Feryal Clark Portrait

Feryal Clark

Labour - Enfield North

First elected: 12th December 2019

Shadow Minister (Crime Reduction)

(since November 2023)

Shadow Minister (Health and Social Care)
4th Dec 2021 - 28th Nov 2023
Opposition Whip (Commons)
14th May 2021 - 4th Dec 2021
Environmental Audit Committee
2nd Mar 2020 - 22nd Feb 2021


There are no upcoming events identified
Division Votes
Wednesday 21st February 2024
Motor Vehicles (Driving Licences) (Reform)
voted No - in line with the party majority
One of 77 Labour No votes vs 0 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 63 Noes - 81
Speeches
Tuesday 6th February 2024
Knife and Sword Ban
I start by expressing my thanks to hon. Members across the House for their powerful contributions this afternoon. They include …
Written Answers
Tuesday 23rd January 2024
Forensic Science: Laboratories
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much funding the Government allocated to establishing a National …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
None available
MP Financial Interests
Monday 20th March 2023
10. Family members engaged in lobbying the public sector on behalf of a third party or client
My spouse, Andrew Clark, is a Director of Kanda Consultancy.
EDM signed
Tuesday 26th October 2021
Campaign to secure the future of the Covid Memorial Wall
That this House welcomes the creation of the Covid Memorial Wall on Albert Embankment by Covid-19 Bereaved Families for Justice; …
Supported Legislation
Monday 8th March 2021
Housing and Homelessness (Local Accommodation Duty) Bill 2019-21
A Bill to place a duty on local authorities to ensure that persons for whom a homeless duty has been …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Feryal Clark has voted in 551 divisions, and 1 time against the majority of their Party.

24 Jan 2022 - Leasehold Reform (Ground Rent) Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
Feryal Clark voted No - against a party majority - in line with the party majority and in line with the House
One of 1 Labour No votes vs 148 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 162 Noes - 306
View All Feryal Clark Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Matt Hancock (Independent)
(13 debate interactions)
Maria Caulfield (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
(12 debate interactions)
Lindsay Hoyle (Speaker)
(9 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Department of Health and Social Care
(66 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(13 debate contributions)
Home Office
(12 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
Legislation Debates
Online Safety Act 2023
(744 words contributed)
Down Syndrome Act 2022
(508 words contributed)
View All Legislation Debates
View all Feryal Clark's debates

Enfield North Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petitions with highest Enfield North signature proportion
Petition Debates Contributed

Invest in FOP research to support this ultra-rare disease community. Research into FOP could inform the understanding/treatment of many more common conditions such as osteoporosis, hip replacements, DIPG (a rare childhood brain cancer) and many common military injuries.


Latest EDMs signed by Feryal Clark

23rd September 2021
Feryal Clark signed this EDM on Tuesday 26th October 2021

Campaign to secure the future of the Covid Memorial Wall

Tabled by: Afzal Khan (Labour - Manchester, Gorton)
That this House welcomes the creation of the Covid Memorial Wall on Albert Embankment by Covid-19 Bereaved Families for Justice; notes that this memorial now includes over 150,000 hand-painted hearts to symbolise all those who lost their lives during the coronavirus pandemic; praises the work of Covid-19 Bereaved Families for …
139 signatures
(Most recent: 21 Feb 2022)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 97
Scottish National Party: 15
Liberal Democrat: 10
Conservative: 5
Democratic Unionist Party: 5
Independent: 3
Plaid Cymru: 3
Green Party: 1
Social Democratic & Labour Party: 1
14th January 2021
Feryal Clark signed this EDM on Monday 18th January 2021

Godfrey Colin Cameron

Tabled by: Chris Stephens (Scottish National Party - Glasgow South West)
That this House is deeply saddened by news of the death of Godfrey Colin Cameron, a hardworking member of Parliamentary security staff and member of the PCS trade union who passed away aged just 55 after contracting covid-19; extends our sincere condolences to his devoted wife Hyacinth, children Leon and …
139 signatures
(Most recent: 8 Feb 2021)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 112
Scottish National Party: 15
Independent: 7
Plaid Cymru: 3
Alba Party: 1
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
View All Feryal Clark's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Feryal Clark, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Feryal Clark has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Feryal Clark has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

Feryal Clark has not introduced any legislation before Parliament


1407 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
8 Other Department Questions
16th Nov 2022
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what steps her Department is taking to help ensure that businesses are complying with all parts of the Equality Act 2010.

It is the responsibility of all businesses to ensure that they are aware of their obligations under the Equality Act 2010 (the Act) to their customers and employees. To help them in this, Government and relevant independent bodies offer a range of technical guidance and statutory codes of practice that clearly explain what businesses should and should not do to ensure that their conduct is lawful and not discriminatory.

The Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) is the public body responsible for enforcing the Act. The EHRC provides guidance to assist businesses, including service providers, to help ensure compliance with all parts of the Act. The guides explain how businesses can avoid the different types of unlawful discrimination, against customers and employees, including those with disabilities.

Guidance for any organisation providing a service can be found here: https://equalityhumanrights.com/en/advice-and-guidance/guidance-businesses

Guidance for employers can be found here: https://equalityhumanrights.com/en/advice-and-guidance/guidance-employers

Tailored advice is also available to both businesses, employees and service users through two helplines. The Equality and Advisory Support Service (EASS) is a Government-funded helpline and the initial point of contact for anyone with discrimination concerns. The EASS provides free bespoke advice and also supports businesses and their customers to resolve issues using alternative informal dispute resolution. The EASS can also advise people who wish to take their complaint further on their options.

Acas offers a similar service to employers and employees, both information and early conciliation, where it is hoped that disputes can be resolved before progression to tribunal. Like the EHRC, Acas has also published guidance for employers to help them to behave in accordance with Equality Act requirements, for example their “What discrimination is by law” pages, that can be viewed at: https://www.acas.org.uk/discrimination-and-the-law

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
14th Mar 2022
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, how the 2010 Equalities Act applies to people with (a) endometriosis, (b) polycystic ovary syndrome and (c) other chronic conditions.

The Equality Act 2010 (the Act), may protect some people with endometriosis and polycystic ovary syndrome as well as other chronic conditions on the grounds of disability. This will be the case where someone suffering from these disorders experiences a physical or mental impairment which has a substantial and long-term adverse effect on their ability to carry out normal day-to-day activities. An employer or a service provider is required to make reasonable adjustments to ensure that disabled people are not put at a substantial disadvantage compared to non-disabled people. Depending on circumstances, the Act may also provide protection from discrimination on grounds of sex and/or age.

The Act also provides that people with progressive conditions that have effects that increase in severity over time should be regarded as meeting the criteria for having a disability before it actually has that effect.

Kemi Badenoch
President of the Board of Trade
30th Nov 2021
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what recent steps she has taken with the Secretary of State for Defence to tackle gender-based harassment, assault and bullying in the armed forces.

Equality Ministers regularly discuss issues with counterparts across government. The Ministry of Defence is working to prevent and tackle all forms of unacceptable behaviour, including on the grounds of sex, sexual harassment and bullying. Unacceptable behaviour is not tolerated in the Armed Forces, and anyone failing to meet values and standards will be dealt with robustly, including being subject to police investigations and dismissal where appropriate.

Kemi Badenoch
President of the Board of Trade
22nd Nov 2021
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, whether her Department has plans to introduce a new criminal offence for people aiding and abetting the removal of a person from the UK for the purpose of sexual orientation or gender identity conversion therapy.

This Government is committed to banning the practice of all coercive conversion therapy in this country. Our approach is to target practitioners and those who promote this abhorrent practice, while providing support to victims and those at risk. We are consulting on our proposals for how to legislate for a ban on conversion therapy until 10 December. Responses to the consultation will inform the Government’s final approach.

This Government wants to ensure that no one is taken abroad to undergo conversion therapy under any circumstance. Certain violent and sexual offences that could be committed in the course of conversion therapy, including rape and grievous bodily harm, already have extraterritorial effect so that, where appropriate, UK nationals and residents who commit those offences outside the UK may be prosecuted in the UK.

We also propose to introduce Conversion Therapy Protection Orders, which could set out certain conditions to protect a person from undergoing the practice overseas, including removing a passport for those at risk of being taken abroad or any requirement that the court considers necessary to protect that person.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
21st Oct 2021
To ask the President of COP26, what recent steps he has taken to help ensure that (a) climate change and (b) ecological destruction are tackled in an integrated way at COP26.

During the World Leaders’ Summit at COP26, there will be a event focused on bringing together ambitious governments, companies, financial actors, and non-state leaders to raise ambition on forests and land-use, in a way that delivers for the climate, people, economic development and biodiversity. The event will demonstrate how action on forests and land-use can contribute to keeping the 1.5 temperature goal in sight, to supporting sustainable livelihoods, and to meeting shared promises on adaptation and finance.

COP26 will also include a Nature Day highlighting action on forests, agriculture and wider land-use to address the climate crisis. We are working with international partners to promote sustainable and climate-resilient agriculture; to mobilise increased and more targeted finance for nature; and to build the political consensus for ambitious action.

At the G7 summit, leaders committed to an ambitious ‘Nature Compact’, which includes working to accelerate an inclusive global transition to sustainable and climate resilient agriculture, as well as committing to achieving net zero emissions no later than 2050.

The UK has also played a central role in promoting the ‘Leaders’ Pledge for Nature’, which now has over 80 signatories. The pledge sets out ten urgent actions to put nature on a path to recovery by 2030, addressing both biodiversity loss and climate change.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
8th Jul 2021
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what recent discussions she has had with the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care on improving maternal care for (a) women living in poverty, (b) Black women, and (c) Asian women in Enfield North constituency.

I have regular discussions with the Minister for Patient Safety, Suicide Prevention and Mental Health on improving maternal outcomes for all ethnic minority women. I have also discussed this issue with Professor Jacqueline Dunkley-Bent, England’s Chief Midwifery Officer, and Dr. Gloria Rowland, who is leading NHS work to improve outcomes, progression and the well-being of ethnic minority maternity staff.

Kemi Badenoch
President of the Board of Trade
21st Apr 2021
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, if she will make it her policy to (a) reject the report from the Commission on Race and Ethnic Disparities published on 31 March 2021 and (b) implement the recommendations on race equality included in the (i) 2019 Timpson review of school exclusions, (ii) 2017 McGregor-Smith review of race in the workplace, (iii) 2018 Windrush lessons learned review, (iv) 2017 Angolini independent review into serious incidents and deaths in custody, (v) 2017 Lammy review on discrimination in the criminal justice system and (vi) 2020 Joint Committee on Human Rights report on Black people, racism and human rights.

The Government will not be rejecting the Commission on Race and Ethnic Disparities’ report. The Prime Minister has established a new Inter-Ministerial Group to review the recommendations, and it is now right that the Government considers the report in detail and assesses the implications for future government policy.

The Government has responded to previous reviews and a significant number of the recommendations have been implemented; others are underway.

The independent Commission's report built on previous reviews in the scope of its work. It makes an important contribution to both the national conversation about race, and our efforts to level up and unite the whole country.

Kemi Badenoch
President of the Board of Trade
24th May 2021
To ask the Attorney General, what meetings (a) he and (b) the Solicitor General have had with women's groups to discuss measures to prevent (a) gender-based violence and (b) domestic violence since February 2020.

Ministers engage regularly with stakeholders from across the justice sector and value the importance of listening to and the opportunity to understand their views in relation to relevant issues. Meetings with external organisations, including women’s groups, are published as part of the quarterly Ministerial transparency returns.

The following table includes a list of meetings the Law Officers have had with stakeholders and women’s groups since February 2020:

Minister

Date

Name of organisation or role

Purpose of meeting

Geoffrey Cox

2020-02-11

Victims' Commissioner, Victims' Commissioner for London, End Violence Against Women and Girls

Meeting to discuss cross-government work on rape.

Michael Ellis

2020-01-23

The Lighthouse

Visit to discuss their work supporting victims of Child Sexual Exploitation and Abuse

Michael Ellis

2020-01-23

Victim Support

Visit to discuss their work supporting victims of crime

Suella Braverman

2020-04-22

Victims' Commissioner

Introductory meeting to discuss work on Rape And Serious Sexual Offending, the Cross-Government End-to-End Rape Review and Domestic Abuse

Suella Braverman

2020-09-09

Victims' Commissioner

To discuss criminal justice issues of interest to the Victims' Commissioner.

Suella Braverman

2020-11-04

Victims' Commissioner

Routine meeting to discuss issues of relevance to the Victims’ Commissioner (including rape and domestic prosecutions, the approach to disclosure, and wider victims’ work).

Lucy Frazer

2021-04-20

Domestic Abuse Commissioner

Introductory meeting to discuss issues in relation to Domestic Abuse, including the prosecution of DA cases during the pandemic.

Lucy Frazer

2021-04-26

Rape Crisis

Meeting to discuss work to improve the criminal justice response to rape and serious sexual offences (‘RASSO’).

Lucy Frazer & Michael Ellis

2021-05-10

Victims' Commissioner

Routine meeting to discuss progress towards publication of the cross-government rape review, and the impact of the pandemic on victims.

7th Jul 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what recent assessment she has made of trends in equal pay in (a) Enfield North constituency, (b) the London Borough of Enfield and (c) London.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority.

A response to the Hon Lady’s Parliamentary Question of 7th July is attached.

12th Jun 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what proportion of the population of (a) Enfield North constituency, (b) the London Borough of Enfield, (c) London and (d) England is over 65.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority.

A response to the Hon lady's Parliamentary Question of 12 June is attached.

12th Jun 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what proportion of the population of (a) Enfield North constituency, (b) the London Borough of Enfield, (c) London and (d) England has English as their second language.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority.

A response to the Hon lady’s Parliamentary Question of 12 June is attached.

6th Jun 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, which Government Grants Enfield Council has received funding from; and what the value was of each grant since December 2019.

The details of grant awards for the financial years 2019/20 to 2021/22 are published in the Government Grants Register, detailing the recipient and the value awarded.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
25th May 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many deaths from all causes there were in people aged 30 and older in (a) Enfield North constituency and (b) the London Borough of Enfield in each year since 2018.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority.

A response to the Hon. Member's Parliamentary Question of 25th May is attached.

20th Apr 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what information his Department holds on the number of people who died from alcoholism in (a) Enfield and (b) London in each year since 2018.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority.

A response to the Hon lady Parliamentary Question of 20th April is attached.

20th Apr 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what data his Department holds on the number of people who died from air pollution in (a) Enfield and (b) London in each year since 2017.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority.

A response to the Hon lady Parliamentary Question of 20th April is attached.

25th Apr 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many pharmacists, as defined by the ONS occupation code 2213, pharmaceutical technicians as defined by ONS code 3217, and pharmacy and other dispensing assistants as defined by ONS occupation code 7114, died during the covid-19 pandemic in England in the period 1 March 2020 to 31 March 2022.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority.

A response to the hon. Member’s Parliamentary Question of 25 April is attached.



30th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what recent steps he has taken to eliminate conflicts of interest in Government business.

The Ministerial Code and the Civil Service Code both set out the requirement for Ministers and Civil Servants (including Special Advisers) to act with integrity. Under these codes, it is not appropriate for a conflict of interest to exist and any such conflicts must be resolved. Further requirements are set out in those Codes and in the Civil Service Management Code regarding the declaration, assessment and management of outside interest - these details include how any actual, perceived or potential conflicts should be handled. For Ministers, the Independent Adviser, Lord Geidt, provides independent advice about outside interests. For Civil Servants, the independent Civil Service Commission is able to consider where the requirements of the Civil Service Code have not been met.

The Prime Minister asked Nigel Boardman to conduct an independent review into the development and use of supply chain finance in government earlier this year. Mr Boardman provided recommendations which were published on 16 September, some of which were in relation to improved management of outside interests in the Civil Service.

The government also notes the work of the Public Administration and Constitutional Affairs and Treasury Committees, as well as the Standards Matter 2 report from the Committee on Standards in Public Life. We will consider their work alongside Mr Boardman’s recommendations and set out a substantive government policy statement to Parliament in due course.

15th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what recent steps he has taken to recall public money from faulty products delivered by private suppliers during the covid-19 outbreak.

Throughout the pandemic, the Government has worked closely with the private sector, procuring expertise and large volumes of goods and services with extreme urgency – including 22,000 ventilators for use by the NHS and 32 billion items of PPE to protect our frontline workers.

Where products have not met required standards then Departments will pursue recourse under the terms of the respective contracts as appropriate.

In particular, the Department of Health and Social Care is pursuing contractual recourse against a small number of companies where they supplied goods or services that did not meet contracted requirements. Cabinet Office is supporting these efforts where appropriate.

15th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what recent steps he has taken to increase the (a) number of civil servants from disadvantaged backgrounds and (b) socio-economic diversity of civil servants.

The Declaration on Government Reform, announced in June, committed the Civil Service to draw on the broadest pool of talent possible. This means that the Civil Service should seek to hire people from varied social and career backgrounds and people from across every part of the UK; including citizens from minority ethnic backgrounds, those living with disabilities and those who have experienced disadvantage in their early lives. The Civil Service is committed to making sure all of these people can flourish in public service. The Civil Service is also looking beyond London - to all corners of the UK - to make sure that it is representative of the communities the Government serves.

A wide range of schemes, programmes and initiatives are aimed at fulfilling that commitment:

  • The Places for Growth programme will bring the government closer to the people it serves, relocating 22,000 roles out of London by 2030 including 50% of Senior Civil Service roles. Over 1,000 roles are to be moved to Scotland, Birmingham and Darlington each, and by 2025, 550 roles will be moved to Stoke-on-Trent.

  • Apprenticeships are a key mechanism for improving the diversity of the Civil Service, as set out in the Declaration on Government Reform. 40% of our apprenticeship intake is from a lower socio-economic background, which provides a more socially diverse talent pipeline into the Civil Service, and provides more opportunities for apprenticeships outside of London.

  • We are extending our outreach and internship programmes. We are improving socio-economic diversity through the Early Diversity Internship programme, for those in their first year at university, providing work experience for people from underrepresented groups including those from lower socio-economic backgrounds.

  • The Fast Stream continues to seek out candidates from lower socio-economic backgrounds and although the number of candidates appointed from lower socio-economic groups tripled between 2016 and 2021 to 12.8%, the Government recognises the need to do more. We have, therefore, developed a new ‘target university list’ to further boost applications from people from lower socio-economic backgrounds. And, the Summer Diversity Internship Programme for those from lower socio-economic backgrounds, ethnic minorities and those with a disability, offers a fast pass to the final stage of the Fast Stream for successful participants giving them a greater chance of success.

  • The Going Forward into Employment scheme is run by the Civil Service Commission, which is hosted by the Cabinet Office. There are 28 accredited life chance schemes in operation across the Civil Service. These help groups of people such as veterans, military partners/spouses and prison leavers find work placements and fixed-term opportunities across Civil Service departments. The programme helps those people overcome barriers associated with entering the Civil Service and supports them into roles. Not only does the scheme help improve their life chances, but it helps make the Civil Service more representative of the country it serves.

15th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to to the Answer of 2 June 2021 to Question 6509 on Electoral Register: Enfield North, how many people in Enfield North are (a) registered to vote and (b) possess a form of Government-approved photo ID broken down by (i) ethnic background, (ii) age and in each local authority ward for each of the last five years.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have, therefore, asked the Authority to respond.

15th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to to the Answer of 2 June 2021 to Question 6509 on Electoral Register: Enfield North, how many people in Enfield North (a) are eligible to vote and (b) possess a form of Government-approved photo ID broken down by (i) ethnic background and (ii) age in each local authority ward for each of the last five years.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have, therefore, asked the Authority to respond.

15th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to Answer of 2 June 2021 to Question 6510 on Electoral Register, if he will list the meetings he has had, and on what dates, with representatives of (a) civil rights organisations, (b) Black, Asian and ethnic minority groups, (c) disability rights groups and (d) interest groups representing elderly people to discuss electoral participation, voter turnout and the proposals set out in the Electoral Integrity Bill since February 2020.

The Cabinet Office has worked, and continues to work, closely with a wide range of charities and civil society organisations to make sure the proposals in the Elections Bill are implemented in a way that is inclusive for all eligible voters.


Details of meetings with external organisations are included in regular transparency reports and can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/ministers-transparency-publications.

24th May 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what meetings he has had with representatives of (a) civil rights organisations, (b) Black, Asian and ethnic minority groups, (c) disability rights groups and (d) interest groups representing elderly people to discuss electoral participation, voter turnout and the proposals set out in the Electoral Integrity Bill since February 2020.

The Cabinet Office has worked and continues to work closely with a wide range of charities and civil society organisations to make sure that the proposals in the Elections Bill are implemented in a way that is inclusive for all eligible voters.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
24th May 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many and what proportion of people in the Enfield North constituency are (a) currently eligible to vote and (b) registered to vote in each of the last five years by local authority ward.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have, therefore, asked the Authority to respond.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
7th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, what estimate she has made of the number of pubs that have closed in (a) Enfield North constituency, (b) the London Borough of Enfield and (c) London in each of the last five years.

The latest ONS data[1] (as of 09 November 2023) shows the overall number of public houses and bars in Enfield North, Enfield and London for each of the last 5 years (Table 1).

Table 1: Number of Public House and Bar Local Units, 2019 – 2023

Date

Enfield North

Enfield

London

2019

15

40

2,215

2020

15

45

2,245

2021

15

45

2,225

2022

15

45

2,265

2023

15

40

2,255

Business closures (VAT de-registrations) are not available at this level of industrial and geographical detail. However, the Insolvency Service[2] do publish monthly data on the total number of insolvencies in the food and beverage services sector in England and Wales from 2019 to 2022 (Table 2).

Date

Food and beverage service activities insolvencies

2019

2,150

2020

1,542

2021

1,542

2022

2,523

[1] ONS Business counts via NOMIS. Data relates to SIC 56.302 – Public houses and bars.

[2] https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/monthly-insolvency-statistics-september-2023

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
7th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, what recent assessment she has made of the impact of trends in the level of export costs to the EU for small businesses on the economy of (a) Enfield North constituency, (b) the London Borough of Enfield and (c) London.

We are better equipped than ever to support SMEs, including those in Enfield and across London, to export. The Department offers a wide range of free support services via great.gov.uk including our Export Support Service, International Markets network and through Export Champions, such as PME Cakes in Enfield. UK Export Finance (UKEF) also supports SMEs, which make up 84% of the companies supported directly with a UKEF product in 2022-23.

London exported £20.3 billion goods to the EU in the 12 months to June 2023. An increase of 26% in current prices since 2018; the largest percentage increase of all the English regions. The Department does not hold data on Enfield at a borough or constituency level.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
19th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, whether she is taking steps to reduce the number of people on zero hour contracts in (a) Enfield North constituency, (b) the London Borough of Enfield and (c) London.

Individuals on zero hours contracts represent a very small proportion of the workforce. The ONS estimates that 155,000 people aged 16 and over were employed on a zero hours contract in London between April – June 2023, representing 3.3% of people in employment in the area.

Zero hours contracts are an important part of the UK’s flexible labour market. They are useful where there is not a constant demand for staff, allowing flexibility for both employers and individuals – like carers, people studying, or retirees. For some, a zero hours contract may be the type of contract which works best for them.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
19th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, how many people are on zero hour contracts in (a) Enfield North constituency, (b) the London Borough of Enfield and (c) London.

Zero hours contracts are an important part of the UK’s flexible labour market. They are useful where there is not a constant demand for staff, allowing flexibility for both employers and individuals – like carers, people studying, or retirees. For some, a zero hours contract may be the type of contract which works best for them.

Individuals on zero hours contracts represent a very small proportion of the workforce. The ONS estimates that 155,000 people aged 16 and over were employed on a zero hours contract in London in April – June 2023, representing 3.3% of people in employment in the area.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
13th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, what steps her Department has taken to increase opportunities for economic growth in (a) Enfield North constituency, (b) the London Borough of Enfield and (c) London in the last three years.

The Department for Business and Trade supports businesses to invest, grow and export, creating jobs and opportunities across the whole country including Enfield and wider London.

For example, as of August 2023, the Department provided Start Up Loans worth over £2.2m to local businesses in Enfield North.

£14.76m has been awarded to Energetik, an Enfield council-owned heating company developing low carbon infrastructure. A further £1m for Enfield's Retrofit Accelerator Programme is generating green jobs in construction, manufacturing, and project management.

London has also benefited from the national Help to Grow scheme which supports small and medium sized enterprises across the UK.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
19th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, if she will make an estimate of the number of breaches of minimum wage legislation by employers in Enfield North constituency in each of the last four years.

All businesses – irrespective of their size, business sector or location – are responsible for paying the correct minimum wage to their staff.

National Minimum Wage enforcement data is not available at constituency level but regional data for London can be seen in the table below.

Financial Year

Region

Arrears (£)

Workers

2018-19

London

6,456,315

59,147

2019-20

London

3,298,935

42,917

2020-21

London

1,285,697

10,005

2021-22

London

5,408,629

55,133

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
17th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, pursuant of the Answer of 13 June 2023 to Question 187340 on the Neonatal Care (Leave and Pay) Act 2023, what secondary legislation will be required to implement the Neonatal Care (Leave and Pay) Act 2023; and when he plans to bring forward each item of secondary legislation.

We anticipate approximately seven statutory instruments will be necessary to implement the leave and pay entitlements. These will be laid in due course, subject to parliamentary time.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
17th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, pursuant of the Answer of 13 June 2023 to Question 187340 on the Neonatal Care (Leave and Pay) Act 2023, if he will publish minutes of meetings where the implementation of the Neonatal care (Leave and Pay) Act 2023 has been discussed since May 2023.

The Government is committed to introducing Neonatal Care Leave and Pay as soon as possible. Discussions have taken place across Government on work necessary to deliver this entitlement and the implementation timeline. The Government does not hold any formal minutes of meetings to discuss the implementation of the Neonatal Care (Leave and Pay) Act 2023, and does not intend to publish notes of internal discussions.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
7th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, what recent assessment her Department has made of the impact of the services sector on (a) exports and (b) economic growth in (i) Enfield North constituency, (ii) the London Borough of Enfield and (iii) London.

The Department periodically monitors the impact of its work supporting the services sector to increase exports via our Made in the UK: Sold to the World Analytical Framework.

In 2021, Enfield ITL3 area exported £295 million services. The services sector generated £6.1 billion Gross Value Added (GVA), contributing towards 78% of total GVA in Enfield.

The same year, London exported £152 billion services. The services sector generated £452 billion GVA, contributing towards 93% of total GVA in London.

The Department does not hold trade and GVA data at a constituency level.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
19th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, what assessment she has made of the impact on levels of land based extraction of critical minerals of emerging green industries.

Within the Critical Minerals Strategy, we are seeking to maximise what the UK can produce domestically, where viable for businesses and where it works for communities and our natural environment. As part of this effort, we commissioned an assessment of the UK’s geological potential for critical mineral extraction. In April this year, the Critical Minerals Intelligence Centre published its report on “Potential for Critical Raw Material Prospectivity in the UK”, which highlighted the UK’s potential to produce a variety of critical minerals, including lithium – a key ingredient of electric vehicles. It is a preliminary assessment, and the Government is working with the British Geological Survey to understand next steps.

Nusrat Ghani
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade) (jointly with the Cabinet Office)
19th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, how many small businesses went bankrupt in (a) Enfield North constituency and (b) the London Borough of Enfield in the last (i) three, (ii) six, (iii) 12 and (iv) 24 months.

Information on company insolvencies is sourced from Companies House, which does not hold information on the size of companies or all types of businesses. Therefore, we cannot provide specific numbers of small business failures. Furthermore, the registered office address for a company may not be its trading location, and is often the address of the appointed Insolvency Practitioner handling the case. Subject to these caveats, estimated company insolvencies in Enfield North and Enfield in the periods up to 31 May 2023 were:

Period

Enfield North Constituency

Enfield Borough [1]

3 Months

7

106

6 Months

16

191

12 Months

36

402

24 Months

59

756

[1] 685 of the 756 company insolvencies registered in Enfield Borough have the same postcode, which is the location of an insolvency practitioner firm. Many of these companies may not have traded in Enfield Borough prior to insolvency.

Numbers of trader (self-employed) bankruptcies to 31 March 2023 (the latest date for which data is held) were:

Period

Enfield North Constituency

Enfield Borough

3 Months

0

3

6 Months

1

5

12 Months

1

8

24 Months

7

18

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
19th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, how many small businesses opened in (a) Enfield North constituency and (b) the London Borough of Enfield in the last (i) three, (ii) six, (iii) 12 and (iv) 24 months.

The latest available data shows that at the end of March 2023 in the London Borough of Enfield there were:

- 560 business births in the last three months;

- 985 business births in the last six months;

- 2,035 business births in the last 12 months; and

- 4,720 business births in the last 24 months.

(ONS, Business demography, Quarterly experimental statistics, Low-level geographic breakdown, UK, Q1 2023)

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
12th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, if she will hold discussions with Royal Mail on publishing a list of the 20 parliamentary constituencies in which Royal Mail has most frequently failed to meet its universal service obligation.

The Postal Services Act 2011 delegates responsibility for the regulation of Royal Mail, as the UK’s universal service provider, including reporting requirements, to Ofcom.

The Government does not have a role in Ofcom’s regulatory decisions.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
2nd Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, when her Department plans to bring forward secondary legislation to implement the Neonatal Care (Leave and Pay) Act 2023.

We are committed to introducing Neonatal Care Leave and Pay as quickly as possible. Work is ongoing across Government to deliver these new entitlements.

Delivery requires a significant amount of secondary legislation which will be brought forward in due course.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
25th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, what recent assessment the Government has made of the impact of the National Minimum Wage Apprentice Rate on the ability of apprentices to afford (a) housing and (b) food in (i) Enfield North constituency and (ii) the UK.

On 1 April 2023, the Apprentice National Minimum Wage (ANMW) rate increased by 9.7% to £5.28. This is an above inflation increase and worth over £850 a year before tax for a full-time apprentice.

The ANMW is designed and set at a rate that acknowledges the particular costs for employers and benefits for young people involved in the provision of apprenticeships and which does not adversely affect apprenticeship opportunities in the labour market.

The Government has published a full impact assessment on gov.uk that assesses the regional impacts of the National Minimum Wage increase.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
14th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, if her Department will make an assessment of the potential merits of issuing guidance to businesses on the potential merits of calculating holiday entitlement on the basis of hours worked on average across the year for people who work more than their contracted number of hours.

The Government has recently consulted on how holiday entitlement is calculated for part-year and irregular hours workers. As part of our response to this consultation, we will consider what additional Government guidance may be required to help employers in calculating holiday entitlement for their workers including those who work more than their contracted hours.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
7th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, if she will make an estimate of the number and proportion of care recipients who are in fuel poverty in (a) Enfield North constituency, (b) the London Borough of Enfield and (c) London.

The Department for Energy Security and Net Zero do not hold the data for the number and proportion of care recipients that are in fuel poverty in the Enfield North Constituency, the London Borough of Enfield or London. The latest sub regional fuel poverty statistics show that we consider 12.8% (5,471) of households to be in fuel poverty in the constituency of Enfield North, 13.8% (17,591) in the London Borough of Enfield and 11.9% (431,366) in London.

Sub regional fuel poverty statistics for England can be found through:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/sub-regional-fuel-poverty-data-2023-2021-data

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
7th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether she is taking steps with Cabinet colleagues to help increase the uptake of local authority net zero schemes by small businesses in (a) Enfield North constituency, (b) the London Borough of Enfield and (c) London.

The Government recognises that many small businesses across the UK are keen to tackle climate change but find it difficult to know how to start. The first step these businesses can take is to visit the UK Business Climate Hub. The Government has recently relaunched the content on the site, providing more up to date, practical and tailored advice on how to reduce emissions as well as signposting to additional resources.

More widely, Government support for local authorities in delivering net zero is outlined in the Net Zero Strategy and Net Zero Growth Plan.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
7th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what steps her Department is taking with energy companies to support the installation of energy efficiency measures through ECO4 in (a) Enfield North constituency, (b) the London Borough of Enfield and (c) London.

The Government sets the overall target and rules for the delivery of the Energy Company Obligation but does not direct where measures are installed; that is left to the obligated energy suppliers and their installers.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
7th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what steps her Department is taking to support community energy schemes in (a) Enfield North constituency, (b) the London Borough of Enfield and (c) London.

The new £10m Community Energy Fund will enable rural and urban communities across England to access grant funding to develop local renewable energy projects, supporting local growth and enabling places to benefit directly from clean, locally owned energy. The Government will launch applications to the Fund as soon as possible and Community Energy Groups in London, including in the London Borough of Enfield and the Enfield North constituency, will be able to apply through the Greater South East Local Net Zero Hub.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
5th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, how many households in Enfield North constituency have received support from Energy Company Obligation schemes in each year that they have operated.

The number of households that have received Energy Company Obligation (ECO) measures in Enfield North constituency in each year since 2013 can be found in the table below:

Year

Number of Households receiving ECO measures

2013

643

2014

763

2015

930

2016

209

2017

60

2018

336

2019

102

2020

87

2021

252

2022

240

Jan – Jun 2023

8

Source: Household Energy Efficiency Statistics, headline release August 2023 (underlying data)

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
1st Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, how many households (a) were eligible for, (b) made an application for and (c) received an Energy Bills Support Scheme Alternative Funding payment in (i) Enfield North constituency, (ii) the London Borough of Enfield and (iii) London.

The government has not yet published data on the number of households that applied or received funding through the Energy Bills Support Scheme Alternative Funding per local authority or parliamentary constituency. This data will be provided in our next publication this autumn. The latest publication on the number of applications for the scheme can be found on GOV.UK - https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/energy-bills-support-scheme-alternative-fund-gb-ni-and-alternative-fuel-payment-alternative-fund-applications-made-by-customers.

We estimate that were approximately 97,700 households in London and 2,900 households located in the Enfield council area who were eligible for the scheme.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
1st Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, how many Energy Bills Support Scheme Alternative Funding payments were awarded by type of accommodation in (i) Enfield North constituency, (ii) the London Borough of Enfield and (iii) London.

The Government has not yet published the application figures per local authority or parliamentary constituency area for the Energy Bills Support Scheme Alternative Funding but this will be published in the autumn. However, the data does not break down to the level of type of accommodation. This is because most of the figures would be too low for accommodation types at constituency and local authority level and so the data would be disclosive.

The latest publication on GOV.UK outlines the number of households in London who received support through this scheme, as of 29 June 2023 - https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/energy-bills-support-scheme-alternative-fund-gb-ni-and-alternative-fuel-payment-alternative-fund-applications-made-by-customers.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
19th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, how many households in (a) Enfield North constituency, (b) the London Borough of Enfield and (c) London were eligible for Alternative Fuel Payments.

The most recent published data for applications for the Alternative Fuel Payment (AFP) scheme in Great Britain can be found here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/energy-bills-support-scheme-alternative-fund-gb-ni-and-alternative-fuel-payment-alternative-fund-applications-made-by-customers

More detailed statistics will be published in due course.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
26th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what estimate his Department has made of the number of families in fuel poverty living in Enfield North constituency.

The latest statistics for the number of households in fuel poverty in parliamentary constituencies in England can be found in the published sub-regional fuel poverty Official Statistics.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
24th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what assessment he has made of trends in the level of households in (a) Enfield North constituency, (b) the London Borough of Enfield and (c) London that have fallen into arrears with their energy bill payments in the last (a) six and (b) 12 months.

The Government does not hold this information.

Ofgem publishes statistics on energy debt and arrears which can be found at: https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/publications/debt-and-arrears-indicators.

The Government introduced the ‘Breathing Space’ scheme which aims to address the ability of consumers to tackle debt and offers legal protections from creditors for 60 days. Under Ofgem rules, energy companies must set appropriate repayment plans based on a customer’s ability to pay for those at risk of, or in, debt.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
22nd Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, when he plans to respond to the letter of 8 March 2023 from the hon. Member for Enfield North on energy support for businesses.

The Department aims to respond where possible, to correspondence within 15 working days.

I will write to the Hon. Member shortly about energy support for businesses.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
7th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, how much support has been provided to (a) the NHS and (b) NHS trusts under the Energy Bills Relief Scheme in 2023.

The Energy Bill Relief Scheme (EBRS) provides a discount on the wholesale element of gas and electricity bills to ensure all eligible customers, including the NHS and NHS trusts, who buy energy from licensed suppliers, are protected from excessively high energy costs over the winter period.

The EBRS discount is applied directly to the energy bills of eligible customers, including the NHS and NHS trusts by their energy providers and therefore we do not have a breakdown of support received by location or sector. The new Energy Bill Discount Scheme (EBDS) will run from April 2023 until March 2024 and continue to provide a discount to eligible NHS trusts.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
5th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, how many new 4G mobile signal masts have been constructed in Enfield North constituency under the Shared Rural Network; and if she will list the mobile network operators responsible for their construction.

The Shared Rural Network (SRN) will extend mobile coverage to 95% of the UK landmass, addressing the digital divide by improving 4G coverage in the areas that need it most. Enfield North, the London Borough of Enfield and London itself already have very good 4G coverage, with 100% of the constituency area being covered with 4G by all four mobile network operators, and as such will not be targeted by the SRN programme.

5th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, what assessment she has made of the potential impact of the Shared Rural Network on 4G mobile signals across (a) Enfield North constituency, (b) the London Borough of Enfield and (c) London.

The Shared Rural Network (SRN) will extend mobile coverage to 95% of the UK landmass, addressing the digital divide by improving 4G coverage in the areas that need it most. Enfield North, the London Borough of Enfield and London itself already have very good 4G coverage, with 100% of the constituency area being covered with 4G by all four mobile network operators, and as such will not be targeted by the SRN programme.

1st Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, how many (a) schools and (b) students were participating in CyberFirst programmes in (i) Enfield North constituency, (ii) the London Borough of Enfield and (iii) London as of 1 September 2023.

The National Cyber Security Centre delivers a range of initiatives through CyberFirst, including a schools and colleges recognition programme, the undergraduate bursary scheme, and the CyberFirst Girls Competition for 12-13 year olds. As part of this effort, DSIT also delivers the Cyber Explorers platform for 11-14 year olds.

In London there were 431 teams from 46 schools entered the CyberFirst Girls Competition last year. A further 204 schools participate in the Cyber Explorers online platform, including 7 in the London Borough of Enfield and 5 in the Enfield North constituency.

There have been 122 undergraduate students accepted on the CyberFirst bursary scheme studying at universities in London. A further 4,387 learners are registered on Cyber Explorers in London, including 70 in the London Borough of Enfield and 22 in the Enfield North constituency. A total of 328 students have applied to attend a CyberFirst summer course at Royal Holloway University.

12th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, what estimate she has made of the number of people in Enfield North constituency who do not use digital services.

According to the latest data from Think Broadband:

  1. In the Enfield North constituency, 92% of premises have access to a gigabit-capable connection, and 98% of premises have access to a fixed superfast (>30 Mbps) connection. The Department for Science, Innovation and Technology does not hold data at a constituency level of the services purchased by households.

