Alex Davies-Jones Portrait

Alex Davies-Jones

Labour - Pontypridd


Select Committee Meeting
Tuesday 11th May 2021
15:30
Select Committee Meeting
Wednesday 12th May 2021
14:30
Women and Equalities Committee - Oral evidence
Subject: Reform of the Gender Recognition Act
12 May 2021, 2:30 p.m.
At 2.30pm: Oral evidence
Dr Harriet Hutchinson - Community Organiser at Action for Trans Health Durham
Dr John Chisholm CBE - Chair of the Medical Ethics Committee at British Medical Association
At 3.30pm: Oral evidence
Dr Michael Brady - National Adviser for LGBT Health at NHS England
John Stewart - National Director of Specialised Commissioning at NHS England
Leigh Chislett - Clinical Manager at 56 Dean Street
View calendar
Select Committee Meeting
Thursday 13th May 2021
13:50
Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee - Oral evidence
Subject: The work of the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
13 May 2021, 1:50 p.m.
At 2.30pm: Oral evidence
Rt Hon Oliver Dowden CBE MP - Secretary of State at Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
View calendar
Division Votes
Wednesday 28th April 2021
Immigration
voted Aye - in line with the party majority
One of 196 Labour Aye votes vs 0 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 270 Noes - 358
Speeches
Wednesday 21st April 2021
Oral Answers to Questions

Can I echo the comments of the Secretary of State on the despicable attempted murder of a serving police officer? …

Written Answers
Thursday 29th April 2021
Nappies and Sanitary Protection: Recycling
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the new Life Cycle Assessment …
Early Day Motions
Monday 16th March 2020
Funding for devolved nations
That this House calls for an urgent review of the implementation of the 42-year-old Barnett Formula for funding devolved nations …
Bills
None available
MP Financial Interests
Monday 27th April 2020
1. Employment and earnings
23 April 2020, payment of £100. Hours: 30 mins. Fee donated to local constituency party. (Registered 27 April 2020)
EDM signed
Monday 18th January 2021
Godfrey Colin Cameron
That this House is deeply saddened by news of the death of Godfrey Colin Cameron, a hardworking member of Parliamentary …
Supported Legislation
Wednesday 4th March 2020
International Development (Women’s Sanitary Products) Bill 2019-21
A Bill to require the Secretary of State to report on the use of official development assistance to increase the …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Alex Davies-Jones has voted in 233 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Alex Davies-Jones Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Jacob Rees-Mogg (Conservative)
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
(12 debate interactions)
Victoria Atkins (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
(11 debate interactions)
Boris Johnson (Conservative)
Prime Minister, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, and Minister for the Union
(10 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Home Office
(21 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(19 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Alex Davies-Jones's debates

Pontypridd Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petitions with highest Pontypridd signature proportion
Petitions with most Pontypridd signatures
Petition Debates Contributed

Every year more and more people, animals and wildlife get hurt by fireworks. It’s time something was fine to stop this. There are enough organised firework groups around for us to still enjoy fireworks safely so please help me stop the needless sale of them to the public!

I would like the government to review and increase the pay for healthcare workers to recognise the work that they do.

We would like the government to support and regard social care: financially, publicly and systematically on an equal par as NHS. We would like parliament to debate how to support social care during COVID-19 and beyond so that it automatically has the same access to operational and financial support.

To revoke the Immigration Health Surcharge increases for overseas NHS staff. The latest budget shows an increase of £220 a year for an overseas worker to live and work in the UK, at a time when the NHS, and UK economy, relies heavily on them.

Give NHS workers who are EU and other Nationals automatic UK citizenship if they stay and risk their own lives looking after the British people during the COVID crisis.


Latest EDMs signed by Alex Davies-Jones

14th January 2021
Alex Davies-Jones signed this EDM on Monday 18th January 2021

Godfrey Colin Cameron

Tabled by: Chris Stephens (Scottish National Party - Glasgow South West)
That this House is deeply saddened by news of the death of Godfrey Colin Cameron, a hardworking member of Parliamentary security staff and member of the PCS trade union who passed away aged just 55 after contracting covid-19; extends our sincere condolences to his devoted wife Hyacinth, children Leon and …
139 signatures
(Most recent: 8 Feb 2021)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 117
Scottish National Party: 15
Plaid Cymru: 3
Independent: 2
Alba Party: 1
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
11th March 2020
Alex Davies-Jones signed this EDM on Tuesday 17th March 2020

War widows pensions

Tabled by: Stephen Doughty (Labour (Co-op) - Cardiff South and Penarth)
That this House honours and recognises the sacrifices that our veterans and their families make; notes the particular sacrifices that the partners of veterans make and the consequences for them of tragically losing a spouse or partner serving in the armed forces; notes the changes announced in 2014 which allowed …
47 signatures
(Most recent: 22 Apr 2020)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 26
Scottish National Party: 6
Conservative: 5
Democratic Unionist Party: 4
Liberal Democrat: 4
Green Party: 1
Plaid Cymru: 1
View All Alex Davies-Jones's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Alex Davies-Jones, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Alex Davies-Jones has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Alex Davies-Jones has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

Alex Davies-Jones has not introduced any legislation before Parliament


154 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Explanation of written questions
1 Other Department Questions
24th Mar 2021
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, when her Department plans to publish a response to the Government’s consultation on sexual harassment in the workplace, which closed on 2 October 2019.

The Government consultation on Sexual Harassment in the Workplace focussed on ensuring that laws to protect people from harassment at work are operating effectively.

We have considered the responses received and listened carefully to the experiences shared through this consultation. We will be setting out the Government’s response shortly.

Kemi Badenoch
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
8th Jan 2021
To ask the Attorney General, on how many occasions since 2010 the CPS has decided that a prosecution for rape is not in the public interest where the perpetrator has confessed.

