of regulatory misalignment with international markets.

L-category vehicles must be type approved to technical standards that primarily flow from international regulations. These are constantly monitored to ensure they remain fit for purpose with respect to evolving technology.

We expect to consult on introducing a new GB type approval scheme in the future which will provide an opportunity to reflect on the potential for new categories and technical requirements.

Anthony Browne
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
24th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 28 November 2023 to Question 3453 on Motorcycles: Carbon Emissions, what support the Government has provided to the Powered Light Vehicle Community in the last 12 months.

The Government has provided the powered light vehicle sector with a variety of support to assist in the transition to zero emission vehicles. The plug-in motorcycle grant, introduced in 2017 to stimulate the early market for zero emission mopeds and motorcycles, has provided over £8m to support the purchase of over 12,000 zero emission mopeds and motorcycles. To grow and develop the zero-emission powered light vehicle supply chain in the UK, the Government has made up to £350,000 of funding available for research and development projects.

Anthony Browne
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
24th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will make an assessment of the potential impact of (a) architectural and (b) safety requirements for L-Category vehicles on the transition of those vehicles to net zero emissions.

Zero emission L-category vehicles can currently be brought to market through the existing regulatory regime which includes electrical safety requirements. These type approval standards primarily flow from international regulations which are constantly monitored to ensure they remain fit for purpose with respect to evolving technology.

We expect to consult on introducing a new GB type approval scheme in the future which will provide an opportunity to reflect on the potential for new categories or technical requirements.

Anthony Browne
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
24th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 28 November 2023 to Question 3453 on Motorcycles: Carbon Emissions, what progress he has made on delivering powered light vehicle action plan items (a) 1, (b) 4, (c) 5, (d) 7, (e) 8 and (f) 10.

The Government continues to engage with industry to deliver the Motorcycle Industry Association and Zemo Partnership’s Action Plan where appropriate.

On action 1, pressures on the legislative timetable mean that Government is not planning to legislate for micromobility in the Fourth Session but remains committed to obtaining further evidence for future legislation to strengthen the evidence base.

On action 4, the plug-in motorcycle grant, introduced in 2017 to stimulate the early market for zero emission mopeds and motorcycles, has provided over £8m to support the purchase of over 12,000 zero emission mopeds and motorcycles.

On action 5, Government recently worked with the Energy Saving Trust to promote zero emission L-category vehicles to consumers and businesses where they had potential to significantly decarbonise personal transport and light freight, enabling people to choose how best to make journeys.

On action 7, the Government published its Future of Transport Rural Transport Innovation guidance in November 2023. This set out how innovative new transport technologies and services can help local authorities respond to rural-specific transport challenges, as well as making up to £3 million available for local authorities to trial and test these technologies.

On action 8, the Department will continue to engage with Local Authorities to help support them decarbonise their transport systems.

On action 10, as the zero-emission powered light vehicle sector grows, Government will continue to work with the sector to support and consider how to best overcome demand side challenges, including the infrastructure needs of these vehicles.

Anthony Browne
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
3rd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of making CCTV compulsory in taxis.

The Statutory Taxi and Private Hire Vehicle Standards issued in 2020 provides the Government’s view on the merits of installing CCTV in taxis and private hire vehicles; that it can deter those drivers that seek to abuse their position of trust and be of investigative and evidential value when this is alleged.

The use of CCTV can provide a safer environment not just for passengers but also for taxi and private hire vehicle drivers who often face verbal and physical assault, which is frequently racially motivated, and from false accusations.

All licensing authorities should consult to identify if there are local circumstances which indicate that the installation of CCTV in vehicles would have either a positive or an adverse net effect on the safety of taxi and private hire vehicle users and drivers, taking into account potential privacy issues.

29th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how his Department determines Attendance Allowance rates for people of state pension age or over who have long-term medical conditions such as Parkinson’s.

Attendance Allowance is intended to help those with a severe disability who have long term care or supervision needs after they reach State Pension age. It provides a contribution towards the extra costs they face because of those care or supervision needs. It is also paid in addition to other support they may receive, whether that be through benefits, the NHS or Local Authorities.

Recipients will include people who have long-term health conditions, such as Parkinson’s disease. Entitlement to Attendance Allowance is based upon the care needs that the person may have as a result of their disability and is not specifically linked to the disability itself. Attendance Allowance is paid at different rates, with the higher rate paid to those who need help or supervision throughout both day and night. Most awards are made for an indefinite period, recognising it is a benefit intended to help those with long term care needs. Those getting the higher rate are receiving around £5300 a year, tax free, which can be paid in addition to other support a pensioner may receive such as the State Pension and Pension Credit. Attendance Allowance is increased each April in line with inflation as measured by the Consumer Prices Index (CPI) for the previous September. The September 2022 CPI was 10.1 per cent which means that the rates of Attendance Allowance are due to be increased from April 2023 by this amount.