  2. In the London Borough of Enfield, 98% of premises have access to a superfast connection, 92% have access to a gigabit capable connection, and only 0.4% of premises have a fixed connection that is below the USO minimum (

  3. In London, 98% of premises have access to a superfast connection, 82% of premises have access to a gigabit-capable connection, and 0.32% of premises are below the USO minimum.

  4. In England, 98% of premises have access to a superfast connection, 76% of have access to a gigabit-capable connection, and 0.69% of premises are below the USO minimum.

The Department does not hold data on the number of people in the Enfield North constituency who do not use digital services. However, according to data from the Lloyds Consumer Digital Index, 3% of those living in London have no foundation level digital skills.

12th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, what comparative assessment she has made of digital connectivity in Enfield North constituency and the rest of (a) the London Borough of Enfield, (b) London and (c) England.

According to the latest data from Think Broadband:

  1. In the Enfield North constituency, 92% of premises have access to a gigabit-capable connection, and 98% of premises have access to a fixed superfast (>30 Mbps) connection. The Department for Science, Innovation and Technology does not hold data at a constituency level of the services purchased by households.

  2. In the London Borough of Enfield, 98% of premises have access to a superfast connection, 92% have access to a gigabit capable connection, and only 0.4% of premises have a fixed connection that is below the USO minimum (

  3. In London, 98% of premises have access to a superfast connection, 82% of premises have access to a gigabit-capable connection, and 0.32% of premises are below the USO minimum.

  4. In England, 98% of premises have access to a superfast connection, 76% of have access to a gigabit-capable connection, and 0.69% of premises are below the USO minimum.

The Department does not hold data on the number of people in the Enfield North constituency who do not use digital services. However, according to data from the Lloyds Consumer Digital Index, 3% of those living in London have no foundation level digital skills.

6th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, whether his Department holds data on the number of BT telephone boxes in (a) Enfield North constituency, (b) the London Borough of Enfield and (c) London as of 6 June 2023.

The Department for Science, Innovation and Technology does not hold any data on the number of BT public telephone boxes in any given area. This is due to the fact that the public telephone box network is privately owned.

Having consulted externally with BT the Department can provide the following figures:

Public payphones in:

  • Enfield Borough: 70

  • London: 2718

Any request for further data should be directed to the provider.

There are clear principles that BT must comply with under its Universal Service obligations, as set out in the telephony Universal Service Order, established in 2003. BT must provide public call boxes to meet the reasonable needs of users in terms of geographical coverage, the number of public call boxes and the quality of call box services. The criteria for ‘reasonable needs’ include that the public call box in question is the only one within 800 metres; there are at least 500 households within 1 kilometre, and at least 12 calls have been made from the public call box within the previous 12 months.

At least 70% of public call boxes must also offer cash payment facilities.

If BT wishes to remove a public call box, it must also notify the relevant local authority in writing, allowing 90 days for a response.

20th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, what the average waiting time was for the installation of fibre-optic broadband for businesses in (a) Enfield North constituency, (b) the London Borough of Enfield, (c) London and (d) England in the latest period for which data is available.

The Department for Science, Innovation and Technology is committed to delivering nationwide gigabit connectivity as soon as possible. By 2025, the Government is targeting a minimum of 85% gigabit-capable coverage. Today, 75% of premises can access gigabit-capable networks.

Whilst we monitor the progress of the gigabit roll-out, the Department does not hold data related to the average waiting time for the installation of fibre-optic broadband given the commercial nature of that information. It is worth mentioning that it is difficult to comment on an average because it may vary depending on the Communications Provider. In order to gauge the average waiting time for the installation of fibre-optic broadband, we encourage you to contact some of the various providers that offer services in Enfield North constituency; the London Borough of Enfield; and London, respectively.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
19th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, how many businesses in (a) Enfield North constituency and (b) the London Borough of Enfield have requested fibre-optic broadband and do not currently have it.

Whilst the Government does not hold data on the number of businesses at a constituency level, data from London Councils state that the number of registered businesses in the London Borough of Enfield is 14,285.

As Enfield is an urban area, it is not in receipt of any of the £5bn Project Gigabit funding. As such, the Government does not hold data at a constituency nor a borough level on the number of businesses that (a) are without fibre-optic broadband; and (b) who have requested fibre-optic broadband and do not currently have it. This is because it is a service that is delivered commercially by the private sector.

The Government is committed to delivering nationwide gigabit connectivity as soon as possible. By 2025 the Government is targeting a minimum of 85% gigabit-capable coverage.

Today, fewer than 8% of all premises in Enfield North and 8.5% of premises in the London Borough of Enfield do not have access to a gigabit-capable network; meaning the overwhelming majority - 92% of premises in Enfield North and 91.5% of premises in Enfield - already have gigabit coverage.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
19th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, what estimate her Department has made of (a) the number of businesses and (b) the number of businesses without fibre-optic broadband in (i) Enfield North constituency and (ii) the London Borough of Enfield.

Whilst the Government does not hold data on the number of businesses at a constituency level, data from London Councils state that the number of registered businesses in the London Borough of Enfield is 14,285.

As Enfield is an urban area, it is not in receipt of any of the £5bn Project Gigabit funding. As such, the Government does not hold data at a constituency nor a borough level on the number of businesses that (a) are without fibre-optic broadband; and (b) who have requested fibre-optic broadband and do not currently have it. This is because it is a service that is delivered commercially by the private sector.

The Government is committed to delivering nationwide gigabit connectivity as soon as possible. By 2025 the Government is targeting a minimum of 85% gigabit-capable coverage.

Today, fewer than 8% of all premises in Enfield North and 8.5% of premises in the London Borough of Enfield do not have access to a gigabit-capable network; meaning the overwhelming majority - 92% of premises in Enfield North and 91.5% of premises in Enfield - already have gigabit coverage.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
18th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, whether she has plans to take steps to help improve broadband infrastructure in (a) Enfield North constituency and (b) the London Borough of Enfield .

The Government is committed to delivering nationwide gigabit connectivity as soon as possible. By 2025 the Government is targeting a minimum of 85% gigabit-capable coverage.

Today, less than 8% of premises in Enfield North and 8.5 % of premises in Enfield do not have access to a gigabit-capable network; meaning the overwhelming majority - 92% of premises in Enfield North and 91.5% of premises in Enfield - already have gigabit coverage.

In order to further improve connectivity in Enfield North and Enfield, we have published the Digital Connectivity Portal - extensive guidance to help local authorities facilitate broadband deployment. This includes technical information on the application of telecoms legislation, as well practical examples of best practice (such as the Street Works Toolkit for working in the country’s highways, and wayleave templates for telecoms operators to gain access to public sector land).

The Department for Science, Innovation and Technology officials regularly facilitate meetings and workshops between local government and the broadband industry, to build relationships that foster more frictionless deployment. The four sub-regional partnerships across London have been vital in coordinating this work. For example, Local London, which represents the London borough of Enfield, has worked with the Government on a number of initiatives.

More generally, we have made it as attractive as possible for firms to build their networks in the UK by removing barriers to rollout and working with Ofcom to promote competition and investment. As a result, there is now a thriving market of over 80 providers investing nearly £35bn rolling out gigabit broadband all over the UK.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
18th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, what estimate her Department has made of the number of households without fibre-optic broadband in (a) Enfield North Constituency and (b) the London Borough of Enfield as of 18th April 2023.

The Government is committed to delivering nationwide gigabit connectivity as soon as possible. By 2025 the Government is targeting a minimum of 85% gigabit-capable coverage.

Today, less than 8% of premises in Enfield North and 8.5 % of premises in Enfield do not have access to a gigabit-capable network; meaning the overwhelming majority - 92% of premises in Enfield North and 91.5% of premises in Enfield - already have gigabit coverage.

In order to further improve connectivity in Enfield North and Enfield, we have published the Digital Connectivity Portal - extensive guidance to help local authorities facilitate broadband deployment. This includes technical information on the application of telecoms legislation, as well practical examples of best practice (such as the Street Works Toolkit for working in the country’s highways, and wayleave templates for telecoms operators to gain access to public sector land).

The Department for Science, Innovation and Technology officials regularly facilitate meetings and workshops between local government and the broadband industry, to build relationships that foster more frictionless deployment. The four sub-regional partnerships across London have been vital in coordinating this work. For example, Local London, which represents the London borough of Enfield, has worked with the Government on a number of initiatives.

More generally, we have made it as attractive as possible for firms to build their networks in the UK by removing barriers to rollout and working with Ofcom to promote competition and investment. As a result, there is now a thriving market of over 80 providers investing nearly £35bn rolling out gigabit broadband all over the UK.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
24th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will strengthen healthcare and workplace support for women and partners affected by pregnancy loss and other fertility related issues.

The Government recognises that pregnancy loss is upsetting and that parents affected will need healthcare and may need support at work.

The Department of Health and Social Care's plans to improve healthcare support for those affected by fertility issues will be set out in the forthcoming Women’s Health Strategy.

Parents who suffer a stillbirth after 24 weeks may be entitled to Parental Bereavement Leave and Pay. Women who are not able to return to work following a miscarriage earlier in pregnancy may be entitled to Statutory Sick Pay while off work. Many employers also offer ‘Compassionate Leave’, and we encourage employers to respond sensitively to each individual’s specific needs.

24th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department has commissioned any research on thorium molten salt reactors.

Thorium fuel research is undertaken via UKRI grants to UK Universities for academic research and via the National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL).

BEIS and its partner organisations continue to maintain a watching brief on the state of development and market demand for thorium-based nuclear fuels. BEIS officials also remain in contact with a number of organisations that support thorium use or are undertaking research into its applications.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
15th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent steps his Department has taken to (a) help improve recruitment to and (b) tackle a skills shortage in the construction industry.

The Government continues to review matters related to skills on a regular basis. We are working closely with the construction industry to ensure that it can attract, retain and develop the skilled workforce it needs for the future. This includes the introduction of a Talent Retention Scheme, which is now being taken forward by industry, to help workers move into construction jobs; and work with the Construction Industry Training Board and the Construction Leadership Council (CLC) to ensure effective and appropriate support for skills development.

Lee Rowley
Minister of State (Minister for Housing)
15th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent discussions he has had with industry leaders on the potential merits of the increased use of sustainable construction materials and methods.

My Rt. Hon. Friend the Secretary of State, BEIS officials and I have regular discussions with construction industry leaders on a wide range of issues, including increasing the sustainability of the sector.

The Government is supporting the sector's move to industrialised offsite manufacturing, digitisation and improved sustainability. The Transforming Construction Challenge, jointly funded with industry is piloting new approaches to construction products and processes to enable the sector to produce safe, efficient, sustainable buildings.

In March, the Construction Leadership Council launched CO2nstructZero, a cross-industry decarbonisation programme. This prioritises development of innovative, sustainable materials, and it will help to develop sustainable solutions for manufacturing production processes and distribution. The CLC will report regularly to Government on its progress against CO2nstructZero priorities.

Lee Rowley
Minister of State (Minister for Housing)
26th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many Green Homes Grant Scheme applications his Department has received from people living in Enfield North since August 2020.

Official scheme statistics published on the 21st October 2021 for the Green Homes Grant Voucher scheme describe the status of applications prior to 7th October 2021, including statistics for the Enfield North constituency.

The next statistical release is expected on 18 November 2021.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
26th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent steps he has taken to (a) support low-income families with energy bills, (b) deliver low-carbon energy schemes and (c) insulate homes in Enfield North constituency.

The energy price cap will save 15 million households up to £100 on their energy bills this winter. The Government supports low-income and fuel poor households with their energy bills through the Warm Home Discount, Winter Fuel Payments and Cold Weather Payments.

The landmark Heat and Buildings Strategy sets out how the Government will decarbonise homes across the country, making them warmer, more efficient and cheaper for families to run.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
26th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent steps he has taken to provide resources to Enfield Council to help deliver low carbon heating and net zero goals as part of the Social Housing Decarbonisation Fund.

The 2020 Summer Economic Update announced the Social Housing Decarbonisation Fund Demonstrator project, launched in 2020, which has awarded £61 million to 18 local authorities to test innovative approaches to retrofitting at scale, covering over 2,100 social homes in England and Scotland.

The London Borough of Barking and Dagenham was awarded £9.6 million to retrofit an estimated 230 homes in London, delivering as part of a consortium, of which the London Borough of Enfield is a member. The project looks to improve the energy performance of homes by installing external wall insultation, having oil and gas heating in homes replaced with air-source heat pumps and installing solar panels.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
19th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent steps his Department has taken to (a) promote the availability and (b) provide investment for non-animal alternatives to tests including organoids, organ-on-a-chip technology and computational and stem cell technology.

The Government actively supports and funds the development and dissemination of techniques that replace, reduce, and refine the use of animals in research (the 3Rs).  This is achieved primarily through funding for the National Centre for the 3Rs (NC3Rs), which works nationally and internationally to drive the uptake of 3Rs technologies and ensure that advances in the 3Rs are reflected in policy, practice, and regulations on animal research.

The NC3Rs receives its core funding from UK Research and Innovation (UKRI)’s Medical Research Council, and Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC). Since the NC3Rs was launched in 2004, it has committed £100 million in research to develop 3Rs technologies.

In addition to funding the NC3Rs, UKRI also funds a portfolio of research projects involving humans, human materials, animal models, and non-animal technologies. The principles of the 3Rs are embedded in all the research within UKRI’s remit involving (or potentially involving) animal use. UKRI also encourages grant applicants, including those whose research does not involve animals but could contribute to greater reduction and replacement, to consider further opportunities to advance the 3Rs.

Between 2015-2019, the BBSRC spent over £7 million on research grants aimed at developing and applying innovative methodologies to studying human and animal physiology, including in silico approaches, organ-on-a-chip, organoid and other advanced cell culture systems.

14th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the number of (a) community, (b) main and (c) Crown Post Offices in (i) the Enfield North constituency and (ii) the UK.

While Post Office Limited is publicly owned, it operates as an independent, commercial business. Therefore, details regarding the number of community and Crown Post Offices in the Enfield North constituency and the United Kingdom as of 15 July 2021, are an operational matter for Post Office Limited.

7th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he has taken to support high street businesses in the Enfield North constituency.

Our comprehensive economic response to business includes grants, the furlough scheme, tax deferrals, and business rates relief. Eligible retail, hospitality and leisure businesses within the constituency continue to benefit from 66% business rates relief until March 2022, subject to a cap, and hospitality, accommodation and attractions are benefitting from a 5% cut in VAT until the end of September, followed by a 12.5% rate until 31 March 2022.

The London Borough of Enfield has made £9,640,989 Additional Restrictions Grant payments, and £12,978,459 Restart Grant payments.

Projects within London Borough of Enfield boundaries received £3,434,663 of funding from the London Economic Action Partnership which receives funding from Government through the Local Growth Fund.

7th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent steps he has taken to support supply chain businesses affected by the covid-19 outbreak in (a) Enfield North constituency, (b) Greater London and (c) England.

The Government has introduced an unprecedented package of support for businesses affected by the Covid-19 pandemic, including grants, business interruption loans and the Coronavirus Job Support Scheme.

The Government continues to provide financial support via Local Authorities for businesses that are required to close, or which are severely affected by the restrictions put in place to tackle Covid-19 and save lives.

7th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent steps he has taken to introduce rights for flexible working.

Employees with 26 weeks continuous service already have a right to request a flexible working arrangement under current flexible working legislation. An employer can only reject a request for business reasons, such as the detrimental impact on ability to meet customer demand or an inability to re-organise work among existing staff.

The Government’s manifesto included a commitment to encourage flexible working and to consult on whether flexible working can be made the default unless employers have good reasons not to. We will issue this consultation in due course.

7th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government on strengthening policy on the decarbonisation of homes.

My Rt. Hon. Friend the Secretary of State has regular discussions with ministerial colleagues on a number of issues.

We will be publishing a Heat and Buildings Strategy which will set out the Government’s position on the decarbonisation of homes in due course.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
7th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government on the energy efficiency of residential housing in the UK.

The Government remains committed to the aspiration set out in the Clean Growth Strategy, that as many homes as possible are improved to Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) Band C by 2035, where practical, affordable and cost effective. In addition, the Ministry for Housing Communities and Local Government and the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy continue to work closely together to deliver the Future Homes Standard which, when it is implemented in 2025, will ensure that new homes produce at least 75% lower CO2 emissions compared to those built to current standards, and require no further retrofit to become fully zero-carbon as the electricity grid continues to decarbonise.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
23rd Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent steps he has taken to ensure adequate funding is available to small and medium sized enterprises in Enfield North constituency to support their economic recovery from the covid-19 outbreak.

SMEs remain the backbone of our economy, and though this has been such a challenging period, we have seen many businesses find creative ways to innovate, adapt and plan for the future. During the Covid-19 outbreak, the Government has introduced an unprecedented package of support for businesses, including the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, a range of Government-guaranteed business loans, and a significant package of direct business grants totalling £25 billion.

The Government is committed to supporting SMEs as they reopen, as Covid restrictions are lifted. The Budget 2021 announced a £520m investment over three years to create Help to Grow: Digital (100,000 SMEs – launching in autumn) and Help to Grow: Management (30,000 SMEs – launching in summer), to boost productivity of SMEs across the UK through software adoption and leadership and management training. This will help drive growth by helping SMEs to learn new skills, reach new customers and boost profits.

‘Help to Grow: Management’ will lay the foundations for recovery by providing SMEs with key skills in financial management, marketing, innovation, and supporting them to develop and adapt their business strategies. ‘Help to Grow: Digital’ will help businesses adopt technology to operate in an increasingly digital market and reach their customers online. This is in addition to the Peer Networks programme, now in its second year, supporting 6,000 small business leaders to develop skills such as leadership, management and technology adoption with the support of their peers.

Businesses which are unable to access business support or are unsure of the support available should contact their nearest Government-backed Growth Hub, where business advisers will be able to highlight potential sources of finance and clarify grants available. All contact details are available online at: www.lepnetwork.net/local-growth-hub-contacts/. All Government support for businesses affected by coronavirus, is detailed online here: www.gov.uk/coronavirus/business-support.

16th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department plans to make funding available for local authorities to support the delivery of new home insulation schemes.

Government is funding a number of schemes as part of its commitment to retrofit homes to cut energy bills for households and to make them greener on the path to Net Zero.

The Local Authority Delivery Scheme (LAD), which supports projects to install energy efficiency measures such as various types of insulation, and low-carbon heating systems for low-income households, has already provided £500million to Local Authorities for upgrades to low-income households across England, and is being delivered up to December 2021. The London Borough of Enfield has already been allocated £305,000 of funding through the first phase of LAD, as well part of the £6.8 million of the Greater London Authority’s successful consortium-led bid in that phase.

On 16th June 2021, the Government launched the Sustainable Warmth Competition enabling Local Authorities to apply for further funding under the £200million Local Authority Delivery Phase 3 scheme and from an initial allocation of £150million for the Home Upgrade Grant Phase 1 scheme, for delivery up to March 2023.

In addition, the Social Housing Decarbonisation Fund Demonstrator has awarded £62million of funding to social landlords across England and Scotland to test innovative approaches to retrofitting at scale, seeing over 2300 social homes improved to at least EPC band C. The London Borough of Enfield has already been allocated part of the £9.6 million awarded to a consortium of 6 London Boroughs in this phase. The Government has announced around a further £160million for the first wave of the £3.8bn manifesto commitment in financial year 21/22, delivering up to March 2023.

The Government announced in the Sustainable Warmth Strategy a four-year, £4 billion successor scheme to Energy Company Obligation (ECO), to accelerate our efforts to improve homes to meet fuel poverty targets. ECO will continue to be an obligation on suppliers.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the effect of closing the Green Homes Grant scheme on the Government's plans to meet its 5th Carbon Budget.

The Green Homes Grant Voucher Scheme was designed to provide a short-term economic stimulus while tackling our contribution to climate change.

In order to ensure we continue to deliver on our net zero ambitions and support a thriving building retrofit industry, the Government will be expanding its funding commitment in financial year 21/22 for both the Social Housing Decarbonisation Fund and the Local Authority Delivery element of the Green Homes Grant scheme with £300 million of new funding and up to £100 million of recycled funding from the Green Homes Grant Vouchers, depending on take up.

The £300 million extra funding for green home upgrades brings the total spending on energy efficiency measures to £1.3 billion, exceeding the Government’s manifesto commitment of £1 billion. The scheme has clearly helped raise awareness of green home measures, and improved demand for a range of clean heat and energy saving installations.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
12th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what steps she is taking to ensure the adequacy of funding for cultural activities for (a) adults and (b) children in Enfield North constituency.

HM Government is committed to ensuring that everyone has access to high-quality arts and culture opportunities and activities, regardless of their background or where they live.

With the encouragement of the Department for Culture, Media and Sport, Arts Council England has developed Priority Places and Levelling Up for Culture Places to address historic imbalances in investment. As part of this, priority places receive dedicated Arts Council staff resources to build capacity locally. The London Borough of Enfield is a Priority Place.

Since 2019/20, Arts Council England has invested almost £4 million in the Enfield North constituency. This funding includes £227,000 to ‘Building Enfield's Creative Capacity', a collaborative project delivering programmes of creative activity between July 2023 and March 2024 which celebrates Enfield’s industrial heritage and explores its future industrial identity through specialist art commissions, participatory workshops, open studios, exhibitions, public artworks, and community theatre co-produced with local people. In addition, Arts Council England’s National Lottery Project Grants programme remains open for funding bids from anyone operating arts and cultural activities for the local community in Enfield North.

7th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, whether she is taking steps to provide financial support to charities in (a) Enfield North Constituency, (b) the London Borough of Enfield and (c) London in the context of the rise in energy prices.

The Government has taken action to support charities across the country.

The Energy Bill Relief Scheme provided charities and voluntary organisations with support for their energy bills up to 31 March 2023, and they continue to receive support under the Energy Bill Discount Scheme.

As announced in the Spring Budget, the Government will provide over £100 million of support for charities and community organisations. This will be targeted towards those organisations most at risk from cost of living pressures, due to increased demand and higher delivery costs, as well as providing investment in energy efficiency. The funding will be open for applications from across England, including from charities in Enfield North constituency, the London Borough of Enfield and London.

Work is underway to finalise the delivery time frames and eligibility criteria. Further details will be announced as soon as possible.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
7th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, whether she is taking steps to financially support charities which have increased service demand in (a) Enfield North constituency, (b) the London Borough of Enfield and (c) London.

The Government has taken action to support charities across the country.

The Energy Bill Relief Scheme provided charities and voluntary organisations with support for their energy bills up to 31 March 2023, and they continue to receive support under the Energy Bill Discount Scheme.

As announced in the Spring Budget, the Government will provide over £100 million of support for charities and community organisations. This will be targeted towards those organisations most at risk from cost of living pressures, due to increased demand and higher delivery costs, as well as providing investment in energy efficiency. The funding will be open for applications from across England, including from charities in Enfield North constituency, the London Borough of Enfield and London.

Work is underway to finalise the delivery time frames and eligibility criteria. Further details will be announced as soon as possible.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
25th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what the real-terms change to funding for youth services has been in each year since 2015 in (a) Enfield North constituency, (b) the London Borough of Enfield and (c) London.

I refer the Hon. Member to the answer I gave on 19 April 2023 to Question 181375.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
26th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what funding her Department is providing to grassroots music venues in Enfield North constituency.

The Government is committed to supporting our grassroots music venues, which are the lifeblood, and research and development centres, of our world-leading music sector.

The Department for Culture, Media and Sport is in regular discussions with all parts of the music industry, including live venues at every level. We work with industry and across Government to improve the sector's economic resilience to future economic shocks, as we did through the pandemic, and the recent Energy Bills Support Scheme.

In Enfield North specifically, across all artforms and disciplines Arts Council England have invested £3.426 million in Enfield North since 2018/19 in 61 projects. This includes 9 music specific applications from available funds, such as:

  • Skanda Sabbagh who received £10,000 through Developing Your Creative Practice fund to develop their North African percussion practice, and electronic music artist and rapper Paul Pitter who received a National Lottery Project Grant award (£23,600) to develop a new Extended Play (EP);

  • £1.25 million was invested in the Enfield North Music Education Hub via the Music Hub Investment Programme; and

  • Four Enfield North based projects received Cultural Recovery Fund funding. Three of these grants were awarded to the local authority (totalling £778,000) with a focus on sustaining their venues, the Dugdale Centre and Millfield Theatre, which programme a range of music, amongst other art forms.

31st Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many youth centres have been funded by her Department since 2010.

Local Authorities have a statutory duty to allocate funding to youth services in line with local need. This is funded from the Local Government settlement, which is anticipated to be almost £60 billion next year (FY 23/24). DCMS is committed to working with Youth Sector organisations and Local Authorities to complete the review of the Local Authority Statutory Duty Guidance for Youth Services.

The Government recognises the vital role that youth services and activities play in improving the life chances and wellbeing of young people.The Government has committed to a National Youth Guarantee: that by 2025, every young person will have access to regular clubs and activities, adventures away from home and opportunities to volunteer. This is supported by a three-year investment of over £500 million in youth services, reflecting young people's priorities and addressing the inconsistencies in national youth spending with a firm focus on levelling up.

Over £300 million of this investment has been dedicated to Phase 2 of the Youth Investment Fund, which will enable up to 300 youth facilities to be built or refurbished over the next three years in some of the less advantaged areas of England. The fund is currently open for bids.

In addition, we are working with the National Youth Agency, who are conducting a National Youth Sector Census, a survey of all youth sector provision across England. It aims to capture an accurate picture of youth services and out of school activities.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
31st Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many youth centres have opened in England since 2010.

Local Authorities have a statutory duty to allocate funding to youth services in line with local need. This is funded from the Local Government settlement, which is anticipated to be almost £60 billion next year (FY 23/24). DCMS is committed to working with Youth Sector organisations and Local Authorities to complete the review of the Local Authority Statutory Duty Guidance for Youth Services.

The Government recognises the vital role that youth services and activities play in improving the life chances and wellbeing of young people.The Government has committed to a National Youth Guarantee: that by 2025, every young person will have access to regular clubs and activities, adventures away from home and opportunities to volunteer. This is supported by a three-year investment of over £500 million in youth services, reflecting young people's priorities and addressing the inconsistencies in national youth spending with a firm focus on levelling up.

Over £300 million of this investment has been dedicated to Phase 2 of the Youth Investment Fund, which will enable up to 300 youth facilities to be built or refurbished over the next three years in some of the less advantaged areas of England. The fund is currently open for bids.

In addition, we are working with the National Youth Agency, who are conducting a National Youth Sector Census, a survey of all youth sector provision across England. It aims to capture an accurate picture of youth services and out of school activities.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
31st Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many youth centres have closed in England since 2010

Local Authorities have a statutory duty to allocate funding to youth services in line with local need. This is funded from the Local Government settlement, which is anticipated to be almost £60 billion next year (FY 23/24). DCMS is committed to working with Youth Sector organisations and Local Authorities to complete the review of the Local Authority Statutory Duty Guidance for Youth Services.

The Government recognises the vital role that youth services and activities play in improving the life chances and wellbeing of young people.The Government has committed to a National Youth Guarantee: that by 2025, every young person will have access to regular clubs and activities, adventures away from home and opportunities to volunteer. This is supported by a three-year investment of over £500 million in youth services, reflecting young people's priorities and addressing the inconsistencies in national youth spending with a firm focus on levelling up.

Over £300 million of this investment has been dedicated to Phase 2 of the Youth Investment Fund, which will enable up to 300 youth facilities to be built or refurbished over the next three years in some of the less advantaged areas of England. The fund is currently open for bids.

In addition, we are working with the National Youth Agency, who are conducting a National Youth Sector Census, a survey of all youth sector provision across England. It aims to capture an accurate picture of youth services and out of school activities.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
1st Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether his Department has made an assessment of the potential merits of extending the Film and TV Production Restart Scheme that was available during the covid-19 outbreak.

The UK Film and TV Production Restart Scheme was introduced as part of Her Majesty’s Government’s commitment to provide support during the Covid-19 pandemic and enable productions to proceed in the absence of insurance for Covid-19 related risks.

The Scheme has supported a production boom during the pandemic, protecting over 100,000 jobs and £3bn of production spend, ensuring the continued production of content for our screens. Thanks to the Government’s Living with Covid plan, the success of the vaccination programme and effective risk management by productions during the pandemic, the risk to productions posed by coronavirus has diminished, with no civil authority restrictions in place that require production shutdowns. As a result, the Government is confident it no longer needs to intervene in the market and has closed the scheme to new applications.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
24th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent steps his Department has taken to (a) help improve recruitment to and (b) tackle a skills shortage in cybersecurity.

The Government has funded the creation of the new professional body for cyber, the UK Cyber Security Council, to establish coherent standards and pathways that will inform employer recruitment and an individual's career development. We are ensuring that every stage of the cyber skills supply chain is developed to meet the demands evidenced in the annual DCMS labour market survey. DCMS has delivered a range of youth programmes to develop future talent, including Cyber Discovery, reaching 115,000 interested young people from across the UK. For people already in the workforce, cyber skills bootcamps are offered through the National Skills Fund, and DCMS has also sought to highlight cyber career opportunities through the Cyber Launchpad programme.

The Government will publish planned activities to further tackle the skills shortage through the National Cyber Strategy shortly.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
19th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent assessment she has made of the implications for her policies of Sport England’s Active Lives Children and Young People Survey Academic Year 2019/20 Report published in January 2021; and what steps she has taken to improve sport and activity levels of Black children and young people.

The government is committed to ensuring that all children and young people have the best opportunities to engage in sport and physical activity. Our Sporting Future strategy has diversity and inclusion at its heart, and sets out how important it is for all children to have a good experience of sport and physical activity.

Throughout the pandemic we provided an unprecedented £1 billion of financial support to ensure the survival of the sport and leisure sector. To tackle inequalities and support those most impacted by the restrictions, Sport England have launched a new £20m Together Fund that builds on the work of their £20m Tackling Inequalities Fund to help people stay active and provide guidance on how to find accessible activities. Initiatives such as the Studio You video platform, funded by Sport England and powered by This Girl Can, are also encouraging more teenage girls to be active. Sport England’s recently launched Uniting the Movement strategy reinforces their commitment to tackling inequalities faced in sport by underrepresented groups.

A key driver of the government’s School Sport and Activity Action Plan is to ensure that all children and young people have access to at least 60 minutes of physical activity every day. This is supported by £320 million per year through the PE and sport premium.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
19th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent steps she has taken to tackle the gender gap in activity levels amongst Asian and Black children and young people set out in Sport England’s Active Lives Children and Young People Survey Academic Year 2019/20 Report, published in January 2021.

The government is committed to ensuring that all children and young people have the best opportunities to engage in sport and physical activity. Our Sporting Future strategy has diversity and inclusion at its heart, and sets out how important it is for all children to have a good experience of sport and physical activity.

Throughout the pandemic we provided an unprecedented £1 billion of financial support to ensure the survival of the sport and leisure sector. To tackle inequalities and support those most impacted by the restrictions, Sport England have launched a new £20m Together Fund that builds on the work of their £20m Tackling Inequalities Fund to help people stay active and provide guidance on how to find accessible activities. Initiatives such as the Studio You video platform, funded by Sport England and powered by This Girl Can, are also encouraging more teenage girls to be active. Sport England’s recently launched Uniting the Movement strategy reinforces their commitment to tackling inequalities faced in sport by underrepresented groups.

A key driver of the government’s School Sport and Activity Action Plan is to ensure that all children and young people have access to at least 60 minutes of physical activity every day. This is supported by £320 million per year through the PE and sport premium.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
19th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent steps she has taken to provide Enfield North the adequate funding necessary to tackle the deteriorating sport-related activity levels referred to in Sport England’s Active Lives Survey November 2019/20 Report published in April 2021.

Sport and physical activity play a fundamental role in improving and maintaining public health, and a transformative role in creating a healthy, happy nation. For these reasons sport and activity are at the centre of the national response to improving people’s health, including tackling obesity. Sport England’s Active Lives Survey is a very important tool to understand the levels of activity across the nation and underline the importance of sport and physical activity to the people of this country.

The Office for Health Improvement and Disparities published ‘Tackling obesity: empowering adults and children to live healthier lives’ in July 2020. The strategy reflects the significant work that we are undertaking across England to halve childhood obesity by 2030 and to help people achieve and maintain a healthier weight.

The government has provided over £1 billion worth of support into the sport and physical activity sector through the pandemic to help to maintain and support the sector. As part of this, Sport England has provided £270 million directly to support community sport clubs and exercise centres, via a range of funds including their £35 million Community Emergency Fund.

Sport England has invested £957,419 in the Enfield North constituency since April 2017. Of this, more than £22,000 was via Sport England’s Community Emergency Fund to support grassroots sport clubs and community organisations to survive the coronavirus pandemic.

Alongside this through Sport England’s new strategy, Uniting the Movement, they set out the importance of working in places to provide the ongoing support needed in communities. Sport England have tested and championed place-based solutions to tackle inactivity through their Local Delivery Pilots since 2017, including testing the role that tackling inactivity can play in reducing obesity and helping those living with obesity.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
19th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent assessment she has made of the implications for her policies of Sport England’s Active Lives Survey November 2019-20 Report published in April 2021; and what steps she has taken to tackle the causes of obesity in (a) Enfield North, (b) Greater London, and (c) England.

Sport and physical activity play a fundamental role in improving and maintaining public health, and a transformative role in creating a healthy, happy nation. For these reasons sport and activity are at the centre of the national response to improving people’s health, including tackling obesity. Sport England’s Active Lives Survey is a very important tool to understand the levels of activity across the nation and underline the importance of sport and physical activity to the people of this country.

The Office for Health Improvement and Disparities published ‘Tackling obesity: empowering adults and children to live healthier lives’ in July 2020. The strategy reflects the significant work that we are undertaking across England to halve childhood obesity by 2030 and to help people achieve and maintain a healthier weight.

The government has provided over £1 billion worth of support into the sport and physical activity sector through the pandemic to help to maintain and support the sector. As part of this, Sport England has provided £270 million directly to support community sport clubs and exercise centres, via a range of funds including their £35 million Community Emergency Fund.

Sport England has invested £957,419 in the Enfield North constituency since April 2017. Of this, more than £22,000 was via Sport England’s Community Emergency Fund to support grassroots sport clubs and community organisations to survive the coronavirus pandemic.

Alongside this through Sport England’s new strategy, Uniting the Movement, they set out the importance of working in places to provide the ongoing support needed in communities. Sport England have tested and championed place-based solutions to tackle inactivity through their Local Delivery Pilots since 2017, including testing the role that tackling inactivity can play in reducing obesity and helping those living with obesity.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
16th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps her Department is taking to help ensure that all recorded shows have adequate subtitles.

The government recognises that as part of a digitally inclusive society, television content should be accessible for all UK audiences. Under the Communications Act 2003, the Secretary of State has the power to impose requirements on service providers for the purpose of ensuring that on demand services are accessible to people with disabilities. This includes requirements in relation to subtitling, audio description and sign language.

As part of the process to implement these new requirements, the Government asked Ofcom to provide recommendations on how legislation could make on-demand services more accessible. Ofcom published an initial report in December 2018, and then, following a request from DCMS, carried out an additional targeted consultation to inform further recommendations on how the new requirements would work in practice to ensure that as far as possible all audiences should be able to access on-demand services. These latest proposals were published on 9 July 2021. We are giving them careful consideration and will set out next steps in due course.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
26th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what guidance his Department has issued to (a) local councils and (b) grassroot sports clubs on whether (i) basketball and (ii) other contact sports can be resumed at the local level as the covid-19 lockdown restrictions are eased.

Sport and physical activity is hugely important in maintaining a healthy lifestyle. That is why the Government continued to permit people to take daily physical activity, including walking, running and cycling, even during the height of the lockdown.

The latest guidance on the phased return of sport and recreation can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-guidance-on-phased-return-of-sport-and-recreation. The Government is in discussions with representatives from the sport and physical activity sector about the steps required to get remaining sports up and running (including team sports and contact sports). We will update the public when it is deemed safe to do so.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
7th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many children with SEND are not in formal education in (a) Enfield North constituency, (b) the London Borough of Enfield and (c) London as of 7 November 2023.

The department holds data on the number of children and young people with an Education, Health and Care plan, including the setting in which the child or young person is typically educated or where they are not in education or training for any reason. The information is available in the National Statistics publication at: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/education-health-and-care-plans.

The data can be broken down by region and local authority. Data is not available at parliamentary constituency level.

David Johnston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
7th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps she is taking to improve support for children with special educational needs in (a) Enfield North constituency, (b) the London Borough of Enfield and (c) London.

The department is committed to ensuring that children and young people with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) get the support they need wherever they live.

​The Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) and Alternative Provision (AP) Improvement Plan outlines the government’s mission to create a single, national SEND and AP system; the proposal to develop National Standards is a fundamental part of this. The Standards will set out what support should be available and who is responsible for providing it to give families confidence and clarity on how the needs of children and young people will be met. These Standards will apply nationally, including London.

​The SEND and AP Improvement Plan also sets out proposals to improve the Education, Health and Care (EHC) plan assessment and planning process, by introducing standardised forms and processes, as well as supporting guidance to provide greater consistency.

In addition, the department’s Delivering Better Value programme aims to improve outcomes for children and young people and put the SEND system on a more sustainable footing by funding high needs system transformation in up to 55 local authorities, including the London Borough of Enfield, with significant Dedicated Schools Grant deficits. It does so by providing diagnostic support to the local authority, identifying opportunities to improve services and meeting children’s needs better, and then grant funding the local authority’s plan.

​Furthermore, high needs funding to support children and young people with complex SEND is rising to £10.1 billion in the 2023/24 financial year, which is an increase of over 50% compared to 2019/20. Of this, the London Borough of Enfield’s high needs funding allocation for 2023/24 is £76 million, which is an 11.5% per head increase compared to the amount of high needs funding allocated in the 2022/23 financial year.

David Johnston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
19th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate she has made of the number of educational psychologists providing services to children in (a) Enfield North constituency, (b) the London Borough of Enfield and (c) London.

Over the past five years, the department has funded a total of 304 educational psychologist (EP) training places across four London-based institutions. This figure includes a total of 56 funded training places per academic year starting in 2018 and 2019, increasing to a total of 64 funded training places per academic year starting in 2020, 2021 and 2022. A further cohort of 64 trainees is due to take up their funded training places at London-based institutions as of this autumn. As training places are allocated to institutions, the requested figures by parliamentary constituency and borough are not available. Additionally, the number employed in the private sector is not collected centrally.

Information on the state-funded school workforce in England, including the number of EPs that were reported as being directly employed by local authorities in England, is published in the annual ‘School workforce in England’ national statistics release, which is available at: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/school-workforce-in-england.

According to the School Workforce Census, in November 2022 there were 2,325 EPs directly employed by local authorities in England, including 646 directly employed by local authorities in London, and 17 by the London Borough of Enfield. The figure provided also excludes local authorities who did not submit a return, or where EP provision has been outsourced or the provision has been shared with other local authorities.