The Crown Prosecution Service (‘CPS’) collects data showing the outcome of charging decisions, including cases flagged as rape where a decision not to prosecute was taken for public interest reasons. However, the CPS has no central record of the number of cases or suspects where a confession to the offence of rape (or any other offence) has been admitted. This information could only be obtained by an examination of CPS case files, which would incur disproportionate cost.

The table below therefore shows the number of rape-flagged suspects where a no prosecution decision for public interest reasons was the outcome. The proportion of decisions where no further action is taken due to public interest reasons is fewer than 2% of all decisions. However, data on cases in which a confession has been admitted is not available.

No Prosecution - Public Interest

2010-2011

128

2011-2012

88

2012-2013

91

2013-2014

98

2014-2015

93

2015-2016

109

2016-2017

84

2017-2018

65

2018-2019

60

2019-2020

51

Data Source: CPS Case Management Information System

Michael Ellis
Attorney General
5th Oct 2020
To ask the Attorney General, how many prosecutions made by the Crown Prosecution Service involved domestic abuse between individuals in a same-sex female relationship, in each year since 2010.

The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) collects finalised prosecutions data showing the sex of defendants for cases flagged as involving domestic abuse. Some, more limited, information is also available showing the identified relationship between defendant and complainant and whether the relationship is between people of the same or different sex.

The table below shows the number of defendants prosecuted for domestic abuse where a relationship was identified as same sex (partner, ex-partner, spouse/civil partner or former spouse/civil partner), during each of the last ten years. It also highlights the number of defendants where the relationship has been recorded. This data is limited, which results in the number of defendants with an identified relationship being under-recorded.

Female Defendants

Male Defendants

% of Relationships Recorded

2010-2011

28

56

16.7%

2011-2012

45

77

30.0%

2012-2013

54

84

47.7%

2013-2014

80

97

52.7%

2014-2015

127

129

55.4%

2015-2016

160

186

55.6%

2016-2017

136

141

52.4%

2017-2018

108

130

48.7%

2018-2019

88

137

48.9%

2019-2020

84

144

56.4%

Data Source: CPS Case Management Information System

While the CPS does not collate prosecutions data by county, data is available showing the number of prosecutions in each of the regional Areas of the CPS. The tables below provide the same information as the table above, broken down for each CPS Area.

Female Defendants

2010-2011

2011-2012

2012-2013

2013-2014

2014-2015

2015-2016

2016-2017

2017-2018

2018-2019

2019-2020

Cymru Wales

4

2

5

7

8

14

15

14

5

10

East Midlands

0

1

4

5

9

8

10

2

4

8

Eastern

3

2

6

5

5

12

9

5

1

7

London North

1

3

5

4

2

13

14

15

5

3

London South

3

5

0

4

7

15

6

13

7

11

Merseyside & Cheshire

1

2

1

5

7

10

17

6

12

2

North East

4

3

1

4

4

5

9

3

6

5

North West

1

12

9

13

29

17

15

8

14

12

South East

0

1

7

5

10

8

6

7

8

4

South West

0

2

2

6

12

5

5

7

1

1

Thames and Chiltern

2

3

2

3

7

8

4

5

1

2

Wessex

2

2

3

6

3

6

4

5

7

3

West Midlands

5

5

5

5

9

26

10

10

10

9

Yorkshire & Humberside

2

2

4

8

15

13

12

8

7

7

Data Source: CPS Case Management Information System

Male Defendants

2010-2011

2011-2012

2012-2013

2013-2014

2014-2015

2015-2016

2016-2017

2017-2018

2018-2019

2019-2020

Cymru Wales

1

4

11

8

4

14

12

2

7

14

East Midlands

1

1

2

7

10

14

10

8

2

9

Eastern

2

5

5

8

8

12

5

5

9

21

London North

1

8

8

13

10

19

11

9

15

12

London South

8

13

7

6

13

18

20

18

15

13

Merseyside & Cheshire

4

2

6

3

6

11

6

5

8

5

North East

9

3

0

4

11

9

6

5

3

7

North West

12

21

12

11

25

25

10

17

18

15

South East

5

2

7

5

9

6

11

9

16

3

South West

1

3

2

9

10

11

5

8

3

5

Thames and Chiltern

5

4

3

2

7

10

8

9

2

9

Wessex

1

5

8

3

4

6

6

5

14

9

West Midlands

5

4

6

10

8

13

17

13

14

6

Yorkshire & Humberside

1

2

7

8

4

18

14

17

11

16

Data Source: CPS Case Management Information System

Michael Ellis
Attorney General
5th Oct 2020
To ask the Attorney General, how many prosecutions made by the Crown Prosecution Service involved domestic abuse between individuals in a same-sex male relationship, in each year since 2010.

The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) collects finalised prosecutions data showing the sex of defendants for cases flagged as involving domestic abuse. Some, more limited, information is also available showing the identified relationship between defendant and complainant and whether the relationship is between people of the same or different sex.

The table below shows the number of defendants prosecuted for domestic abuse where a relationship was identified as same sex (partner, ex-partner, spouse/civil partner or former spouse/civil partner), during each of the last ten years. It also highlights the number of defendants where the relationship has been recorded. This data is limited, which results in the number of defendants with an identified relationship being under-recorded.

Female Defendants

Male Defendants

% of Relationships Recorded

2010-2011

28

56

16.7%

2011-2012

45

77

30.0%

2012-2013

54

84

47.7%

2013-2014

80

97

52.7%

2014-2015

127

129

55.4%

2015-2016

160

186

55.6%

2016-2017

136

141

52.4%

2017-2018

108

130

48.7%

2018-2019

88

137

48.9%

2019-2020

84

144

56.4%

Data Source: CPS Case Management Information System

While the CPS does not collate prosecutions data by county, data is available showing the number of prosecutions in each of the regional Areas of the CPS. The tables below provide the same information as the table above, broken down for each CPS Area.