The lower rate of Attendance Allowance will increase from £61.85 to £68.10 and the higher rate will increase from £92.40 to £101.75. This is around an additional £1050 and £1600 a year respectively for disabled pensioners since 2010.

In addition, in 2022/23 and 2023/24 people in receipt of Attendance Allowance are entitled to a £150 disability cost of living payment, in addition to the pensioner cost of living payment of £300 per household. If they are in receipt of Pension Credit, they will also receive further cost of living payments worth up to £650 in 2022/23 and up to £900 in 2023/24. This is in addition to other measures announced during the Autumn Statement, such as the amended Energy Price Guarantee from April 2023 which will save also the average UK household £500 in 2023-24

Laura Trott
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
29th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if he will make it his policy to assess the adequacy of Attendance Allowance payments in providing support to people of state pension age or over, who have long-term conditions such as Parkinson’s.

Attendance Allowance is intended to help those with a severe disability who have long term care or supervision needs after they reach State Pension age. It provides a contribution towards the extra costs they face because of those care or supervision needs. It is also paid in addition to other support they may receive, whether that be through benefits, the NHS or Local Authorities.

Recipients will include people who have long-term health conditions, such as Parkinson’s disease. Entitlement to Attendance Allowance is based upon the care needs that the person may have as a result of their disability and is not specifically linked to the disability itself. Attendance Allowance is paid at different rates, with the higher rate paid to those who need help or supervision throughout both day and night. Most awards are made for an indefinite period, recognising it is a benefit intended to help those with long term care needs. Those getting the higher rate are receiving around £5300 a year, tax free, which can be paid in addition to other support a pensioner may receive such as the State Pension and Pension Credit. Attendance Allowance is increased each April in line with inflation as measured by the Consumer Prices Index (CPI) for the previous September. The September 2022 CPI was 10.1 per cent which means that the rates of Attendance Allowance are due to be increased from April 2023 by this amount.

The lower rate of Attendance Allowance will increase from £61.85 to £68.10 and the higher rate will increase from £92.40 to £101.75. This is around an additional £1050 and £1600 a year respectively for disabled pensioners since 2010.

In addition, in 2022/23 and 2023/24 people in receipt of Attendance Allowance are entitled to a £150 disability cost of living payment, in addition to the pensioner cost of living payment of £300 per household. If they are in receipt of Pension Credit, they will also receive further cost of living payments worth up to £650 in 2022/23 and up to £900 in 2023/24. This is in addition to other measures announced during the Autumn Statement, such as the amended Energy Price Guarantee from April 2023 which will save also the average UK household £500 in 2023-24

Laura Trott
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
12th Apr 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether she plans to increase the scope of the Pharmacy First programme.

Pharmacy First was launched on 31 January 2024, and as the service embeds, we will monitor and evaluate the service, and keep the conditions covered by Pharmacy First under review.

Andrea Leadsom
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
12th Apr 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Answer of 23 June 2023 to Question 189729 on Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency, whether she plans to initiate a priority review for medical devices.

The Priority Review programme is not currently planned, but the Government is taking other significant steps for medical device regulatory reform, as part of a broader Medical Technology Strategy. Further information on the Medical Technology Strategy is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/medical-technology-strategy/medical-technology-strategy

The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) is responsible for regulating medical devices, and designates United Kingdom Approved Bodies to conduct conformity assessments against the relevant regulatory requirements. The MHRA works closely with Approved Bodies to ensure their timely assessment.

Following a consultation on the future regulation of medical devices in 2021, the MHRA is leading a programme of work to introduce updated regulations for medical devices that prioritise patient safety, improve patient access to innovative medical devices, and ensure the UK remains an attractive market for medical technology innovators. In January of this year, the MHRA published a MedTech Regulatory roadmap that sets out the main activities in implementing the future regulations throughout 2024 and 2025. An international recognition framework for medical devices will form part of the future regulatory framework, which will provide an alternative route to the UK’s market, by leveraging approvals from comparable international regulators. The MHRA aims to publish an outline of the International Recognition Framework for medical devices later this spring, aligned to the Life Sciences Council, subject to necessary approvals.

In addition, the MHRA is leading the reform of the medical devices regulatory landscape and includes a new pathway to accelerate access to safe, innovative medical devices to help meet the unmet needs of patients. The Innovative Devices Access Pathway aims to bring new medical technologies and solutions to the National Health Service, to support the medical needs that are not currently being met. There are eight innovative medical technologies included in the pilot phase.