David Johnston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
19th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many educational psychologist training places were funded by her Department in (a) Enfield North constituency, (b) the London Borough of Enfield and (c) London in each of the last five years.

Over the past five years, the department has funded a total of 304 educational psychologist (EP) training places across four London-based institutions. This figure includes a total of 56 funded training places per academic year starting in 2018 and 2019, increasing to a total of 64 funded training places per academic year starting in 2020, 2021 and 2022. A further cohort of 64 trainees is due to take up their funded training places at London-based institutions as of this autumn. As training places are allocated to institutions, the requested figures by parliamentary constituency and borough are not available. Additionally, the number employed in the private sector is not collected centrally.

Information on the state-funded school workforce in England, including the number of EPs that were reported as being directly employed by local authorities in England, is published in the annual ‘School workforce in England’ national statistics release, which is available at: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/school-workforce-in-england.

According to the School Workforce Census, in November 2022 there were 2,325 EPs directly employed by local authorities in England, including 646 directly employed by local authorities in London, and 17 by the London Borough of Enfield. The figure provided also excludes local authorities who did not submit a return, or where EP provision has been outsourced or the provision has been shared with other local authorities.

David Johnston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
18th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if she will make an assessment of the potential impact of extending the eligibility criteria for free school meals on the educational outcomes of children in Enfield North constituency.

Since 2010, the number of pupils receiving a free school meal (FSM) has increased by more than two million. This increase in provision is due to the introduction of Universal Infant Free School Meals and protections put in place as benefit recipients move across to Universal Credit. Over a third of pupils in England now receive FSM, compared with one in six in 2010.

The Department believes that the current eligibility threshold level, which enables pupils in low income households to benefit from FSM, while remaining affordable and deliverable for schools, is the right one. The Department does not have plans to change the current eligibility conditions for FSM. The Department continues to keep eligibility under review to ensure that these meals are supporting those who most need them. The Department also continues to monitor the consequences of the rising cost of living and is working with other Government Departments to provide support to disadvantaged families.

The Department monitors the educational outcomes of disadvantaged pupils. The latest published statistics on the attainment gap are available at: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/key-stage-2-attainment (see attainment by pupil characteristics), and: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/key-stage-4-performance-revised/2021-22 (see attainment by disadvantage status).

The attainment gap narrowed by 9% at secondary school level and by 13% at primary school level between 2011 and 2019. For over a decade, the Department has consistently taken a range of steps to give priority support and deliver programmes that help disadvantaged pupils, including improving the quality of teaching and curriculum resources, strengthening the school system, and providing targeted support where needed. The Department understands that disadvantaged children have been disproportionately affected by the pandemic.

At a national level, the Department delivers a number of core policies to support disadvantaged pupils including FSM, the holiday activities and food programme, where we are investing over £200m a year for the next two years, and support for 2,500 breakfast clubs and family hubs. Additionally, the Department is also ensuring better targeting of deprivation factors through the National Funding Formula (over 9% of all funding), as well as record amounts of Pupil Premium funding, £2.6 billion in 2022/23 financial year and £2.9 billion this financial year.

The National Tutoring Programme (NTP) funds schools based on rates of disadvantage. Since the launch of the NTP in November 2020, more than £1 billion has been made available to support tutoring. From November 2020 to academic year 2023/24, nearly four million tutoring courses have been started, up to July 2023. By 2024, the Department will have embedded tutoring across schools in England. The Department expects tutoring to continue to be a staple offer from schools, with schools using their core budgets, including Pupil Premium, to fund targeted support for those children who will benefit.

12th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent steps her Department has taken to improve children's oracy skills in Enfield North constituency.

The Department recognises the importance of oracy, which is why spoken language is already part of the National Curriculum for English for 5 to 16 year olds. In the early years, the Department are providing up to £17 million of funding in the Nuffield Early Language Intervention (NELI), improving the language skills of reception age pupils who need it most following the pandemic. In addition, the Department has secured over £28 million to support the speech and language of young children worst affected by the Covid-19 pandemic, delivered to 3 and 4 year olds through the new family hubs network.

In secondary schools, the GCSE English Language qualification ensures that students are able to listen to and understand spoken language and use spoken standard English effectively. Provisional 2023 data published by Ofqual shows that overall entries to GCSE English Language increased by 4.9% between summer 2022 and summer 2023. This data can be accessed at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/provisional-entries-for-gcse-as-and-a-level-summer-2023-exam-series/provisional-entries-for-gcse-as-and-a-level-summer-2023-exam-series#gcse-entries.

The Department funds the national poetry recitation competition. This encourages both primary and secondary schools to participate to improve pupils’ knowledge and enjoyment of poetry, and to improve oracy through poetry recitation and recall. The competition provides an opportunity for pupils to enjoy sharing poems aloud.

The £67 million English hubs programme, launched in 2018, is dedicated to improving the teaching of reading, with a focus on phonics, early language development and reading for pleasure. Since its launch, the programme has provided appropriate and targeted support to several thousands of schools across England.

​Enfield North’s local English hub, New Wave, is working to engage and support primary schools across the region to improve the teaching of phonics, including offering showcase events especially for local schools. 10 schools in Enfield have received intensive support from the New Wave English hub, excluding new partner schools who have joined the programme this year. A further five schools received resource funding from the hub in the 2022/23 academic year.

12th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment she has made of the potential role of (a) further education colleges and (b) universities in tackling the level of inequality of educational outcomes for children in Enfield North constituency.

Spreading opportunity is a top priority for this government. In education, ability is evenly spread but opportunity is not. We need to reduce the dependency of people’s education and skills outcomes on where they live by ensuring that in every area, children can access excellent schools, progress to high quality technical and higher education, and go into good jobs.

This government is focused on levelling up opportunities so that every young person, regardless of their background or geographic location, can get the skills and training needed to secure rewarding, well-paid jobs and move up the ladder of opportunity.

To help improve people’s lives and boost the economy, the government’s skills mission sets out an ambition for 200,000 more people to complete high quality training in England each year by 2030. This includes 80,000 more people completing courses in areas of England with the lowest skills levels.

We want to make sure we are raising skill levels in the places where they are the lowest, so that more people have the skills they need to get good jobs.

Skills are a crucial driver of economic disparities between people and places. Boosting skills improves human capital and is a clear way to improve the earnings potential and life chances of people who have already left school.

This government has built a new skills system from the ground up as we recognise that skills are crucial in driving long-term economic growth and is taking forward major reforms set out in the Skills for Jobs White Paper: delivering T Levels, boosting apprenticeships, approving Higher Technical Qualifications, rolling out Skills Bootcamps, and introducing the Lifelong Learning Entitlement from 2025.

In November 2021, we issued guidance to the Office for Students, asking it to refocus the access and participation regime to create a system that supports young people from disadvantaged backgrounds throughout their education.

Prior attainment is a key determinant of successful participation in HE. That is why we have asked universities to take on a more direct role in driving up the standards in schools. The department wants universities to:

  • Work more with schools and colleges to raise standards so that students have more options and can choose the path that is right for them.
  • Move away from just getting disadvantaged students through the door, and instead tackle dropout rates and support students through university to graduation and into high skilled, high paid jobs.
  • Offer more courses that are linked to skills and flexible learning such as degree apprenticeships, higher technical qualifications, and part time courses.

The department is funding Uni Connect through the Strategic Priorities Grant at £30 million for 2023/24. Uni Connect delivers targeted interventions and support aimed at increasing the number of young people from under-represented areas going into FE and HE by bringing together universities, colleges and local partners.

There are three Uni Connect partnerships in London; Access HE works with under-represented young people in North London, including those from Enfield.

So far over one million young people from underrepresented groups have engaged with the Uni Connect programme.

Robert Halfon
Minister of State (Education)
6th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many paid severances have been made by (a) schools and (b) academy trusts in (i) Enfield North constituency, (ii) the London Borough of Enfield and (iii) London for each of the last five years; and what the total cost to the public purse for these severances was in each of the last five years.

The Government requires a high level of accountability and transparency of academy trusts. Academy trusts’ status as companies, charities, and public sector bodies, means they have a rigorous tri-partite framework, and are held up to greater scrutiny.

Academy trusts’ responsibilities on severance payments are set out in the Academy Trust Handbook, which can be accessed at: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/academy-trust-handbook. Additional guidance can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/academies-severance-payments-form. Data on severance payments is published in academy trusts’ accounts, which are available on trusts’ websites and Companies House, and at sector level in the Academies Consolidated Annual Report and Accounts, found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/academies-sector-annual-reports-and-accounts. The latest sector data for the Consolidated Annual Report and Accounts year ending 31 August 2022 will be published in autumn 2023.

As academy trusts rort at trust rather than individual school level, their accounts do not specify which school any severance payment relates to. Because trusts often operate across geographic locations, it is not possible to align this information to a specific borough, constituency or city.

As the responsibility for maintained schools’ severance payments sits with the school and the Local Authority, the Department does not collect the number of severances or amounts paid by Local Authority maintained schools.

6th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether her Department has (a) contacted every school in Enfield North constituency that may be affected by the presence of reinforced autoclaved aerated concrete, (b) assigned a caseworker to each affected school and (c) informed the relevant local authority of their (i) findings and (ii) actions.

Nothing is more important than the safety of children and staff. It has always been the case that where we are made aware of a building that may pose an immediate risk, the Department takes immediate action.

It is the responsibility of those who run schools – academy trusts, Local Authorities, and voluntary-aided school bodies – who work with their schools on a day-to-day basis, to manage the safety and maintenance of their schools and to alert us if there is a concern with a building.

The Department has acted decisively and proactively to tackle this issue. This Government has taken more proactive action on RAAC than any other in the UK. The Department issued comprehensive guidance in 2018, and subsequent years, to all responsible bodies highlighting the potential risks associated with RAAC and supporting them to identify this within their buildings, as well as to take appropriate steps in meeting their obligations to keep buildings safe. The most recent guidance is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/reinforced-autoclaved-aerated-concrete-estates-guidance.

There are over 22,000 schools and colleges in England, and the vast majority are unaffected. A significant proportion of the estate was built outside the period where RAAC was used, with around one third of the estate built since 2001, therefore, the Department has focused efforts on buildings built in the post-war decades.

The Department issued a questionnaire in March 2022, asking responsible bodies to inform the Department of any suspected RAAC identified in their estates. Responsible bodies have submitted questionnaires for over 98% of schools with blocks built in the target era, of which there are 14,900. We are pressing all remaining schools to get checks completed, to determine which schools require surveys.

The Department is contacting responsible bodies to help them respond to this request and to advise on what needs to be done, so that they can establish whether they believe they have RAAC. This work will continue until we have a response for all target era schools.

Schools and colleges where RAAC is suspected are being fast tracked for surveying, which is used to confirm whether RAAC is actually present. All schools and colleges that have already told us they suspect they might have RAAC will be surveyed within a matter of weeks, in many cases in a matter of days.

All schools where RAAC is confirmed are provided with a dedicated caseworker to support them and help implement a mitigation plan and minimise the disruption to children’s learning.

Across Government, Departments have been asked to report on the current picture of suspected and confirmed RAAC in their estates as soon as possible. This will be updated on a regular basis as new buildings are identified and surveying and remediation are carried out. The Department for Education published lists of education settings confirmed as having RAAC on Wednesday 6 September, and committed to providing further updates.

Schools will contact parents where RAAC is identified and inform them of any impacts on their child. The vast majority of schools are unaffected. Any parents that are unsure if their child’s school is affected should contact their school directly.

While some short term disruption is inevitable, all available measures will be taken to minimise disruption to pupil learning and ensure that pupils continue to receive face-to-face teaching. Where there is any disturbance to face-to-face education, schools will prioritise attendance for vulnerable children and young people and children of key workers. The guidance published by the Department in August also includes guidance on provision for pupils with SEND and sets out expectations that schools continue to provide free school meals to eligible pupils.

The Department will fund emergency mitigation work needed to make buildings safe, including installing alternative classroom space where necessary. Where schools and colleges need additional help with revenue costs, like transport to locations or temporarily renting a local hall or office, the department will provide that support for all reasonable requests. The Department will also fund longer term refurbishment projects, or rebuilding projects where these are needed, to rectify the RAAC issue in the long term.

All previously confirmed Schol Rebuilding Programme projects announced in 2021 and 2022 will continue to go ahead. A full list of confirmed projects can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/school-rebuilding-programme-schools-in-the-programme.

Further information on RAAC in education settings is available on the Education Hub: https://educationhub.blog.gov.uk/2023/09/06/new-guidance-on-raac-in-education-settings/.

5th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps her Department is taking to support apprenticeships in Enfield North constituency.

Apprenticeships are crucial in driving growth and social mobility. They boost skills across the economy and improve people's earnings and career opportunities nationwide. Since 2010, there have been 7,790 apprenticeship starts in the Enfield North constituency, and the department wants to ensure that this number continues to grow.

To support this, the government is increasing investment in apprenticeships to £2.7 billion by 2024/25, encouraging more employers across the country to recruit new apprentices. The department has introduced flexible training models, such as flexi-job and accelerated apprenticeships, to make apprenticeships more accessible and has improved the transfer system so that levy-payers can make better use of their funds. We are also supporting employers to access apprenticeships by reducing administrative burdens and cutting the number of steps needed to register to take on an apprentice by one third.

The department recognises the vital role that small to medium-sized employers (SMEs) play in creating apprenticeship opportunities. That is why we removed the limit on the number of apprentices that smaller employers can take on, making it easier for SMEs to grow their businesses with the skilled apprentices they need.

The department is also allocating an additional £40 million over the next two years to support degree apprenticeship providers to expand and help more people access this provision, on top of our £8 million investment in 2022/23.

Furthermore, in August, the care leavers bursary increased for apprentices under the age of 25 from £1,000 to £3,000, supporting more people from all backgrounds to undertake apprenticeships.

We continue to promote apprenticeships to young people in schools and further education colleges across the country through our Apprenticeship Support and Knowledge programme, and UCAS will be expanding its service to allow students to search for and apply to apprenticeships alongside degrees.

Robert Halfon
Minister of State (Education)
5th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many pupils are eligible for the pupil premium in Enfield North constituency.

The Government provides additional funding through the Pupil Premium (PP) to support disadvantaged pupils. PP rates have increased by 5% for 2023/24, taking total PP funding nationally to almost £2.9 billion.

As of June 2023, 7,470 were eligible for PP in Enfield North constituency this year, equating to £9,570,205 in funding. The Department publishes PP allocations, including at constituency level, here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/pupil-premium-allocations-and-conditions-of-grant-2023-to-2024.

5th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps her Department is taking to support SEND provision in Enfield North constituency.

High needs funding for supporting children and young people with complex Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) in England is increasing by a further £440 million, or 4.3%, in the 2024/25 financial year, which will bring the total high needs budget to £10.5 billion. This is an increase of over 60% from the 2019/20 high needs allocations. This funding will help local authorities and schools with the increasing costs of provision for these children and young people.

The department has recently announced provisional 2024/25 high needs allocations for local authorities. Funding is provided to local authorities rather than constituencies.

Enfield Council‘s allocation is £79 million, which is £2.6 million more than the Council will receive this year. This is an increase of 30% per head over the three years from 2021/22.

In March 2022, the department also announced High Needs Provision Capital Allocations (HNPCA) amounting to over £1.4 billion of new investment. This funding is to support local authorities to deliver new places for the 2023/24 and 2024/25 academic years and improve existing provision for children and young people with SEND. This funding forms part of the £2.6 billion the department is investing between 2022 and 2025, and represents a significant, transformational investment in new high needs provision.

Of the £1.4 billion announced, Enfield Council received £6.1 million.

David Johnston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
5th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many schools (a) are affected by and (b) have been forced to close because of the presence of reinforced autoclaved aerated concrete (RAAC) in Enfield North constituency.

Departments have been asked to report on the current picture of suspected and confirmed RAAC in their estates as soon as possible. This will be updated on a regular basis as new buildings are identified and surveying and remediation are carried out.

The Government published lists of education settings confirmed as having RAAC on Wednesday 6 September, and committed to providing further updates.

5th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what proportion of classes exceed 30 pupils in (a) primary and (b) secondary state schools in Enfield North constituency; and what information her Department holds on those figures for private schools in that constituency.

The department publishes figures on class sizes for state-funded primary and secondary schools in England. The most recent figures are for January 2023 and can be found here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/school-pupils-and-their-characteristics.

Despite an increase of more than a million pupils in state-funded primary and secondary schools since 2010, at secondary level, average class sizes remain low at only 22.4 pupils, whilst the average primary class has remained broadly stable at 26.7 pupils.

The average class size in Enfield North constituency is 27.1 in state-funded primary schools, and 22.9 in state-funded secondary schools.

5.8% of state-funded primary school classes and 12.4% of state-funded secondary school classes in Enfield North constituency had more than thirty pupils in them, compared to 10.4% and 10.2% in England. Nationally, the vast majority of pupils in classes over 30 are in classes of 31 or 32.

The department does not collect information on class sizes in independent schools

1st Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much her Department has spent on anti-bullying initiatives for schools in (a) Enfield North constituency, (b) the London Borough of Enfield and (c) London in the last 12 months.

The department does not collect information on how much money has been spent on anti-bullying initiatives for schools in specific areas of the country. The department is providing over £3 million of funding, between 10 August 2021 and 31 March 2024, to five anti-bullying organisations to support schools across the country to tackle bullying. This includes projects targeting bullying of particular groups, such as those who are victims of hate related bullying.

David Johnston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
1st Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether her Department has made an estimate of the number of schools at risk of imminent closure as a result of the (a) condition of and (b) type of building material in school buildings in (i) Enfield North constituency, (ii) the London Borough of Enfield and (iii) London.

Nothing is more important than the safety of children and staff. It has always been the case that where we are made aware of a building that may pose an immediate risk, the Department takes immediate action.

It is the responsibility of those who run schools – academy trusts, Local Authorities, and voluntary-aided school bodies – who work with their schools on a day-to-day basis, to manage the safety and maintenance of their schools and to alert us if there is a concern with a building.

The Department has acted decisively and proactively to tackle this issue. This Government has taken more proactive action on RAAC than any other in the UK. The Department issued comprehensive guidance in 2018, and subsequent years, to all responsible bodies highlighting the potential risks associated with RAAC and supporting them to identify this within their buildings, as well as to take appropriate steps in meeting their obligations to keep buildings safe. The most recent guidance is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/reinforced-autoclaved-aerated-concrete-estates-guidance.

There are over 22,000 schools and colleges in England, and the vast majority are unaffected. A significant proportion of the estate was built outside the period where RAAC was used, with around one third of the estate built since 2001, therefore, the Department has focused efforts on buildings built in the post-war decades.

The Department issued a questionnaire in March 2022, asking responsible bodies to inform the Department of any suspected RAAC identified in their estates. Responsible bodies have submitted questionnaires for over 98% of schools with blocks built in the target era, of which there are 14,900. We are pressing all remaining schools to get checks completed, to determine which schools require surveys.

The Department is contacting responsible bodies to help them respond to this request and to advise on what needs to be done, so that they can establish whether they believe they have RAAC. This work will continue until we have a response for all target era schools.

Schools and colleges where RAAC is suspected are being fast tracked for surveying, which is used to confirm whether RAAC is actually present. All schools and colleges that have already told us they suspect they might have RAAC will be surveyed within a matter of weeks, in many cases in a matter of days.

All schools where RAAC is confirmed are provided with a dedicated caseworker to support them and help implement a mitigation plan and minimise the disruption to children’s learning.

Across Government, Departments have been asked to report on the current picture of suspected and confirmed RAAC in their estates as soon as possible. This will be updated on a regular basis as new buildings are identified and surveying and remediation are carried out. The Department for Education published lists of education settings confirmed as having RAAC on Wednesday 6 September, and committed to providing further updates.

Schools will contact parents where RAAC is identified and inform them of any impacts on their child. The vast majority of schools are unaffected. Any parents that are unsure if their child’s school is affected should contact their school directly.

While some short term disruption is inevitable, all available measures will be taken to minimise disruption to pupil learning and ensure that pupils continue to receive face-to-face teaching. Where there is any disturbance to face-to-face education, schools will prioritise attendance for vulnerable children and young people and children of key workers. The guidance published by the Department in August also includes guidance on provision for pupils with SEND and sets out expectations that schools continue to provide free school meals to eligible pupils.

The Department will fund emergency mitigation work needed to make buildings safe, including installing alternative classroom space where necessary. Where schools and colleges need additional help with revenue costs, like transport to locations or temporarily renting a local hall or office, the department will provide that support for all reasonable requests. The Department will also fund longer term refurbishment projects, or rebuilding projects where these are needed, to rectify the RAAC issue in the long term.

All previously confirmed Schol Rebuilding Programme projects announced in 2021 and 2022 will continue to go ahead. A full list of confirmed projects can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/school-rebuilding-programme-schools-in-the-programme.

Further information on RAAC in education settings is available on the Education Hub: https://educationhub.blog.gov.uk/2023/09/06/new-guidance-on-raac-in-education-settings/.

19th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if her Department will make an estimate of the median level of student debt held by people in Enfield North constituency.

The median debt of full-time undergraduate borrowers funded by Student Finance England, whose postcode is within the Enfield North constituency and who entered repayment within the last five years is £44,881.70. The median debt includes tuition fee and maintenance loans.

The borrower’s postcode refers to the current contact or home address supplied by the borrower to the Student Loans Company.

Robert Halfon
Minister of State (Education)
10th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many teachers in Enfield North constituency have left the profession in the last (a) one, (b) two and (c) five years.

Information on the school workforce, including the number of teachers leaving service nationally and pupil to adult and pupil to teacher ratios at national, regional and local authority level, is published in the ‘School Workforce in England’ statistical publication here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/school-workforce-in-england.

The requested figures for teachers leaving service by parliamentary constituency are not available.

As at November 2022, the latest data available, there were over 468,000 full time equivalent (FTE) teachers in state funded schools in England, an increase of 27,000 (6%) since 2010. This makes the highest number of FTE teachers since the school workforce census began in 2010.

The Department has taken action to improve teacher workload, working with teachers and head teachers to understand and address longstanding issues around marking, planning and data management. The Department continues to work proactively with the sector to understand the drivers behind workload and wellbeing issues, and to improve policies and interventions.

The Department is supporting schools to act and remove unhelpful practice that creates unnecessary workload. The School Workload Reduction Toolkit, developed alongside head teachers, is a helpful resource for schools to review and reduce workload. Further information on the workload reduction toolkit can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/school-workload-reduction-toolkit.

The Department also worked in partnership with the education sector and mental health experts to create the Education Staff Wellbeing Charter, which the Department is encouraging schools to sign up to as a shared commitment to promote staff wellbeing. So far, 2,600 schools have signed up to the Charter. The Charter is available at: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/education-staff-wellbeing-charter.

The table below provides the pupil to adult ratio and the pupil to teacher ratio for state funded secondary schools in Enfield North constituency and England for academic years 2019/20 to 2022/23.

Pupil to adult and pupil to teacher ratios for state-funded secondary schools1 in Enfield North constituency and England, by year

2019/20 to 2022/232

Enfield North constituency

England

Pupil to adult ratio3,5

Pupil to teacher ratio4,5

Pupil to adult ratio3,5

Pupil to teacher ratio4,5

2019/20

11.6

15.8

11.9

16.6

2020/21

11.6

15.8

11.9

16.6

2021/22

12.2

16.4

11.9

16.7

2022/23

12.4

16.8

12.0

16.8

Source: School Workforce Census.

1. Includes one all-through school.

2. Workforce data as at November and pupils data as at the following January. For instance, 2019/20 relates to November 2019 workforce and January 2020 pupils.

3. Pupil to adult ratio includes teachers and support staff (excluding administrative and auxiliary staff).

4. Pupil to teacher ratio includes all teachers.

5. The ratios are calculated using pupil numbers taken from the publication, Schools, Pupils and their Characteristics, available at: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/school-pupils-and-their-characteristics.

10th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the average staff to student ratio was in secondary schools (a) nationally and (b) in Enfield North constituency in (i) 2019, (ii) 2020, (iii) 2021 and (iv) 2022.

Information on the school workforce, including the number of teachers leaving service nationally and pupil to adult and pupil to teacher ratios at national, regional and local authority level, is published in the ‘School Workforce in England’ statistical publication here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/school-workforce-in-england.

The requested figures for teachers leaving service by parliamentary constituency are not available.

As at November 2022, the latest data available, there were over 468,000 full time equivalent (FTE) teachers in state funded schools in England, an increase of 27,000 (6%) since 2010. This makes the highest number of FTE teachers since the school workforce census began in 2010.

The Department has taken action to improve teacher workload, working with teachers and head teachers to understand and address longstanding issues around marking, planning and data management. The Department continues to work proactively with the sector to understand the drivers behind workload and wellbeing issues, and to improve policies and interventions.

The Department is supporting schools to act and remove unhelpful practice that creates unnecessary workload. The School Workload Reduction Toolkit, developed alongside head teachers, is a helpful resource for schools to review and reduce workload. Further information on the workload reduction toolkit can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/school-workload-reduction-toolkit.

The Department also worked in partnership with the education sector and mental health experts to create the Education Staff Wellbeing Charter, which the Department is encouraging schools to sign up to as a shared commitment to promote staff wellbeing. So far, 2,600 schools have signed up to the Charter. The Charter is available at: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/education-staff-wellbeing-charter.

The table below provides the pupil to adult ratio and the pupil to teacher ratio for state funded secondary schools in Enfield North constituency and England for academic years 2019/20 to 2022/23.

Pupil to adult and pupil to teacher ratios for state-funded secondary schools1 in Enfield North constituency and England, by year

2019/20 to 2022/232

Enfield North constituency

England

Pupil to adult ratio3,5

Pupil to teacher ratio4,5

Pupil to adult ratio3,5

Pupil to teacher ratio4,5

2019/20

11.6

15.8

11.9

16.6

2020/21

11.6

15.8

11.9

16.6

2021/22

12.2

16.4

11.9

16.7

2022/23

12.4

16.8

12.0

16.8

Source: School Workforce Census.

1. Includes one all-through school.

2. Workforce data as at November and pupils data as at the following January. For instance, 2019/20 relates to November 2019 workforce and January 2020 pupils.

3. Pupil to adult ratio includes teachers and support staff (excluding administrative and auxiliary staff).

4. Pupil to teacher ratio includes all teachers.

5. The ratios are calculated using pupil numbers taken from the publication, Schools, Pupils and their Characteristics, available at: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/school-pupils-and-their-characteristics.

10th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many (a) primary and (b) secondary school students receive free school meals in (i) Enfield North constituency, (ii) the London Borough of Enfield and (iii) London.

Over a third of pupils in England now receive FSM in schools and colleges, compared with 1 in 6 in 2010. The Government has extended eligibility several times to more groups of children than any other Government over the past half a century. This includes introducing new eligibility criteria for families receiving Universal Credit, to ensure even more children are eligible FSM.

The Department publishes annual data on free school meal (FSM) eligibility for pupils at schools in England. The most recently published data is for January 2023, and is available here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/school-pupils-and-their-characteristics/2022-23. Data for primary and secondary schools in London and Enfield Local Authority can be found at: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/data-tables/permalink/7b574105-ac0c-4c93-311f-08db81f158b1.

In Enfield North, 23.3% (1,724) of pupils in state funded primary schools, and 19.6% (1,168) of pupils in state funded secondary schools were eligible for FSM.

14th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps her Department is taking to improve the (a) recruitment and (b) retention of teachers in (i) Enfield North constituency and (ii) Enfield.

There are now over 468,000 full time equivalent (FTE) teachers in state-funded schools in England, which is an increase of 2,800 (less than 1%) since last year, and an increase of 27,000 (6%) since 2010. This makes it the highest FTE of teachers since the School Workforce Census began in 2010.

The Department’s reforms are aimed at increasing teacher recruitment and at ensuring teachers across England stay and thrive in the profession.

The Department announced a financial incentives package worth up to £181 million for those starting initial teacher training (ITT) in the 2023/24 academic year. The Department is providing bursaries worth up to £27,000 and scholarships worth up to £29,000 to encourage trainees to apply to train in key secondary subjects such as mathematics, physics, chemistry, and computing.

The Government remains committed to delivering £30,000 starting salaries to attract talented people to teaching.

To support retention across all areas, the Department has worked with the education sector and published a range of resources to help address staff workload and wellbeing. This includes the published workload reduction toolkit, which can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/school-workload-reduction-toolkit, and the Education Staff Wellbeing Charter, which can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/education-staff-wellbeing-charter. More than 2,600 schools have signed up to the Charter so far.

14th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps she is taking to help ensure the availability of high-quality childcare in (a) Enfield North constituency and (b) Enfield.

The department is determined to support as many families as possible with access to high-quality, affordable childcare. This is why the Spring Budget 2023 announced significant new investments to expand the free early education entitlements from 2024/25, together with uplifts in 2023/24 and 2024/25 for the existing entitlement offers.

Eligible working parents in England will be able to access 30 hours of childcare per week, for 38 weeks of the year, from when their child is 9 months old to when they start school.

The government is committed to ensuring that every child in an early years setting, regardless of their background or any additional needs they may have, receives high-quality education and care.

Access to high-quality childcare ensures children and families can fulfil their potential, helping children to learn in their earliest years, and supporting a functioning economy by enabling parents to work.

The department knows that children are accessing high-quality childcare. As of August 2022, 96% of providers on the Early Years Register were rated Good or Outstanding, up from 74% in 2012.

Under Section 6 of the Childcare Act 2006, local authorities are responsible for ensuring that the provision of childcare is sufficient to meet the requirements of parents in their area. Part B of the early education and childcare statutory guidance for local authorities highlights that local authorities are required to report annually to elected council members on how they are meeting their duty to secure sufficient childcare, and to make this report available and accessible to parents.

The department has regular contact with each local authority in England about their sufficiency of childcare and any issues they are facing.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
12th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many Mental Health Support Teams there were in (a) Enfield North Constituency, (b) the London Borough of Enfield and (c) London in each year since 2010.

Mental Health Support Teams (MHSTs) are now in place in approximately 6,800 schools and colleges across the country, with 398 expert teams offering support to children experiencing mental health issues. Further information can be found here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/1156762/Transforming_CYPMH_implementation_programme__data_release_May_2023.pdf. MHSTs have achieved their NHS Long Term Plan coverage ambition a year early and over 500 MHSTs will be up and running by April 2024.

Data on the roll out of MHSTs is available from 2018/19, when the first wave of ‘Trailblazer’ teams was commissioned.

Data from NHS England shows that as of March 2023, 76 MHSTs are currently up and running in the NHS England London region, rising to 87 teams by April 2024. This has steadily increased from 15 teams in the Trailblazer wave in 2018/19. A link to the data and more information can be found here: https://www.england.nhs.uk/mental-health/cyp/trailblazers/#_Mental_Health_Support. Data on the number of MHSTs is currently only available at Integrated Care System level and not at local authority or constituency level. The London Borough of Enfield sits within the North Central London Integrated Care System, which has 16 MHSTs. A full breakdown of the growth in MHSTs across London is below and further information can be found here: https://nclhealthandcare.org.uk/about/your-area/enfield/.

Integrated Care System

North Central
London

Total in London

2018/19 Trailblazer

4

15

2019/20 Wave 1 & 2

8

26

2020/21 Wave 3 & 4

1

19

2021/22 Wave 5 & 6

1

16

2022/23 Wave 7 & 8

2

11

Total

16

87

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
5th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much her Department allocated to Enfield Council through the Financial Transparency in Local Authority Maintained Schools Grant in each of the last ten years in real terms.

In the 2021/22 financial year, Enfield was given £3,547.68 through the Financial Transparency in Local Authority Maintained Schools Grant. This was the first time that the grant was distributed. In 2022/23 this grant, totalling £772,000, distributed across 150 Local Authorities, was consolidated into the Department for Levelling Up Housing and Communities’ local government settlement, alongside other similar grants to Local Authorities.

5th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much her Department allocated to Enfield Council through the Early Years Programme in each of the last ten years in real terms.

The Government is committed to providing a world class education system for all pupils and has provided significant funding in education to achieve that.

The Autumn Statement 2022 announced additional funding of £2 billion in each of the financial years 2023/24 and 2024/25, over and above totals announced at the 2021 Spending Review. This means funding for mainstream schools and high needs is £3.5 billion higher in 2023/24, compared to 2022/23. That is on top of the £4 billion, year on year increase provided in 2022/23. This is an increase of £7.5 billion, or over 15%, in just two years.

Total funding for both mainstream schools and high needs will total £58.8 billion in 2024/25, which is the highest ever level in real terms per pupil.

The Dedicated Schools Grant Early Years Block and High Needs Block allocations for financial years 2014 to 2024 for Enfield are available in the links in the attached annex. The most recent data is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/dedicated-schools-grant-dsg-2023-to-2024.

The School Improvement and Monitoring Grant allocations for 2018 to 2023 for Enfield are available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/school-improvement-monitoring-and-brokering-grant-allocations#full-publication-update-history. This was a ringfenced grant designed to support councils to monitor performance of maintained schools, broker school improvement provision, and intervene as appropriate. The functions this grant covered are now funded from maintained schools’ budgets.

The Covid Catch Up Premium allocation for 2020 to 2021 for Enfield is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-catch-up-premium-provisional-allocations. The Catch Up Premium was followed by the Recovery Premium, which is worth over £1.3 billon for state funded schools in England, across the 2021/22 and 2023/24 academic years. The Recovery Premium was, and continues to be, targeted towards disadvantaged pupils, as the evidence is clear that the disadvantaged have been impacted more than others. Enfield’s allocations for 2021 to 2023 are available in the links in the attached annex, the most recent data is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-recovery-premium-funding-allocations-and-conditions-of-grant-2022-to-2023.

Since September 2014, all pupils in Reception, Year 1, and Year 2 in England's state funded schools, including academies and free schools, are entitled to free school meals. Universal Infant Free School Meals (UIFSM) are funded through a direct grant to schools. In June 2022, the Government announced an increase to £2.41 per pupil in UIFSM funding. This was uplifted from £2.34 in June 2022 and backdated to 1 April 2022 in recognition of the cost pressures schools were facing. The UIFSM provisional allocation for Enfield for 2014 to 2023 are available in the links in the attached annex. The most recent data is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/universal-infant-free-school-meals-uifsm-2022-to-2023.

The Pupil Premium provides additional funding to support disadvantaged pupils. Pupil Premium rates have increased by 5% for 2023/24. The Pupil Premium allocations for 2014 to 2024 for Enfield are available in the links in the attached annex. The most recent data is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/pupil-premium-allocations-and-conditions-of-grant-2023-to-2024.

The Government publishes GDP deflators that can be used to understand the impact of inflation over time. These are available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/gdp-deflators-at-market-prices-and-money-gdp-march-2023-quarterly-national-accounts.

5th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much funding her Department allocated to Enfield Council through the High Needs Funding Programme in each of the last ten years in real terms.

The Government is committed to providing a world class education system for all pupils and has provided significant funding in education to achieve that.

The Autumn Statement 2022 announced additional funding of £2 billion in each of the financial years 2023/24 and 2024/25, over and above totals announced at the 2021 Spending Review. This means funding for mainstream schools and high needs is £3.5 billion higher in 2023/24, compared to 2022/23. That is on top of the £4 billion, year on year increase provided in 2022/23. This is an increase of £7.5 billion, or over 15%, in just two years.

Total funding for both mainstream schools and high needs will total £58.8 billion in 2024/25, which is the highest ever level in real terms per pupil.

The Dedicated Schools Grant Early Years Block and High Needs Block allocations for financial years 2014 to 2024 for Enfield are available in the links in the attached annex. The most recent data is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/dedicated-schools-grant-dsg-2023-to-2024.

The School Improvement and Monitoring Grant allocations for 2018 to 2023 for Enfield are available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/school-improvement-monitoring-and-brokering-grant-allocations#full-publication-update-history. This was a ringfenced grant designed to support councils to monitor performance of maintained schools, broker school improvement provision, and intervene as appropriate. The functions this grant covered are now funded from maintained schools’ budgets.

The Covid Catch Up Premium allocation for 2020 to 2021 for Enfield is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-catch-up-premium-provisional-allocations. The Catch Up Premium was followed by the Recovery Premium, which is worth over £1.3 billon for state funded schools in England, across the 2021/22 and 2023/24 academic years. The Recovery Premium was, and continues to be, targeted towards disadvantaged pupils, as the evidence is clear that the disadvantaged have been impacted more than others. Enfield’s allocations for 2021 to 2023 are available in the links in the attached annex, the most recent data is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-recovery-premium-funding-allocations-and-conditions-of-grant-2022-to-2023.

Since September 2014, all pupils in Reception, Year 1, and Year 2 in England's state funded schools, including academies and free schools, are entitled to free school meals. Universal Infant Free School Meals (UIFSM) are funded through a direct grant to schools. In June 2022, the Government announced an increase to £2.41 per pupil in UIFSM funding. This was uplifted from £2.34 in June 2022 and backdated to 1 April 2022 in recognition of the cost pressures schools were facing. The UIFSM provisional allocation for Enfield for 2014 to 2023 are available in the links in the attached annex. The most recent data is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/universal-infant-free-school-meals-uifsm-2022-to-2023.

The Pupil Premium provides additional funding to support disadvantaged pupils. Pupil Premium rates have increased by 5% for 2023/24. The Pupil Premium allocations for 2014 to 2024 for Enfield are available in the links in the attached annex. The most recent data is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/pupil-premium-allocations-and-conditions-of-grant-2023-to-2024.

The Government publishes GDP deflators that can be used to understand the impact of inflation over time. These are available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/gdp-deflators-at-market-prices-and-money-gdp-march-2023-quarterly-national-accounts.

5th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much her Department made available to Enfield Council as part of the School Improvement, Monitoring and Brokering Grant in each of the last ten years in real terms.

The Government is committed to providing a world class education system for all pupils and has provided significant funding in education to achieve that.

The Autumn Statement 2022 announced additional funding of £2 billion in each of the financial years 2023/24 and 2024/25, over and above totals announced at the 2021 Spending Review. This means funding for mainstream schools and high needs is £3.5 billion higher in 2023/24, compared to 2022/23. That is on top of the £4 billion, year on year increase provided in 2022/23. This is an increase of £7.5 billion, or over 15%, in just two years.

Total funding for both mainstream schools and high needs will total £58.8 billion in 2024/25, which is the highest ever level in real terms per pupil.

The Dedicated Schools Grant Early Years Block and High Needs Block allocations for financial years 2014 to 2024 for Enfield are available in the links in the attached annex. The most recent data is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/dedicated-schools-grant-dsg-2023-to-2024.

The School Improvement and Monitoring Grant allocations for 2018 to 2023 for Enfield are available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/school-improvement-monitoring-and-brokering-grant-allocations#full-publication-update-history. This was a ringfenced grant designed to support councils to monitor performance of maintained schools, broker school improvement provision, and intervene as appropriate. The functions this grant covered are now funded from maintained schools’ budgets.