Female Defendants

2010-2011

2011-2012

2012-2013

2013-2014

2014-2015

2015-2016

2016-2017

2017-2018

2018-2019

2019-2020

Cymru Wales

4

2

5

7

8

14

15

14

5

10

East Midlands

0

1

4

5

9

8

10

2

4

8

Eastern

3

2

6

5

5

12

9

5

1

7

London North

1

3

5

4

2

13

14

15

5

3

London South

3

5

0

4

7

15

6

13

7

11

Merseyside & Cheshire

1

2

1

5

7

10

17

6

12

2

North East

4

3

1

4

4

5

9

3

6

5

North West

1

12

9

13

29

17

15

8

14

12

South East

0

1

7

5

10

8

6

7

8

4

South West

0

2

2

6

12

5

5

7

1

1

Thames and Chiltern

2

3

2

3

7

8

4

5

1

2

Wessex

2

2

3

6

3

6

4

5

7

3

West Midlands

5

5

5

5

9

26

10

10

10

9

Yorkshire & Humberside

2

2

4

8

15

13

12

8

7

7

Data Source: CPS Case Management Information System

Male Defendants

2010-2011

2011-2012

2012-2013

2013-2014

2014-2015

2015-2016

2016-2017

2017-2018

2018-2019

2019-2020

Cymru Wales

1

4

11

8

4

14

12

2

7

14

East Midlands

1

1

2

7

10

14

10

8

2

9

Eastern

2

5

5

8

8

12

5

5

9

21

London North

1

8

8

13

10

19

11

9

15

12

London South

8

13

7

6

13

18

20

18

15

13

Merseyside & Cheshire

4

2

6

3

6

11

6

5

8

5

North East

9

3

0

4

11

9

6

5

3

7

North West

12

21

12

11

25

25

10

17

18

15

South East

5

2

7

5

9

6

11

9

16

3

South West

1

3

2

9

10

11

5

8

3

5

Thames and Chiltern

5

4

3

2

7

10

8

9

2

9

Wessex

1

5

8

3

4

6

6

5

14

9

West Midlands

5

4

6

10

8

13

17

13

14

6

Yorkshire & Humberside

1

2

7

8

4

18

14

17

11

16

Data Source: CPS Case Management Information System

Michael Ellis
Attorney General
5th Oct 2020
To ask the Attorney General, how many prosecutions made by the Crown Prosecution Service involved domestic abuse between individuals in same-sex relationships, by (a) gender and (b) county in England and Wales, in each year since 2010.

The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) collects finalised prosecutions data showing the sex of defendants for cases flagged as involving domestic abuse. Some, more limited, information is also available showing the identified relationship between defendant and complainant and whether the relationship is between people of the same or different sex.

The table below shows the number of defendants prosecuted for domestic abuse where a relationship was identified as same sex (partner, ex-partner, spouse/civil partner or former spouse/civil partner), during each of the last ten years. It also highlights the number of defendants where the relationship has been recorded. This data is limited, which results in the number of defendants with an identified relationship being under-recorded.

Female Defendants

Male Defendants

% of Relationships Recorded

2010-2011

28

56

16.7%

2011-2012

45

77

30.0%

2012-2013

54

84

47.7%

2013-2014

80

97

52.7%

2014-2015

127

129

55.4%

2015-2016

160

186

55.6%

2016-2017

136

141

52.4%

2017-2018

108

130

48.7%

2018-2019

88

137

48.9%

2019-2020

84

144

56.4%

Data Source: CPS Case Management Information System

While the CPS does not collate prosecutions data by county, data is available showing the number of prosecutions in each of the regional Areas of the CPS. The tables below provide the same information as the table above, broken down for each CPS Area.

Female Defendants

2010-2011

2011-2012

2012-2013

2013-2014

2014-2015

2015-2016

2016-2017

2017-2018

2018-2019

2019-2020

Cymru Wales

4

2

5

7

8

14

15

14

5

10

East Midlands

0

1

4

5

9

8

10

2

4

8

Eastern

3

2

6

5

5

12

9

5

1

7

London North

1

3

5

4

2

13

14

15

5

3

London South

3

5

0

4

7

15

6

13

7

11

Merseyside & Cheshire

1

2

1

5

7

10

17

6

12

2

North East

4

3

1

4

4

5

9

3

6

5

North West

1

12

9

13

29

17

15

8

14

12

South East

0

1

7

5

10

8

6

7

8

4

South West

0

2

2

6

12

5

5

7

1

1

Thames and Chiltern

2

3

2

3

7

8

4

5

1

2

Wessex

2

2

3

6

3

6

4

5

7

3

West Midlands

5

5

5

5

9

26

10

10

10

9

Yorkshire & Humberside

2

2

4

8

15

13

12

8

7

7

Data Source: CPS Case Management Information System

Male Defendants

2010-2011

2011-2012

2012-2013

2013-2014

2014-2015

2015-2016

2016-2017

2017-2018

2018-2019

2019-2020

Cymru Wales

1

4

11

8

4

14

12

2

7

14

East Midlands

1

1

2

7

10

14

10

8

2

9

Eastern

2

5

5

8

8

12

5

5

9

21

London North

1

8

8

13

10

19

11

9

15

12

London South

8

13

7

6

13

18

20

18

15

13

Merseyside & Cheshire

4

2

6

3

6

11

6

5

8

5

North East

9

3

0

4

11

9

6

5

3

7

North West

12

21

12

11

25

25

10

17

18

15

South East

5

2

7

5

9

6

11

9

16

3

South West

1

3

2

9

10

11

5

8

3

5

Thames and Chiltern

5

4

3

2

7

10

8

9

2

9

Wessex

1

5

8

3

4

6

6

5

14

9

West Midlands

5

4

6

10

8

13

17

13

14

6

Yorkshire & Humberside

1

2

7

8

4

18

14

17

11

16

Data Source: CPS Case Management Information System

Michael Ellis
Attorney General
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the total value of contracts awarded to PA Consulting in 2020 was to help the Government’s response to covid-19.