We are working alongside others to further the Life Sciences Vision, particularly improving regulation and regulatory processes around medical devices, and supporting broader ambitions in the vision aligned to the conditions set out in the Major Conditions Strategy. As we work to update the medical devices regulatory landscape, the MHRA is taking the Major Conditions Strategy into consideration, including the six groups of major health conditions.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) is not a regulator but makes recommendations for the NHS on whether selected medical devices should be routinely adopted by the NHS, based on an assessment of their costs and benefits. Medical devices are prioritised for the NICE’s evaluation, in line with NICE’s published topic selection manual.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
12th Apr 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether she plans to develop a Priority Review programme for medical devices.

The Priority Review programme is not currently planned, but the Government is taking other significant steps for medical device regulatory reform, as part of a broader Medical Technology Strategy. Further information on the Medical Technology Strategy is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/medical-technology-strategy/medical-technology-strategy

The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) is responsible for regulating medical devices, and designates United Kingdom Approved Bodies to conduct conformity assessments against the relevant regulatory requirements. The MHRA works closely with Approved Bodies to ensure their timely assessment.

Following a consultation on the future regulation of medical devices in 2021, the MHRA is leading a programme of work to introduce updated regulations for medical devices that prioritise patient safety, improve patient access to innovative medical devices, and ensure the UK remains an attractive market for medical technology innovators. In January of this year, the MHRA published a MedTech Regulatory roadmap that sets out the main activities in implementing the future regulations throughout 2024 and 2025. An international recognition framework for medical devices will form part of the future regulatory framework, which will provide an alternative route to the UK’s market, by leveraging approvals from comparable international regulators. The MHRA aims to publish an outline of the International Recognition Framework for medical devices later this spring, aligned to the Life Sciences Council, subject to necessary approvals.

In addition, the MHRA is leading the reform of the medical devices regulatory landscape and includes a new pathway to accelerate access to safe, innovative medical devices to help meet the unmet needs of patients. The Innovative Devices Access Pathway aims to bring new medical technologies and solutions to the National Health Service, to support the medical needs that are not currently being met. There are eight innovative medical technologies included in the pilot phase.

We are working alongside others to further the Life Sciences Vision, particularly improving regulation and regulatory processes around medical devices, and supporting broader ambitions in the vision aligned to the conditions set out in the Major Conditions Strategy. As we work to update the medical devices regulatory landscape, the MHRA is taking the Major Conditions Strategy into consideration, including the six groups of major health conditions.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) is not a regulator but makes recommendations for the NHS on whether selected medical devices should be routinely adopted by the NHS, based on an assessment of their costs and benefits. Medical devices are prioritised for the NICE’s evaluation, in line with NICE’s published topic selection manual.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
12th Apr 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether she plans to increase core community pharmacy funding.

As part of the Community Pharmacy Contractual Framework five-year deal, we committed £2.6 billion every year to community pharmacy, and agreed not to recover £212 million in over delivered fees and margin from community pharmacies in recent years. In addition, we are now investing up to £645 million across 2023/24 and 2024/25 in Pharmacy First, for more blood pressure checks and more contraception consultations in pharmacy. We have begun the consultation with Community Pharmacy England on the national funding and contractual framework arrangements for 2024/25.

Andrea Leadsom
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
12th Apr 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment she has made of the potential impact of medication costs on community pharmacies.

Through the medicine margin survey, the Department assesses whether the reimbursement arrangements pay pharmacy contractors as agreed as part of the community pharmacy contractual framework (CPCF). The medicine margin survey considers what pharmacies paid for medicines by looking at their invoices compared to the amount reimbursed by the National Health Service. Where the survey finds that they have been underpaid, we increase the pharmacy contractors’ payments, and where they have been overpaid, we decrease payments.

Furthermore, where pharmacies cannot purchase products at or below the Drug Tariff NHS reimbursement price, Community Pharmacy England can request that the Department reassesses the reimbursement price. If a new reimbursement price is issued, this is known as a concessionary price.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
18th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of the (a) funding and (b) guidance provided to public bodies delivering menstrual (i) products and (ii) services.

No specific assessment has been made.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
1st Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to reduce the time taken to diagnose migraines.

To reduce the time taken to diagnose conditions such as migraines, NHS England has published a delivery plan for recovering access to primary care. As part of this plan, the National Health Service will deliver on the commitment of 26,000 more direct patient care staff and 50 million more appointments in general practice by March 2024.