The Covid Catch Up Premium allocation for 2020 to 2021 for Enfield is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-catch-up-premium-provisional-allocations. The Catch Up Premium was followed by the Recovery Premium, which is worth over £1.3 billon for state funded schools in England, across the 2021/22 and 2023/24 academic years. The Recovery Premium was, and continues to be, targeted towards disadvantaged pupils, as the evidence is clear that the disadvantaged have been impacted more than others. Enfield’s allocations for 2021 to 2023 are available in the links in the attached annex, the most recent data is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-recovery-premium-funding-allocations-and-conditions-of-grant-2022-to-2023.

Since September 2014, all pupils in Reception, Year 1, and Year 2 in England's state funded schools, including academies and free schools, are entitled to free school meals. Universal Infant Free School Meals (UIFSM) are funded through a direct grant to schools. In June 2022, the Government announced an increase to £2.41 per pupil in UIFSM funding. This was uplifted from £2.34 in June 2022 and backdated to 1 April 2022 in recognition of the cost pressures schools were facing. The UIFSM provisional allocation for Enfield for 2014 to 2023 are available in the links in the attached annex. The most recent data is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/universal-infant-free-school-meals-uifsm-2022-to-2023.

The Pupil Premium provides additional funding to support disadvantaged pupils. Pupil Premium rates have increased by 5% for 2023/24. The Pupil Premium allocations for 2014 to 2024 for Enfield are available in the links in the attached annex. The most recent data is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/pupil-premium-allocations-and-conditions-of-grant-2023-to-2024.

The Government publishes GDP deflators that can be used to understand the impact of inflation over time. These are available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/gdp-deflators-at-market-prices-and-money-gdp-march-2023-quarterly-national-accounts.

5th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much her Department made available to Enfield Council as part of the Coronavirus Catch-Up Premium Scheme in each of the last ten years in real terms.

The Government is committed to providing a world class education system for all pupils and has provided significant funding in education to achieve that.

The Autumn Statement 2022 announced additional funding of £2 billion in each of the financial years 2023/24 and 2024/25, over and above totals announced at the 2021 Spending Review. This means funding for mainstream schools and high needs is £3.5 billion higher in 2023/24, compared to 2022/23. That is on top of the £4 billion, year on year increase provided in 2022/23. This is an increase of £7.5 billion, or over 15%, in just two years.

Total funding for both mainstream schools and high needs will total £58.8 billion in 2024/25, which is the highest ever level in real terms per pupil.

The Dedicated Schools Grant Early Years Block and High Needs Block allocations for financial years 2014 to 2024 for Enfield are available in the links in the attached annex. The most recent data is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/dedicated-schools-grant-dsg-2023-to-2024.

The School Improvement and Monitoring Grant allocations for 2018 to 2023 for Enfield are available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/school-improvement-monitoring-and-brokering-grant-allocations#full-publication-update-history. This was a ringfenced grant designed to support councils to monitor performance of maintained schools, broker school improvement provision, and intervene as appropriate. The functions this grant covered are now funded from maintained schools’ budgets.

The Covid Catch Up Premium allocation for 2020 to 2021 for Enfield is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-catch-up-premium-provisional-allocations. The Catch Up Premium was followed by the Recovery Premium, which is worth over £1.3 billon for state funded schools in England, across the 2021/22 and 2023/24 academic years. The Recovery Premium was, and continues to be, targeted towards disadvantaged pupils, as the evidence is clear that the disadvantaged have been impacted more than others. Enfield’s allocations for 2021 to 2023 are available in the links in the attached annex, the most recent data is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-recovery-premium-funding-allocations-and-conditions-of-grant-2022-to-2023.

Since September 2014, all pupils in Reception, Year 1, and Year 2 in England's state funded schools, including academies and free schools, are entitled to free school meals. Universal Infant Free School Meals (UIFSM) are funded through a direct grant to schools. In June 2022, the Government announced an increase to £2.41 per pupil in UIFSM funding. This was uplifted from £2.34 in June 2022 and backdated to 1 April 2022 in recognition of the cost pressures schools were facing. The UIFSM provisional allocation for Enfield for 2014 to 2023 are available in the links in the attached annex. The most recent data is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/universal-infant-free-school-meals-uifsm-2022-to-2023.

The Pupil Premium provides additional funding to support disadvantaged pupils. Pupil Premium rates have increased by 5% for 2023/24. The Pupil Premium allocations for 2014 to 2024 for Enfield are available in the links in the attached annex. The most recent data is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/pupil-premium-allocations-and-conditions-of-grant-2023-to-2024.

The Government publishes GDP deflators that can be used to understand the impact of inflation over time. These are available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/gdp-deflators-at-market-prices-and-money-gdp-march-2023-quarterly-national-accounts.

5th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much her Department has allocated to Enfield Council as part of the Universal infant free school meal funding in each of the last ten years in real terms.

The Government is committed to providing a world class education system for all pupils and has provided significant funding in education to achieve that.

The Autumn Statement 2022 announced additional funding of £2 billion in each of the financial years 2023/24 and 2024/25, over and above totals announced at the 2021 Spending Review. This means funding for mainstream schools and high needs is £3.5 billion higher in 2023/24, compared to 2022/23. That is on top of the £4 billion, year on year increase provided in 2022/23. This is an increase of £7.5 billion, or over 15%, in just two years.

Total funding for both mainstream schools and high needs will total £58.8 billion in 2024/25, which is the highest ever level in real terms per pupil.

The Dedicated Schools Grant Early Years Block and High Needs Block allocations for financial years 2014 to 2024 for Enfield are available in the links in the attached annex. The most recent data is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/dedicated-schools-grant-dsg-2023-to-2024.

The School Improvement and Monitoring Grant allocations for 2018 to 2023 for Enfield are available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/school-improvement-monitoring-and-brokering-grant-allocations#full-publication-update-history. This was a ringfenced grant designed to support councils to monitor performance of maintained schools, broker school improvement provision, and intervene as appropriate. The functions this grant covered are now funded from maintained schools’ budgets.

The Covid Catch Up Premium allocation for 2020 to 2021 for Enfield is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-catch-up-premium-provisional-allocations. The Catch Up Premium was followed by the Recovery Premium, which is worth over £1.3 billon for state funded schools in England, across the 2021/22 and 2023/24 academic years. The Recovery Premium was, and continues to be, targeted towards disadvantaged pupils, as the evidence is clear that the disadvantaged have been impacted more than others. Enfield’s allocations for 2021 to 2023 are available in the links in the attached annex, the most recent data is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-recovery-premium-funding-allocations-and-conditions-of-grant-2022-to-2023.

Since September 2014, all pupils in Reception, Year 1, and Year 2 in England's state funded schools, including academies and free schools, are entitled to free school meals. Universal Infant Free School Meals (UIFSM) are funded through a direct grant to schools. In June 2022, the Government announced an increase to £2.41 per pupil in UIFSM funding. This was uplifted from £2.34 in June 2022 and backdated to 1 April 2022 in recognition of the cost pressures schools were facing. The UIFSM provisional allocation for Enfield for 2014 to 2023 are available in the links in the attached annex. The most recent data is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/universal-infant-free-school-meals-uifsm-2022-to-2023.

The Pupil Premium provides additional funding to support disadvantaged pupils. Pupil Premium rates have increased by 5% for 2023/24. The Pupil Premium allocations for 2014 to 2024 for Enfield are available in the links in the attached annex. The most recent data is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/pupil-premium-allocations-and-conditions-of-grant-2023-to-2024.

The Government publishes GDP deflators that can be used to understand the impact of inflation over time. These are available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/gdp-deflators-at-market-prices-and-money-gdp-march-2023-quarterly-national-accounts.

5th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what allocation of funding through Pupil Premium was given to Enfield Council for each year in real terms since 2010.

The Government is committed to providing a world class education system for all pupils and has provided significant funding in education to achieve that.

The Autumn Statement 2022 announced additional funding of £2 billion in each of the financial years 2023/24 and 2024/25, over and above totals announced at the 2021 Spending Review. This means funding for mainstream schools and high needs is £3.5 billion higher in 2023/24, compared to 2022/23. That is on top of the £4 billion, year on year increase provided in 2022/23. This is an increase of £7.5 billion, or over 15%, in just two years.

Total funding for both mainstream schools and high needs will total £58.8 billion in 2024/25, which is the highest ever level in real terms per pupil.

The Dedicated Schools Grant Early Years Block and High Needs Block allocations for financial years 2014 to 2024 for Enfield are available in the links in the attached annex. The most recent data is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/dedicated-schools-grant-dsg-2023-to-2024.

The School Improvement and Monitoring Grant allocations for 2018 to 2023 for Enfield are available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/school-improvement-monitoring-and-brokering-grant-allocations#full-publication-update-history. This was a ringfenced grant designed to support councils to monitor performance of maintained schools, broker school improvement provision, and intervene as appropriate. The functions this grant covered are now funded from maintained schools’ budgets.

The Covid Catch Up Premium allocation for 2020 to 2021 for Enfield is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-catch-up-premium-provisional-allocations. The Catch Up Premium was followed by the Recovery Premium, which is worth over £1.3 billon for state funded schools in England, across the 2021/22 and 2023/24 academic years. The Recovery Premium was, and continues to be, targeted towards disadvantaged pupils, as the evidence is clear that the disadvantaged have been impacted more than others. Enfield’s allocations for 2021 to 2023 are available in the links in the attached annex, the most recent data is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-recovery-premium-funding-allocations-and-conditions-of-grant-2022-to-2023.

Since September 2014, all pupils in Reception, Year 1, and Year 2 in England's state funded schools, including academies and free schools, are entitled to free school meals. Universal Infant Free School Meals (UIFSM) are funded through a direct grant to schools. In June 2022, the Government announced an increase to £2.41 per pupil in UIFSM funding. This was uplifted from £2.34 in June 2022 and backdated to 1 April 2022 in recognition of the cost pressures schools were facing. The UIFSM provisional allocation for Enfield for 2014 to 2023 are available in the links in the attached annex. The most recent data is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/universal-infant-free-school-meals-uifsm-2022-to-2023.

The Pupil Premium provides additional funding to support disadvantaged pupils. Pupil Premium rates have increased by 5% for 2023/24. The Pupil Premium allocations for 2014 to 2024 for Enfield are available in the links in the attached annex. The most recent data is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/pupil-premium-allocations-and-conditions-of-grant-2023-to-2024.

The Government publishes GDP deflators that can be used to understand the impact of inflation over time. These are available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/gdp-deflators-at-market-prices-and-money-gdp-march-2023-quarterly-national-accounts.

5th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much her Department made available to Enfield Council through the Teaching School Core Grant in each of the last ten years in real terms.

The Teaching Schools programme operated from September 2011 to August 2021 and focused on school to school support.

In the Recruitment and Retention strategy, published in January 2019, the Department committed to improving support for all teachers, ensuring that they receive high quality training and development at every stage of their career. The Teaching Schools Hubs programme, in operation since September 2021, created a network of 87 centres of excellence for teacher training and development to replace the previous network of around 750 Teaching Schools.

Enfield Council has not received a direct Teaching School Core Grant from the Department. The Teaching Schools programme, which ended in 2021, paid the Teaching School Core Grant to the nominated bank account of the Teaching Schools based in Enfield as shown in the table below.

Designated Teaching School

Highlands School

Southgate School

2013/14 (AY)

0

50,000

2014/15 (AY)

60,000

40,000

2015/16 (AY)

50,000

40,000

2016/17 (AY)

40,000

40,000

2017/18 (AY)

40,000

40,000

2018/19 (AY)

40,000

40,000

2019/20 (AY)

40,000

40,000

2020/21 (AY)

40,000

40,000

Total

310,000

330,000

North West London Teaching School Hub has been designated to provide its services to the area of Enfield until August 2024 and its grant is paid directly to its bank account. In the 2021/22 academic year the Department paid North West London Teaching School Hub £220,000 for the delivery of Initial Teacher Training, Early Career Framework, National Professional Qualifications, the Appropriate Body role and additional professional development according to local need.

5th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much her Department allocated to Enfield Council through the Early Years Professional Development Programme (Phase 2) in each of the last ten years in real terms.

Phase 2 of the Professional Development Programme (PDP2) ran during one calendar year, from January to July 2022, providing high-quality training to over 1,300 practitioners in 51 local authorities. The training covered early language, early mathematics and personal, social and emotional development.

To enable practitioners to access the training, the department provided funding for backfill costs, through a Section 31 grant to local authorities. Local authorities were asked to pass on the backfill funding to settings participating in the programme. The backfill was paid in two tranches.

Tranche 1, covering training delivered in January to March 2022, was issued to local authorities in March 2022. In Tranche 1, Enfield Council was paid £14,300.

Tranche 2, covering training delivered in April to July 2022, was issued in March 2023. In Tranche 2 Enfield Council was paid £12,700.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
5th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much her Department allocated to Enfield Council through the Wellbeing for Education Recovery Grant in each of the last ten years in real terms.

The department has been offering a grant to all state schools and colleges to train a senior mental health lead since October 2021, helping settings to develop their holistic approach to mental health and wellbeing. Senior mental health lead training grants are paid to eligible schools and colleges once they have completed their application and provided evidence of booking a department quality assured course.

The department publishes a list of schools and colleges that have claimed a senior mental health lead training grant, updated throughout the year, which can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-data-on-funding-claims-by-institutions. This data confirms that 33 grants were paid in 2021/22 to schools and colleges in the London Borough of Enfield, and 19 were paid in 2022/23, totalling £62,400 in grants to date.

The department also provided Wellbeing for Education Return/Recovery grants to local authorities in the 2020/21 and 2021/22 financial years, to provide additional support to state-funded schools and colleges to enable education staff to promote and support the wellbeing and mental health of pupils and students, during the return to schools and in the pandemic recovery period.

The London Borough of Enfield received a Wellbeing for Education Return grant of £37,356 in 2020/21 and a further Wellbeing for Education Recovery grant of £32,825 in 2021/22, amounting to a total of £70,181. This data can be obtained from the tables published in the Wellbeing for Education Return and Recovery grant determination letters which can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/wellbeing-for-education-return-grant-s31-grant-determination-letter.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
5th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much her Department made available to Enfield Council through the Senior Mental Health Lead Training Grants in each of the last ten years in real terms.

The department has been offering a grant to all state schools and colleges to train a senior mental health lead since October 2021, helping settings to develop their holistic approach to mental health and wellbeing. Senior mental health lead training grants are paid to eligible schools and colleges once they have completed their application and provided evidence of booking a department quality assured course.

The department publishes a list of schools and colleges that have claimed a senior mental health lead training grant, updated throughout the year, which can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-data-on-funding-claims-by-institutions. This data confirms that 33 grants were paid in 2021/22 to schools and colleges in the London Borough of Enfield, and 19 were paid in 2022/23, totalling £62,400 in grants to date.

The department also provided Wellbeing for Education Return/Recovery grants to local authorities in the 2020/21 and 2021/22 financial years, to provide additional support to state-funded schools and colleges to enable education staff to promote and support the wellbeing and mental health of pupils and students, during the return to schools and in the pandemic recovery period.

The London Borough of Enfield received a Wellbeing for Education Return grant of £37,356 in 2020/21 and a further Wellbeing for Education Recovery grant of £32,825 in 2021/22, amounting to a total of £70,181. This data can be obtained from the tables published in the Wellbeing for Education Return and Recovery grant determination letters which can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/wellbeing-for-education-return-grant-s31-grant-determination-letter.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
5th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much funding her Department allocated to Enfield Council for the Priority school building programme in the latest period for which data is available.

There were four schools from Enfield Council included in the Priority School Building Programme, the predecessor to the School Rebuilding Programme (SRP), with a total funding of over £14 million. The projects at Eldon Primary School, Walker Primary School, Durants School and Brimsdown Primary School have all been completed and the schools are able to teach in modern facilities that will inspire generations of pupils.

The SRP was announced in 2020 and will transform buildings at 500 schools and sixth form colleges over the next decade. It will rebuild or refurbish poor condition buildings, providing modern designs, with new buildings being net zero carbon in operation. Five schools from within Enfield Council area have been selected for SRP, announced in 2022. These schools are being scheduled for delivery, and the funding for each project will depend on the works at each school. This will be determined when the scope and delivery plans for each project are developed.

5th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much her Department allocated to Enfield Council through the Apprenticeships Participation 18 plus Grant in each of the last ten years in real terms.

Funding available in the 2023/24 financial year for apprenticeships in England is £2.58 billion.

Funding for new apprenticeship starts is not allocated to individual areas, or by age. Rather, employers of all sizes across England can access funding to offer high-quality apprenticeships to help meet their skills needs.

Since 2010, there have been over 20,000 apprenticeship starts in Enfield local authority.

The department is unable to provide a breakdown of apprenticeship spending by region as it does not publish this data.

Robert Halfon
Minister of State (Education)
5th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much her Department allocated to Enfield Council through the 16 to 19 Education Grant in each of the last ten years in real terms.

The department allocates 16-19 funding, through a national funding formula to individual institutions who can use their funds, as appropriate, to support students in line with the funding rules we set each year. The department publishes allocations by institution. Allocations covering the last 10 academic years can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/16-to-19-education-funding-allocations.

The 16 to 19 funding is allocated to Enfield London Borough Council as a training provider. The council are also allocated funding to pay maintained school sixth forms and maintained special schools (bursary funding).

The government publishes GDP deflators that can be used to understand the impact of inflation over time. These are available at: GDP deflators at market prices, and money GDP March 2023 (Quarterly National Accounts) - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk).

Robert Halfon
Minister of State (Education)
5th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much her Department allocated to Enfield Council through the Summer Schools Grant in each of the last ten years in real terms.

The department has made available almost £5 billion for education recovery packages to support children and young people of all ages in catching up on missed education and development. Funding was made available for demand-led summer schools in summer 2021 so that children, particularly in transition years between primary and secondary, could access some of the fundamental teaching and enrichment activities that are so vitally important to development.

The allocations made available to each eligible secondary school, by local authority in England, can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-summer-schools-programme-funding.

Enfield London Borough Council was allocated a maximum of £232,830 for its maintained schools. This funding was demand-led and, overall, claims for actual costs were less than that allocated.

Maintained schools received their funding via the local authority and academies received their funding directly in the October/November 2021 funding round.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
5th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much her Department allocated to Enfield Council through the Secure Accommodation Grant in each of the last ten years in real terms.

Enfield Council does not have any secure children’s homes (SCH) and therefore has not been in receipt of a grant for secure accommodation.

The 2021 Spending Review announced a total of £259 million of funding to undertake a programme of work aimed at maintaining sufficiency and expanding provision of both secure and open residential children’s homes estates. A new SCH is proposed for London as part of this. The Pan-London SCH project is at the construction feasibility stage. The project is following a Gateway approach which enables the department to review proposed project costs and progress at key delivery points to ensure value for money and ensure that the project is on track as it progresses.

Once operational, the new facility will provide an additional 24 beds, with plans for four step-down beds for young people with complex needs who require this care.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
5th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many social workers are (a) permanent and (b) agency staff; and what the cost is of employing each group in (i) Enfield North Constituency, (ii) the London Borough of Enfield and (iii) London.

The department does not collect the number of permanent and agency staff at constituency level, and does not collect data on the cost of employing permanent or agency social workers.

In 2022 there were a total of 5,392.8 Full Time Equivalent (FTE) child and family social workers employed by local authorities in London. In addition there were 1,700 child and family social workers in London that were hired as agency staff. This gives a total of 7,092.8 FTE child and family social workers in London.

In 2022 there were a total of 201.2 FTE child and family social workers employed in the London Borough of Enfield. In addition there were 31.3 child and family social workers in the London Borough of Enfield that were hired as agency staff. This gives a total of 232.5 FTE child and family social workers in the London Borough of Enfield.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
5th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much her Department made available to Enfield Council through the School Condition Allocation in each of the last ten years in real terms.

Well maintained, safe school buildings are a priority for the Department. Over £15 billion has been allocated since 2015 to improve the condition of the estate. In 2023/24, the Department has announced £1.8 billion for improving school buildings, including £1.1 billion in school condition allocations for Local Authorities, large multi-academy trusts and large Voluntary Aided bodies. This is informed by consistent data on the condition of the school estate.

As part of this, Enfield Local Authority has been allocated a School Condition Allocation of £4,937,946 for the 2023/24 financial year to spend in maintained schools. Large multi-academy trusts and large Voluntary Aided school bodies with schools in Enfield will also have been allocated a School Condition Allocation to spend on their school buildings, whilst smaller and single academy trusts were invited to bid into the Condition Improvement Fund, with outcomes now published on GOV.UK including four schools in the Enfield Local Authority area.

Schools maintained by Enfield Local Authority have also been allocated £435,674 in devolved formula capital to spend on their own capital priorities, whilst schools in the Local Authority across all types of responsible body have been allocated £1,227,483.

As well as allocating condition funding, the Department also delivers major rebuilding programmes to improve or replace school buildings. Five schools have been announced in the School Rebuilding Programme, which will transform buildings at those schools by rebuilding or refurbishing poor condition blocks, providing modern designs which are net zero carbon in operation. In addition, four schools within the Enfield Local Authority were included in the Priority School Building Programme.

It is not possible to make direct, like for like comparisons between annual allocations over time as the methodology used, number of pupils/schools funded and data on the condition of those schools changes over time. It is worth noting that Enfield has seen a significant drop of approximately 40% in the number of schools for which it is responsible over the last ten years.

25th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps she plans to take with Cabinet colleagues to ensure young people in (a) Enfield North constituency, (b) the London Borough of Enfield and (c) London have access to learning in nature settings.

In April 2022, the Department released its Sustainability and Climate Change Strategy. Key initiatives included ‘The National Education Nature Park’ and ‘Climate Action Award’. These programmes will engage children and young people with the natural world and directly involve them in measuring and improving biodiversity in their nursery, school, college or university

In May, as part of this initiative, the Department announced £15 million of funding to help young people in nature depleted areas, which will enable schools, colleges and nurseries to create opportunities for outdoor learning in natural settings.

Young people in Enfield may already be taking advantage of activities run by London’s National Park City Rangers.

By 2025, the Department aims to introduce a natural history GCSE, giving young people a further opportunity to engage with and develop a deeper knowledge and understanding of the natural world. In studying this GCSE, young people will explore organisms and environments in more depth and gain knowledge and practical experience of fieldwork. This new qualification adds to fieldwork opportunities already available in subjects such as geography. As we deliver on our climate change strategy, the Department will continue to work across Government to identify opportunities for young people to access learning in nature settings.

25th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the average funding per pupil in mainstream schools was in (a) Enfield North constituency, (b) the London Borough of Enfield and (c) London in each academic year since 2015.

The table below shows the Schools Block Unit of Funding (SBUF) for the London Borough of Enfield and London between the 2015/16 and 2017/18 financial years, when mainstream schools funding was calculated only at Local Authority level, prior to the introduction of the schools National Funding Formula (NFF). This means the Department does not have school level funding calculations prior to the NFF, so cannot provide constituency level allocations prior to 2018. The Department can only provide funding by financial years, not academic years.

Financial year

Enfield Local Authority

London (inner and outer)

2015/16

£5,187

£5,394

2016/17

£5,204

£5,448

2017/18

£5,050

£5,396

The Department introduced the schools NFF in 2018/19. The Department uses the schools NFF to calculate notional funding allocations for each mainstream school. These school level allocations are added up to calculate a total allocation for each Local Authority. Local Authorities then set their own local formulae to distribute their total allocation between all the schools in their area. This means that schools receive their actual funding allocation based on their Local Authority’s formula.

The table below shows the average funding per pupil provided for mainstream schools in the Enfield North constituency, London Borough of Enfield and London, through the schools NFF.

The per pupil funding amounts exclude ’growth’ funding, which is funding to support schools seeing significant growth in pupil numbers. The Department does not hold constituency level data for the 2018/19 financial year.

Financial year

Enfield North Constituency

Enfield Local Authority

London (inner and outer)

2018/19

-

£5,037

£5,379

2019/20

£5,151

£5,099

£5,426

2020/21

£5,366

£5,270

£5,519

2021/22

£5,730

£5,629

£5,904

2022/23

£5,879

£5,779

£6,049

2023/24

£6,235

£6,106

£6,337

On top of this funding through the schools NFF, all schools received additional funding through the Schools Supplementary Grant (SSG) in 2022/23 and the Mainstream Schools Additional Grant (MSAG) in 2023/24. For schools in the Enfield North constituency, the SSG was worth an average additional £172 per pupil and the MSAG is worth an average additional £212 per pupil.

19th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the average funding per pupil in mainstream schools was in (a) Enfield North constituency, (b) the London Borough of Enfield and (c) London in each of the last five years.

Through the schools National Funding Formula (NFF), the Department calculates notional funding allocations for each mainstream school. These school level allocations are added up to calculate a total allocation for each Local Authority. Local Authorities then set their own local formulae to distribute their total allocation between all the schools in their area. This means that schools receive their budget allocation based on their Local Authority’s formula.

The table below shows the average funding per pupil provided for mainstream schools in the Enfield North constituency, the London Borough of Enfield and London through the schools NFF.

The per pupil funding amounts exclude ‘growth’ funding, which is funding to support schools seeing significant growth in pupil numbers.

Financial year

Enfield North

Enfield

London (inner and outer)

2019/20

£5,151

£5,099

£5,426

2020/21

£5,366

£5,270

£5,519

2021/22

£5,730

£5,629

£5,904

2022/23

£5,879

£5,779

£6,049

2023/24

£6,235

£6,106

£6,337

On top of this funding through the schools NFF, all schools in Enfield North received additional funding through the Schools Supplementary Grant (SSG) in 2022/23, worth an average additional £172 per pupil. They are also receiving funding from the Mainstream Schools Additional Grant (MSAG) in 2023/24, worth an average additional £212 per pupil.

15th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment she has made of the impact of Outer London pay scales on (a) recruitment and (b) retention of teachers in (i) Enfield North constituency and (ii) the London Borough of Enfield.

The Government is concentrating funding in the teaching profession with school funding in 2024/25 due to reach its highest level in history per pupil and in real terms, as measured by the Institute for Fiscal Studies.

The Department implemented in full the School Teachers’ Review Body’s (STRB) recommendations for the 2022/23 academic year of an 8.9% pay rise for early career teachers outside London, and a 5% pay rise for experienced teachers. This is the highest pay award in 30 years.

This uplift raised starting salaries to over £32,400 in Outer London, including Enfield North and the London Borough of Enfield. The Department hopes that further rises next academic year will see starting salaries reach £30,000 in all areas of England, ensuring that they are competitive relative to alternative professional graduate starting salaries.

Decisions on pay ranges and allowances, such as the London pay scales, are based on recommendations by the STRB, the independent body that advises on teachers’ pay and conditions. This year’s written evidence to the STRB sets out the Government’s position on pay awards this year, detailing how these need to strike a careful balance between recognising the vital importance of public sector workers, whilst not increasing the country’s debt further or exacerbating inflation. The evidence includes an assessment of recruitment and retention trends broken down geographically, including for areas such as Outer London. The final pay award decisions for the 2023/24 academic year will be determined later this year.

The Department announced a financial incentives package of up to £181 million for those starting Initial Teacher Training in the 2023/24 academic year, a £52 million increase on the last cycle. The Department is providing bursaries worth up to £27,000 and scholarships worth up to £29,000 to encourage trainees to apply to train in key secondary subjects such as mathematics, physics, chemistry, and computing.

The Department also provides a Levelling Up Premium worth up to £3,000 annually for mathematics, physics, chemistry, and computing teachers in the first five years of their careers who work in disadvantaged schools nationally, including within Education Investment Areas. The eligibility criteria and the list of eligible schools are available at: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/levelling-up-premium-payments-for-teachers.

10th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate she has made of the number of teachers in (a) Enfield North constituency, (b) the London Borough of Enfield and (c) London who have left the profession in the last (i) one, (ii) two and (iii) five years.

Information on the school workforce, including the number of teachers leaving service nationally, is published in the ‘School Workforce in England’ statistical publication here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/school-workforce-in-england.

The table below provides the full-time equivalent (FTE) number of qualified teachers leaving, and the leaving rate, from state funded schools in the London Borough of Enfield, London (inner and outer) and England for academic years 2016/17 to 2020/21 (the latest data available). The requested figures by parliamentary constituency are not available.

Full-time equivalent (FTE) qualified teachers leaving and leaving rate1 from state-funded schools as at November 2016 to 2020

Enfield local authority

London (inner & outer)

England

Leavers

Leaving rate

Leavers

Leaving rate

Leavers

Leaving rate

2020/212

283

9.0

7,052

9.7

36,262

8.1

2019/20

234

7.6

6,064

8.5

32,249

7.3

2018/19

334

10.6

8,115

11.4

41,150

9.4

2017/18

298

9.6

8,296

11.7

43,102

9.8

2016/17

353

10.8

9,090

12.6

46,667

10.6

Source: School Workforce Census

1: Leaving rate is the number of leavers divided by the total number of qualified teachers in post in November each year

2: For example, 2020/21 leavers are those who left service between November 2020 and November 2021.

Leavers are defined as qualified teachers leaving the state funded sector in England, for example due to a change of career or joining other UK education sectors and those leaving on career breaks such as maternity leave or secondments outside of the school sector. Some of these teachers may re-join a state funded school in England at a later date.

Almost 9 in 10 (87.5%) teachers who qualified in 2020 were still teaching one year after qualification, and just over two thirds (68.8%) of teachers who started teaching five years ago are still teaching.

As at November 2021 (latest data available) there were 465,500 FTE teachers working in state funded schools in England, of which 75,700 were in inner and outer London and 3,200 were in Enfield. This is an increase of 4,400 since the previous year (7,000 increase in London and 120 in Enfield).

One of the Department’s priorities is to ensure that we continue to attract, retain and develop the highly skilled teachers needed to inspire the next generation.

The Department has set out a range of measures to make teaching an increasingly attractive profession, including bursaries worth up to £27,000 and scholarships worth up to £29,000, to encourage talented trainees to key subjects such as mathematics, physics, chemistry, and computing for those starting teacher training in 2023/24.

In addition, through the Department’s Levelling Up Premium, specialist teachers in the first five years of their career will be able to receive up to £3,000 tax-free each year from 2022/23 to 2024/25.

The Department has made good progress towards raising starting salaries to £30,000, with all new teachers to earn at least £28,000 from September – an 8.9% uplift, alongside a 5% pay award for more experienced teachers and leaders.

The Department is taking action to improve teacher quality and pupil outcomes by transforming the training and support provided for teachers, and attracting more people to teaching and enabling them to succeed.

The Department will deliver 500,000 teacher training and development opportunities by 2024, giving all teachers and headteachers access to world class, evidence based training and professional development at every stage of their career.

The Department has made a pay offer to unions that was fair, reasonable, and recognised teachers’ hard work. As per the Department’s published calculations, the pay offer would also have been fully funded, and we welcome the Office for Statistics Regulation’s recognition that we have communicated this transparently.

Just last week, thousands of schools received additional funding, as part of the extra £2 billion of funding the Department is providing both this year and next. As a result, school funding will be at its highest level in history next year, as measured by the Institute for Fiscal Studies.

26th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many defibrillators have been delivered to state funded schools in (a) Enfield North constituency and (b) Enfield Council in 2023.

On 20 January 2023, the Department announced that the first deliveries of defibrillators had taken place. More information on the announcement can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/defibrillator-deliveries-begin-for-all-schools-that-need-one.

Since this announcement, as part of the ongoing rollout, the Department has delivered over 3,900 defibrillators to state funded schools.

As of 27 April 2023, 20 defibrillators have been delivered to state funded schools in Enfield North constituency and 32 to schools in Enfield Local Authority. All eligible schools in Enfield are expected to receive a defibrillator by the end of the 2022/23 academic year. Schools will be contacted by the supplier, Lyreco, once their defibrillator has been dispatched.

20th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many Degree Apprenticeships were (a) advertised and (b) completed in (i) Enfield North constituency, (ii) the London Borough of Enfield and (iii) London in each of the last five years.

The table below provides details of degree-level apprenticeship (Level 6 and 7) vacancies in Enfield North, the London Borough of Enfield, and London that were advertised on the Find an Apprenticeship (FAA) service on GOV.UK in each of the last five years.

The department encourages employers to advertise on FAA to maximise engagement with their vacancies and to ensure that they are accessible to all potential apprentices, but not all choose to use the service. Employers may choose to recruit apprentices through their own channels, such as their own websites, which we do not monitor. The figures below therefore do not represent the total number of degree-level apprenticeship vacancies advertised.

​Academic Year

​Number of Level 6 and 7 Apprenticeship Vacancies Advertised on the FAA Website

Enfield North

Enfield

London

​2017/18

0

0

580

​2018/19

low

low

1240

​2019/20

low

low

990

​2020/21

low

10

1130

​2021/22

10

10

3060

The table below provides details of degree-level apprenticeships that have been achieved in each of the last five years.

​Academic Year

​Number of Level 6 and 7 Apprenticeship Achievements[1]

Enfield North

Enfield

London

​2017/18

low

low

10

​2018/19

low

low

50

​2019/20

low

10

450

​2020/21

low

20

1,160

​2021/22

20

50

1,790

Between the 2017/18 and 2021/22 academic years. there have been 230, 690, and 22,230 degree-level apprenticeship starts in Enfield North, Enfield, and London respectively. Level 6 and 7 apprenticeship standards range from one to five years in duration and typically take three to four years to complete.

[1] The vacancy region is based on the postcode of the vacancy whereas the achievement/start region is based on an apprentice’s home postcode. The data is rounded to the nearest ten. ‘Low’ indicates fewer than five.

Robert Halfon
Minister of State (Education)
18th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many and what proportion of teachers in (a) primary and (b) secondary schools do not have qualified teacher status in Enfield North constituency.

Information on the school workforce in England is published in the annual ‘School Workforce in England’ national statistics release, available at: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/school-workforce-in-england.

The number of teachers without qualified teacher status in all state funded schools in England, including a breakdown by primary and secondary, and by local authority, is available at: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/data-tables/permalink/29d83b82-2aba-44c7-bb82-08db371944c7.

Data relating to schools in individual constituencies can be found in the ‘teacher and support staff numbers by school’ file, within the additional supporting files section, available at: https://content.explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/api/releases/0728fb07-f014-492c-aac9-fd11bb441601/files/2dfcc772-c410-46ac-cb9d-08da713e9200.

There are 24,000 more teachers now than in 2010. The quality of teaching is the most important in school factor in improving outcomes for children, especially for those from disadvantaged backgrounds. Evidence is clear that high quality professional development can lead to improved pupil attainment.

The Department has invested in transforming training for teachers and head teachers. Every teacher and head teacher now has access to high quality, evidence based training and professional development at every stage of their career, starting with initial teacher training (ITT).

By 2024, a reformed ITT provider market will be delivering quality assured training leading to qualified teacher status (QTS) that places a greater emphasis than ever before on embedding structured practice into courses, ensuring trainees are ready to thrive in the classroom.

A new system of higher quality training provider partnerships will be supported by £36 million to introduce new Quality Requirements, including better training for mentors and the delivery of new, cutting edge, intensive training, and practice activity. Every teaching school hub will be involved in ITT to ensure that training places are available across the country.

QTS is considered desirable for teachers in most schools in England. In some schools, including academies, free schools, and independent schools, QTS is not a legal requirement. Academies have a fundamental freedom to employ talented people who do not necessarily have QTS.

Most teachers in all schools, including academies, have QTS and have undertaken initial teacher training. In the 2021/22 academic year, the latest data available, 14,771 teachers (headcount) did not have qualified teacher status, equivalent to 2.9% of teachers.

18th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many hours of (a) mathematics, (b) English, (c) sciences, and (d) modern foreign languages were taught in secondary schools by teachers who neither had a relevant A-level or higher qualification in Enfield North constituency in the last 12 months for which data are available.

Information on the school workforce in England, including subjects taught in state funded secondary schools, is collected as part of the annual School Workforce Census each November. Information is published in the ‘School Workforce in England’ statistical publication, available at: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/school-workforce-in-england.

The total number of hours taught for each subject are available at: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/data-tables/permalink/38de2951-c92c-46e4-39fb-08db371965b6.

The proportion of those hours that were taught by teachers without a relevant A level or higher level qualification are available at: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/data-tables/permalink/ee831a35-e304-4821-bb6a-08db371944c7.

Timetabled teaching is reported for a typical week in November, as determined by the school. It does not cover an entire year of teaching. If there are variations in timetabling across the year, this is not covered in the data available to the Department. To reduce the burden during the COVID-19 pandemic, schools and Local Authorities were not required to provide information on teacher qualifications in the 2020 census.

Data on the subject taught is only collected from secondary schools that use electronic timetabling software that can produce data in the format required. Data is then weighted to provide national totals. Breakdowns by Local Authority and parliamentary constituency are, therefore, not available.

18th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many hours of teaching were delivered by supply teachers in (a) primary and (b) secondary schools in Enfield North constituency in the last 12 months for which data are available.

The information requested on the hours of teaching delivered by supply teachers is not held by the Department.

Information on the state funded school workforce in England, including the hours spent teaching subjects in a typical week in secondary schools, is collected as part of the annual School Workforce Census each November, and published in the annual ‘School Workforce in England’ national statistics release, available at: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/school-workforce-in-england. Information on subjects taught is only collected from a sample of secondary schools and the data does not identify whether the teacher was a supply teacher. Information on the hours spent teaching subjects is not collected from primary schools.

18th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps her Department is taking to ensure that schools provide effective support for children with Education, Health and Care plan in (a) Enfield North constituency, (b) the London Borough of Enfield and (c) London.

The department is committed to ensuring that children and young people with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND), wherever they live, get the support they need, including those with Education, Health and Care (EHC) plans.

The SEND and Alternative Provision (AP) Improvement Plan outlines the department’s mission to create a single, national SEND and AP system with the proposal to develop national standards a fundamental part of this. The standards will set out what support should be available and who is responsible for providing it, to give families confidence and clarity on how the needs of children and young people will be met. As these standards will apply nationally. London and more specifically the London Borough of Enfield, including the Enfield North constituency, are automatically included.

The plan also sets out proposals to improve the assessment and planning process for EHC plans, by introducing standardised forms and processes and supporting guidance to provide greater consistency.

Quality teaching and support is vital for all children with SEND to reach their potential. The department will introduce a new leadership level Special Educational Needs Co-ordinator National Professional Qualification for schools. We are also taking steps to build teacher expertise in meeting the needs of children with SEND through a review of the Initial Teacher Training Core Content Framework and Early Career Framework.

Furthermore, high needs funding to support children and young people with complex SEND is rising to £10.1 billion in the 2023/24 financial year, an increase of over 50% compared to the 2019/20 financial year. Of this, London Borough of Enfield’s high needs funding allocation for the 2023/24 financial year will be £76 million, an 11.5% per head increase compared to the amount of high needs funding allocated in the 2022/23 financial year.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
18th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many defibrillators have been delivered to state funded schools in (a) Enfield North constituency and (b) the London Borough of Enfield in 2023.