As has been the case under successive administrations, details of meetings with external contractors are not usually disclosed. Details of ministers' meetings with external organisations and individuals are published on gov.uk periodically.


Details of Government contracts above £10,000 are published on Contracts Finder: https://www.contractsfinder.service.gov.uk/Search

Julia Lopez
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will publish the attendees at negotiations for the contracts awarded to PA Consulting to help deliver the Government’s covid-19 response.

As has been the case under successive administrations, details of meetings with external contractors are not usually disclosed. Details of ministers' meetings with external organisations and individuals are published on gov.uk periodically.


Details of Government contracts above £10,000 are published on Contracts Finder: https://www.contractsfinder.service.gov.uk/Search

Julia Lopez
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
2nd Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the total value of service credits applied to the contracts awarded for consultancy spend across all Government Departments since 1 March 2020.

This Government recognises that outsourcing is an important component in a “mixed economy” of public service provision and that the private sector has played a crucial role in the country’s response to the Covid-19 pandemic, including in relation to the development and procurement of the Government’s world-leading vaccine programme. Under the terms of the Public Contracts Regulations 2015, departments and other public authorities are able to use various applicable procedures. Public authorities across the United Kingdom including the devolved administrations and local authorities have made use of direct awards - this includes Leeds City Council. Similar approaches were adopted by many other countries, including Japan, Finland and New Zealand. It is unrealistic to suggest that the government ought to have run a full public procurement competition for PPE and other critical contracts at the height of the pandemic. The minimum number of days a competitive award could take place under the current rules is 25 days. This would have hugely slowed down the buying of vital PPE supplies.

Further to the Outsourcing Playbook, available on gov.uk, and as has been the case under successive administrations, public sector contracting authorities are responsible for their own commercial decisions, such as the award and monitoring of contracts. Regarding cyber security, details of the Cyber Essentials scheme is available on gov.uk. The requested information on service credits is not held centrally.

I note that the Hon Member has not yet replied to the letter by my Rt Hon Friend the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster of 20 November 2020. As a courtesy, I will ensure that a further copy of the letter is sent to her office to ensure she has a chance to reply to the points raised.

Julia Lopez
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
30th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, on how many occasions Ministers of devolved Governments have been invited to meetings of the EU Exit Operations Cabinet Committee to discuss preparedness for the end of the transition period (a) from 1 February to 31 August 2020 and (b) since 1 September 2020.

The letter from the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster to Michael Russell MSP on 27 October, available on GOV.UK at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/letters-from-the-chancellor-of-the-duchy-of-lancaster-to-jeremy-miles-ms-and-michael-russell-msp includes detail of the extensive joint working with the devolved administrations.

Penny Mordaunt
Paymaster General
19th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many times the EU Exit Operations Cabinet Committee met to discuss preparedness for the end of the transition period (a) from 1 February and 31 August 2020 and (b) since 1 September 2020.

In line with the practice of successive administrations, details of the discussions that have taken place in Cabinet and its Committees, and how often they have met, is not normally disclosed.

Penny Mordaunt
Paymaster General
5th Jun 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what criteria his Department will use to determine the success of the Geospatial Commission’s National Underground Asset Register trials in London and the North East, announced in April 2019.

Details of the work of the Geospatial Commission are available on their blog page, which includes information on the National Underground Asset Register Pilots.

The UK does not have a comprehensive map of underground utilities which increases the likelihood of dangerous utility strikes (especially for emergency works) and results in significant costs to utility companies, their operators and the wider economy. Any decision to proceed with creating a national register would be announced in the usual way, including invitations to tender for relevant work. Interim findings from the pilots will be published in due course.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
5th Jun 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps he is taking to ensure that the National Underground Asset Register developed by the Geospatial Commission will not affect the financial sustainability of private business that map underground assets and support utility strike avoidance.

Details of the work of the Geospatial Commission are available on their blog page, which includes information on the National Underground Asset Register Pilots.

The UK does not have a comprehensive map of underground utilities which increases the likelihood of dangerous utility strikes (especially for emergency works) and results in significant costs to utility companies, their operators and the wider economy. Any decision to proceed with creating a national register would be announced in the usual way, including invitations to tender for relevant work. Interim findings from the pilots will be published in due course.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
5th Jun 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, when the Geospatial Commission plans to publish (a) the full findings of its trial to develop a National Underground Asset Register and (b) the business case and timeframe for the development of that service.

Details of the work of the Geospatial Commission are available on their blog page, which includes information on the National Underground Asset Register Pilots.

The UK does not have a comprehensive map of underground utilities which increases the likelihood of dangerous utility strikes (especially for emergency works) and results in significant costs to utility companies, their operators and the wider economy. Any decision to proceed with creating a national register would be announced in the usual way, including invitations to tender for relevant work. Interim findings from the pilots will be published in due course.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
24th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Government’s response to the Pregnancy and maternity discrimination consultation published in July 2019, what progress the Government has made on establishing a taskforce on that matter.

The Government remains committed to bringing together a broad set of key stakeholders to look at what improvements can be made to address pregnancy and maternity discrimination in the workplace.

We are finalising plans and will be setting up the first meeting shortly.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the number of covid-19 vaccine distribution deliveries that have been (a) delayed and (b) cancelled as a result of procurement issues in (a) England, (b) Wales, (c) Scotland and (d) Northern Ireland; and if he will make a statement.

The Government has procured 40 million doses of the Pfizer/BioNTech and 100 million doses of the Oxford University/AstraZeneca vaccines.

The UK was the first country in the world to start a vaccination programme using these vaccines. Due to our swift and decisive action there has been a regular and steady supply of vaccine doses arriving into the UK since early December 2020.

As of 27 January 2021, over 7.1 million people across the UK have been vaccinated with the first dose of the vaccine. We continue to work to meet our target of vaccinating all four priority groups by 15 February. The UK COVID-19 Vaccines Delivery Plan sets out how the Government will work with the NHS, devolved administrations, local councils, and the Armed Forces to deliver the largest vaccination programme in British history.