NHS England’s national programme of neurology service improvement is led by the National Neuro Advisory Group (NNAG), which convenes public bodies, expert bodies, clinicians, academics, and patient voice organisations. NNAG is not a decision-making body, but it does make formal recommendations to NHS England about how neurology services should be commissioned and improved.

One of the bodies that advises the NNAG is the NHS Getting It Right First Time (GIRFT) programme for neurology. In September 2021, GIRFT published its National Specialty Report for Neurology, which describes the delivery of neurology services in England and makes recommendations for their improvement. The report is available at the following link:

https://gettingitrightfirsttime.co.uk/medical_specialties/neurology/

1st Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of offering migraine specialist services at women’s health hubs.

No specific assessment is planned.

In July we announced that the £25 million investment in women’s health hubs is being distributed to every integrated care board (ICB), with each ICB receiving £595,000 in total over 2023/24 and 2024/25. ICBs have been asked to use the funding to establish or expand one women’s health hub within their system.

It is important that services are provided in a way that best meets population needs and reduces health inequalities, and ICBs will determine which specific services their hub will offer. To support ICBs to establish women’s health hubs, we have published a cost-benefit analysis, and a core specification. The core specification sets out which services ICBs could consider incorporating into their hub model, either in terms of provision or signposting. Specialist services for migraines are not listed in the core specification, but this does not prevent women’s health hubs from providing or signposting to migraine services.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
20th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department plans to take with NHS Hampshire and Isle of Wight Integrated Care System to increase the delivery of endoscopy procedures for patients in Gosport constituency.

£2.3 billion was awarded at the 2021 Spending Review to transform diagnostic services over the next three years to increase diagnostic capacity, including for endoscopy services. This funding will also increase the number of Community Diagnostic Centres up to 160 by March 2025, including a number delivering endoscopy services.

Cutting National Health Service waiting lists, including for endoscopy services, is one of this government’s top priorities. This is a shared ambition amongst integrated care systems (ICSs), including the NHS Hampshire and Isle of Wight ICS. Priorities are set locally through joint strategic needs assessments as part of joint forward plans across the ICS and partnering NHS trusts.

There are currently nine sites delivering diagnostics for Hampshire and the Isle of Wight. This includes the provision of endoscopy services at some sites.

In the South East Hampshire Locality which includes Portsmouth, Fareham and Gosport, 1,908 additional endoscopy tests have been delivered closer to people’s homes, increasing earlier access to endoscopy procedures.

20th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how much and what proportion of funding provided to the NHS Hampshire and Isle of Wight integrated care system for diagnostic funding was spent on diagnostic endoscopy procedures in NHS Portsmouth in the 2022-23 financial year.

This information is not held in the format requested.

£2.3 billion was awarded at the 2021 Spending Review to transform diagnostic services over the next three years to increase diagnostic capacity, including for endoscopy services. This funding will also increase the number of Community Diagnostic Centres to 160 by March 2025, including a number delivering endoscopy services.

27th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to increase awareness and education on HPV and HPV-related cancers among children and teenagers.

UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA) works closely with several charities such as Jo’s Cervical Cancer Trust and the Teenage Cancer Trust to develop lesson plans for schools and other resources that can be used to raise awareness and educate young people about the Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine and related cancers.

UKHSA has also helped develop resources for schools on the HPV vaccination and other adolescent immunisation programmes available at the following links:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/adolescent-vaccination-programme-in-secondary-schools/adolescent-vaccination-programme-briefing-for-secondary-schools

https://www.jostrust.org.uk/information-healthcare-professionals/information-teachers;

https://www.teenagecancertrust.org/about-us/what-we-do/cancer-awareness/resources#cervicalcancer

https://pshe-association.org.uk/resource/educate-hpv-vaccine

UKHSA HPV resources are available at the following link: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/hpv-vaccination-programme

Also available to order in print on the UKHSA Health Publications website in a range of language and accessible formats available at the following link:

www.healthpublications.gov.uk

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
27th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that HPV vaccination reaches 90 per cent uptake in (a) girls and (b) boys.

Ease of access is key to ensure high uptake of vaccines. For this reason, the HPV programme is primarily delivered through schools, with alternative provision for those not in mainstream education and catch-up programmes offered through general practitioner (GP) practices for both girls and boys who are eligible but missed their initial offer.

Additionally, NHS England and the UK Health Security Agency deliver annual communication campaigns to promote the HPV vaccine via GPs and universities, emphasising the benefits of the HPV vaccine for both girls and boys.

It is vitally important that everyone takes up the vaccinations to which they are entitled; for themselves, their families, and wider society. Anyone unsure about their eligibility or vaccination status should contact their GP for advice.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
27th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to monitor inequalities in HPV vaccination uptake.

The UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA) monitor HPV vaccine coverage and publish annual data which is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/human-papillomavirus-hpv-vaccine-coverage-estimates-in-england-2021-to-2022

In order to track inequalities these data are available by gender at the local authority, NHS and UKSHA Regional levels. School-based HPV immunisation delivery has successfully achieved high coverage in England and reduced inequalities at area level since the start of the programme in 2008.

In addition, the UKHSA also conducts undertakes research to understand how knowledge, beliefs and attitudes towards immunisation, vaccine safety and disease severity, influence vaccine uptake decision-making, including for the HPV vaccine. This includes working with partners in the NIHR Health Protection Research Unit (HPRU) for Vaccines exploring issues within specific minority communities and monitoring inequalities.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
27th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether the four-month visa extension for newly trained international medical graduates announced in the Delivery plan for recovering access to primary care, published by NHS England on 9 May 2023, will apply across all four nations.

The four-month visa extension for newly trained international medical graduates will apply across all four nations.

19th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to Alzheimer’s Research UK and the Royal College of Psychiatrists report entitled Are we ready to deliver disease modifying treatments?, published on 26 May 2021, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of that report's findings that 36 per cent of psychiatrists think their services could adapt to deliver a new treatment within a year; and what steps his Department is taking to prepare the NHS for future dementia treatments following the approval of lecanemab in the US.

NHS England has a proactive national dementia programme in place and is monitoring international trial data with great interest, including studies looking into new ways of more easily diagnosing dementia at an earlier stage.

Any decision on the potential scale of testing infrastructure and workforce to support the administration of new treatments will take account of numerous factors. These include the quality of trial evidence to emerge that supports a future licence in the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease, and whether it is subsequently determined by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence to be a clinically and cost-effective National Health Service treatment option.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
1st Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will take steps to ensure that additional funding for hospital discharge will be allocated to registered care settings.

The Department has no current plans to provide discharge funding directly to care providers.

The £500 million Adult Social Care Discharge Fund has been distributed to local authorities and Integrated Care Boards (ICBs). The funding has been pooled locally into the Better Care Fund, to facilitate joint planning and decision-making across health and care systems. This funding should be used for locally determined measures to reduce delayed discharge, which could include funding care packages in registered care settings.

The additional £200 million funding specifically for short term care is held centrally by NHS England (NHSE) and allocated to ICBs, who may work with registered care settings where that is the most appropriate approach in their circumstances.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
30th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether the 10 Year Cancer Plan will include specific plans for expanding the availability of radiotherapy for cancer patients.

Following the call for evidence for a ten year cancer plan earlier this year, we received over 5,000 submissions. We are currently reviewing these responses.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
30th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to help reduce waiting times for cancer treatment.

The ‘Delivery plan for tackling the COVID-19 backlog of elective care’ sets out how the National Health Service will recover and expand elective services over the next three years, including cancer services. The plan states the ambition that the number of people waiting more than 62 days to start treatment following suspected cancer will return to pre-pandemic levels by March 2023. We have allocated more than £8 billion from 2022/23 to 2024/25, in addition to the £2 billion Elective Recovery Fund and £700 million Targeted Investment Fund already made available in 2021/2022 to increase elective activity, including cancer services.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
30th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department will take to increase cancer treatment capacity in the NHS.

The ‘Delivery plan for tackling the COVID-19 backlog of elective care’ sets out how the National Health Service will recover and expand elective services over the next three years, including cancer services. The plan states the ambition that the number of people waiting more than 62 days to start treatment following suspected cancer will return to pre-pandemic levels by March 2023. We have allocated more than £8 billion from 2022/23 to 2024/25, in addition to the £2 billion Elective Recovery Fund and £700 million Targeted Investment Fund already made available in 2021/2022 to increase elective activity, including cancer services.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
29th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the potential impact of increased inflation on (a) his Department's budget and (b) patient care in the NHS.

The Government is investing an additional £3.3 billion in 2023/24 and 2024/25 to respond to pressures on the National Health Service and improve emergency, elective and primary care. The NHS resource budget in England will increase to £160.4 billion in 2023/24 and £165.9 billion in 2024/25.

29th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if the Government will publish a sustainable and funded plan for the cancer workforce to ensure the training and retention of more healthcare professionals to tackle the Cancer backlog.

Health Education England is implementing the priorities in the Cancer Workforce Plan Phase 1 and is investing an additional £50 million in 2022/23 to further expand the cancer and diagnostics workforce.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
29th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect of workforce pressures within the NHS on people living with cancer.

No specific assessment has been made.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)