On 20 January 2023, the Department announced that the first deliveries of defibrillators had taken place. More information on the announcement can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/defibrillator-deliveries-begin-for-all-schools-that-need-one.

Since the announcement, the Department has delivered over 3,500 defibrillators to state funded schools.

As of 19 April 2023, 20 defibrillators have been delivered to state funded schools in Enfield North, 4 to schools in Enfield Southgate and 8 to schools in Edmonton. This covers all constituencies in the London Borough of Enfield. All eligible schools in the London Borough of Enfield are expected to receive a defibrillator by the end of the 2022/23 academic year. Schools will be contacted by the supplier, Lyreco, once their defibrillator has been dispatched.

The Department would again like to express thanks to Mark King and the Oliver King Foundation.

14th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent assessment she has made of the impact of delays experienced in getting a diagnosis of autism on parents' ability to apply for an Educational, Health and Care Plan.

The department recognises that there can be long waits for autism assessments. In 2023/24 there is national funding from government of £4.2 million to improve services for autistic children and young people, including to continue to transform and develop autism assessment and diagnosis and/or pre- and post-diagnostic support to children and young people (aged 0-25), and to support the continuation of the Autism in Schools programme.

Additionally, NHS England has recently published a national framework to deliver improved outcomes in all-age autism assessment pathways and the Operational Guidance to deliver improved outcomes in all-age autism assessment pathways.

The department is committed to ensuring children who need education, health and care (EHC) plans are supported. The Special Educational Needs and Disabilities Code of Practice is clear that, whilst the application for an EHC needs assessment requires evidence to proceed and that a diagnosis would be considered in this way, it is not a requirement for a formal diagnosis to be made before this process can begin. Where an NHS diagnosis has not been received, the assessment process can still be started and an EHC plan put in place.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
27th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the SEND and alternative provision improvement plan, published on 2 March 2023, when she plans to respond to the consultation on the schools National Funding Formula in 2023.

As set out in the Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) and Alternative Provision (AP) Improvement Plan, published on 2 March 2023, the Government response to the consultation on the schools National Funding Formula will be published in spring 2023.

27th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the SEND and alternative provision improvement plan, published on 2 March 2023, when updated Ofsted and CQC Area SEND inspections will be delivered in 2023.

Ofsted and the Care Quality Commission’s (CQC) joint area special educational needs and disabilities inspections activity, commenced in January 2023 and will continue on a continuous cycle in line with their published framework and handbook.

Ofsted and CQC intend that every local area will receive their first full inspection under the new framework within five years. Some areas might receive a second inspection and/or monitoring visit within that timeframe, depending on their first inspection outcome. The guidance can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/area-send-framework-and-handbook/area-send-inspections-framework-and-handbook.

These inspections will place greater emphasis on the outcomes that are being achieved for children and young people and look more closely at children under five and those aged 16-25 years old. They will also include alternative provision (AP) for the first time. The first inspection reports are expected to be published in spring 2023.

Ofsted and CQC will also undertake a series of thematic visits, with the first set focusing on AP. The outcome is expected to be published in autumn 2023. The guidance for thematic reviews of AP in local areas is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/thematic-reviews-of-alternative-provision-in-local-areas.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
27th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the SEND and alternative provision improvement plan, published on 2 March 2023, what steps her Department plans to take to ensure parents are supported to (a) understand and (b) contribute to the new education health care plans.

The proposal to standardise education, health and care (EHC) plans set out in the special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) and alternative provision (AP) green paper was broadly popular, and the department has committed to delivering standardised EHC plans by 2025.

Children, young people and their families must be at the heart of these reforms. The department has already sought views from children and young people, sector experts and practitioners on the principles of a standardised EHC plan template, working with the Council for Disabled Children.

The department will continue to work in partnership with local authorities, professionals and others who use the SEND and AP system so that we hear as many views as possible on standardised templates and understand user needs. We will consider how to support all users, particularly children, young people and families, so that they benefit fully from the improvements.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
27th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the SEND and alternative provision improvement plan, published on 2 March 2023, if she will list the stakeholders who will be consulted on the new standardised education health and care plans.

The proposal to standardise education, health and care (EHC) plans set out in the special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) and alternative provision (AP) green paper was broadly popular, and the department has committed to delivering standardised EHC plans by 2025.

Children, young people and their families must be at the heart of these reforms. The department has already sought views from children and young people, sector experts and practitioners on the principles of a standardised EHC plan template, working with the Council for Disabled Children.

The department will continue to work in partnership with local authorities, professionals and others who use the SEND and AP system so that we hear as many views as possible on standardised templates and understand user needs. We will consider how to support all users, particularly children, young people and families, so that they benefit fully from the improvements.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
27th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the SEND and alternative provision improvement plan, published on 2 March 2023, when her Department plans to roll out the new standardised education health and care plans.

The proposal to standardise education, health and care (EHC) plans set out in the special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) and alternative provision (AP) green paper was broadly popular, and the department has committed to delivering standardised EHC plans by 2025.

Children, young people and their families must be at the heart of these reforms. The department has already sought views from children and young people, sector experts and practitioners on the principles of a standardised EHC plan template, working with the Council for Disabled Children.

The department will continue to work in partnership with local authorities, professionals and others who use the SEND and AP system so that we hear as many views as possible on standardised templates and understand user needs. We will consider how to support all users, particularly children, young people and families, so that they benefit fully from the improvements.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
27th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the document entitled Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) and Alternative Provision (AP) Improvement Plan, published on 2 March 2023, what steps she plans to take to monitor the implementation of the National Special Educational Needs and Alternative Provision Standards.

In the Special Educational Needs and Disabilities and Alternative Provision Improvement Plan, the department set out the mission for more children and young people to have their needs met effectively in mainstream settings, reducing reliance on education, health and care plans to access support.

We will improve mainstream education through setting standards for early and accurate identification of need, and timely access to support to meet those needs. The standards will include clarifying the types of support that should be ordinarily available in mainstream settings, who is responsible for securing the support, and from what budgets. This will give parents confidence and clarity on how their child’s needs will be met.

The department wants to ensure National Standards are evidence-based, deliverable, and support financial sustainability. We will test our work with a wide range of stakeholders across education, health, and social care, including to consider the resources required to deliver the National Standards.

The department will embed development of standards in our £70 million Change Programme to ensure the standards can be tested, iterated, and set up for success. We will publish a significant proportion of the National Standards by the end of 2025.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
27th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the document entitled Special Educational Needs and Disabilities and Alternative Provision Improvement Plan, published on 2 March 2023, whether she plans to provide additional funding to support services to deliver the National Special Educational Needs and Alternative Provision Standards.

In the Special Educational Needs and Disabilities and Alternative Provision Improvement Plan, the department set out the mission for more children and young people to have their needs met effectively in mainstream settings, reducing reliance on education, health and care plans to access support.

We will improve mainstream education through setting standards for early and accurate identification of need, and timely access to support to meet those needs. The standards will include clarifying the types of support that should be ordinarily available in mainstream settings, who is responsible for securing the support, and from what budgets. This will give parents confidence and clarity on how their child’s needs will be met.

The department wants to ensure National Standards are evidence-based, deliverable, and support financial sustainability. We will test our work with a wide range of stakeholders across education, health, and social care, including to consider the resources required to deliver the National Standards.

The department will embed development of standards in our £70 million Change Programme to ensure the standards can be tested, iterated, and set up for success. We will publish a significant proportion of the National Standards by the end of 2025.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
27th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the document entitled Special Educational Needs and Disabilities and Alternative Provision Improvement Plan, published on 2 March 2023, what estimate she has made of when the National Special Educational Needs and Alternative Provision Standards will be published.

In the Special Educational Needs and Disabilities and Alternative Provision Improvement Plan, the department set out the mission for more children and young people to have their needs met effectively in mainstream settings, reducing reliance on education, health and care plans to access support.

We will improve mainstream education through setting standards for early and accurate identification of need, and timely access to support to meet those needs. The standards will include clarifying the types of support that should be ordinarily available in mainstream settings, who is responsible for securing the support, and from what budgets. This will give parents confidence and clarity on how their child’s needs will be met.

The department wants to ensure National Standards are evidence-based, deliverable, and support financial sustainability. We will test our work with a wide range of stakeholders across education, health, and social care, including to consider the resources required to deliver the National Standards.

The department will embed development of standards in our £70 million Change Programme to ensure the standards can be tested, iterated, and set up for success. We will publish a significant proportion of the National Standards by the end of 2025.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
27th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many staff were employed to support pupils with special educational needs and disabilities in the London Borough of Enfield in each year since 2010 for which records are available.

The department is committed to ensuring that all pupils, including those with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND), can reach their potential and receive excellent support from their teachers.

Alongside excellent teachers, teaching assistants play an important role supporting pupils with SEND to fulfil their potential in mainstream and special schools.

Information on the school workforce in England is collected as part of the annual School Workforce Census each November. Information is published in the ‘School Workforce in England’ statistical publication, available at: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/school-workforce-in-england.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
27th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the SEND and alternative provision improvement plan published on 2 March 2023, how the new standardised EHCP process will support people who do not have access to digital technologies.

The proposals to introduce a standardised education, health and care (EHC) plan template and digitise the associated processes, set out in the Special Education Needs and Disabilities (SEND) and Alternative Provision Improvement Plan, committed to delivering standardised EHC plans by 2025 and to continue work on developing digital requirements.

The department will work in partnership with those who use the SEND system, including parents, carers, children and young people, local authorities, to hear as many views as possible. We will also ensure that accessibility for all groups is considered, including those who do not speak English as their first language.

For the proposals regarding digital EHC plan systems, this will also include considering access to technology.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
27th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the SEND and alternative provision improvement plan, published on 2 March 2023, how the new standardised EHCP process will support parents who do not speak English as their first language.

The proposals to introduce a standardised education, health and care (EHC) plan template and digitise the associated processes, set out in the Special Education Needs and Disabilities (SEND) and Alternative Provision Improvement Plan, committed to delivering standardised EHC plans by 2025 and to continue work on developing digital requirements.

The department will work in partnership with those who use the SEND system, including parents, carers, children and young people, local authorities, to hear as many views as possible. We will also ensure that accessibility for all groups is considered, including those who do not speak English as their first language.

For the proposals regarding digital EHC plan systems, this will also include considering access to technology.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
27th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the SEND and alternative provision improvement plan published on 2 March 2023, what the new approaches to funding alternative provisions will be.

The department will work with the sector to develop new approaches to funding alternative provision, to ensure any new approaches are inclusive, sustainable, and effective. This includes plans to design and test reforms, through our Change Programme, to inform future choices about delivery and put the system on a more efficient and financially sustainable footing.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
27th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the document entitled Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) and Alternative Provision (AP) Improvement Plan, published on 2nd March 2023, when her Department plans to introduce local SEND and alternative provision partnerships.

The Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) and Alternative Provision (AP) Change Programme’s Regional Expert Partners will support areas to design and test local area partnerships from spring 2023. Non-statutory guidance will be published in autumn 2023, outlining the full detail of the expectations for local SEND and AP partnerships, including clear roles and responsibilities for the partnership collectively and the partners individually.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
27th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the Special Educational Needs and Disabilities and Alternative Provision Improvement Plan Right Support, Right Place, Right Time, published on 2 March 2023, when her Department plans to publish guidance to support effective transitions between all stages of education.

The Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) and Alternative Provision (AP) Improvement Plan, published on 2 March 2023, outlines the government’s mission to establish a single, national SEND and AP system. The plan can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/send-and-alternative-provision-improvement-plan/send-and-alternative-provision-roadmap.

Alongside this, the department published a roadmap which summarises the actions set out in the Improvement Plan to improve the SEND and AP system in England. The roadmap can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/send-and-alternative-provision-improvement-plan/send-and-alternative-provision-roadmap.

As part of this roadmap, the department is committed to publishing guidance to support effective transitions between all stages of education, and into employment and adult services, by the end of 2025.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
27th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the document entitled Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) and Alternative Provision (AP) Improvement Plan, published on 2nd March 2023, when her Department plans to review social care legislation relating to disabled children.

The department has accepted the recommendation of the Independent Review of Children’s Social Care for the Law Commission to review children's social care legislation for disabled children. We recognise that the current legal framework can make it difficult for families to understand what they are entitled to. We are in preliminary discussions with the Law Commission about the parameters and timing of such a review, and we will work with the Law Commission to conclude the review as soon as practicable.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
27th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the SEND and alternative provision improvement plan published on 2 March 2023, how often the National SEND and Alternative Provision Implementation Board will publish updates on progress in delivery against this Plan for children, young people and parents.

The department will set out further details in due course on when the National Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) and Alternative Provision (AP) Implementation Board will publish updates on progress in delivery against the SEND and AP Plan for children, young people and parents.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
27th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the SEND and alternative provision improvement plan, published on 2 March 2023, what recent discussions she has had with the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care on that Department's approach to SEND workforce planning.

The department recognise that children and young people with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) frequently require access to additional support from a broad specialist workforce across education, health and care. Ministers have regular discussions on cross-government policy issues, such as the commitments set out in the SEND and Alternative Provision (AP) Improvement Plan. The Improvement Plan, which was published on 2 March 2023, was jointly signed by my right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education, and my right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State of Health and Social Care, and set out that both departments will work together to take a joint approach to SEND workforce planning. We will establish a steering group in 2023 to oversee this work, which will feed into the National SEND and AP Implementation Board. The Board will be jointly chaired by Education and Health ministers.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
27th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the SEND and alternative provision improvement plan, published on 2 March 2023, what steps her Department plans to take to support the London Borough of Enfield through the Delivering Better Value and the Safety Valve programmes.

​​The department is committed to ensuring that all children with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) receive the support they need to realise their potential.

High needs funding to support children and young people with complex SEND is rising to £10.1 billion in the 2023/24 financial year, which is an increase of over 50% compared to 2019/20. Of this, Enfield Council’s high needs funding allocation for 2023/24 will be £76 million, an 11.5% per head increase compared to the amount of high needs funding allocated in the 2022/23 financial year.

The department is also currently working with Enfield Council as part of the Delivering Better Value in SEND programme, which aims to support up to 55 local authorities, and their partners, to improve the delivery of SEND services for children and young people, while functioning sustainably.

Enfield Council is currently engaged in Phase One of the programme, which focuses root cause diagnostics to identify the highest impact changes that can be made to improve outcomes for children and young people with SEND, and improve financial sustainability for local authorities.

Following the Phase One diagnostics, the local authority will create a plan to deliver improvements across their local systems and following a successful grant application, will receive funding from the department. This funding will assist with implementation and ongoing support as they move into Phase Two of the programme.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
27th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps her Department is taking to ensure that children with special educational needs in Enfield have adequate levels of support.

​​The department is committed to ensuring that all children with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) receive the support they need to realise their potential.

High needs funding to support children and young people with complex SEND is rising to £10.1 billion in the 2023/24 financial year, which is an increase of over 50% compared to 2019/20. Of this, Enfield Council’s high needs funding allocation for 2023/24 will be £76 million, an 11.5% per head increase compared to the amount of high needs funding allocated in the 2022/23 financial year.

The department is also currently working with Enfield Council as part of the Delivering Better Value in SEND programme, which aims to support up to 55 local authorities, and their partners, to improve the delivery of SEND services for children and young people, while functioning sustainably.

Enfield Council is currently engaged in Phase One of the programme, which focuses root cause diagnostics to identify the highest impact changes that can be made to improve outcomes for children and young people with SEND, and improve financial sustainability for local authorities.

Following the Phase One diagnostics, the local authority will create a plan to deliver improvements across their local systems and following a successful grant application, will receive funding from the department. This funding will assist with implementation and ongoing support as they move into Phase Two of the programme.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
27th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate she has made of the (a) number and (b) proportion of students with special educational needs that are attending the most appropriate early years setting for their needs.

The department recognises that high-quality childcare supports children’s development and prepares younger children for school. It also gives parents the ability to balance work and family life.

As announced in the 2023 Spring Budget, the department is removing one of the biggest barriers to parents working by vastly increasing the amount of free childcare that working families can access.

From April 2024, working parents of two-year-olds can access 15 hours of free childcare per week (38 weeks a year), from September 2024 this will be extended to parents of nine month to three-year-olds, and from September 2025 working parents of nine month to three-year-olds will be able to access 30 free hours per week (38 weeks a year). Information on the current childcare offer can be found at: www.childcarechoices.gov.uk.

Local authorities have a statutory duty under section 7 of the Childcare Act 2006 to secure early education places free of charge for all eligible children. It is for parents and carers to choose a childcare provider that best meets their child’s needs.

The ‘Education provision: children under 5 years of age’ publication identifies that in 2022, there were 84,539 three and four-year-olds with special education needs and disabilities (SEND) registered for the 15-hour entitlement, which equates to 7% of the registered 15-hour entitlement population for this age group. There were 11,590 three and four-year-olds with SEND registered for the entitlement 30-hour entitlement (3.3% of the registered 30-hour entitlement population for this age group), and 5,496 two-year-olds with SEND were registered for the 15-hour entitlement in 2022 (4.1% of the registered 15-hour entitlement population for this age group). This information can found at: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/education-provision-children-under-5.

The SEND and Alternative Provision (AP) Improvement Plan, published on 2 March 2023, sets out how an effective single national SEND and AP system will be delivered. The plan can found here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/1139561/SEND_and_alternative_provision_improvement_plan.pdf. Many of the proposals in the Improvement Plan will include early years education, including the funding the department is providing to train up to 5,000 early years Special Educational Needs Co-Ordinators (SENCOs) to gain an accredited Level 3 Early Years SENCO qualification.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
8th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps her Department has taken since the Women’s Health Strategy to ensure that girls and boys receive high quality, evidence based education from an early age on (a) fertility, (b) contraception and (c) pregnancy planning, maternity care and pregnancy loss.

The Department of Health and Social Care published the first ever government-led Women’s Health Strategy for England in Summer 2022. This sets out a 10 year ambition for boosting the health and wellbeing of women and girls.

To support women’s health, in September 2020 the Government made relationships education compulsory for primary school pupils, relationships and sex education compulsory for secondary school pupils, and health education compulsory for all pupils in state funded schools.

The relationships, sex and health education statutory guidance states that pupils should be taught factual knowledge around sex, sexual health, and sexuality, set firmly within the context of relationships. This statutory guidance can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/relationships-education-relationships-and-sex-education-rse-and-health-education.

Within the topic ‘intimate and sexual relationships, including sexual health’, pupils should learn about human fertility and reproduction, pregnancy, sexually transmitted infections and contraception and sexual health advice. Schools have the flexibility to teach about a wide range of topical subjects, including maternity care and pregnancy loss.

To support teachers to deliver these topics safely and with confidence, the Department has produced relationships, sex and health education teacher training modules that are free to download. These are available at: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/teaching-about-relationships-sex-and-health. The content of the intimate and sexual relationships module was informed by subject experts, including the National Children’s Bureau and Public Health England, now the Office for Health Improvement and Disparities.

24th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if she will make an assessment of the potential impact of the proposed redundancies of (a) academic and (b) administrative staff at Birkbeck College on the quality of (i) teaching, (ii) outcomes for students and (iii) research undertaken by the university.

Higher education (HE) providers are independent institutions, responsible for their own decisions on staffing issues, including how they structure themselves to deliver research and teaching priorities. Where it is necessary to reshape their activities, it is important that universities carefully consider the impact of job losses on staff and students and the overall sustainability of teaching and research in this country.

Robert Halfon
Minister of State (Education)
17th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what plans her Department has to ensure children with speech and language challenges benefit from programmes to support literacy and numeracy.

The Schools White Paper, published in March 2022, sets out the Department’s policies to improve literacy and numeracy.

Since its launch in 2018, the English Hubs programme has provided targeted support to several thousands of schools across England. The 34 English Hubs in the programme are primary schools which are outstanding at teaching early reading. Over 1,000 schools which were underperforming in phonics have received intensive support, reaching approximately 50,000 pupils in Reception and Year 1. In addition to this, more than 5,000 schools have been supported through medium level support, which provides schools with targeted support, continuing professional development opportunities, and workshops focused on phonics and the teaching of early reading.

The Department is continuing to support and enhance mathematics teaching through the national network of 40 school led Maths Hubs, which are helping local schools improve the quality of their mathematics teaching based on best practice, covering all regions of England. This includes the £100 million Teaching for Mastery programme, which is bringing training on mastery teaching to 11,000 schools across England by 2023.

The Department published a list of approved phonics programmes in 2021 to support schools in choosing a phonics programme. This is together with the provision of £4 million additional funding in the 2021/22 academic year to eligible schools to support them in obtaining validated phonics schemes, whilst committing a further £8.7 million in the 2022/23 academic year to extend this nationwide. In 2021, the ‘Reading framework: teaching the foundations of literacy’ was published. This defines best practice for teachers and school leaders, and the introduction of specialist training to drive better literacy through a new National Professional Qualification for Leading Literacy and a new National Professional Qualification for Early Years Leadership.

Guidance has been published to support teachers in planning and prioritising the mathematics curriculum from Key Stage 1 to 3, which can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/teaching-mathematics-in-primary-schools and here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/teaching-mathematics-at-key-stage-3. This is alongside the establishment of two new support schemes through the Maths Hubs programme that will reach thousands of schools within their first year alone.

The Department will also be funding up to £180 million in the Early Years workforce, including training for Early Years practitioners to support literacy and numeracy teaching.

The Department recognises the importance of speech and language in young people’s development and has funded £17 million to deliver the Nuffield Early Language Intervention programme, which supports children in Reception with their language ability. Over two thirds of eligible mainstream primary schools are taking part in this evidence based programme, benefitting around 90,000 children who are most in need of language support. Providing support for early language is a founding aim of the English Hub programme. In January 2023, the Hubs will begin delivering a new early language support scheme to schools which has been designed by Hubs and external experts.

17th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to his Departments policy paper entitled Opportunity for all: strong schools with great teachers for your child, published March 2022, what steps her Department is taking to help 90 per cent of children reach the expected standards in literacy and numeracy.

The Schools White Paper, published in March 2022, sets out the Department’s policies to improve literacy and numeracy.

Since its launch in 2018, the English Hubs programme has provided targeted support to several thousands of schools across England. The 34 English Hubs in the programme are primary schools which are outstanding at teaching early reading. Over 1,000 schools which were underperforming in phonics have received intensive support, reaching approximately 50,000 pupils in Reception and Year 1. In addition to this, more than 5,000 schools have been supported through medium level support, which provides schools with targeted support, continuing professional development opportunities, and workshops focused on phonics and the teaching of early reading.

The Department is continuing to support and enhance mathematics teaching through the national network of 40 school led Maths Hubs, which are helping local schools improve the quality of their mathematics teaching based on best practice, covering all regions of England. This includes the £100 million Teaching for Mastery programme, which is bringing training on mastery teaching to 11,000 schools across England by 2023.

The Department published a list of approved phonics programmes in 2021 to support schools in choosing a phonics programme. This is together with the provision of £4 million additional funding in the 2021/22 academic year to eligible schools to support them in obtaining validated phonics schemes, whilst committing a further £8.7 million in the 2022/23 academic year to extend this nationwide. In 2021, the ‘Reading framework: teaching the foundations of literacy’ was published. This defines best practice for teachers and school leaders, and the introduction of specialist training to drive better literacy through a new National Professional Qualification for Leading Literacy and a new National Professional Qualification for Early Years Leadership.

Guidance has been published to support teachers in planning and prioritising the mathematics curriculum from Key Stage 1 to 3, which can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/teaching-mathematics-in-primary-schools and here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/teaching-mathematics-at-key-stage-3. This is alongside the establishment of two new support schemes through the Maths Hubs programme that will reach thousands of schools within their first year alone.

The Department will also be funding up to £180 million in the Early Years workforce, including training for Early Years practitioners to support literacy and numeracy teaching.

The Department recognises the importance of speech and language in young people’s development and has funded £17 million to deliver the Nuffield Early Language Intervention programme, which supports children in Reception with their language ability. Over two thirds of eligible mainstream primary schools are taking part in this evidence based programme, benefitting around 90,000 children who are most in need of language support. Providing support for early language is a founding aim of the English Hub programme. In January 2023, the Hubs will begin delivering a new early language support scheme to schools which has been designed by Hubs and external experts.

17th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps her Department is taking to ensure that schools are delivering phonics programmes.

The Schools White Paper, published in March 2022, sets out the Department’s policies to improve literacy and numeracy.

Since its launch in 2018, the English Hubs programme has provided targeted support to several thousands of schools across England. The 34 English Hubs in the programme are primary schools which are outstanding at teaching early reading. Over 1,000 schools which were underperforming in phonics have received intensive support, reaching approximately 50,000 pupils in Reception and Year 1. In addition to this, more than 5,000 schools have been supported through medium level support, which provides schools with targeted support, continuing professional development opportunities, and workshops focused on phonics and the teaching of early reading.

The Department is continuing to support and enhance mathematics teaching through the national network of 40 school led Maths Hubs, which are helping local schools improve the quality of their mathematics teaching based on best practice, covering all regions of England. This includes the £100 million Teaching for Mastery programme, which is bringing training on mastery teaching to 11,000 schools across England by 2023.

The Department published a list of approved phonics programmes in 2021 to support schools in choosing a phonics programme. This is together with the provision of £4 million additional funding in the 2021/22 academic year to eligible schools to support them in obtaining validated phonics schemes, whilst committing a further £8.7 million in the 2022/23 academic year to extend this nationwide. In 2021, the ‘Reading framework: teaching the foundations of literacy’ was published. This defines best practice for teachers and school leaders, and the introduction of specialist training to drive better literacy through a new National Professional Qualification for Leading Literacy and a new National Professional Qualification for Early Years Leadership.

Guidance has been published to support teachers in planning and prioritising the mathematics curriculum from Key Stage 1 to 3, which can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/teaching-mathematics-in-primary-schools and here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/teaching-mathematics-at-key-stage-3. This is alongside the establishment of two new support schemes through the Maths Hubs programme that will reach thousands of schools within their first year alone.

The Department will also be funding up to £180 million in the Early Years workforce, including training for Early Years practitioners to support literacy and numeracy teaching.

The Department recognises the importance of speech and language in young people’s development and has funded £17 million to deliver the Nuffield Early Language Intervention programme, which supports children in Reception with their language ability. Over two thirds of eligible mainstream primary schools are taking part in this evidence based programme, benefitting around 90,000 children who are most in need of language support. Providing support for early language is a founding aim of the English Hub programme. In January 2023, the Hubs will begin delivering a new early language support scheme to schools which has been designed by Hubs and external experts.

21st Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what his timescale is for responding to his Department's consultation on Higher education policy statement and reform, which closed on 6 May 2022.

The department is now considering the views received in the higher education policy statement and reform consultation and plans to publish a response in due course.

21st Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what free childcare is available during the school summer holidays.

The government is providing childcare support in several ways. Support is available through Universal Credit, where working parents on a low income can claim back up to 85% of their childcare costs. Further support is available through Tax-Free Childcare, in which working parents can get up to £2,000 a year per child to pay for childcare, including holiday and out-of-school clubs. This is increased to up to £4,000 a year per child for those with disabilities

The department’s holiday activities and food (HAF) programme also provides free childcare places with healthy meals and enriching activities to children from low-income families, benefiting their heath, wellbeing and learning. The government has committed over £200 million per year for this programme, which is targeted primarily towards children who receive benefits-related free school meals (FSM). Local authorities also have discretion to provide free or subsidised holiday club places for children who are not in receipt of FSM but who the local authority believe could benefit from HAF provision. In summer 2021, the programme reached over 600,000 children and young people in England.

21st Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the impact of school holidays on the ability of parents to secure childcare arrangements.

The government is providing childcare support in several ways. Support is available through Universal Credit, where working parents on a low income can claim back up to 85% of their childcare costs. Further support is available through Tax-Free Childcare, in which working parents can get up to £2,000 a year per child to pay for childcare, including holiday and out-of-school clubs. This is increased to up to £4,000 a year per child for those with disabilities

The department’s holiday activities and food (HAF) programme also provides free childcare places with healthy meals and enriching activities to children from low-income families, benefiting their heath, wellbeing and learning. The government has committed over £200 million per year for this programme, which is targeted primarily towards children who receive benefits-related free school meals (FSM). Local authorities also have discretion to provide free or subsidised holiday club places for children who are not in receipt of FSM but who the local authority believe could benefit from HAF provision. In summer 2021, the programme reached over 600,000 children and young people in England.

30th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the potential impact of provisions in the Schools Bill on home education.

The department has completed all relevant and required impact assessment for the Schools Bill.

The children not in school measures, which are those most likely to impact home educating families, have been subject to a thorough Equalities Impact Assessment. This considers the impact on families with different protected characteristics. The measures have also been subject to a regulatory impact assessment, which looks at the impact measures will have on businesses and charities. A summary of these impact assessments has been published online as part of the Schools Bill impact assessment document. It is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/schools-bill-impact-assessment.

7th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent steps his Department has taken to (a) support schools in Enfield North constituency and (b) tackle regional inequality in school outcomes in the London Borough of Enfield.

The department is pursuing an ambitious programme of work to provide continued support to all schools across the country as well as tackling inequality in outcomes.

The department wants to ensure that children and young people, including in Enfield, leave education better educated, better skilled, and equipped for successful and productive careers. The COVID-19 outbreak has been disruptive, but the department is helping pupils to recover, and support is especially focused on helping the most disadvantaged, vulnerable or those with least time left in education, wherever they live. Almost £5 billion in direct investment has been announced for education recovery. This includes an additional £1.8 billion of funding announced in the recent Spending Review to support young people to catch up on missed education. This is in addition to a strong core funding settlement, which will see core schools funding rise by £4.7 billion by the 2024-25 financial year compared to existing plans. The department’s overall £5 billion direct investment in education recovery includes:

  • funding for up to 100 million tutoring hours for 5-19 year olds
  • multi-year direct funding, so schools can deliver evidence-based interventions based on pupil needs
  • summer schools in 2021
  • extra time in 16-19 education
  • 500,000 training opportunities for school teachers and early years practitioners

We are investing in teachers, tutors and direct funding to schools and colleges, so they can determine how best to support the pupils that most need support, all of which benefits students in Enfield.

This is in addition to the core school funding through the National Funding Formula (NFF) which targets 17% of its funding towards pupils with additional needs, including deprived pupils. This financial year, 2021-22, schools in Enfield North are attracting £5,730 per pupil through the schools NFF. In 2022-23, this NFF funding will increase to £5,879 per pupil. These figures are based on notional school-level NFF allocations. The department does not update constituency figures on actual school-level allocations. The distribution of the additional £1.6 billion for schools and high needs in 2022-23 secured in the Spending Review will be confirmed in due course.

7th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many students have been supported by the National Tutoring Programme in (a) Enfield North and (b) the London Borough of Enfield since November 2020.

National tutoring programme (NTP) participation data has not yet been published. We continue to collect data from schools for all three strands of the programme – school-led tutoring, tuition partners and academic mentors, and will be publishing this in due course.

The NTP aims to engage up to 2 million pupils this year, and to deliver up to 90 million hours of tuition by the 2024/25 academic year.

7th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many schools have been supported by the School Rebuilding Programme in (a) Enfield North constituency and (b) the London Borough of Enfield since June 2020.

Earlier this year, the department announced the first 100 schools in the new School Rebuilding Programme, as part of a commitment to 500 projects over the next decade: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/school-rebuilding-programme/school-rebuilding-programme. There are no schools from the Enfield North constituency or the London Borough of Enfield in the programme. Two schools in the Enfield North constituency and a further two in the London Borough of Enfield have been rebuilt under the Priority School Building Programme.

The department will publish details of how schools will be prioritised for future places in the programme following a review of the results from our recent consultation, which closed on 8 October 2021.

7th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent assessment his Department has made of the adequacy of provision of work experience and careers advice in secondary education in (a) Enfield North constituency, (b) the London Borough of Enfield, and (c) England.

The department recognises that activities involving employers, such as careers insights, mentoring, work tasters and work experience, provide opportunities that are essential for young people to test out different careers, improve their skills and show their commitment and enthusiasm.

Through the Careers and Enterprise Company, we continue to support schools and colleges to provide young people with access to meaningful experiences of the workplace, and the evidence suggests this is working. Careers Hubs are accelerating improvements in careers education and guidance, in line with the Gatsby Benchmarks, which together define what good career guidance looks like. Schools and colleges that have been part of Careers Hubs for the longest achieved 4.8 Gatsby Benchmarks on average, compared with 3.8 for schools and colleges not in a Careers Hub. More than 2,260 (45%) of schools and colleges are part of a Careers Hub.

In September 2021, four Careers Hubs were launched across London to support over 300 schools and colleges across the capital to give young Londoners a head start in finding their next best steps and planning their futures. We know nine schools and colleges across the Borough of Enfield are part of a Careers Hub this year and six of these are in the Enfield North constituency.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
7th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent steps his Department has taken to encourage the uptake of apprenticeships in (a) Enfield North constituency, (b) the London Borough of Enfield and (c) Greater London.

Apprenticeships provide people with the opportunity to earn and learn the skills needed to start an exciting career in a wide range of industries, and we want more people to benefit from high-quality apprenticeships. Since May 2010, there have been 6,900 apprenticeship starts in Enfield North constituency, 18,730 in the London Borough of Enfield and 462,650 in London.

Funding for apprenticeships in England will grow to £2.7 billion by the 2024-25 financial year to support apprenticeships in all employers, including employers that do not pay the levy who will continue to be able to reserve funding for 95% of apprenticeship training and assessment costs.

We are supporting employers to offer new apprenticeship opportunities by extending the higher incentive payment of £3,000 for every new apprentice hired between 1 October 2021 and 31 January 2022, as part of the government's Plan for Jobs. We have seen over 125,000 incentive payments claimed by employers so far (as of 10 November 2021). We also continue to improve apprenticeships by making them more flexible for employers, and by making it easier for employers to make full use of their levy funds.

To encourage more young people to consider apprenticeships, we are promoting apprenticeships at schools in Enfield and London through our Apprenticeship Support & Knowledge programme. This free service providers resources and interventions to help better educate young people about apprenticeships.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
7th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many Sure Start centres have closed or been downgraded in each of the last 10 years in (a) Enfield North, (b) London and (c) England.

Based on the information supplied by local authorities, as of 8 December 2021[1] there were 2,301 children’s centres and 699 children’s centre linked sites[2] open to families and children providing children's centre services as part of a network.

The attached table shows the number of children’s centres sites that have closed in Enfield North, London and England in each year since 2011[3].

The department does not routinely collect data on the services provided by children’s centres. This data is held at a local level.

[1] Source: This is based on information supplied by local authorities to the Get Information about Schools (GIAS) database: https://www.get-information-schools.service.gov.uk and internal management information held by the department on historical children’s centre closure dates as of 8 December 2021. These figures may be different to previous answers, and could change again in future, since local authorities may update their data at any time. The GIAS collects data on children’s centres that local authorities have closed on a permanent basis. It does not collect data on children’s centres that local authorities may have closed temporarily in response to the COVID-19 outbreak.

[2] No data is held on the date a children’s centre converts to a children’s centre linked site, therefore, while a figure for the split between children’s centres and linked sites at the point a query is made can be established, it is not possible to provide a historic breakdown of this figure in previous years.

[3] No closures have been reported in 2021.

7th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent steps he has taken to support nurseries, childminders, and other early years providers in (a) Enfield North, (b) London and (c) England.

The department has spent over £3.5 billion in each of the past three years on early education entitlements, and the government will continue to support families with their childcare costs.

At the Spending Review on 27 October 2021, we announced that we are investing additional funding for the early years entitlements worth £160 million in the 2022-23 financial year, £180 million in 2023-24 and £170 million in 2024-25, compared to the current year. This is for local authorities to increase hourly rates paid to childcare providers for the government’s free childcare entitlement offers and reflects cost pressures as well as anticipated changes in the number of eligible children.

As a result of this additional funding, for 2022-23 we will increase the hourly funding rates for all local authorities by 21p an hour for the two-year-old entitlement and, for the vast majority of areas, by 17p an hour for the three and four-year-old entitlement. We are also increasing the minimum funding floor, meaning no council can receive less than £4.61 per hour for the three and four-year-old entitlements.

We continue to work with the early years sector and officials from the department are in regular telephone and email contact with Early Years Leads in all local authorities in England, including Enfield and the other 32 boroughs in the London region, to understand how they can best be supported to ensure that sufficient safe, appropriate and affordable childcare is available for those who need it now, and for all families who need it in the longer term.

30th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent steps he has taken with the Minister for Women and Equalities to ensure that autistic children are receiving appropriate educational support in (a) Enfield North and (b) the London Borough of Enfield.

The department wants every autistic young person to reach their potential and feel heard at every stage of their life, no matter where they live. That is why, in its first year alone, the department is investing £74 million into our cross-government National Autism Strategy to promote a straightforward route to diagnosis, the correct support, increasing understanding and improving access to a quality education and social care.

In total, £600,000 of this funding has gone towards the department’s contract with the Autism Education Trust (AET) for the 2021/22 academic year. The department has funded the AET since 2011 to deliver autism awareness training to education staff in early years, schools, and further education settings. As the funding is to provide national coverage across the country, rather than specific allocations to regions or local authorities, the department does not have the exact figure for Enfield. However, it has so far reached more than 305,000 people across the country. As well as teachers and teaching assistants, this includes support staff such as receptionists, dining hall staff and caretakers, encouraging a 'whole school' approach to supporting autistic pupils.

In addition to our existing commitments, the department is determined to ensure that the special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) system works more effectively for those children who need extra support, including autistic children. That is why the department is completing the SEND Review, to improve outcomes and build a sustainable SEND system, where there is clear accountability.

15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 20 September 2021 to Question 44463, on Schools: Standards, what the total amount of funding is for each school in Enfield North based on the figure provided of £5,283 per pupil.

Enfield local authority is receiving £5,640 per pupil this financial year (2021-22). This is above the national average in per pupil funding of £5,228.

The average funding per pupil in Enfield North constituency is £5,730 this year. To see individual schools’ notional funding allocations under the national funding formula, please follow this link https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/national-funding-formula-tables-for-schools-and-high-needs-2021-to-2022 and click on the spreadsheet entitled ‘Impact of the schools NFF, 2021 to 2022’.

Please also see the attached spreadsheet, which shows notional funding allocations for each school in Enfield North constituency for financial year 2021-22.

Under the current funding system, schools’ actual allocations are determined by each local authority’s own funding formulae rather than directly through the national funding formula. Actual allocations, at both national and school level, are published on the following link: https://skillsfunding.service.gov.uk/view-latest-funding.

15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to Answer of 15 September to Question 44463, in reference to the pupil premium allocation, if he will publish a breakdown of the £405 million figure for each London Council for the 2021-22 financial year.

Pupil premium allocations for each local authority, including those in Inner and Outer London, are published here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/pupil-premium-allocations-and-conditions-of-grant-2021-to-2022. Please click on the spreadsheet entitled ‘Pupil premium allocations 2021 to 2022: national, local authority, parliamentary constituency level (updated September 2021)’.