Vaccines are a precious resource in very high demand across the world; therefore, for security reasons it is not possible to provide detail about the size of our supplies and exact detail about deliveries.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
17th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to ensure that data collected by businesses in the hospitality industry to support test and trace is not being used for marketing purposes.

Government advice from the Department for Health and Social Care is clear. The data that is being asked to collect is personal data and must be handled in accordance with General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) to protect the privacy of your staff, customers and visitors.

Personal data that is collected for NHS Test and Trace, which organisations would not collect in their usual course of business, must be used only to share with NHS Test and Trace. It must not be used for other purposes, including marketing, profiling, analysis or other purposes unrelated to contact tracing, or they will be in breach of GDPR.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
17th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what guidance his Department has provided to small businesses on data use and collection in relation to the coronavirus test and trace system.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
28th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps the Government is taking to ensure that broadband remains affordable to those on (a) universal credit and (b) other low-income benefits.

The Government has worked closely with industry throughout the pandemic and agreed a set of commitments with the UK’s major broadband and mobile operators to support vulnerable consumers during the Covid-19 period. Providers committed to working with customers who are finding it difficult to pay their bill as a result of Covid-19 to ensure that they are treated fairly and appropriately supported. Providers also committed to removing fixed broadband data caps, in addition to providing new and generous landline and mobile offers, such as free or low cost mobile data boosts.

There are already social tariffs available which offer low cost landline and broadband services for those on certain means-tested benefits. However, the Government is now encouraging all fixed broadband providers to introduce a social tariff and we will monitor the situation closely.

Matt Warman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
19th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the effect of the covid-19 lockdown announced in January 2021 on women’s elite level football.

I have regular discussions with the Football Association about the impact of COVID-19 on elite level football, including on women's elite football. Last year we also put in place an exemption for elite sport to continue behind closed doors has allowed elite level women’s football competitions like the Women’s Super League to continue.

Government has provided unprecedented support to businesses through tax reliefs, cash grants and employee wage support, which many women’s sport clubs have benefited from. The £300m Sports Winter Survival Package also aims to protect the immediate futures of major spectator sports in England over the winter period, including women’s football.

Nigel Huddleston
Assistant Whip
19th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent steps he has taken to support women’s sport through the covid-19 outbreak.

I am committed to helping women’s sport come out of the current crisis stronger than ever and I am continuing to work closely with the sector to ensure that happens. Over the last year I have met with a range of sports organisations to discuss the impact of COVID-19 on women’s sport and how together we can address these challenges going forward. I have made clear in these discussions that I expect women’s sport to be protected through the pandemic and prioritised as we emerge on the other side.

Government has provided unprecedented support to businesses through tax reliefs, cash grants and employee wage support, which many women’s sport clubs have benefited from. For example, Sport England’s Community Emergency Fund has provided £220m directly to support community sport clubs and exercise centres through this pandemic. Women’s spectator sports severely impacted by the restrictions around fans over the winter are also being supported through the £300m Sports Winter Survival Package, which aims to protect the immediate futures of major spectator sports in England over the winter period.

Nigel Huddleston
Assistant Whip
19th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent steps he has taken to tackle the effect of misinformation online on disordered eating.

The government is committed to making the UK the safest place to be online.

The Full Government Response to the Online Harms White Paper consultation, published in December 2020, sets out the government’s plans to introduce a new statutory duty of care. Tech companies will have new responsibilities to protect their users, particularly children, from harmful content, which could include eating disorder content. The Online Safety Bill, which will give effect to the regulatory framework outlined in the full government response, will be ready this year.

We have asked the Law Commission to review the current legislation on harmful online communications. As part of this review the Government has also asked the Law Commission to examine how the criminal law will address the encouragement or assistance of self harm. The Law Commission has made provisional recommendations and has consulted on these proposed reforms. They will provide final recommendations in summer 2021.

Online media and digital literacy can equip users with the skills they need to spot dangers online, critically appraise information and take steps to keep themselves and others safe online. The Online Harms White Paper, set out the government’s intention to develop an online media literacy strategy. The strategy will ensure a coordinated and strategic approach to online media literacy education and awareness for children, young people and adults.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
16th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent assessment he has made of the effect on individual’s data privacy of Facebook moving UK users on to US privacy agreements in 2021; and if he will make a statement.

On 15th December, Facebook publicly announced that from next year Facebook Inc in the US rather than Facebook Ireland will be the service provider responsible for UK users’ personal data.

At the end of the Transition Period, any online service provider dealing with UK users' personal data will still be subject to the UK Data Protection Act 2018 and UK General Data Protection Regulation. The legislation will, therefore, continue to apply to Facebook's treatment of personal data of UK users when those users are served from the US.

The UK is committed to high data protection standards and we are confident that the UK’s data protection laws provide appropriate protection for UK users.

John Whittingdale
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
15th Sep 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps he is taking to improve mental health support for veterans.

The Government is taking a number of measures to improve mental health support for veterans across the UK. From the beginning of service in the Armed Forces, personnel now undergo ‘through-life’ psychological resilience training, and upon leaving they have access to the Defence Transition Service (DTS), launched in October 2019. The DTS provides support for Service leavers and families who are the most likely to face challenges during transition to civilian life, including an impact on their mental health.

Wherever they live in the UK, all veterans are able to receive specialist mental health support if they need it. As healthcare is a devolved matter, further questions regarding Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland should be addressed to the relevant devolved administration.

As well as the statutory services delivered by the NHS, the Government provides funding to a range of charity and third sector organisations, through the Armed Forces Covenant Fund Trust and, most recently, a £6 million emergency COVID-19 Impact Fund. This funding has supported fantastic organisations across the four nations to deliver services to support the mental and physical wellbeing of veterans.