15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 20 September 2021 to Question 44463, what amount of the £250 million in teacher quality funding will schools in Enfield North receive.

As part of the education recovery plan, in June 2021 the department announced over £250 million of additional funding to provide 500,000 world-leading training opportunities for teachers and head teachers, at every stage of their career. This additional funding was allocated as follows:

    • £69 million to extend the rollout of the Early Career Framework (ECF) reforms to meet far higher than expected demand for the programme
    • £138 million for National Professional Qualifications (NPQs) to offer all teachers and head teachers access to qualifications to support career development

Of this £250 million in teacher quality funding, calculations are made based on participant numbers, as opposed to being calculated on a per-schools basis, which means funding amounts in each area will depend on schools’ choices of ECF programme and level of NPQ uptake.. This applies to both the ECF funding for early career teachers and mentors, and to participants undertaking a NPQ. Funding for both the ECF and NPQs is calculated per participant and is paid directly to the providers, to reduce the burden on schools.

15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many permanent exclusions per 100 pupils there have been in (a) academies, (b) community schools and (c) private schools in Enfield North constituency in each of last 10 years.

The number of permanent exclusions per 100 pupils there have been in (a) academies and (b) community schools in Enfield North constituency in each of last 10 years is provided in the attached table.

Data on permanent exclusions from private schools is not collected by the department.

15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 15 September 2021 to Question 44466 on Schools and Pay, what assessment his Department has made of the potential impact of public sector pay freezes for 2021-22 on the (a) public sector's ability to recruit and retain the workers it needs to deliver education and (b) delivery and quality of public services.

The pause to headline pay rises for the majority of public sector workforces this academic year (2021/22) is in order to ensure fairness between public and private sector wage growth. The department will reassess the pay policy ahead of the 2022 pay round, taking into account the wider labour market.

Teaching remains an attractive and fulfilling profession. Recent pay awards have helped to increase the competitiveness of teacher pay in the wider labour market. The average pay award for teachers was 2.4% in the 2018/19 academic year, 2.75% in 2019/20, and 3.1% in 2020/21, meaning that the cumulative average pay award for teachers is 8.5% since 2018/19.

The department understands that high-performing teachers drive up pupil attainment and we want schools to be able to reward the best teachers and attract the best graduates into the profession. As a result of the flexible performance-based pay system the department has introduced, schools are able to choose to give teachers or head teachers a higher pay rise where this is appropriate to their particular local context and budget.

The department is committed to providing world-class training and development for teachers. In June, over £250 million of additional funding was announced to help provide 500,000 teacher training opportunities so teachers can access world-leading training appropriate for whatever point they are at in their career, from new teachers to head teachers.

In October, we announced a £129 million investment in recruitment incentives for those starting initial teacher training in the 2022/23 academic year, including tax-free bursaries of up to £24,000 in the highest priority subjects.

7th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to tackle sexual harassment and violence on university campuses.

Any form of harassment, violence or sexual assault is abhorrent and unacceptable anywhere in society, including in our universities. Sexual harassment is in no way tolerable on our campuses and online environments. The government urges university leaders to ensure a zero-tolerance approach to all harassment and sexual misconduct and to ensure they have robust systems in place for reporting incidents where they do occur.

The Office for Students (OfS) statement of expectations on harassment and sexual misconduct was published on 19 April and is a useful tool for providers. As part of its next steps on harassment and hate crime, the OfS will now be considering options for connecting the statement of expectations to its conditions of registration. The OfS wrote to providers on 10 June, asking them to review and update their systems, policies and procedures in line with the statement of expectations on harassment and sexual misconduct by the beginning of the next academic year. I have made it clear that government sees the OfS statement as the minimum that providers should be doing to keep students safe from sexual harassment and misconduct, and to handle reported incidents appropriately when they do occur.

I also wrote to the sector on 2 July reasserting the government’s firm expectations for providers in this space. This includes giving urgent consideration to the OfS request to update their systems. I detailed the way in which the government will legislatively tackle the use of non-disclosure agreements (NDAs) in relation to workers and employers. I also outlined that I have asked officials to explore options for going further in this area in higher education (HE). The use of NDAs in relation to sexual violence, harassment and misconduct is wholly inappropriate.

I am extremely concerned that many of the deeply disturbing testimonies that continue to be posted on the ‘Everyone’s Invited’ website reference experiences within HE settings. I met with the founder of Everyone’s Invited in June, to discuss tackling sexual harassment in HE. I also met with Universities UK (UUK) to discuss this issue, including their existing guidance for providers in this area. I understand they are preparing guidance on staff to student sexual misconduct, which will be published soon.

I know that sexual harassment and misconduct is an area that for several years HE providers, the OfS, the government and sector bodies have been working together on. In 2015, UUK set up a taskforce on harassment at the request of the government. Since 2016, a total investment of £4.7 million, match funded by HE providers, has been invested by the OfS and its predecessor, funding 119 safeguarding projects. £2.45 million of this was given to 63 projects specifically focused on tackling sexual and gender-based violence in HE. In my recent letter to the sector, I highlighted that it may also be timely to revisit the resources produced by these OfS-funded projects relating to this area, available via the following link: https://www.officeforstudents.org.uk/advice-and-guidance/student-wellbeing-and-protection/student-safeguarding-evaluation-and-resources/.

In addition to preventative policies and procedures, we expect providers to ensure that students continue to have access to support services, and complaints processes, during the COVID-19 outbreak, to ensure they are able to report any issues. I will continue to work across government to ensure that sexual harassment is stamped out of our world leading HE sector.

Michelle Donelan
Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology
7th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many meals were delivered to children eligible for free school meals over the 2021 school summer holidays in Enfield North constituency.

Schools provide free school meals for eligible pupils during term time only. Beyond that, billions of pounds of welfare assistance is in place to support families, young people and children.

The department has significantly expanded the Holiday Activities and Food (HAF) programme with a £220 million investment in 2021, building on the pilot programme that has been in place since 2018. The programme ran in every English local authority this summer holiday, providing healthy nutritious food and enriching activities to eligible children.

In addition, the Covid Local Support Grant established by the Department for Work and Pensions, operated through local authorities in England, is there to support the hardest hit families and individuals with food and essential utility costs.

This grant was extended with a further investment of £160 million, to cover the period up to 30 September 2021. This grant is further to the £269 million invested since the scheme (previously known as the Covid Winter Grant Scheme) launched in December 2020. Local authorities have discretion to decide how to allocate this government funding in their areas, recognising that they are best placed to understand local needs.

7th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent estimate his Department has made of the number of Sure Start centres that have (a) closed and (b) reduced the services they provide since 2010.

Based on the information supplied by local authorities as of 31 August 2021, there were 3,000 Sure Start children's centres and sites open to families and children providing children's centre services as part of a network. A total of 637 centres had closed since 2010[1]. The department does not routinely collect data on the services provided by children’s centres. This data is held at a local level.

[1] Source: This is based on information supplied by local authorities on the number of children’s centres in their area to Get Information about Schools (GIAS) database about the location of https://www.get-information-schools.service.gov.uk and internal management information held by the department as of 31 August 2021. These figures may be different to previous answers and could change again in future since local authorities may update their data at any time. The GIAS collects data on children’s centres that local authorities have closed on a permanent basis. It does not collect data on children’s centres that local authorities may have closed temporarily in response to the COVID-19 outbreak.

7th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent steps his Department is taking to support (a) nurseries, (b) childminders and (c) other early years providers in Enfield North.

The government has put unprecedented investment into the early years sector over the last decade, including over £3.5 billion in each of the past 3 years on our early education entitlements, as well as investing £44 million for the 2021/22 financial year, for local authorities to increase hourly rates paid to childcare providers for the government’s free childcare entitlement offers.

In 2017 we introduced Tax-Free Childcare, which is available for parents of children aged 0-11 (or up to 16 if their child is disabled). Tax-Free Childcare uses the same income thresholds as 30 hours free childcare and contributes an additional 20% towards their childcare costs. This scheme can save parents up to £2,000 per year (or up to £4,000 for children with disabilities). In June 2021, 308,000 families used Tax-Free Childcare.

Working parents on a low income may also be eligible for help with up to 85% of their childcare costs (for children under 16) through Universal Credit Childcare. This is subject to a monthly limit of £646 for one child or £1108 for two or more children, payable in arrears.

We have also provided unprecedented support to early years providers during the COVID-19 outbreak, and settings have also had access to a range of business support packages, including the extended Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme. As long as the staff in the nursery schools affected meet the criteria for the scheme, early years providers are still able to furlough their staff while that scheme remains in operation (for example, if settings have to close temporarily to manage local effects of COVID-19, such as infections).

We also have a number of government reforms to support the childminding profession and have made it easier to work as a childminder. These reforms include making it easier for childminders to access government funding, allowing them to work for up to half their time on non-domestic premises, and the creation of childminder agencies details for which can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/childminder-agencies-list-of-agencies.

We continue to work with the early years sector and officials from the Department for Education regularly speak with Enfield Council’s Early Years team to understand how they can best be supported to ensure that sufficient safe, appropriate, and affordable childcare is available for those who need it now, and for all families who need it in the longer term.

7th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he plans to take to improve pay for (a) school staff, (b) teacher agency staff and (c) all other education and school workers.

As set out in the 2020 Spending Review, there will be a pause to headline pay rises for the majority of public sector workforce this academic year. This is in order to ensure fairness between the public and private sector wage growth.

To protect the lowest earners, the School Teachers’ Review Body has recommended a pay award of £250 for all teachers earning less than £24,000 (full time equivalent), with recommended equivalent values for those in the London pay areas, plus the reintroduction of advisory pay points on the Unqualified Teacher pay range. The Government has proposed accepting these recommendations.

Academies have the freedom to set their own pay policies.

The Department will assess the pay policy ahead of the 2022 pay round once the economic recovery is established and the impact of the COVID-19 outbreak on the wider labour market is clearer.

The Department remains committed to increasing the teacher starting salary to £30,000 to make teaching an attractive graduate option. Whilst pay restraint means that progress towards this commitment will be slower, the steps taken in recent years, including the 5.5% uplift to pay in September 2020, have already made a substantial difference to the competitiveness of early career pay.

The rate of pay depends on who employs a supply teacher. State maintained schools or local authorities who directly employ supply teachers must pay in accordance with the statutory arrangements for teachers laid down in the School Teachers’ Pay and Conditions Document. If a supply teacher is employed by a non-maintained school, a multi-academy trust or agency, the employer can set the rates of pay and conditions of employment.

The Government gives schools the freedom to set terms and conditions for teaching assistants according to their own circumstances. Most local authority schools and academies choose to use the local government pay scales to pay their support staff in conjunction with National Joint Council terms and conditions, known as the green book. Given there is no requirement to do this, there is some variability in pay and conditions across the country.

The Government encourages employers to pay their workers more than the statutory minimum where they can afford to, although we recognise the ability to do so will vary across different sectors.

7th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent steps his Department has taken to reduce the attainment gap between state and independent schools in (a) Enfield North constituency, (b) London and (c) England.

Since 2010, this government has been committed to raising educational standards in all state schools across the country. In March 2020, 86% of schools were Good or Outstanding compared to just 68% in 2010. When it comes to raising standards, evidence shows that teachers are the most important in-school factor affecting attainment.

In June 2021, we announced an investment of over £250 million in teacher development , which includes investment in our National Professional Qualification and Early Career Framework programmes. School leadership is the second most important in-school influence on pupil learning. Since 2010 the number of academies has grown from 200 to over 9,400, enabling more leaders of good schools to make decisions based on local need and the interests of their pupils, and more previously underperforming schools to receive the support they need to raise standards for all pupils as part of a strong multi-academy trust.

We know that COVID-19 and disruption to education has created an additional challenge for schools, and that the impact of the COVID-19 has been felt most significantly by disadvantaged pupils, which is why we have targeted much of our education recovery funding specifically at this group. Through the recovery premium, schools will directly receive over £300 million in the 2021/22 academic year for them to use flexibly to support disadvantaged pupils.

This is in addition to the funding we already target towards disadvantaged pupils as part of the National Funding Formula. The pupil premium targets further funding to disadvantaged pupils and plays a crucial role in the work of schools across England, to ensure they have the resources they need to boost the progress and attainment of disadvantaged pupils. Through this, we will be providing £2.5 billion nationally for the 2021/22 financial year. The pupil premium allocation for London is £405 million, and £19.2 million for Enfield for the 2021/22 financial year.

In Enfield, we know there are a higher number of pupils who are eligible for free school meals, with an average of 37.6% of secondary pupils eligible, compared to the national average of 27.7%. This year, Enfield is receiving £283.4 million, or £5,640 per pupil, in funding. This is an increase of 2.0% per pupil in the local authority’s pupil-led funding compared to the 2020/21 financial year, and is above the national average in per pupil funding of £5,228.

6th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent steps his Department has taken to ensure that children with special educational needs and disabilities (a) recover their lost learning and (b) are in receipt of adequate (i) wellbeing, (ii) development and (iii) education services in response to the covid-19 outbreak.

We are committed to helping all pupils, including those with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) in all education settings, make up education lost as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak. We recognise that extended school and college restrictions have had a substantial impact on children and young people’s learning, health and wellbeing, particularly for those with SEND. We are committed to supporting them and their families.

Since June 2020, we have announced more than £3 billion to support education recovery in schools, 16-19 providers, and early years settings, and this will have a material impact in closing gaps that have emerged.

We have consistently prioritised children who attend specialist settings by providing additional uplifts both in the Catch-up Premium in the 2020/21 academic year and now the Recovery Premium in the 2021/22 academic year, in recognition of the significantly higher per pupil costs they face. In mainstream settings, school leaders are able to target these initiatives to vulnerable children and are able to use the Recovery Premium to meet wider non-academic needs. Funding announced for school-led tutoring will also provide greater flexibility to schools and we anticipate that this will especially benefit children and young people with SEND in all settings, where tutors familiar to these children can support them to realise the benefits of tuition. Specialist settings were given an uplift to deliver summer schools, at 3 times the normal rate.

The government is committed to an ambitious, long-term education recovery plan. The next stage will include a review of time spent in school and 16-19 education and the impact this could have on children and young people’s attainment and wellbeing. The findings of the review will inform the Spending Review. We will continue to monitor the impact of COVID-19 on education and consider what more needs to be done to help children and young people, including those with SEND, catch up.

In addition to summer schools this year, a broader programme of summer enrichment activities, including the Holiday Activities and Food programme, ran to support children and young people, and their families.

For pupils and students with SEND in mainstream settings we are investing over £42 million in 2021/22 to continue funding projects that support them.

18th Aug 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will take steps to increase the pay of (a) non-teaching school staff, (b) non-teaching staff in other education settings and (c) employees of teacher supply agencies.

The Department does not set pay for non-teaching staff in schools, further education colleges or teacher supply agencies. Employers have the flexibility to determine the most appropriate pay and conditions to suit their circumstances.

Most schools and further education colleges use the local government pay scales in conjunction with the National Joint Council terms and conditions, known as the Green Book. Employers are required to pay at least the statutory minimum wage, and the Department encourages employers to pay more when they can afford to do so.

30th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many and what proportion of children were eligible for free school meals in Enfield North constituency in each of the last five years.

The number and proportion of children who are eligible for and claiming free school meals in Enfield North and for England for each of the last 5 years are provided in the attached table. The department does not hold information on the number of pupils living in poverty.

30th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent estimate he has made of the number and proportion of children who are (a) eligible for free school meals and (b) living in poverty; and if he will make a statement.

The number and proportion of children who are eligible for and claiming free school meals in Enfield North and for England for each of the last 5 years are provided in the attached table. The department does not hold information on the number of pupils living in poverty.

26th Apr 2021
What assessment he has made of the financial effect on (a) students and (b) schools of the Government's decision to base pupil premium allocations for 2021-22 on the October 2020 school census.

Pupil premium rates will be maintained in 2021-22. We expect to increase pupil premium funding nationally to over £2.5 billion, and a typical school can expect an increase in their pupil premium funding. Data is not yet available on the impact of using the October 2020 census to determine eligibility. Basing pupil premium funding for 2021-22 on October 2020 census data, instead of using the January census, brings the pupil premium in line with how the rest of the core schools’ budget is calculated and provides earlier clarity for schools on their allocations.

Pupil premium will continue to be based on “Ever6 FSM”, whereby all pupils eligible for free school meals (FSM) at the time of the October census, or at any point in the previous six years, will attract pupil premium funding. As a result, we expect a typical school to see an increase in pupil premium funding from 2020-21 to 2021-22 as more children have become eligible for FSM as a result of the impact of the COVID-19 outbreak. We will confirm pupil premium allocations for the financial year 2021-22 in June 2021.

Alongside the pupil premium, we also intend to change the date for the FSM6 factor in the schools national funding formula (NFF). Without a change in dates, the FSM6 factor in the 2022-23 NFF would be based on January 2020 census data. Using the October 2020 census data instead will shorten the FSM6 funding lag in the NFF by nine months, and increase the amount of funding allocated through the FSM6 factor in 2022-23, as FSM eligibility increased significantly between January and October last year.

In addition to pupil premium funding, on 24 February 2021 the Government also announced a further £700 million package on top of the £1 billion COVID-19 catch-up already provided. This package includes £302 million for a one-off recovery premium which will be allocated to schools based on the same methodology as the pupil premium. In this way, schools with more disadvantaged pupils will receive larger amounts. The recovery premium also includes a “floor” to ensure that no primary school will receive less than £2000 and no secondary school less than £6000.

15th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many (a) schools and (b) pupils in Enfield North have requested but not received (i) laptops and (ii) other technology required for remote learning during the January 2021 covid-19 lockdown.

The Government is investing over £400 million to support access to remote education and online social care services, by securing 1.3 million laptops and tablets for disadvantaged children and young people. As of Monday 18 January, over 800,000 laptops and tablets had been delivered to schools, trusts and local authorities.

The number of devices available to each school, trust and local authority is determined by their number of children eligible for free school meals. All schools, trusts and local authorities have now been given the opportunity to order their full current allocation of devices.

The Government is providing this significant injection of devices on top of an estimated 2.9 million laptops and tablets already owned by schools before the start of the COVID-19 outbreak. On 12 January, we announced that we will be providing a further 300,000 devices over the course of this term.

Figures on the number of devices delivered is available at: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/laptops-and-tablets-data/2021-week-3. These figures are broken down by local authority and academy trust. Figures on delivery by constituency are not available.

We have also partnered with the UK’s leading mobile operators to provide free data to help disadvantaged children get online as well as delivering 4G wireless routers for pupils without connection at home. Routers have been distributed to schools, trusts and local authorities, who are responsible for allocating them to the families that need them most.

12th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to help ensure the safety of staff at early years settings during the covid-19 lockdown announced in January 2021.

Early years settings remain low risk environments for children and staff. The department has worked collaboratively with Public Health England (PHE) to develop a system of controls which, when implemented in line with a revised risk assessment, create an environment where the risk of transmission of infection is substantially reduced for children and staff.

Current evidence suggests that the PHE endorsed ‘system of controls’ that have been in use throughout the COVID-19 outbreak continue to be the right measures to take. These are set out in ‘Actions for early years and childcare providers during the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak’, which includes:

  • minimising contact with individuals who are unwell,
  • use of face coverings for adults in corridors and communal areas,
  • cleaning hands and good respiratory hygiene,
  • regular thorough cleaning,
  • minimising contact,
  • use of PPE where specifically advised,
  • good ventilation.

Further guidance can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-early-years-and-childcare-closures/coronavirus-covid-19-early-years-and-childcare-closures.

Settings must comply with health and safety law, which requires them to assess risks and put in place proportionate control measures. Settings should thoroughly review their health and safety risk assessment and draw up plans on re-opening, in the event that they have to close. Settings should have active arrangements in place to monitor that the controls are effective, working as planned, and updated appropriately, for example when any issues are identified, or when there are changes in public health advice.

When conducting risk assessments, settings should ensure consideration is given to staff and children with protected characteristics from groups where a disparity has been shown by the review of disparities in risks and outcomes (for example, age and sex, where someone lives, deprivation, ethnicity and/or people’s occupation).

The department is continuing to work closely with colleagues across government and local authorities to secure the most effective approach to asymptomatic testing for the whole of the early years sector. We are rolling out our asymptomatic testing programme to primary schools with deliveries of test kits which started from the week commencing 18 January 2021. The Department for Education’s asymptomatic testing programme will offer all primary school, schools-based nursery and maintained nursery school staff home lateral flow device test kits for twice weekly testing. This will help to break the chains of transmission of COVID-19 in education settings by identifying asymptomatic positive cases. Those who test positive will then self-isolate, helping to reduce transmission of the virus.

In addition, community testing programmes are currently being rolled out across the country. They are led by local authorities and provide asymptomatic testing through testing sites based in the local community. This testing is primarily focused on those who have to leave home to work during lockdown, with local authorities able to focus on the right people in their areas and decide how the testing is best delivered. The purpose is to help people who are playing essential roles to keep the country going, and to give them knowledge to protect themselves, loved ones and colleagues. Local authorities are in different stages of delivering community testing. We have encouraged local authorities to prioritise early years for community testing.

Early years staff, as critical workers, continue to have priority access to Department of Health and Social Care-led symptomatic polymerase chain reaction testing via the online portal: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/coronavirus-covid-19-getting-tested.

We are having ongoing discussions about providing testing via the education testing programme as well as encouraging local authorities to consider prioritising appropriate testing for private, voluntary and independent settings and childminders via the community testing programme, which is being rolled out to all local authorities. Furthermore, regarding vaccinations, the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) advises that the first priorities for the COVID-19 vaccination programme should be the prevention of mortality and the maintenance of the health and social care systems. As the risk of mortality from COVID-19 increases with age, prioritisation is primarily based on age.

Under the priority groups for the first phase of vaccine rollout, those over 50 years of age, and all those 16 years of age and over in a risk group, would be eligible for vaccination within the first phase of the programme. This prioritisation captures almost all preventable deaths from COVID-19.

Regarding the next phase of vaccine rollout, the JCVI have asked that DHSC consider occupational vaccination in collaboration with other government departments. The department is inputting into this cross-governmental exercise.

7th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what additional financial support his Department has allocated to schools in Enfield to support (a) cleanliness and hygiene and (b) the recruitment of supply teachers in cases where teachers are having to self-isolate since the start of the covid-19 outbreak.

The first window for schools to claim funding back for exceptional costs incurred due to the COVID-19 outbreak, between March and July 2020, closed on 21 July. Payments against claims made within the published scope of the fund were made to schools and academies in September. Schools in Enfield have received the following payments for additional cleaning costs required due to confirmed or suspected COVID-19 cases, over and above the cost of existing cleaning arrangements.

School Name

Local Authority

Additional Cleaning Costs Claim

Eversley Primary School

Enfield

£ 16,394

Russet House School

Enfield

£ 10,061

Durants School

Enfield

£ 8,461

Garfield Primary School

Enfield

£ 8,103

Meridian Angel Primary School

Enfield

£ 4,233

De Bohun Primary School

Enfield

£ 3,534

The Raglan Junior School

Enfield

£ 3,426

Waverley School

Enfield

£ 3,391

Bush Hill Park Primary School

Enfield

£ 2,920

Forty Hill CofE Primary School

Enfield

£ 1,958

Oakthorpe Primary School

Enfield

£ 1,813

Suffolks Primary School

Enfield

£ 1,619

Highfield Primary School

Enfield

£ 1,505

Latymer All Saints CofE Primary School

Enfield

£ 1,488

St John and St James CofE Primary School

Enfield

£ 1,416

West Grove Primary School

Enfield

£ 1,294

Alma Primary School

Enfield

£ 1,282

St Anne's Catholic High School for Girls

Enfield

£ 1,250

Keys Meadow Primary School

Enfield

£ 1,155

St Andrew's CofE Primary School

Enfield

£ 1,105

Worcesters Primary School

Enfield

£ 1,064

Houndsfield Primary School

Enfield

£ 998

Raynham Primary School

Enfield

£ 790

Wilbury Primary School

Enfield

£ 750

Galliard Primary School

Enfield

£ 750

Fleecefield Primary School

Enfield

£ 750

Brettenham Primary School

Enfield

£ 750

St Andrew's Southgate Primary School (CE)

Enfield

£ 511

St Michael at Bowes CofE Junior School

Enfield

£ 284

Hadley Wood Primary School

Enfield

£ 113

Schools can now claim for any costs that fell between March and July in the same approved categories, for which they did not claim during the first window. Schools can make claims here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/claiming-exceptional-costs-associated-with-coronavirus-covid-19/exceptional-costs-associated-with-coronavirus-covid-19--2.

In addition to this, the Department has announced details of a new COVID-19 workforce fund for schools and colleges to help them remain open: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-workforce-fund-for-schools/coronavirus-covid-19-workforce-fund-to-support-schools-with-costs-of-staff-absences-from-1-november-2020-to-31-december-2020. It will fund the costs of teacher absences over a threshold in schools and colleges, and is intended for those with high staff absences that are also facing significant financial pressures. The Department expects schools to be able to claim for workforce costs relating to November and December 2020 in spring 2021. Schools will be able to incur additional costs, backdated to November, in the knowledge that they will be reimbursed if they meet the relevant criteria.

19th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much his Department has spent on (a) consultancy services including (i) communications, (ii) advertising, (iii) marketing and (iv) media buying since 1 March 2020.

From 1 March to 20 November 2020, the Department spent £13.3 million on paid-for communications and campaigns activity, including spend on creative, production, agency fees and paid-for media. Of this, a total of £8.42 million was spent specifically on advertising media buying. It is not possible to break down spend separately by i) communications or iii) marketing as these definitions include several areas of overlapping activity.

Of the £13.3 million spent between 1 March and 20 November 2020, an estimated £526,924 was spent on consultancy services to help plan and deliver communication, advertising, marketing campaigns and to inform media buying. It is not possible to provide separate costs for each category requested as these services inform a range of activity delivered as part of broader campaign strategies.

This activity includes vital work to recruit 30,000 teachers a year and drive the uptake of apprenticeships and the new T level qualification. All our paid-for campaigns are agreed with and regularly assessed by the Cabinet Office to ensure effectiveness.

The Department’s work covers a number of manifesto commitments and is central to my right hon. Friend, the Prime Minister’s levelling up agenda, in addition to the Government's response to the COVID-19 outbreak including the continuity of education as a national priority. With almost a million staff working in state funded schools in England, 66,000 staff in the further education sector, and 4.2 million households across the country with primary school aged children, the Department must explain policy to our key audiences, influence attitudes and change behaviour through targeted external communications, advertising and marketing campaigns to achieve publicly stated policy objectives.

28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether he plans to provide a financial support package for (a) childminders, (b) nurseries and (c) other Early Years Foundation Stage childcare providers when they re-open during the covid-19 outbreak.

Nurseries, childminders and pre-schools, who have provided crucial support throughout the COVID-19 outbreak, are now more vital than ever as hard-working families begin returning to work.

We want to provide security to nurseries and childminders who are open for the children who need them. That is why on 20 July we announced that we will continue to fund childcare at the same level as before the COVID-19 outbreak, until the end of the year. This will give nurseries and childminders another term of secure income, regardless of whether fewer children are attending. Despite the COVID-19 outbreak, early years settings will continue to benefit from a planned £3.6 billion funding in 2020-21 to create free early education and childcare places for children.

In addition to this, the government has provided a package of support for individuals and businesses which are directly benefitting providers of childcare. This includes business rates relief and grants, the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme, the Business Interruption Loan Scheme and the furlough scheme to retain staff, up to the proportion of their salary bill that would be considered as paid from public funding. More details are available here:
https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/financial-support-for-businesses-during-coronavirus-covid-19.

26th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when his Department will commence the delivery of laptops and other school equipment to Enfield Council, as part of the Government's programme to provide technology support for children and schools during the covid-19 outbreak.

The Government has committed over £100 million to support vulnerable and disadvantaged children in England to access remote education and social care services, including by providing laptops, tablets and 4G wireless routers.

We are providing laptops and tablets to disadvantaged children who would otherwise not have access and are preparing for examinations in year 10, receiving support from a social worker or are a care leaver. Where care leavers, children with a social worker at secondary school and children in year 10 do not have internet connections, we are providing 4G wireless routers.

The Department has ordered over 200,000 laptops and tablets and allocated devices to local authorities and academy trusts based on its estimates of the number of eligible children that do not have access to a device. Local authorities and academy trusts are best placed to identify and prioritise children and young people who need devices. All local authorities and academy trusts have been invited to place their orders. Laptops, tablets and 4G wireless routers will arrive within five days of an order being placed.

The Department has published information about how many laptops, tablets and 4G wireless routers we have delivered or dispatched to local authorities and academy trusts in total which can be viewed here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/laptops-tablets-and-4g-wireless-routers-progress-data. This includes 723 laptops and 149 4G wireless routers dispatched to Enfield Council on 18 June.

1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what guidance the Government has provided for teachers returning to work who live with (a) partners and (b) children with (i) asthma, (ii) chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or (iii) another health concern categorised as at risk from covid-19.

Guidance on GOV.UK on implementing protective measures in schools and nurseries provides advice to staff and pupils who are shielding or clinically vulnerable, or are living with a shielded or clinically vulnerable person: That guidance can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-implementing-protective-measures-in-education-and-childcare-settings/coronavirus-covid-19-implementing-protective-measures-in-education-and-childcare-settings.

Clinically vulnerable people are those considered to be at a higher risk of severe illness from COVID-19. This includes anyone who has asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

Clinically vulnerable people have been advised to take extra care in observing social distancing and should work from home where possible. Schools should endeavour to support this, for example by asking staff to support remote education, carry out lesson planning or other roles which can be done from home. If clinically vulnerable individuals cannot work from home, they should be offered the safest available on-site roles, staying 2 metres away from others wherever possible.

If a member of staff lives with someone who is clinically vulnerable (but not clinically extremely vulnerable) they can attend their school or nursery.

Some people have been informed that they are clinically extremely vulnerable and have been advised to follow shielding guidance. They should therefore not attend work. Some people with severe COPD or severe asthma may have been classed as clinically extremely vulnerable, and will have received a letter informing them of this.

If a member of staff member lives in a household with someone who is extremely clinically vulnerable, it is advised they only attend work if stringent 2m distancing can be adhered to. If it cannot be adhered to, we do not expect those individuals to attend and they should be supported to work at home.

Detailed guidance on shielding and protecting people who are clinically extremely vulnerable from COVID-19 is available on GOV.UK: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/guidance-on-shielding-and-protecting-extremely-vulnerable-persons-from-covid-19/guidance-on-shielding-and-protecting-extremely-vulnerable-persons-from-covid-19#work-and-employment-for-those-who-are-shielding.

6th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what deadline his Department has set for appeals to be heard following the issuance of exam grades and assessments at the end of the 2019-20 academic year.

This is a matter for the Office of Qualifications and Examinations Regulation (Ofqual) and I have asked its Chief Regulator, Sally Collier, to write directly to the Honourable Member. A copy of her reply will be placed in the House of Commons Library.

5th May 2020
What steps he is taking to ensure that the attainment gap between disadvantaged children and their peers does not widen during the covid-19 outbreak.

The government has already committed over £100 million to boost remote education, including by providing devices and internet access to vulnerable children who need it most.

Schools also continue to receive the pupil premium – worth around £2.4 billion annually – to help them support their disadvantaged pupils.

7th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what information her Department holds on the level of illegal waste disposal in (a) Enfield North constituency, (b) the London Borough of Enfield and (c) London in the last 12 months.

In the last 12 months the Environment Agency (EA) has received six reports of illegal waste disposal in the London Borough of Enfield. There were three reports of small-scale burning which were all referred to the council, and where two addresses were identified as carrying out burning, letters were sent. There was one small-scale fly tipping incident in the N9 area which was also referred to Enfield Council due to the impact on the highways, and two major fly tipping incidents in the N11 and N18 areas. The EA currently has no outstanding investigations in the illegal disposal of waste in the Enfield area.

The EA continues to work closely with internal and external stakeholders across London and the Southeast to initiate partnership solutions to the multi-faceted issues we deal with, often involving significant investigations of various strands to not only disrupt criminal activity but to hold to account those responsible.

In addition, local authorities are required to report fly-tipping incidents and enforcement actions to Defra, which we publish annually here.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
13th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many sewage releases there have been in (a) Enfield North constituency, (b) the London Borough of Enfield and (c) London in (i) 2023 and (ii) 2022.

Event Duration Monitoring (EDM) provides information on when and for how long sewage discharges have occurred. All EDM data is published online (opens in a new tab) annually since 2020. The 2022 data was published in March 2023 (opens in a new tab). The full EDM data set for 2023 will be published by the Environment Agency in March 2024.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent steps she has taken to help tackle waste crime in Enfield North constituency.

The Government is committed to tackling waste crime, which is a blight on our local communities and the environment and damages legitimate businesses. We have strengthened regulators' powers, are tightening the law and have increased the Environment Agency's budget by £10 million per year to make it harder for rogue operators to find work in the sector and easier for regulators to take action against criminals. The Prime Minister’s Anti-Social Behaviour Action Plan set out how we will support councils across the country to take tougher action against those who fly-tip such as by raising the upper limit on fixed penalty notices to £1,000, which we did earlier this year. As part of the plan, we have also published league tables showing which councils are issuing the most and least fixed penalties in relation to fly-tipping.

The Environment Agency continues to work in partnership with the local authority in tackling waste crime, including investigating two large fly-tips in North Enfield.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
5th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps her Department is taking to help ensure the preservation of green spaces within (a) Enfield North constituency, (b) the London Borough of Enfield and (c) London.

The Government recognises the importance of providing access to the outdoors for people’s health and wellbeing and is working to ensure this is safe and appropriate. We committed in our Environmental Improvement Plan to work across government to help ensure that everyone lives within 15 minutes’ walk of a green or blue space.

The Government is delivering a number of policies to protect access to green spaces including in urban areas. Examples of these include:

  • Delivering the £9m Levelling Up Parks Fund to improve green space in over 100 disadvantaged neighbourhoods in the UK.
  • The launch of the Green Infrastructure Framework: Principles and Standards for England in January 2023 which shows what good green infrastructure looks like and will help local authorities, developers and communities to improve provision in their area.
  • Local Nature Recovery Strategies will identify locations where action for nature recovery would be particularly beneficial, encouraging the creation of more green spaces, including in urban areas.

In Enfield, Natural England is working with the Council in developing its local plan to create high quality places that tackle climate change, the nature emergency, inequalities, and promote health and well-being. This will also help Enfield to embed Natural England’s Green Infrastructure Standards into the plan and supporting documents.

In addition Enfield has been awarded £500,000 from the Landscape Recovery Scheme to support schemes to restore nature, reduce flood risks and boost biodiversity include creating hundreds of hectares of woodlands and grassland, wetlands and restore rivers and expanding the Enfield Chase Restoration Project. Natural England are also working with the London Borough of Enfield on a new Countryside Stewardship scheme.

19th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many dogs were seized by the police by breed in each year since 2013.

The police are not required to report this to us, and we do not hold this data. Any information on the seizure of dogs will be held by individual local authorities and police forces.

25th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how much her Department has spent on reducing air pollution in (a) Enfield North constituency and (b) the London Borough of Enfield in each of the last five years.

The Mayor of London is responsible for air quality in the capital and has devolved powers under the Environment Act 1995 allowing him to require London boroughs to take action to address local air pollution. The provision of funding to tackle air pollution is also devolved to the Mayor of London.

Additionally, Defra’s annual Air Quality Grant is open to all English councils. Under the grant, councils can submit bids for projects to help them develop and implement locally targeted air quality measures. In 2023, London Borough of Enfield Council, which includes the Enfield North Constituency, received £223,500 to fund a project reducing pollution outside schools.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent steps she has she has taken to tackle waste-related crime in (a) Enfield North constituency and (b) London.

The Government is committed to tackling waste crime, which is a blight on our local communities and the environment and damages legitimate businesses. We have strengthened regulators' powers, are tightening the law and have increased the Environment Agency's budget by £10 million per year to make it harder for rogue operators to find work in the sector and easier for regulators to take action against criminals. We are also providing grants to councils across the country to help them purchase equipment to tackle fly-tipping. Recipients include London Borough of Newham Council and London Borough of Waltham Forest Council.

The Environment Agency is aware of recent suspected large scale illegal deposits of waste in the Enfield area. Those suspected of being involved are subject to Operation Angola and an investigation into this group is ongoing. The Environment Agency also has ongoing investigations into large scale organised illegal depositing of waste and are progressing several major cases one of which is going through the court system at this time. All reports of waste related crime are recorded on the Environment Agency National Incident Recording System and investigated in order of seriousness.

In the South London area (that also includes Kent), Environment Agency investigations to date have resulted in 20 successful prosecutions. Active on-going investigations are targeting priority offenders linked to large scale illegal disposal of waste with a current focus in Kingston, Croydon and Sutton. These investigations are being undertaken with partner organisations such as the police and local authorities.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps she is taking to protect access to (a) green spaces and (b) Greenways in (i) Enfield North constituency and (ii) London.

The Government recognises the importance of providing access to the outdoors for people’s health and wellbeing and is working to ensure this is safe and appropriate. We committed in our Environmental Improvement Plan to work across government to help ensure that everyone lives within 15 minutes’ walk of a green or blue space.

The Government is delivering a number of policies to protect access to green spaces including in urban areas. Examples of these include:

  • Delivering the £9m Levelling Up Parks Fund to improve green space in over 100 disadvantaged neighbourhoods in the UK.
  • The launch of the Green Infrastructure Framework: Principles and Standards for England in January 2023 which shows what good green infrastructure looks like and will help local authorities, developers and communities to improve provision in their area.
  • Local Nature Recovery Strategies will identify locations where action for nature recovery would be particularly beneficial, encouraging the creation of more green spaces, including in urban areas.
  • Implementing a number of rights of way reforms which will streamline the process for adding new or lost footpaths to the rights of way network.

Local highway authorities are responsible for the management and maintenance of existing public rights of way and are required to keep a Rights of Way Improvement Plan (ROWIP) to plan improvements to the rights of way network in their area. This must include an assessment of the local rights of way including the condition of the network.

In Enfield, Natural England is working with the Council in developing its local plan to create high quality places that tackle climate change, the nature emergency, inequalities, and promote health and well-being. This will also help Enfield to embed Natural England’s Green Infrastructure Standards into the plan and supporting documents.

In addition Enfield has been awarded £500,000 from the Landscape Recovery Scheme to support schemes to restore nature, reduce flood risks and boost biodiversity include creating hundreds of hectares of woodlands and grassland, wetlands and restore rivers and expanding the Enfield Chase Restoration Project.

24th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment she has made of trends in the level of households in (a) Enfield North constituency, (b) the London Borough of Enfield and (c) London that have fallen into arrears with their water bill payments in the last (a) six and (b) 12 months.