We are also investing in research, to improve our understanding of mental health amongst serving and ex-service personnel. This includes a recent study looking at the impact of COVID-19 on veterans and a long term veterans study examining a range of mental health and wellbeing factors; both of these are led by Kings College. A further two studies will contribute to improving the data and understanding around suicide; the first examining the cause of death, including suicide in members of the Armed Forces who have served since 2001 and a further study looking at the events in the 12 months leading up to known suicides in the last five years of anyone from the Armed Forces community.

10th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether his Department classifies professional (performance) wrestling as a sport or performance art for the purposes of observing covid-19 guidelines.

For the purposes of observing Covid-19 guidelines, we advise participants and spectators of this form of wrestling to refer to both the Performance Arts Guidance (for managing rehearsals, training and audiences), and the Phased Return of Sport and Recreation Guidance (for guidance related to physical activity).

Professional Activity, such as professional wrestling, is permitted in line with Stage 4 of the performing arts roadmap within venues that are able to host such activities in line with Covid secure guidance. From 14 September, venues such as theatres, concert halls and other entertainment venues that host such events will need to ensure they are Covid secure in line with the relevant guidance, and that groups within the audience are limited to six. Venues will also need to ensure that groups are kept separate from one another to ensure they do not mix and do not exceed the new legal limits and that they adhere to new legal requirements around track and trace.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
10th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what guidance his Department has published on the safe operation of professional wrestling training schools during the covid-19 outbreak; and if he will make a statement.

For the purposes of observing Covid-19 guidelines, we advise participants and spectators of this form of wrestling to refer to both the Performance Arts Guidance (for managing rehearsals, training and audiences), and the Phased Return of Sport and Recreation Guidance (for guidance related to physical activity).

Professional Activity, such as professional wrestling, is permitted in line with Stage 4 of the performing arts roadmap within venues that are able to host such activities in line with Covid secure guidance. From 14 September, venues such as theatres, concert halls and other entertainment venues that host such events will need to ensure they are Covid secure in line with the relevant guidance, and that groups within the audience are limited to six. Venues will also need to ensure that groups are kept separate from one another to ensure they do not mix and do not exceed the new legal limits and that they adhere to new legal requirements around track and trace.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
10th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether professional wrestling matches and events are permitted under lockdown restrictions for performance art and theatre during the covid-19 outbreak.

For the purposes of observing Covid-19 guidelines, we advise participants and spectators of this form of wrestling to refer to both the Performance Arts Guidance (for managing rehearsals, training and audiences), and the Phased Return of Sport and Recreation Guidance (for guidance related to physical activity).

Professional Activity, such as professional wrestling, is permitted in line with Stage 4 of the performing arts roadmap within venues that are able to host such activities in line with Covid secure guidance. From 14 September, venues such as theatres, concert halls and other entertainment venues that host such events will need to ensure they are Covid secure in line with the relevant guidance, and that groups within the audience are limited to six. Venues will also need to ensure that groups are kept separate from one another to ensure they do not mix and do not exceed the new legal limits and that they adhere to new legal requirements around track and trace.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
10th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether professional wrestling matches and events are currently permitted to take place during the covid-19 outbreak.

For the purposes of observing Covid-19 guidelines, we advise participants and spectators of this form of wrestling to refer to both the Performance Arts Guidance (for managing rehearsals, training and audiences), and the Phased Return of Sport and Recreation Guidance (for guidance related to physical activity).

Professional Activity, such as professional wrestling, is permitted in line with Stage 4 of the performing arts roadmap within venues that are able to host such activities in line with Covid secure guidance. From 14 September, venues such as theatres, concert halls and other entertainment venues that host such events will need to ensure they are Covid secure in line with the relevant guidance, and that groups within the audience are limited to six. Venues will also need to ensure that groups are kept separate from one another to ensure they do not mix and do not exceed the new legal limits and that they adhere to new legal requirements around track and trace.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
20th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care on the potential effect of the implementation of covid-19 track and trace systems on the (a) protection and (b) use of personal data by businesses in the hospitality sector.

The Department of Health and Social Care has been working closely with the Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) to ensure that the development of test and trace systems, including customer, visitor and staff logs comply with data protection legislation. The ICO has published user-friendly guidance for organisations to ensure they notify individuals that their data is being collected; and that any information collected is limited to what is necessary, is not used for other purposes, is held securely and deleted after 21 days when no longer needed.

The guidance can be viewed on the ICO's website at: https://ico.org.uk/global/data-protection-and-coronavirus-information-hub/contact-tracing-protecting-customer-and-visitor-details/

John Whittingdale
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
3rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the debate on forced adoption in the UK of 12 July 2018, Official Report, column 1187, whether he has met with any victims of the historic practice of forced adoption in the UK since that date; and if he will make a statement.

Following on from the debate in 2018, I can confirm that my hon. Friend, the former Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Children and Families and current Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy and the Department of Health and Social Care, Nadhim Zahawi, met with the hon. Member for Wirral South on 24 October 2018. The meeting was attended by a number of women who had experienced these historical adoption practices. I understand it was a very difficult and moving experience to hear from women who gave up their children under historical adoption practices.

However, whilst we cannot undo the past, we now have a society that takes a very different attitude to single mothers and lessons of the time have been learned and have led to significant changes to legislation and practice.

Single parents are now supported to help ensure that families can stay together, and children are only removed permanently without the consent of the parents by a court if it is satisfied that the child is suffering significant harm or is likely to suffer significant harm.

NHS maternity services now have robust policy, guidance and processes in place to safeguard care for vulnerable women and babies.

I understand in the 2018 debate Minister Zahawi committed to making the 1972 Houghton Report available. I will ensure this is publicly available as soon as possible.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
3rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the debate on forced adoption in the UK of 12 July 2018, Official Report, column 1187, whether he has met with any victims of the historic practice of forced adoption in the UK since that date; and if he will make a statement.

Following on from the debate in 2018, I can confirm that my hon. Friend, the former Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Children and Families and current Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy and the Department of Health and Social Care, Nadhim Zahawi, met with the hon. Member for Wirral South on 24 October 2018. The meeting was attended by a number of women who had experienced these historical adoption practices. I understand it was a very difficult and moving experience to hear from women who gave up their children under historical adoption practices.

However, whilst we cannot undo the past, we now have a society that takes a very different attitude to single mothers and lessons of the time have been learned and have led to significant changes to legislation and practice.

Single parents are now supported to help ensure that families can stay together, and children are only removed permanently without the consent of the parents by a court if it is satisfied that the child is suffering significant harm or is likely to suffer significant harm.

NHS maternity services now have robust policy, guidance and processes in place to safeguard care for vulnerable women and babies.

I understand in the 2018 debate Minister Zahawi committed to making the 1972 Houghton Report available. I will ensure this is publicly available as soon as possible.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
3rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will publish the findings from the 1972 Houghton Report on adoption; and if he will make a statement.

Following on from the debate in 2018, I can confirm that my hon. Friend, the former Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Children and Families and current Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy and the Department of Health and Social Care, Nadhim Zahawi, met with the hon. Member for Wirral South on 24 October 2018. The meeting was attended by a number of women who had experienced these historical adoption practices. I understand it was a very difficult and moving experience to hear from women who gave up their children under historical adoption practices.

However, whilst we cannot undo the past, we now have a society that takes a very different attitude to single mothers and lessons of the time have been learned and have led to significant changes to legislation and practice.

Single parents are now supported to help ensure that families can stay together, and children are only removed permanently without the consent of the parents by a court if it is satisfied that the child is suffering significant harm or is likely to suffer significant harm.

NHS maternity services now have robust policy, guidance and processes in place to safeguard care for vulnerable women and babies.

I understand in the 2018 debate Minister Zahawi committed to making the 1972 Houghton Report available. I will ensure this is publicly available as soon as possible.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
28th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what his Departments' policy is on measuring attendance rates at schools where children have been sent home from school due to a covid-19 outbreak.

School attendance rates are based on the data collected via the termly school census. Data relating to the autumn term of the 2020-21 academic year will be collected as part of the spring 2021 census.

The Department has included an additional category ‘not attending in circumstances relating to coronavirus’ for use in situations as outlined in the following guidance: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/school-attendance/addendum-recording-attendance-in-relation-to-coronavirus-covid-19-during-the-2020-to-2021-academic-year.

Sessions recorded under this category will not count towards normal absence in the statistical releases derived from this data.

In addition to the termly school census, the Department is monitoring data collected daily from schools who are self-reporting and manually inputting data through a web portal each day. We ask schools where children have been sent home due to a COVID-19 outbreak to provide the number of pupils and students not attending due to a suspected or confirmed case of COVID-19, and those that have been requested to remain home due to a potential contact with COVID-19.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
28th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many children have been sent home from school due to a covid-19 outbreak since March 2020; if he will publish the number of those children who have been sent home who have been counted in his Department's attendance figures; and if he will make a statement.

Keeping close track of suspected or confirmed COVID-19 cases in schools is a priority for the Government. Public Health England (PHE) leads in holding data on infection, incidence and COVID-19 cases overall. PHE have published data on COVID-19 incidents by institution, including educational settings. This data can be found here:
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/national-covid-19-surveillance-reports.

The Department is currently collecting data from schools on a daily basis, as well as gathering information from local areas and following up with individual settings to confirm that procedures for requiring pupils to isolate are well understood and that necessary decisions are made on the basis of public health advice.

The Department collects data on the number of schools that have indicated that they have sent children home due to COVID-19 containment measures. We are currently looking at the quality of the data collected with a view to publishing it as part of the official statistics series. The series includes published data on school openings and attendance, which shows that at a national level approximately 93% of state-funded schools were fully open on 24 September. Of all schools that responded to the survey, 6% said they were not fully open due to suspected or confirmed cases of COVID-19 on 24 September. Approximately 88% of all children on roll in all state-funded schools were in attendance on 24 September. More information is available at:
https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/attendance-in-education-and-early-years-settings-during-the-coronavirus-covid-19-outbreak.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
27th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the new Life Cycle Assessment of nappies and absorbent hygiene products, what plans he has to introduce a strategy on tackling the effect of such products on the environment.

In line with the 25 Year Environment Plan, and our Resources and Waste Strategy, we are considering the best approach to minimise the environmental impact of a range of products, including nappies, taking on board the environmental and social impacts of the options available.

Potential additional policy measures include standards, consumer information and encouraging voluntary action by business. We are seeking powers, through the Environment Bill, that will enable us to, where appropriate and subject to consultation, introduce ecodesign and consumer information requirements. This could include labelling schemes that provide accurate information to consumers, to drive the market towards more sustainable products.

The previous Life Cycle Assessment of disposable and washable nappies dates from 2005, and was updated in 2008. To take account of the latest technological developments we are now funding a new environmental assessment of disposable and washable absorbent hygiene products (AHPs) with the primary focus on nappies. This is in progress and is looking at the waste and energy impacts of washable products, disposal to landfill or incineration, and recycling options. It will be published later this year following peer review and will help inform possible future action on AHPs by Government and industry.

In order to complete this study and explore feasible options going forward, information is being gathered from industry. I have met with representatives of the Nappy Alliance, and will be meeting with the Absorbent Hygiene Product Manufacturers Association and disposable nappy business representatives shortly.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
27th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether his Department plans to publish an update on the Life Cycle Assessment of nappies and absorbent hygiene products.

In line with the 25 Year Environment Plan, and our Resources and Waste Strategy, we are considering the best approach to minimise the environmental impact of a range of products, including nappies, taking on board the environmental and social impacts of the options available.