We do not track households that have fallen into arrears with their water bill payments; this would be undertaken by water companies. However, I am very mindful that consumers are concerned about their bills. All water companies offer WaterSure and social tariffs to help reduce bills for households who struggle to pay their bills in full. Water companies also offer a range of financial support measures to assist households to better manage their budgets and provide flexible payments including payment holidays, bill matching, benefit entitlement checks and money/debt advice referral arrangements. The Government expects water companies to continue to actively engage with households and inform them of support measures they offer.

I encourage customers to access the Consumer Council for Water’s Advice Hub, which has information and useful tools to help customers reduce their bills or access financial support.

To support people with the cost of living, the Government has put in place a substantial package of support. Further information can be found here: Cost of living support - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
20th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many farms in Enfield North constituency are part of the Sustainable Farming Incentive.

As of 21 April 2023 there is one farm in Enfield North that has a Sustainable Farming Incentive agreement.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
20th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many farms in Enfield North constituency are part of Countryside Stewardship scheme.

As of 21 April 2023 there are two farms in Enfield North that have Countryside Stewardship agreements.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
10th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when he plans to publish the National Air Pollution Control Plan.

A consultation on a revised National Air Pollution Control Plan was launched on 25th July 2022 and closed on the 4th September 2022. The responses to the consultation are currently being carefully considered.

23rd Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps he is taking to ensure an adequate food supply in the context of potential shortages.

The UK has a highly resilient food supply chain which is well equipped to deal with situations with the potential to cause disruption. The recently published Government Food Strategy sets out a plan to transform our food system to ensure it is fit for the future. Responding to recent events, the Food Strategy puts food security at the heart of the Government's vision for the food sector. The strategy sets out ambitions to boost food production in key sectors with post-Brexit opportunities and create jobs, with a focus on skills and innovations to level-up across the country.

The UK's high degree of food security is built on supply from diverse sources, strong domestic production as well as imports through stable trade routes. We produce 60% of all the food we need, and 74% of food which we can grow or rear in the UK for all or part of the year, and these figures have changed little over the last 20 years. In addition, the UK has nearly 100% sufficiency in poultry, carrots and swedes. UK consumers have access through international trade to food products that cannot be produced here, or at least not on a year-round basis. This supplements domestic production, and also ensures that any disruption from risks such as adverse weather or disease does not affect the UK's overall security of supply.

The UK Government has well established ways of working with the industry and with the Devolved Administrations to monitor risks that may arise. This includes extensive, regular and ongoing engagement in preparedness for, and response to, issues with the potential to cause disruption to food supply chains. The capability, levers and expertise to respond to disruption lie with industry. They have highly resilient supply chains, and this was proven in the initial COVID-19 response. The Government's role is to support and enable an industry-led response.

Victoria Prentis
Attorney General
3rd Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent steps his Department has taken to tackle nitrogen pollution.

The Government has made ambitious commitments to improve the environment, including air and water quality. Addressing nitrogen pollution remains a priority for delivering these commitments and we are taking steps to achieve this.

We are taking action to address pollution from agriculture by utilising a suite of effective advice programmes, incentives, and regulations. Recent actions include but are not limited to a near doubling of funding for the Catchment Sensitive Farming Programme; providing financial support for positive action from farmers, such as through the Countryside Stewardship scheme and the Farming Equipment and Technology Fund; and promoting compliance with regulation by allocating £1.2 million to the Environment Agency to recruit an additional 50 inspectors. We continue to review and consider options to deliver our commitments in this area.

In addition, we are helping to tackle local nitrogen dioxide exceedances for air quality by providing £880 million to help local authorities develop and implement local air quality plans.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
29th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of the findings of the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds report entitled Mind the Gap, published in November 2021; and what steps he is taking to improve agricultural policy to protect hedgerows and wildlife in the UK.

While no formal assessment of the report has been made, we agree about the value of hedgerows to our countryside. Hedgerows provide vital resources for mammals, birds and insect species, and they also act as wildlife corridors, allowing dispersal between isolated habitats. Many are also important historical and cultural landscape features.

Legal protection for hedgerows in England and Wales is provided by the Hedgerows Regulations 1997. These regulations prohibit the removal of most countryside hedgerows (or parts of them) without first seeking approval from the local planning authority. It decides whether a hedgerow is ‘important’ and should not be removed because of its wildlife, landscape, historical or archaeological value.

Alongside the Hedgerows Regulations, all wild birds, their eggs and their nests are protected, under the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981, making it an offence to kill, injure or take wild birds or to take or damage their eggs and nests. This provides important protections for farmland birds.

Hedgerows are also protected by standards under cross compliance. As we move away from cross compliance, we have committed to maintaining our high environmental standards. Our new environmental land management schemes will continue to recognise the role and fund the management of hedgerows. The hedgerow standard, part of the new Sustainable Farming Incentive scheme, will pay farmers to plant more hedgerows, leave them uncut or raise the cutting height, and buffer them from agricultural operations.

We will also continue to keep our domestic regulatory standards under review, raising standards sustainably and as needed over time, as new research and evidence emerge.

Victoria Prentis
Attorney General
19th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent steps he has taken to tackle drain blockages and fatbergs.

Defra is considering a range of options to tackle drain blockages and fatbergs. My officials are working to assess the effects of wet wipes containing plastic on sewers and identify possible solutions. The incorrect disposal of wet wipes can be one of the main causes of sewer blockages. Wipes often then combine with fats, oil and grease, which are also often disposed of down sinks into drains, and combine to form fatbergs.

Defra also continues to encourage the water industry and wet wipe manufacturers to work together to raise consumer awareness about the appropriate disposal of wet wipes and other non-flushable products. This will be crucial for generating meaningful behavioural change with consumers and customers.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
19th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Business, Energy, and Industrial Strategy on accurately labelling (a) sanitary and (b) toilet products in respect to whether they are flushable.

In line with our Resources and Waste Strategy for England, we are considering the best approach to minimising the environmental impact of a range of products, including absorbent hygiene products, taking on board the environmental and social impacts of the options available.

There are a number of policy measures available to us, including standards and consumer information, as well as encouraging voluntary action by business. We are seeking powers through the Environment Bill that will enable us to, where appropriate and subject to consultation, introduce eco-design and consumer information requirements including labelling schemes that provide accurate information to consumers, to drive the market towards more sustainable products. The water industry has developed their ‘Fine to Flush’ standard for wet wipe products and Defra is considering a range of policy options to tackle the issue.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
19th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent steps he has taken to prevent deterioration in river wildlife; and what resources he will provide to local authorities in England to protect and restore water habitats.

River basin management plans (RBMPs) set out objectives and put in place measures to protect, enhance and manage our surface waters, including the conservation objectives for protected sites. The 2015 RBMPs confirmed £3 billion investment over the period to 2021. In England this has led to over 11,000km of surface water being enhanced since the 2015 plans were published. The next update of the plans has just been published for consultation by the Environment Agency (EA) and I encourage local authorities and all interested parties to engage in that process.

Many of our rivers are designated as protected sites, in whole or in part, in view of their national and/or international importance. These provisions provide a high level of protection but also rely on a broad range of complementary measures to secure their conservation, often at the catchment scale. These measures are an important part of river basin planning.

In addition, Defra and the EA are working together to tackle the main pressures affecting the water environment and freshwater habitats. We are tackling river and lake pollution from poor farming practice with regulation, financial incentives and educational schemes for farmers. Water company investment in environmental improvements has been scaled up to £7.1 billion over the period 2020-25. The storm overflow task force and new measures through the Environment Bill will focus effort on reducing harms from storm overflows and our new chemicals strategy will build on an already robust statutory regime to ensure chemicals are managed and handled safely. We will also be setting at least one new, legally binding target on water quality through the Environment Bill.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
19th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent steps his Department has taken to help ensure untreated sewage is not discharged into rivers in Enfield North constituency.

We have made it crystal clear to water companies that they must reduce significantly sewage discharges from storm overflows as a priority. The draft Strategic Policy Statement to Ofwat sets out our expectation that companies work to significantly reduce storm overflows for the first time and we expect funding to be approved for water companies to be able to do so. We have announced that we’ll put that instruction on a statutory footing with a new duty on water companies to reduce progressively impacts of sewage discharges.

We are also already taking action through the Environment Bill and have introduced a range of new legally binding commitments on both water companies and Government to tackle this issue.

The Environment Bill includes the following new duties directly on water companies to:

  • publish statutory Drainage and Sewerage Management Plans, for the first time, setting out how they will reduce overflows, as well as detailing other improvements, and provides the power for Government to direct companies if these plans are inadequate;
  • monitor water quality up and downstream of areas potentially affected by discharges;
  • publish data on storm overflow operation on an annual basis;
  • publish near real time information - within 1 hour - on the operation of storm overflows.

We are also taking action to challenge underperforming companies and are working hard to drive up monitoring and transparency to tackle non-compliance and pollution incidents, including through the work of the Storm Overflows Taskforce.

The Storm Overflows Taskforce, launched last year, is continuing to push forward work with industry, and we won’t hesitate to hold companies to account where necessary. Earlier this year Southern Water was handed a record-breaking £90 million fine, and Thames Water was fined £4 million and £2.3 million for separate incidents.

Furthermore, the Government has committed to publish a plan next September to set out the detail of how we expect water companies to achieve significant reductions in sewage discharges and the harm they cause.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will make an estimate of the (a) quantity of food produced in the UK that was wasted in each of the last five years and (b) environmental and economic cost of that waste.

Defra funds the Waste and Resources Action Programme (WRAP) to produce periodic estimates of UK food waste levels post-farm-gate. Whilst the next report is not due until 2022, previous reports show significant reductions:

  • 2007 - 11.2 million tonnes
  • 2015 - 10 million tonnes
  • 2018 - 9.5 million tonnes

WRAP estimate that this waste has an economic value of £19 billion.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether his Department has taken recent steps to help ensure that fresh, nutritious, unsold food is diverted to charities supporting vulnerable families.

The safe and speedy redistribution of surplus food is a priority, be it from retail, manufacture or the hospitality and food service sector, which all may have their own issues and challenges in their supply chains. Defra supports a range of action to overcome these challenges, reduce food waste and help get more surplus food to charities.

Since 2017 Defra has made a series of grants available to help the redistribution sector. In total nearly £12m has been awarded to over 250 large and small redistribution organisations across the country for the provision of for example warehousing, vehicles, fridges and freezers.

We continue to support WRAP and the Courtauld 2030 redistribution working group that seeks to overcome barriers to redistribution. The most recent outputs from the group is the publication of new guidance on storing surplus food; best practice on redistributing own brand products and the tool Framework for Effective Redistribution.

We remain committed to the WRAP led Food Waste Reduction Roadmap which supports business to target, measure and specifically act on reducing food waste for instance by making sure food surplus is redistributed.

The amount of surplus food redistributed in 2020, over 92,000 tonnes, was worth £280 million and was the equivalent of 220 million meals. Since UK-level data was first reported in 2015, overall levels of redistribution have increased three-fold.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
15th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will hold discussions with Ministers of the Department for International Trade on the finding that plastic packaging and bags from seven of the top 10 UK supermarkets have been found at multiple sites across south-west Turkey as set out in Greenpeace’s report, Trashed: how the UK is still dumping plastic waste on the rest of the world, published in May 2021; and if he will make a statement.

It is illegal to export waste from the UK to be dumped or burned overseas. Under the UK legislation on waste shipments, businesses involved in the export of wastes are required to take all necessary steps to ensure that the waste they ship is managed in an environmentally sound manner throughout its shipment and during its recycling. The Environment Agency (EA), as the competent authority for waste shipments for England, has been proactively engaging with the authorities in Turkey on the issue of illegal plastic waste exports over the past year. The Environment Agency has liaised with Greenpeace, following their recent report, in order to seek information which could assist them with their compliance monitoring and enforcement of waste exports to Turkey.

All waste exports need to be made in accordance with the relevant legislation and the UK regulators have a system of inspections in place to verify compliance under the waste exports and packaging regimes respectively. Over the last 12 months, monitoring by the Environment Agency (EA) has had a particular focus on preventing illegal plastic waste exports. In 2020, the EA prevented the illegal export of 46 shipping containers of plastic waste to Turkey, this year they have already prevented the illegal export of 122 containers of plastic waste to Turkey. The EA also currently has four active investigations into illegal waste exports to Turkey. The Environment Agency (EA) has developed a good relationship with the Turkish Ministry of Environment, who have expressed their thanks for the UK’s collaborative approach in preventing illegal exports of waste to Turkey. Turkey has now banned the import of most plastic wastes.

The UK government has pledged to introduce tougher controls on illegal waste exports, and the Environment Bill includes a power to introduce mandatory electronic tracking of waste which will make it harder for criminals to obtain and export waste illegally. We plan to launch a consultation on this in the Autumn.

Within this context, Defra is working with the Department for International Trade on supporting the development of more plastic processing infrastructure within the UK to reduce the need to export these materials to other countries, such as Turkey. The Government is also committed to a bringing forward a ban on plastic exports to non-OECD countries.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps he is taking to increase funding for tree-planting and urban greening schemes in Enfield North constituency.

We are committed to increasing tree planting, and will set out policies to achieve this in the England Tree Strategy, including planting and protecting trees in and around urban areas, which are vital to creating healthy places to live.

We have announced a third round of bidding for the Urban Tree Challenge Fund (UTCF) on the 26 April 2021. Currently there are no UTCF funded projects in Enfield North however, applications are open to anyone who wants to plant trees in urban or peri-urban areas.

We have also announced the Local Authority Treescapes Fund (LATF) to increase tree planting and natural regeneration in local communities. £2.7 million will be available this year (2021/22) and is aimed at establishing more trees in non-woodland settings such as along riverbanks or footpaths. Applications will be accepted from unitary and top tier local authorities in England, including London Boroughs.

These funds are part of the Government’s Nature for Climate Fund and support trees in locations with the greatest levels of benefit to ecosystems and society, such as climate adaptation, health, and wellbeing, as well as connecting fragmented habitats.

The London Borough of Enfield was awarded a grant of £678,700 in the first round of the Green Recovery Challenge Fund which was for large scale ecological improvements to Enfield’s rivers, including planting 60ha of new accessible woodland which was separately funded by the Forestry Commissions’ Woodland Carbon Fund and installing 20 rural sustainable drainage systems to reduce flood risk to over 1,000 properties.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
21st Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the debate on Dolphin and Whale Hunting: Faroe Islands on 11 July 2022, what diplomatic steps her Department has taken since July 2022 to encourage the Faroese Government to stop the practice of dolphin and whale hunting; and if she will make a statement.

The government is strongly opposed to the hunting of whales and dolphins. My colleagues and I will continue to raise this issue with the Faroe Islands, and we will raise it when the Joint Committee of our agreement meets in November. Our Trade agreement strengthens our ability to have these discussions and influence crucial issues like animal welfare.

We continue to use our diplomatic relationship to lobby the Faroes to stop this practice altogether. His Majesty’s Ambassador to Copenhagen is due to visit the Faroes Islands in the near future and this will be a key topic of her visit.

14th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 8 June 2021 to Question 7981 on Overseas Trade: Turkey, on what occasions she has raised human rights concerns with representatives from the Turkish Government since the implementation of the UK-Turkey Free Trade Agreement.

HM Government is clear that more trade need not come at the expense of our values. We have a longstanding relationship with Turkey and will continue to engage the Turkish government on such issues.

7th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether his Department has made a recent assessment of the adequacy of the accessibility of train stations to disabled people in (a) Enfield North constituency, (b) the London Borough of Enfield and (c) London.

The Plan for Rail announced a comprehensive accessibility audit of network facilities. Accessibility audits of all 2,575 GB mainline rail stations have now been completed and quality assured. Work is ongoing to consider how to make the data available to the public and policy makers.

Huw Merriman
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
7th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps his Department is taking to help increase the safety of pedestrians in (a) Enfield North constituency, (b) the London Borough of Enfield and (c) London.

The Department for Transport updated the Highway Code on 29 January 2022 to include changes to improve safety for cyclists, pedestrians and horse riders. However, responsibility for managing London's road network is shared between Transport for London (TfL), National Highways, and the 32 London boroughs, plus the City of London. They are responsible for making decisions about local roads, based on their local knowledge and taking into account local needs.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
7th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what data he holds on the average waiting time for a driving test in (a) Enfield North constituency, (b) the London Borough of Enfield and (c) London as of 27 October 2023.

In October 2023, the average waiting time for a car practical driving test in (a) Enfield North Constituency and (b) the London Borough of Enfield was 24 weeks, and in (c) London it was 23.5 weeks.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
7th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether he has made a recent assessment of his Department's progress on increasing the number of electric vehicle charging points in (a) Enfield North constituency, (b) the London Borough of Enfield and (c) London.

The most recent published figures for London, London Borough of Enfield and Enfield North Constituency can be found in the tables below. The first table shows the number of public charging devices, and those public devices funded under the On-street Residential Chargepoint Scheme (ORCS). From October 2022 to October 2023 London has seen a 54% increase in the number of public charging devices, and the London Borough of Enfield a 16% increase.

Public Charging Devices (Oct 23)

ORCS Completed (Jul 23)

ORCS Approved Applications (Jul 23)

London

16,963

1,557

7,921

London Borough of Enfield

242

23

32

Enfield North Constituency

67

Data not held

Data not held

The second table shows residential and workplace devices funded by the following schemes: Electric Vehicle Chargepoint Grant (EVCG), Workplace Charging Scheme (WCS), Electric Vehicle Homecharge Scheme (EVHS) and Domestic Recharging Scheme (DRS).

EVCG Sockets (Jul 23)

WCS Sockets (Jul 23)

EVHS (Jul 23)

DRS (Jul 23)

London

795

2,981

26,379

1,031

London Borough of Enfield

29

92

1,145

27

Enfield North Constituency

13

31

300

8

Going forward, the Local Electric Vehicle Infrastructure (LEVI) Fund will support local authorities to work with industry and transform the availability of public charging for drivers without off-street parking.

London – which includes the Enfield North constituency – has been allocated £35.7 million in capital funding, and £3 million in capability (resource) funding through the LEVI Fund.

Local authorities can also continue to apply for support from the On-Street Residential Chargepoint Scheme (ORCS).

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
18th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps his Department is taking to improve the safety of pedestrians on rural roads (a) with Transport for London and local authorities in (i) Enfield North constituency and (ii) London and (b) in England.

Responsibility for managing London's road network is shared between Transport for London, National Highways and the London boroughs.

At a national level, the Highway Code was updated on 29 January 2022 to include changes to improve safety for cyclists, pedestrians and horse riders. Key changes include the introduction of a Hierarchy of Road Users, which ensures that those who do the greatest harm have the greatest responsibility to reduce the danger or threat that they pose to others, strengthening pedestrian priority on pavements and at crossings and guidance on safe passing distances when overtaking cyclists, pedestrians and horse-riders. The changes will lead to improvements in road safety as they encourage more mutual respect and consideration for all road users.

Richard Holden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
18th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will list the dates on which he held meetings with the Traffic Commissioner for London and the south east since November 2022; and if he will publish the minutes from those meetings.

Since November 2022, the Secretary of State has not met with the Traffic Commissioner for London and the South-East.

Richard Holden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
18th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether he plans to take steps to increase the powers of the Traffic Commissioners for Great Britain.

In May 2023, we published a review into the function of the Traffic Commissioners of Great Britain. This review sought to produce a robust assessment of the function and align it wherever possible to Cabinet’s Office direction on Public Bodies reviews.

The review found that the Traffic Commissioner function generally operates effectively and can meet the standards of service for the transport industry. It also identified that future, substantive, reform of the Traffic Commissioner function would require legislative changes to be made. These will need to be considered alongside other Government priorities.

Richard Holden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
18th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent assessment he has made of the adequacy of the powers of the Traffic Commissioners for Great Britain.

In May 2023, we published a review into the function of the Traffic Commissioners of Great Britain. This review sought to produce a robust assessment of the function and align it wherever possible to Cabinet’s Office direction on Public Bodies reviews.

The review found that the Traffic Commissioner function generally operates effectively and can meet the standards of service for the transport industry. It also identified that future, substantive, reform of the Traffic Commissioner function would require legislative changes to be made. These will need to be considered alongside other Government priorities.

Richard Holden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
6th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent discussions he has with the DVSA on the availability of practical driving tests in (a) Enfield North constituency, (b) the London Borough of Enfield and (c) London.

Details of Ministerial meetings with external organisations are published every quarter and this information can be accessed on the GOV.UK website via the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/dft-ministerial-gifts-hospitality-travel-and-meetings

Richard Holden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
6th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what the average level of overcrowding is on (a) Govia Thameslink and (b) Great Northern Rail.

The level of crowding varies significantly by route, time of day and location on individual journeys and there is therefore not an overall average figure for crowding. Govia Thameslink and Great Northern Rail operates a demand led timetable and monitors passenger usage closely on a train-by-train basis. Service provision continues to be kept under review in response to demand and usage data.

Huw Merriman
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
5th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment his Department has made of the potential impact of closing train station ticket offices on passengers in Enfield North constituency.

We are now in a period where the independent passenger bodies (Transport Focus and London TravelWatch) are engaging with train operators on the basis of the consultation responses they have received and the criteria they have set out. We expect train operators, including Greater Anglia, who manage several stations in the Enfield North area, to work collaboratively with the passenger bodies in the coming weeks, to listen to the concerns raised and to refine their proposals accordingly.

When proposing major changes to ticket office opening hours, as set out in the Ticketing and Settlement Agreement, train operators are required to take into account the adequacy of the proposed alternatives in relation to the needs of passengers who are disabled, and to include this in the notice of the proposal sent to other operators and passenger groups. All operators prepared Equality Impact Assessments and published these on their websites.

Together with industry, we want to improve and modernise the passenger experience by moving staff out from ticket offices to provide more help and advice in customer focused roles. No currently staffed station should be unstaffed as a result of industry changes.

Huw Merriman
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
19th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether he has made an assessment of the potential impact of closing train station ticket offices in Enfield North constituency on the (a) safety and (b) accessibility of passenger rail travel in (i) Enfield North constituency, (ii) the London Borough of Enfield and (iii) London.

The UK’s rail network is one of the safest in Europe and we will never compromise the safety of passengers on our railways. As the industry takes forward vital reforms, safety remains a top priority for all.

When proposing major changes to ticket office opening hours, including closures, operators are required to take into account the adequacy of the proposed alternatives in relation to the needs of all passengers; and to include this in the notice of the proposal sent to other operators and passenger groups. We would also expect operators to consider other equality related needs and make this clear in the notice sent to other operators and passenger groups.

Together with industry, we want to improve and modernise the passenger experience by moving staff out from ticket offices to provide more help and advice in customer focused roles. Following the consultations, the independent passenger bodies will play a vital role in assessing and shaping proposals.

Huw Merriman
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
10th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether his Department is taking steps to support (a) Enfield Council and (b) other local authorities with preventing parking outside schools.

Around 98% of local authorities have the power to undertake civil parking enforcement, including Enfield Council. Local authorities with these powers can use CCTV cameras to enforce parking on a ‘Keep Clear’ zig-zag area outside a school.

London councils already have powers to civilly enforce moving traffic contraventions, including school street restrictions, which are signed using 'no motor vehicle' or 'pedestrian and cycle zone' signs. Since 31 May 2022, local authorities outside London have been able to apply to the Department to be granted the same powers, by Designation Order. Twelve authorities received the powers last year, and we have laid a second Order in Parliament which will come into force on 22nd July 2023 giving the powers to a further 40 authorities. The department is currently accepting applications for a third such Order.

Richard Holden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
12th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent assessment his Department has made of the adequacy of transport links from (a) Enfield North constituency and (b) the London Borough of Enfield.

Transport in London is devolved and is the responsibility of the Mayor of London and Transport for London (TfL).

In terms of National Rail services operating in Enfield, the Department monitors rail punctuality closely. It continues to engage with Greater Anglia (GA), Govia Thameslink Railway (GTR) and Network Rail. For the 2022-23 rail year, GA’s On Time performance on the West Anglia Main Line route which serves Enfield North was 82.1%. GTR’s performance was 87.3% at stations in the constituency. These figures are above the national average of 67.8% for the same period.

Richard Holden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
6th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many and what proportion of rail services that ran from train stations in Enfield North constituency were cancelled in the last 12 months.

The stations in Enfield North are served by a number of train operators. In the period May 2022 to May 2023, Greater Anglia had a cancellation rate of 1.6 per cent across the network and an average of 2.57 per cent on the route serving Waltham Cross, Enfield Lock and Brimsdown. Govia Thameslink Railway had levels of 5.9 per cent across the network and 5.7 per cent between Gordon Hill, Crews Hill and Enfield Chase.

Cancellations remain a priority for my Department, and I am encouraged by strong improvements in recent months, including the best cancellation rates since May 2021 in the most recent rail period of 30 April to 27 May 2023.

Huw Merriman
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
6th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will make an estimate of the number of passengers who boarded a rail service from a rail station in Enfield North constituency in each of the last 12 months.

The Department does not hold records to that level of detail. The Office of Rail and Road produces annual estimates on the number of entries, exits and interchanges at each station across the network. It is expected that they will publish their figures for April 2022 to March 2023 in November of this year, whilst records for the rail year April 2021 to March 2022 and those prior can be found on the ORR website.

Huw Merriman
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
6th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether his Department has taken recent steps to help improve the punctuality of rail services in Enfield North constituency.

The Department monitors punctuality closely and continues to engage with Greater Anglia (GA), Govia Thameslink Railway (GTR) and Network Rail to deliver reliable performance on the network. For the 2022-23 rail year, GA’s On Time performance on the West Anglia Main Line route which serves Enfield North was 82.1 per cent. GTR’s performance was 87.3 per cent at stations in the constituency. Both were above the national average of 67.8 per cent for the same period and I am encouraged by improvements in On Time performance across the network since December 2022.

Huw Merriman
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
25th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether he has had recent discussions with the Mayor of London on the increased use of 20mph speed limits on roads in (a) Enfield North constituency and (b) the London Borough of Enfield.

The responsibility for managing London's road network is shared between Transport for London (TfL) and the London boroughs.

Richard Holden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
19th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps his Department plans to take to support the installation of public charging infrastructure for electric vehicles in Enfield North constituency.

To ensure that the transition of electric vehicles takes place in every part of the country, the Local Electric Vehicle Infrastructure (LEVI) Fund will support local authorities to work with industry and transform the availability of charging for drivers without off-street parking.

London – which includes Enfield North constituency – has been allocated £35.7 million in capital funding, and £3 million in capability (resource) funding through the LEVI Fund.

Local authorities can also apply for support from the On-Street Residential Chargepoint Scheme (ORCS). To date, The London Borough of Enfield has been awarded £115,380 to install 55 chargepoints through ORCS.

16th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of introducing a minimum level of brightness car lights must have when driving at night.

This is already the case. Before cars can be sold or registered in the UK, they must demonstrate that the lighting system meets a range of lighting system performance requirements. Lamps must also be maintained throughout the life of the vehicle - which is checked at each MoT.

Richard Holden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
16th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many and what proportion of railway stations in (a) Enfield North constituency, (b) the London Borough of Enfield and (c) London are equipped with defibrillators.

Train stations in Enfield North constituency and the London Borough of Enfield are managed by London Overground, Great Northern or Greater Anglia. Greater Anglia do not currently have defibrillators installed at their stations in the Enfield area but all Great Northern stations are equipped. Information on defibrillators at London Overground stations is a matter for Transport for London.

In London, defibrillators are installed at all 11 stations managed by Network Rail including Waterloo, Euston and Victoria. Train operating companies are also making continuous progress in rolling out defibrillators at the stations they manage.

Huw Merriman
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
16th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of legally requiring cars that have broken down on motorways to display a hazard sign.

Rules relating to road users displaying hazard signs (e.g. warning triangles) in the event of a breakdown are set out in Rule 276 of The Highway Code. Rule 76 advises motorists not to place a warning sign on the carriage if they breakdown on a motorway. This is because priority is for the safety of the vehicle occupants, and, as a matter of urgency, they should move to a safe place away from fast moving traffic.

In line with The Highway Code, National Highways provides guidance to drivers on what to do in the event that their vehicle breaks down on any kind of high-speed road. This was the subject of a major campaign and there is further breakdown advice on their website.

Richard Holden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
15th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of making (a) Enfield Chase and (b) Gordon Hill stations step free.

The Department is actively committed to improving accessibility at stations. We are assessing over 300 nominations, including for Enfield Chase and Gordon Hill stations, for the next tranche of the Access for All programme. We hope to be in a position to announce successful projects later this year.

Huw Merriman
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
15th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of extending the train platforms to accommodate longer trains at (a) Enfield Lock and (b) Brimsdown Station.

Greater Anglia operates rail services from Enfield Lock and Brimsdown using 5 and 10 carriage trains at peak times. When the longer 10 carriage trains operate at these stations the trains operate in selective door operation mode meaning that doors do not open where there is no platform edge. Passengers are advised as to which carriages to travel in, depending on their destination. There are currently no plans to extend the train platforms at these stations. Greater Anglia monitors ongoing travel patterns to inform future plans and investment priorities across its network.

Huw Merriman
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
10th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what the current average waiting time is in (a) Enfield North constituency, (b) the London Borough of Enfield and (c) London to take a driving test from the date of booking the test; and how many people are waiting to take a test in those areas.

As of 8 May 2023, within the Enfield North constituency and the London Borough of Enfield, there were 1786 car practical driving tests booked, and 71 car practical driving tests available within the next 24-weeks.

Within London, as of 8 May 2023, there were 79,109 car practical driving tests booked, and 4,390 car practical driving tests available within the next 24-weeks.

Richard Holden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
10th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of improving service levels at Enfield Chase rail station.

This Department and the train operating companies monitor demand closely to deliver a timetable which matches passenger needs and provides the right level and consistency of service. There are no plans to increase service levels at Enfield Chase station in the near future, although service provision remains under regular review.

Huw Merriman
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
10th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what proportion of trains did not arrive on-time between (a) 07:30 and 09:30 and (b) 17:00 and 19:00 at (i) Crews Hill, (ii) Gordon Hill and (iii) Grange Park rail stations in the last 12 months.

This Department does not hold data to that level of detail. However, I can confirm the proportion of trains which arrived on time (defined as less than one minute late against the public timetable) at those stations during the 2022/23 rail year was 86.9 per cent at Crews Hill, 86.8 per cent at Gordon Hill and 90.9 per cent at Grange Park. These compare to a National On Time average of 67.8 per cent across all operators for the same time period.

Huw Merriman
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
3rd May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many deaths from road traffic accidents there were in (a) Enfield North constituency, (b) the London Borough of Enfield, (c) London in each year since 2017.

The number of deaths in reported road traffic collisions from 2017 to 2021 (the most recent year for which figures are available) are shown in the table. Caution should be attached to the interpretation of these figures due to the small numbers which vary annually, and the impact of Covid.

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

Enfield North

1

6

2

2

0

Borough of Enfield

10

8

5

3

0

London

131

112

125

96

75

Richard Holden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
24th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether his Department plans to provide support to Enfield Council to increase road safety in Enfield in the next (a) six and (b) 12 months.

Roads in Enfield are primarily the responsibility of Enfield Borough Council, plus Transport for London (TfL) for the red routes. Any concerns about their safety should be raised with them in the first instance. Since the onset of the pandemic, Government has provided TfL with over £6billion of emergency funding support.

Richard Holden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
18th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many public charging points for electric vehicles there are in (a) Enfield North constituency and (b) the London Borough of Enfield.

Data on electric vehicle charging devices in the UK, held by the Department for Transport, are sourced from the electric vehicle charging platform Zap-Map. Charging devices not recorded on Zap-Map are not included and the true number of charging devices may be higher than recorded in these figures.

The below table provides the data requested, as of 1 January 2023.

Enfield North Constituency

London Borough of Enfield

Public Charging Devices (see note 1)

58

209

1) Zap-Map data counts charging devices publicly available at any given point, with decommissioned charge points removed from the data supplied to us. Therefore, the number of installed public charge points in each given year is likely to be higher as this accounts for the number decommissioned and removed from the data.

18th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what estimate he has made of the number of public charging points for electric vehicles due to be installed in (a) Enfield North constituency and (b) the London Borough of Enfield in each reporting year until 2028.

The Government has not set targets for chargepoint provision per region or local area because the exact number and type of chargepoints will be highly dependent on local circumstances, future charging behaviour and the future development of electric vehicle technology. Local authorities have a key role to play as they are best placed to consider local needs. We will require all local transport authorities in England to develop their own chargepoint strategies, subject to consultation.

To date, the London Borough of Enfield has been awarded £72,000 to deliver 32 public chargepoints through the On Street Residential Chargepoint Scheme. So far, 23 completed chargepoints have been installed which were funded through this scheme.

18th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether he has received any information on the cleanliness standard of the M25 embankments, carriageways, hard shoulders, slip roads around Junction 25.

National Highways confirms that the most recent assessment of Junction 25 of the M25 was carried out on 7 April 2023 and the area was scored as a Grade B (Predominately free of litter and refuse apart from some small items). This area is next due to be graded on 21 April 2023.

NH has carried out litter collections on the slip roads over the course of the last two weeks. They have the following planned closures booked to address litter collections and other maintenance activities in the area; M25 Junctions 25 to 27 on the 15th to 19th May; and M25 Junctions 27 to 25 on the 22nd to 26th May.

Richard Holden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
29th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of enforcement by the Traffic Commissioners of compliance with relevant requirements by holders of operator's licences for heavy goods vehicles.

The Traffic Commissioners are an arms-length tribunal. They review licences when evidence of non-compliance is provided by enforcement agencies, such as the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency or Police. The Traffic Commissioners will call operators to public inquiry in response to allegations of serious failings, for instance significant drivers’ hours or roadworthiness. In 2021-2022 Traffic Commissioners undertook 920 Public Inquiries for this type of case leading to the revocation, curtailment or other action in all but 67 cases.

In addition, Traffic Commissioners held 315 Public Inquiries to determine new applications for goods vehicle operator’s licences due to concerns that the applicant may not meet the requirements to hold a licence.

Richard Holden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
29th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what data his Department holds on the number and proportion of traffic accidents in rural areas involving heavy goods vehicles; and whether he is taking steps to control the level of heavy goods vehicle traffic in such areas.

The Department’s reported road casualty statistics are based on data collected via the STATS19 system of injury collisions reported by the police.

In 2021, the latest year for which data is available, there were a total of 1,593 reported injury collisions on rural roads in Great Britain which involved at least one heavy goods vehicle. This represented 5.4% of the total number of injury collisions on rural roads in Great Britain in 2021.

We keep rural roads under review as part of considerations for any future plans on road safety.

Richard Holden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
14th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what his Department's funding plans are for walking and cycling schemes in the next three years.

The second statutory Cycling and Walking Investment Strategy, published in July of this year, reiterated the Government’s commitment to this important agenda and set out the funding that was projected to be spent on it from 2020/21 to 2024/25 from a wide range of funding streams.

The Autumn Statement of 17 November confirmed the Department for Transport’s overall funding levels for 2023-24 and 2024-25. The Department is currently considering the budget for active travel as part of its examination of all future spending plans following that Statement.

14th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, by what date he will launch Active Travel Fund 4.

The Department plans to launch Active Travel Fund 4 once future budgets are confirmed through the Departmental business planning process.

2nd Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether the DVLA is required to pass on personal information to third parties such as private parking companies.

Regulation 27 of The Road Vehicles (Registration and Licensing) Regulations 2002 allows information about the keepers of UK-registered vehicles to be disclosed to third parties in certain limited circumstances, subject to appropriate safeguards. This includes the release of information to help manage parking on private land.

To help ensure that motorists are treated fairly when any parking charges are levied, vehicle keeper information is disclosed only to companies that are members of an accredited trade association and adhere to an enforceable code of practice.

The British Parking Association and the Independent Parking Committee are the relevant accredited trade associations for the parking industry.

Regulations allow the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency to charge a fee for releasing information to private parking companies. HM Treasury guidance dictates that fees are set to recover the cost of providing the information and this ensures that the cost is borne by the requester and not passed on to the taxpayer.

Robert Courts
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
2nd Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether revenue is generated by the DVLA from private parking companies.

Regulation 27 of The Road Vehicles (Registration and Licensing) Regulations 2002 allows information about the keepers of UK-registered vehicles to be disclosed to third parties in certain limited circumstances, subject to appropriate safeguards. This includes the release of information to help manage parking on private land.

To help ensure that motorists are treated fairly when any parking charges are levied, vehicle keeper information is disclosed only to companies that are members of an accredited trade association and adhere to an enforceable code of practice.

The British Parking Association and the Independent Parking Committee are the relevant accredited trade associations for the parking industry.

Regulations allow the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency to charge a fee for releasing information to private parking companies. HM Treasury guidance dictates that fees are set to recover the cost of providing the information and this ensures that the cost is borne by the requester and not passed on to the taxpayer.

Robert Courts
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
21st Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps he is taking to increase the provision of audio-visual announcements on local bus services.

The Department recognises the importance of audible and visible information in ensuring disabled passengers have the information they need to travel safely, with confidence, and without the fear of a journey taking them anywhere other than their desired destination.

DfT statistics indicate that in March 2021, 45% of buses were providing audible and visible information across Great Britain. More and more services are now incorporating accessible information, but its availability remains inconsistent across the country, and the Department is determined to address this.

The Department therefore intends, subject to final analysis, to introduce Accessible Information Regulations before the end of this year. This will ensure a rapid increase in the provision of better information for passengers, with the implementation timescale, also taking account of the impact on operators. The Department will also provide Accessible Information Grant funding to help smaller operators to meet the new requirements.

21st Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of the speed of the rollout of audio-visual announcements on local bus service.

The Department recognises the importance of audible and visible information in ensuring disabled passengers have the information they need to travel safely, with confidence, and without the fear of a journey taking them anywhere other than their desired destination.

DfT statistics indicate that in March 2021, 45% of buses were providing audible and visible information across Great Britain. More and more services are now incorporating accessible information, but its availability remains inconsistent across the country, and the Department is determined to address this.

The Department therefore intends, subject to final analysis, to introduce Accessible Information Regulations before the end of this year. This will ensure a rapid increase in the provision of better information for passengers, with the implementation timescale, also taking account of the impact on operators. The Department will also provide Accessible Information Grant funding to help smaller operators to meet the new requirements.

31st Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to the end of plan B covid-19 restrictions, whether he has issued updated guidance to rail operators on service (a) levels and (b) capacity to account for the absence of restrictions.

The Department continues to work closely with rail operators as they adjust timetables to meet the demand for travel and to mitigate the impact of staff absences on rail services. Following the lifting of Plan B restrictions, the Department has worked with train operating companies as they manage the reinstatement of services and develop sustainable timetables which provide sufficient capacity to meet demand as staffing pressures ease.

27th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether he has made an assessment of the potential merits of extending the validity of the two year driving theory test.

It is important road safety knowledge and hazard perception skills are up to date at the critical point a person drives unsupervised for the first time.

The maximum duration of two years between passing the theory test and a subsequent practical test is in place to ensure a candidate’s road safety knowledge and ability to identify developing hazards is current. This validity period is set in legislation and the Government has no current plans to lay further legislation to extend it.

Ensuring new drivers have current relevant knowledge and skills is a vital part of the preparation of new drivers, who are disproportionality represented in casualty statistics. Learners will therefore need to pass another theory test if their certificate expires.

15th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent steps he has taken to provide adequate resources to help Enfield Council tackle air pollution by (a) delivering clean air zones, (b) encouraging the use of electric vehicles with recharging points, (c) encouraging cycling and walking and (d) delivering borough-wide air pollution monitoring networks.

The Mayor of London is responsible for air quality in the capital and has reserve powers under Part IV of the Environment Act 1995 to reflect this.

In 2020, London Boroughs received £25 million via the Active Travel Fund (ATF) to deliver safe cycling and walking routes in their areas. They have also received £13m through the Go Ultra Low City Scheme (GULCS) to drive the uptake of ultra-low emission vehicles.

Over the last two financial years, London Borough of Enfield have been awarded a total of £117,000 through the On-Street Residential Chargepoint Scheme, which will see 44 EV chargepoints installed across the Borough.

15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent steps his Department has taken to encourage investment in electric vehicle and battery manufacturing in the UK.

As part of the Government’s Net Zero Strategy, we are allocating a further £350 million for the Automotive Transformation Fund, as part of our up to £1 billion commitment to build an internationally competitive electric vehicle supply chain including gigafactories. This is in addition to the £500m of funding announced as part of the 10 Point Plan. This will help ensure the UK maximises the benefits from the transition to a zero emission vehicle future and support tens of thousands of high-quality green jobs across the UK.

We continue to work closely with investors to progress plans for manufacturing the batteries that we will need for the next generation of electric vehicles here in the UK. The £1bn investment announced by Nissan and Envision AESC to create an electric vehicle (EV) manufacturing hub is a major vote of confidence in the UK. We are delivering on our commitment to transition to a zero-carbon future, secure Gigafactories and ensure we continue our proud legacy of being one of the best locations for competitive, high-quality automotive manufacturing.

15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent discussions he has had with Ministerial colleagues in the Treasury to help ensure that transport decarbonisation measures are adequately funded in the comprehensive spending review.

The Department for Transport is committed to decarbonising the UK’s transport system. Our pathway to net zero was set out in our ambitious Transport Decarbonisation Plan earlier this year and reducing the environmental impacts of transport is one of our Departmental Priority Outcomes.

Department for Transport ministers have had positive and ongoing engagement with their HM Treasury counterparts throughout the Spending Review process. Ministers across Government are committed to achieving net zero by 2050 and we will continue to progress towards this goal over this coming Spending Review period.

The outcomes of Spending Review will be published at Autumn Budget on Wednesday 27th October.

15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent discussions he has had with Ministerial colleagues in the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy on ensuring that the Net Zero Strategy includes a pathway for decarbonising transport.

Our Transport Decarbonisation Plan, published in July 2021, set out a credible, deliverable pathway to net zero greenhouse gas emissions in the transport sector by 2050, as well as delivering the sector’s contribution to demanding carbon budgets along the way. The Net Zero Strategy presents a pathway to net zero emissions across the whole economy, including the transport sector.

15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent steps his Department has taken to (a) decarbonise transport and (b) encourage active travel in Enfield North constituency.

London has been allocated over £150 million of active travel funding since the start of the pandemic to support the roll-out of safe cycling and walking routes across the capital. The allocation of funding to London Boroughs is a matter for Transport for London, and this is overseen by a steering group comprising senior representatives from TfL, DfT and Number 10.

15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent assessment he has made of the effect of the temporary increase to the maximum daily working hours for HGV drivers on road safety.

It is important to note that the relaxations made to the drivers’ hours rules are limited in nature. No requirements of the rules, whether it be breaks during the day, daily & weekly rest periods, or weekly and fortnightly driving limits, have been removed. The rules have been relaxed in a controlled way.

The drivers’ hours relaxation requires compensatory rest when the option to amend weekly rest patterns is taken. This is designed to combat cumulative fatigue and is very similar to a provision in force across the UK and EU permanently for some international driving.

There is published guidance about the circumstances in which the temporary relaxations can be used. There must be evidence of detriment to the wider community, that the relaxation leads to a significant improvement and that driver safety must not be compromised. In respect of detriment and safety there are specific benchmarks.

The rules are enforced by the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) who also collect data on compliance.

15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent discussions he has had with Cabinet colleagues on the ongoing shortage of heavy goods vehicle drivers.

Cabinet Ministers attend regular meetings organised by the National Economic Recovery Taskforce (NERT) to agree measures and actions to address the heavy goods vehicle driver shortage. Cabinet Ministers also engage in informal discussions as and when required.

15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent steps his Department has taken to support taxi and private hire vehicle drivers during the period of reduced demand as a result of the covid-19 outbreak.

The majority of taxi and PHV drivers are self-employed and were therefore able to apply for grants through the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme (SEISS) before the scheme closed on 30 September 2021.

Drivers of taxis and private hire vehicles may also have been eligible for other sources of support, including locally administered grant funding. An online support finder tool was made available to help businesses and self-employed workers determine what support was available to them.

Ongoing engagement with sector stakeholders indicate that demand for taxi and private hire vehicles (PHVs) is very high with PHV operators seeking to increase driver numbers to meet this.

15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to Answer of 20 September to Question 47079, what (a) number of training places were created for job seekers to drive HGVs, (b) additional amount of money was provided to fund these places and (c) number of places were created for apprenticeships, and (d) number of additional HGV driver testing places have been created since September 2020.

The requested information on the number of training places created for job seekers to drive HGVs and the amount of funding provided for the places is not available. The DWP Sector-based Work Academy Programme (SWAPs) statistics include non-HGV driver roles and it is not possible to split HGV driver SWAPs from the data. It is also not possible to identify purchases of HGV driver training within general Flexible Support Fund spending.

The number of apprenticeship places is not limited. There were 1,739 LGV Driver apprenticeship starts in the academic year 2020/21. The new Large Goods Vehicle Driver apprenticeship was made available on 2 August 2021. The data for starts since its introduction is not yet available.

Weekly HGV testing capacity prior to March 2020 was 1,500. Additional capacity has been incrementally put into place since May this year, through operational and legislative changes. Currently there are up to 2,850 HGV tests are available weekly.

10th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what discussions he has had with his Turkish counterpart on the status of Turkey on the traffic light covid-19 travel list.

Decisions on Red, Amber or Green List assignment and associated border measures are taken by Ministers, who take into account Joint Biosecurity Centre risk assessments of countries and territories, alongside wider public health factors.

These are intended to be temporary measures and the government keeps data for countries and territories under regular review. Turkey will move to the amber list from 4am on Wednesday 22 September.

Robert Courts
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
10th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what the evidential basis is for his Department’s decision to assign Turkey to the red travel list for covid-19, and what criteria Turkey needs to meet to move to the amber covid-19 travel list.

Decisions on Red, Amber or Green List assignment and associated border measures are taken by Ministers, who take into account Joint Biosecurity Centre risk assessments of countries and territories, alongside wider public health factors.

These are intended to be temporary measures and the government keeps data for countries and territories under regular review. Turkey will move to the amber list from 4am on Wednesday 22 September.

Robert Courts
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
10th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps he is taking to review the status of Turkey on the traffic light covid-19 travel list.

Decisions on Red, Amber or Green List assignment and associated border measures are taken by Ministers, who take into account Joint Biosecurity Centre risk assessments of countries and territories, alongside wider public health factors.

These are intended to be temporary measures and the government keeps data for countries and territories under regular review. Turkey will move to the amber list from 4am on Wednesday 22 September.

Robert Courts
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
10th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent assessment he has made of the impact of the UK's withdrawal from the EU on the number of heavy goods vehicle drivers in the UK.

The Department for Transport has regular discussions with the road haulage industry. We are working together to address the current HGV driver shortage, which is an issue affecting many countries worldwide. For example, the International Road Transport Union predicts a gap of 185,000 drivers by 2027 in Germany.

The Government has already taken firm action, including through training for jobseekers, additional funding for apprenticeships, and taking measures to increase lorry driver testing capacity to bring new drivers into the industry as soon as possible.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
7th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of a rollout of acoustic cameras to tackle the nuisance of car exhaust noise amplifiers on residential and A roads.

The Department is aware of nuisance caused by excessively noisy car exhausts. New vehicles are required to meet strict noise limits before being first placed on the market and once on the road, exhausts and silencers are not permitted to be altered to increase noise such as the fitment of noise amplifiers.

The police have powers to take action under the Road Vehicles (Construction and Use) Regulations 1986 (as amended) if they believe excessive vehicle noise could have been avoided through reasonable driver care. Local authorities can issue a Community Protection Notice if an individual’s behaviour is having a negative impact on the community. In both cases, failure to comply can result in a fine or a fixed penalty notice.

The Department is currently considering the outcome of a preliminary trial of a prototype acoustic camera. Due to the early stages of testing and prototype nature of the technology it is too early to assess the potential impact of widespread deployment, but we are optimistic that it will provide an effective enforcement tool in the future.

7th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps he is taking to tackle the nuisance of car exhaust noise amplifiers on (a) residential and (b) A roads; and what enforcement powers (i) police and (ii) local authorities have to tackle that nuisance.

The Department is aware of nuisance caused by excessively noisy car exhausts. New vehicles are required to meet strict noise limits before being first placed on the market and once on the road, exhausts and silencers are not permitted to be altered to increase noise such as the fitment of noise amplifiers.

The police have powers to take action under the Road Vehicles (Construction and Use) Regulations 1986 (as amended) if they believe excessive vehicle noise could have been avoided through reasonable driver care. Local authorities can issue a Community Protection Notice if an individual’s behaviour is having a negative impact on the community. In both cases, failure to comply can result in a fine or a fixed penalty notice.

The Department is currently considering the outcome of a preliminary trial of a prototype acoustic camera. Due to the early stages of testing and prototype nature of the technology it is too early to assess the potential impact of widespread deployment, but we are optimistic that it will provide an effective enforcement tool in the future.

7th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether he plans to ban the sale of car exhaust noise amplifiers.

The Department is aware of nuisance caused by excessively noisy car exhausts. New vehicles are required to meet strict noise limits before being first placed on the market and once on the road, exhausts and silencers are not permitted to be altered to increase noise such as the fitment of noise amplifiers.

The police have powers to take action under the Road Vehicles (Construction and Use) Regulations 1986 (as amended) if they believe excessive vehicle noise could have been avoided through reasonable driver care. Local authorities can issue a Community Protection Notice if an individual’s behaviour is having a negative impact on the community. In both cases, failure to comply can result in a fine or a fixed penalty notice.

The Department is currently considering the outcome of a preliminary trial of a prototype acoustic camera. Due to the early stages of testing and prototype nature of the technology it is too early to assess the potential impact of widespread deployment, but we are optimistic that it will provide an effective enforcement tool in the future.

7th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Transport on ensuring that the Transport Decarbonisation Plan makes progress for achieving net-zero for all modes of transport.

My Rt. Hon. Friend the Secretary of State has regular discussions with Ministerial Colleagues on a number of issues including transport decarbonisation. We have worked closely right across government throughout the development of our world-leading plan, “Decarbonising Transport: a better, greener Britain” which has now been published. We will continue to work together to implement its policies and deliver our commitments to decarbonise transport and achieve net zero by 2050.

30th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent steps his Department has taken to encourage the uptake of cycling and walking in (a) Enfield North constituency, (b) the London Borough of Enfield, (c) London and (d) England.

The responsibility for transport in London is devolved to the Mayor of London and Transport for London (TfL), and decisions on cycling and walking schemes in Enfield are a matter for the borough and for TfL. In 2020/2021 the Department provided over £100 million of funding to support active travel in the capital, and its financial support to TfL over the period from May to December 2021 includes a further £100 million for active travel.

The Department for Transport is investing an unprecedented £2 billion in active travel schemes in England over the course of this Parliament. This is the biggest ever boost for cycling and walking. The funding will be spent on a wide range of measures, as set out in the Prime Minister’s July 2020 Gear Change plan.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
30th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent steps his Department has taken to reverse the growth of road traffic.

The Department is working closely with the Ministry for Housing Communities and Local Government to ensure the transport and spatial planning systems are better aligned and actively promote sustainable transport options. The two Departments are also considering how we ensure we deliver on our commitment in Gear Change and ensure that walking, cycling and public transport are the first choice for journeys in new developments. As part of this, Active Travel England, once established, will be a statutory consultee in the planning system. Officials from my Department are in contact with MHCLG officials to determine the scope of this involvement.

Additionally, as set out in the Prime Minister’s July 2020 Gear Change plan, the Department is investing an unprecedented £2 billion in active travel schemes in England over the course of this Parliament. This is the biggest ever boost for cycling and walking and the funding will be spent on a wide range of measures.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
30th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether he has made recent representations to Ministerial colleagues in the Ministry for Housing, Communities and Local Government to identify opportunities for (a) combined transport and planning policies and (b) 20-minute walkable neighbourhoods to increase walking, cycling and reduce car usage.

The Department is working closely with the Ministry for Housing Communities and Local Government to ensure the transport and spatial planning systems are better aligned and actively promote sustainable transport options. The two Departments are also considering how we ensure we deliver on our commitment in Gear Change and ensure that walking, cycling and public transport are the first choice for journeys in new developments. As part of this, Active Travel England, once established, will be a statutory consultee in the planning system. Officials from my Department are in contact with MHCLG officials to determine the scope of this involvement.

Additionally, as set out in the Prime Minister’s July 2020 Gear Change plan, the Department is investing an unprecedented £2 billion in active travel schemes in England over the course of this Parliament. This is the biggest ever boost for cycling and walking and the funding will be spent on a wide range of measures.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
26th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of the creation of Great British Railways on tickets prices for commuters using National Rail lines in Enfield North constituency.

On 20th May, government published Great British Railways: The Williams-Shapps Plan for Rail – a blueprint for a more customer focused, reliable and growing railway. The biggest reform and simplification of our railways in 30 years will bring “track and train” together under single national leadership in a new public body – Great British Railways – accountable to ministers. Great British Railways will own the infrastructure, collect fare revenue, run and plan the network, set the timetable and most fares.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
12th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will make adequate funding available to Enfield Council to support the delivery of electric vehicle charging points to support residents in making the transition to electric cars.

Up to January 2021, specifically within the London Borough of Enfield, the Office for Zero Emission Vehicles has provided grant funding assistance for the installation of 481 chargepoints in drivers’ homes and 31 chargepoints in workplaces as well as awarded funding for the installation of 12 public chargepoints on residential streets through the On-Street Residential Chargepoint Scheme (ORCS). The ORCS, worth £20million this financial year, is open to all UK local authorities to provide charging infrastructure for residents without access to private parking. This scheme is just part of a £1.3 billion Government investment in electric vehicle charging infrastructure, including ongoing support for chargepoints in homes and workplaces, which complements growing private sector investment.

12th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps his Department will take to measure the effect of pollution on Bullsmoor Lane as a result of the M25 junction development scheme.

Highways England’s assessment of the impact of the scheme concluded that changes in air quality as a result of the scheme would be negligible. Air quality monitoring on Bullsmoor Lane is already being carried out by the London Borough of Enfield, as the relevant local authority. Since construction on the scheme has started, they have not notified Highways England of any exceedances recorded for any monitoring stations within the locality of Bullsmoor Lane. As this monitoring is already in place, Highways England has no plans to implement further monitoring in the locality.

19th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how much his Department has spent on (a) consultancy services including (i) communications, (ii) advertising, (iii) marketing and (iv) media buying since 1 March 2020.

For the core department, the amount incurred for consultancy from 1st March – 31st October 2020 is £53m. As with previous years, the majority of this is in relation to large scale transport infrastructure programmes. £96k out of the £53m relates to spend on Marketing and Communications Consultancy.

Consultancy is defined as the provision of objective advice relating to strategy, structure, management or operations of an organisation, in pursuit of its purposes and objectives. Such advice is provided outside the ‘business-as-usual’ environment when in-house skills are not available and is time-limited. The numbers quoted here are from unaudited internal management accounting information.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
30th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps his Department will take to ensure that all approved driving instructors receive guidance on how they can safely restart driving lessons and tests as the covid-19 lockdown restrictions are eased.

The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency’s (DVSA) priority throughout the COVID-19 pandemic has been the safety of its staff and the wider public. That remains its priority as it restarts its services.

Driving instructors are responsible for ensuring their services remain safe. Guidance on how they can carry out risk assessments can be found on the Health and Safety Executive’s website. The DVSA will release an updated version of its standard operating procedure for driving examiners, which driving instructors might wish to refer to when developing their own health and safety procedures. The DVSA will be sending this directly to driving instructors and it will be hosted on the National Associations Strategic Partnership website.

The DVSA would encourage all driving instructors to keep up to date with the driving instructors’ National Associations Strategic Partnership (NASP) website for further advice and information.

3rd Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, in what circumstances the power to recall vehicles proposed in the Environment Bill would be used.

The proposed power would enable the Government to compel manufacturers to recall road vehicles, and non-road mobile machinery, if they are found not to comply with the environmental standards which they are required to meet by law.

The Government will set out how the regime will operate in full in secondary legislation.

7th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many claims for Disability Living Allowance for children were (a) successful and (b) not successful in (i) Enfield North constituency, (ii) the London Borough of Enfield and (iii) London in each of the last three years for which data is available.

We have grouped the response to the above two parliamentary questions.

The information is not available. However, quarterly statistics for the number of children receiving Disability Living Allowance, by length of claim and by government office regions and Westminster parliamentary constituency to February 2023, are published on Stat-Xplore.

Users can log in or access Stat-Xplore as a guest user and, if needed, can access guidance on how to extract the information required.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
7th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many claims for Disability Living Allowance for children were made in (a) Enfield North constituency, (b) the London Borough of Enfield and (c) London in each of the last three years for which data is available.

We have grouped the response to the above two parliamentary questions.

The information is not available. However, quarterly statistics for the number of children receiving Disability Living Allowance, by length of claim and by government office regions and Westminster parliamentary constituency to February 2023, are published on Stat-Xplore.

Users can log in or access Stat-Xplore as a guest user and, if needed, can access guidance on how to extract the information required.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
7th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many unsuccessful claims for Disability Living Allowance for children were (i) appealed and (ii) successful following an appeal in (a) Enfield North constituency, (b) the London Borough of Enfield and (c) London in each of the last three years for which data is available.

The information requested is not available and to provide it would incur disproportionate cost.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
7th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what recent assessment his Department has made of the potential impact of inflation on pensioners in (a) Enfield North constituency, (b) the London Borough of Enfield and (c) London.

No such assessment has been made of the impact of inflation on pensioners in (a) Enfield North constituency, (b) the London Borough of Enfield and (c) London.

The Government understands the pressures people are facing with the cost of living and is taking action to help. Overall, we are providing total support of over £94bn over 2022/23 and 2023/24 to help households and individuals with the rising cost of bills. This includes 8.7m pensioner households who received a £300 Cost of Living Payment last winter as an addition to the Winter Fuel Payment. Pensioners will also receive a further £300 additional payment later this year in their Winter Fuel Payment.

In April, the State Pension saw its biggest ever rise, increasing by 10.1%. The full yearly amount of the basic State Pension will be over £3,050 higher, in cash terms, than in 2010. That’s £790 more than if it had been uprated by Prices, and £945 more than if it had been uprated by earnings (since 2010).

Paul Maynard
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
7th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps his Department is taking to support people who have been made redundant to (a) access training and skills support and (b) find suitable alternative employment in (i) Enfield North constituency, (ii) the London Borough of Enfield and (iii) London.

The Department for Work and Pensions stands ready to support anyone affected by redundancy with our Rapid Response Service offer. This is a service designed to give support and advice to employers and their employees when faced with redundancy.

This service is co-ordinated nationally by the National Employer and Partnership Team and is managed by Jobcentre Plus. Delivery partners include The National Careers Service, local training providers, Money Helper and the skills bodies in England.

The Rapid Response Service offer is flexible and can include a range of options (see below) that can be pulled together into an appropriate support package. This package will be tailored to meet the needs of the employer, the individuals affected and the local community.

The range of support available from Jobcentre Plus and partners may include:

  • Help with job search including CV writing, interview skills, where to find jobs and how to apply for them.
  • Connecting people to jobs in the labour market
  • Help to identify transferable skills and skills gaps (linked to the local labour market).
  • What benefits they may get and how to claim.
Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
19th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people are awaiting an Access to Work assessment in (a) Enfield North constituency, (b) the London Borough of Enfield and (c) London.

The information requested about Access to Work applications that have been made in Enfield North and London Borough of Enfield and London is not readily available and to provide it would incur disproportionate costs.

At close of business on 17th September 22,063 applications were outstanding.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
19th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what the longest waiting time was to apply for Access to Work in (a) Enfield North constituency, (b) the London Borough of Enfield and (c) London in the latest period for which data is available.

The information requested about Access to Work applications that have been made in Enfield North and London Borough of Enfield and London is not readily available and to provide it would incur disproportionate costs.

Customers were notified of a 20 week wait to be assigned when applying in late 2022. Customers are now being notified of a 12 week wait.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
19th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many and what proportion of Universal Credit claimants have an advance attached to their claim during the wait for their first payment (a) Enfield North constituency, (b) the London Borough of Enfield and (c) London by claimant age group as of 18 September 2023.

The information requested is not available for this period.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
13th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what the average length of a face-to-face appointment with a work coach at a job centre is in (a) Enfield North constituency, (b) the London Borough of Enfield and (c) London.

The requested information is not readily available and could only be provided at disproportionate cost. Maintaining an effective Work Coach diary is a joint responsibility between a team leader and the Work Coach, and is reached collaboratively through regular discussion and agreement.

The duration of each appointment is determined by the appointment type, and the length of time the appointment is expected to take is recorded by our diary management tool. We do not hold information on the actual duration of an appointment, for example, whether the appointment was longer or shorter than the allocated time.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
12th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what recent assessment his Department has made of the potential impact of inflation on pensioners in Enfield North constituency.

The Government understands the pressures people are facing with the cost of living and is taking action to help. Overall, we are providing total support of over £94bn over 2022/23 and 2023/24 to help households and individuals with the rising cost of bills. This includes 8.7m pensioner households who received a £300 Cost of Living Payment last winter as an addition to the Winter Fuel Payment. Pensioners will also receive a further £300 additional payment later this year in their Winter Fuel Payment.

In April, the State Pension saw its biggest ever rise, increasing by 10.1%. The full yearly amount of the basic State Pension will be over £3,050 higher, in cash terms, than in 2010. That’s £790 more than if it had been uprated by Prices, and £945 more than if it had been uprated by earnings (since 2010).

Laura Trott
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
6th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what data his Department holds on the average monthly deduction taken from households with children in receipt of Universal Credit in (a) Enfield North constituency, (b) the London Borough of Enfield and (c) London.

The requested information is provided in the table below.

Table 1 : Number of Households with Children, May 2023

Administrative Area

Number of Households on Universal Credit

Number of Households with Children on Universal Credit

Number of Households with Children on Universal Credit with a Deduction

Total amount deducted for Households with Children

Average Amount Deducted for Households with Children

Enfield North Parliamentary Constituency

12,700

6,700

3,200

£230,000

£73

London Borough of Enfield

38,200

18,600

8,500

£630,000

£74

London

813,000

352,000

153,000

£11,400,000

£75

Table 1 shows the requested analysis of Universal Credit households with children with a payment due in May 2023 for each of the requested administrative areas.

Notes:

1. Volumes have been rounded to the nearest 100, total amounts have been rounded to the nearest £10,000 and average amounts have been rounded to the nearest £1. For region level: volumes have been rounded to the nearest 1,000, total amount has been rounded to the nearest £100,000 and average amount has been rounded to the nearest £1.

2. Deductions include advance repayments, third party deductions and all other deductions, but exclude sanctions and fraud penalties which are reductions of benefit rather than deductions.

3. Children are defined here as being people who are declared as living in the same household as the UC claimant(s) and who are under the age of 20. The number of children may not be equal to the number of dependent children in the household who are eligible for child element for various reasons. This includes children over the age of 16 in non-advanced full-time education, looked-after children and, other young people living in multigenerational households whose parents are not the claimant. Those affected by the policy to provide support for a maximum of two children may also have a larger number of children compared to the number of children entitled to the child element in their household.

4. Figures are provisional and are subject to retrospective change as later data becomes available.

5. The ‘unknown' parliamentary constituency equates to 0.2% of all households and relates to households for which a constituency could not be determined due to incomplete postcode information.

6. Data for May 2023 has been provided in line with the latest available UC Household Statistics.

7. Claim numbers and number of children on UC will not match official statistics caseloads due to methodological differences.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
5th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people were on long-term sickness benefits in (a) Enfield North Constituency, (b) the London Borough of Enfield and (c) London in each of the last five years.

The requested information is contained in the attached spreadsheet.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
10th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if he will make (a) an estimate of average housing rental costs and (b) an assessment of the adequacy of local housing allowance rates in (i) Enfield North constituency, (ii) the London Borough of Enfield and (iii) London; and if he will make a statement.

The Department collects rental data necessary for calculating UC or HB payments for its claimants, therefore we cannot produce an estimate of average housing rental costs for all rental properties in specific geographical areas. The Valuation Office Agency collects data on rental costs in England to produce the 30th percentile of market rents and publishes the list of rents utilised to calculate this. The latest list of rents for the period 1st October 2021 to 30th September 2022 is published here. For figures specific to Enfield, Enfield North, and London please refer to the table below.

Geographical Area

Proportion of Households with a shortfall

Average Monthly Shortfall

Enfield North Constituency

39%

£213

Enfield Local Authority

37%

£213

London (Region)

41%

£244

For detailed information on LHA rates and Government support, please refer to the answer given to PQ191728/191729.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
20th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if he will make an assessment of the potential impact of the rate of statutory maternity pay as of June 2023 on health outcomes for (a) new mothers and (b) babies in each of the first five years following birth.

The standard rate of Statutory Maternity Pay (SMP) is reviewed annually. From April 2023, we increased the rate of SMP by September's CPI figure of 10.1 per cent to £172.48. There are no plans to review SMP outside of the annual uprating process.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
15th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether he has made an assessment of the potential merits of excluding maternity allowance from the benefits cap.

No assessment has been made.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
15th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether he has made an assessment of the potential merits of extending statutory maternity pay to self-employed people.

There are no plans to extend Statutory Maternity Pay to self-employed people. Statutory Maternity Pay forms part of a package of employment rights and protections available specifically to the employed. These rights do not extend to the self-employed because of the difference in the nature of the employment.

Women who are self-employed and expecting, can apply for Maternity Allowance to support them to take a break from their business prior to, and after, giving birth.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
15th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether he is taking steps with the Secretary of State for Business and Trade to raise awareness among new mothers of all employment status types about their rights to maternity pay.

Information about Statutory Maternity Pay and Maternity Allowance entitlement is available on GOV.UK.

Some employers however may choose to offer more than the statutory minimum required, sometimes referred to as Occupational Maternity Pay.

This is a matter between employer and employee.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
15th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether he is taking steps to ensure that all new mothers have access to maternity pay.

All employed women who satisfy the eligibility criteria are entitled to receive Statutory Maternity Pay (SMP) from their employer. Employed women who are not entitled to SMP, and self-employed women, can claim for Maternity Allowance (MA) from the Department for Work and Pensions. The qualifying conditions for both SMP and MA are generally based on a woman's recent employment and earnings. Information on the eligibility criteria for SMP and MA can be found on GOV.UK.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
15th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of increasing the rate of statutory maternity pay to the level of the national minimum wage.

The standard rate of Statutory Maternity Pay (SMP) is reviewed annually. From April 2023, we increased the rate of SMP by September's CPI figure of 10.1 per cent to £172.48. There are no plans to review the rate of SMP outside of the annual uprating process.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
15th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how much was taken from Universal Credit payments to households subject to a benefit deduction in Enfield North constituency in (a) March 2020 to February 2021, (b) March 2021 to February 2022 and (c) March 2022 to February 2023.

The primary aim of the Universal Credit deductions policy is to protect vulnerable claimants by providing a last resort repayment method for arrears of essential services. In recent years, the standard UC deduction cap has been reduced twice – from 40% to 30% of the Standard Allowance in October 2019, and down to 25% in April 2021.

From April 2020 to July 2020, a temporary freeze on government and third party deductions was introduced as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The requested information is provided in the separate spreadsheet.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
15th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many households had a Universal Credit deduction in Enfield North constituency from (a) March 2022 to February 2023, (b) March 2021 to February 2022 and (c) March 2020 to February 2021; and how many children lived in such households in each of those periods.

The primary aim of the Universal Credit deductions policy is to protect vulnerable claimants by providing a last resort repayment method for arrears of essential services. In recent years, the standard UC deduction cap has been reduced twice – from 40% to 30% of the Standard Allowance in October 2019, and down to 25% in April 2021.

From April 2020 to July 2020, a temporary freeze on government and third party deductions was introduced as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The requested information is provided in the separate spreadsheet.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
15th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many Universal Credit deductions for (a) households and (b) households with children in Enfield North constituency there were from (i) March 2022 to February 2023, (ii) March 2021 to February 2022 and (iii) March 2020 to February 2021.

The primary aim of the Universal Credit deductions policy is to protect vulnerable claimants by providing a last resort repayment method for arrears of essential services. In recent years, the standard UC deduction cap has been reduced twice – from 40% to 30% of the Standard Allowance in October 2019, and down to 25% in April 2021.

From April 2020 to July 2020, a temporary freeze on government and third party deductions was introduced as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The requested information is provided in the separate spreadsheet.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
13th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what the longest period between receipt and approval of an application for Pension Credit was in each region of the UK in the last 12 months.

This information is only available at disproportionate cost to The Department for Work & Pensions as the Department does not have a business requirement for this information to be retained.

Laura Trott
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
12th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if he will make an estimate of the number of families in (a) Enfield North Constituency, (b) the London Borough of Enfield and (c) London that have been subject to the two-child benefit limit for each year since 2015.

The policy that provides support for a maximum of 2 children in Universal Credit and Child Tax Credit came into effect in April 2017, therefore statistics are only available from 2018.

Between April 2019 and April 2020 there was the most notable increase across GB due to the Covid spike in claims and the gateway for families with 3+ children being able to apply for UC opening in February 2019.

The available statistics for Enfield North Constituency are provided in the table below.

Number of UC Households affected by the policy to provide support for a maximum of two children – households not receiving a child element for at least one child

Apr-18

Apr-19

Apr-20

Apr-21

Apr-22

20

50

250

440

590

The available statistics for the London Borough of Enfield are provided in the table below.

Number of UC Households affected by the policy to provide support for a maximum of two children – households not receiving a child element for at least one child

Apr-18

Apr-19

Apr-20

30

120

640

The available statistics for London are provided in the table below.

Number of UC Households affected by the policy to provide support for a maximum of two children – households not receiving a child element for at least one child

Apr-18

Apr-19

Apr-20

2,000

3,010

12,830

Statistics for regions and local authorities have been published routinely since 2021:

Universal Credit and Child Tax Credit claimants: statistics related to the policy to provide support for a maximum of 2 children, April 2021 - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

Universal Credit and Child Tax Credit claimants: statistics related to the policy to provide support for a maximum of 2 children, April 2022 - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

Notes:

  1. Base: Those in receipt of Universal Credit, at 2 April between 2018 and 2022
  2. Figures are rounded to the nearest 10
  3. Region/Local Authority/Parliamentary Constituency is derived using postcode lookup data against the claimant address, however, is not present for all households in this data source
  4. Between April 2019 and April 2020 there was the most notable increase across GB due to the Covid spike in claims and the gateway for families with 3+ children being able to apply for UC opening in February 2019.
  5. Geography data has been updated since the April 2022 publication so figures may differ slightly
Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
7th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many Disability Employment Advisors were employed by his Department as of 1 June in each year since 2018 in (a) Enfield North constituency, (b) the London Borough of Enfield and (c) London.

Data at constituency and borough level is not available. Relevant data for London Region is shown in the table below.

Year

Work Coach - Full Time Staff Equivalent

Disability Employment Adviser (DEA) - Full Time Staff Equivalent

2018

3210

69

2019

3050

2

2020

2040

0

2021

4980

120

2022

3800

170

2023

2770

130

Source: DWP’s internal Activity Based Model (ABM)

Notes:

  • Data is correct as of 1 June 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021, 2022, and 2023.
  • Data for Work Coaches and Disability Employment Advisers (DEAs) do not include Work Coach Team Leaders. Number of DEAs was impacted during the Covid Pandemic.
  • Figures were derived from the Department’s Activity Based Model (ABM), which provides Full Time Equivalent (FTE) figures based on point in time estimate by Line Managers. They cover only FTE of staff with paid employment. WCs have been rounded to the nearest 10.
  • The number of Work Coaches is unpublished management information, collected and intended for internal department use and has not been quality assured to National Statistics or Official Statistics standard. As the Department holds the information, we have released it.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
7th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many work coaches were employed in Jobcentres as of 1 June in each month since 2018 in (a) Enfield North constituency, (b) the London Borough of Enfield and (c) London.

Data at constituency and borough level is not available. Relevant data for London Region is shown in the table below.

Year

Work Coach - Full Time Staff Equivalent

Disability Employment Adviser (DEA) - Full Time Staff Equivalent

2018

3210

69

2019

3050

2

2020

2040

0

2021

4980

120

2022

3800

170

2023

2770

130

Source: DWP’s internal Activity Based Model (ABM)

Notes:

  • Data is correct as of 1 June 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021, 2022, and 2023.
  • Data for Work Coaches and Disability Employment Advisers (DEAs) do not include Work Coach Team Leaders. Number of DEAs was impacted during the Covid Pandemic.
  • Figures were derived from the Department’s Activity Based Model (ABM), which provides Full Time Equivalent (FTE) figures based on point in time estimate by Line Managers. They cover only FTE of staff with paid employment. WCs have been rounded to the nearest 10.
  • The number of Work Coaches is unpublished management information, collected and intended for internal department use and has not been quality assured to National Statistics or Official Statistics standard. As the Department holds the information, we have released it.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
7th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment he has made of trends in the numbers of children living in low income households in (a) Enfield North constituency, (b) the London Borough of Enfield and (c) London.

Latest statistics for the levels of children who are in low income in the Enfield North constituency and the London Borough of Enfield are published in “Children in Low Income Families”, and can be found here.

National and regional statistics (including those for London) on the number and percentage of children in low income are published annually in the “Households Below Average Income” publication, and can be found here.

Due to methodological differences, the figures in these two publications are not comparable.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
15th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment his Department have made of trends in the distribution of food parcels in (a) Enfield North constituency, (b) the London Borough of Enfield and (c) London.

Foodbanks are independent, charitable organisations and HM Government does not have any role in their operation. As such, data on trends in the distribution of food parcels in Enfield North constituency, the London Borough of Enfield and London is not available.

This government is committed to understanding and addressing poverty which is why we have published official estimates of foodbank use for the first time in March 2023.

National statistics on food bank use for 2021/22 are available here. We aim to publish statistics for 2022/23 in March 2024.

In 2021/22, 3% of individuals, or 2.1m people, were living in households where a food bank has been used in the 12 months prior to the interview.

In 2021/22, 2% of households in London used a foodbank in the 12 months prior to the interview.

Statistics are not available at the constituency level.

This Government is committed to a sustainable long-term approach to tackling poverty and supporting people on lower incomes. We will spend around £276bn through the welfare system in 2023/24, including around £124bn on people of working age and children and around £152 billion on pensioners. Of this, around £79 billion will be spent on benefits to support disabled people and people with health conditions. (GB, includes non-DWP spend, prices in 23-24 terms).

Over 8 million UK households on eligible means tested benefits will receive additional Cost of Living Payments totalling up to £900 this financial year. Over 99% of initially eligible households have now been sent their first payment of £301 and more than eight million pensioner households across the UK will receive an additional £300 Cost of Living Payment during winter 2023-24 and over 6 million people across the UK on eligible ’extra-costs’ disability benefits will receive a further £150 Disability Cost of Living Payment this summer 2023, to help with the additional costs they face.

For those who require extra support Government is also providing an additional £1 billion of funding, including Barnett impact, to enable a year-long extension of the Household Support Fund in England this financial year. This is on top of what we have already provided since October 2021, bringing total funding to £2.5 billion. It will be for the devolved administrations to decide how to allocate their additional Barnett funding. The London borough of Enfield been allocated £5,695,989 for the period 1 April 2023 to 31 March 2024 to support those most in need with the cost of essentials, including those who may not be eligible for other Government support.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
10th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many employers in (a) Enfield North constituency, (b) the London Borough of Enfield and (c) London have achieved level (i) one, (ii) two and (iii) three of the Disability Confident scheme in each of the last five years.

The information requested is not readily available and to provide it would incur disproportionate cost.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
3rd May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what progress his Department has made on providing a cost of living update for the value of Access to Work grant payments.

As all Access to Work grants are tailored to the individual need, there is no automatic uprating. Instead, all increases in support costs are considered and where appropriate awards are increased, up to an upper limit per individual per annum.

To provide support for those at the upper limit of Access to Work, the upper limit is normally increased on an annual basis. It was increased to £66,000 from April 2023.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
25th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many households were in receipt of housing benefit in each year since 2010 in Enfield North constituency.

The information requested is available at the constituency level on Stat-Xplore, which can be found here.

Guidance for users is available here.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
24th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what recent estimate he has made of the number of pensioners living in poverty in (a) Enfield North constituency, (b) the London Borough of Enfield and (c) London.

National and regional statistics on the number and percentage of pensioners in low income are published annually in the “Households Below Average Income” publication, and can be found at: Households below average income: for financial years ending 1995 to 2022 - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

Laura Trott
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
24th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what recent estimate he has made of the number of children living in poverty in (a) Enfield North constituency, (b) the London Borough of Enfield and (c) London.

Latest statistics for the levels of children who are in low income in the Enfield North Constituency and in the London Borough of Enfield are published in “Children in Low Income Families”, and can be found here.

National and regional statistics on the number and percentage of children in low income are published annually in the “Households Below Average Income” publication, and can be found here.

Due to methodological differences, the figures in these two publications are not comparable.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
20th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many and what proportion of people who were not awarded the Personal Independence Payment following (a) the initial decision and (b) mandatory reconsideration (i) lodged an appeal which then lapsed in each of the last five years and (ii) were awarded at least one enhanced component in (A) Enfield North constituency, (B) Enfield and (C) Greater London in each of the last five years.

The tables below show the number and proportion of individuals awarded Personal Independence Payment (PIP), due to a lapsed appeal, following an initial decision and a mandatory reconsideration decision to not award PIP by the financial year of the initial decision for the specified geographical breakdown. Volumes and proportions of this group receiving at least one enhanced component of PIP have also been provided.

Table 1: Parliamentary Constituency of Enfield North

Financial Year of Initial Decision

Number of individuals awarded PIP due to a lapsed appeal, following an initial decision and MR decision to not award PIP

Proportion of those not awarded PIP following an initial decision and