Potential additional policy measures include standards, consumer information and encouraging voluntary action by business. We are seeking powers, through the Environment Bill, that will enable us to, where appropriate and subject to consultation, introduce ecodesign and consumer information requirements. This could include labelling schemes that provide accurate information to consumers, to drive the market towards more sustainable products.

The previous Life Cycle Assessment of disposable and washable nappies dates from 2005, and was updated in 2008. To take account of the latest technological developments we are now funding a new environmental assessment of disposable and washable absorbent hygiene products (AHPs) with the primary focus on nappies. This is in progress and is looking at the waste and energy impacts of washable products, disposal to landfill or incineration, and recycling options. It will be published later this year following peer review and will help inform possible future action on AHPs by Government and industry.

In order to complete this study and explore feasible options going forward, information is being gathered from industry. I have met with representatives of the Nappy Alliance, and will be meeting with the Absorbent Hygiene Product Manufacturers Association and disposable nappy business representatives shortly.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
27th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps his Department plans to take to reduce single-use nappy waste by 2042 as part of the 25 Year Environment Plan.

In line with the 25 Year Environment Plan, and our Resources and Waste Strategy, we are considering the best approach to minimise the environmental impact of a range of products, including nappies, taking on board the environmental and social impacts of the options available.

Potential additional policy measures include standards, consumer information and encouraging voluntary action by business. We are seeking powers, through the Environment Bill, that will enable us to, where appropriate and subject to consultation, introduce ecodesign and consumer information requirements. This could include labelling schemes that provide accurate information to consumers, to drive the market towards more sustainable products.

The previous Life Cycle Assessment of disposable and washable nappies dates from 2005, and was updated in 2008. To take account of the latest technological developments we are now funding a new environmental assessment of disposable and washable absorbent hygiene products (AHPs) with the primary focus on nappies. This is in progress and is looking at the waste and energy impacts of washable products, disposal to landfill or incineration, and recycling options. It will be published later this year following peer review and will help inform possible future action on AHPs by Government and industry.

In order to complete this study and explore feasible options going forward, information is being gathered from industry. I have met with representatives of the Nappy Alliance, and will be meeting with the Absorbent Hygiene Product Manufacturers Association and disposable nappy business representatives shortly.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent assessment he has made of the adequacy of the Marine Stewardship Council's certification and verification process when classifying fish for consumption; and if he will make a statement.

Our ambition is world-class fisheries management to achieve sustainable fisheries, safeguarding stocks and the environment for the long-term. We also support the development of traceable supply chains, where businesses and users can ascertain the legality and sustainability of their products.

We have not made an assessment of the MSC’s certification and verification process and it would not be appropriate to do so. However, the Environmental Audit Committee’s ‘Sustainable Seas’ report of 2019 offers a balanced and insightful enquiry into the Marine Stewardship Council. The recommendation that the report makes with regards to a transparent and independently evaluated review is important, not least to ensure public confidence in the MSC. Transparent and effective reviews of the MSC will also ensure that it is constantly keeping up with the best available fisheries governance.

Victoria Prentis
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
9th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the Local Authority Enforcement Project in Wales, what similar support he is making available to local authorities for collaboration on animal welfare enforcement across the UK.

The Welsh Government has kept us informed of its Local Authority Enforcement Project and we are looking into whether any lessons can be learnt to inform better training of local authority inspectors in England.

Meanwhile, Defra has published statutory guidance notes for local authorities to support the enforcement of the Animal Welfare (Licensing of Activities Involving Animals) Regulations 2018 (the 2018 Regulations) which govern activities such as dog breeding and pet sales.

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/animal-activities-licensing-guidance-for-local-authorities

The 2018 Regulations require that all local authority inspectors must be suitably qualified and the procedural guidance notes define how inspectors can meet this criterion. Such criteria includes any person holding a Level 3 certificate or equivalent granted by a body, recognised and regulated by the Office of Qualifications and Examinations Regulation which oversees the training and assessment of persons in inspecting and licensing animal activities businesses, confirming the passing of an independent examination.

We also helped facilitate the establishment of the Local Government Animal Welfare Group (LGAWG) and its website which provides information for local authority teams as well as other animal welfare enforcers such as the police and the RSPCA. This Group seeks to raise the profile of animal welfare enforcement as well as sharing best practice and providing advice for those working with animals. Supported by Defra, the Local Government Association and the Animal Health & Welfare Board England, the LGAWG provides up to date information and news.

Victoria Prentis
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
1st Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what the value is of service credits applied to the contracts awarded to (a) Brake Brothers and (b) BFS Group to provide food boxes for shielding vulnerable adults.

The Defra Contracts with Brakes and Bidfood delivered 4.7 million food boxes to the doorsteps of the clinically extremely vulnerable in England between 27 March and 1 August 2020. The contract contained Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) to cover on-time, in-full and zero defect delivery. KPIs were monitored on a daily and weekly basis. Brakes and Bidfood delivered the service in accordance with these KPIs and therefore service credits were not required.

Victoria Prentis
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
27th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what guidance his Department has developed to assist police officers to tackle crimes related to animal welfare; and if he will make a statement.

The police do not normally enforce animal welfare legislation except in relation to serious organised crimes, such as dog fighting. Consequently, the police are not usually issued with guidance on animal welfare crimes. Local authorities enforce certain animal welfare laws such as those relating to the licensing of particular animal-related activities. To assist them in this responsibility, we have provided them with the necessary guidance such as that which accompanies The Animal Welfare (Licensing of Activities Involving Animals) (England) Regulations 2018. A copy of the associated guidance can be found on GOV.UK: www.gov.uk/government/publications/animal-activities-licensing-guidance-for-local-authorities.

Victoria Prentis
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
27th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent assessment he has made of the link between those who commit domestic abuse offences as well as animal welfare offences; and if he will make a statement.

The Government is committed to animal welfare. Whilst the Government has not made a formal assessment of existing research into the link between those who commit domestic abuse offences and those who commit animal welfare offences, as a reflection of the seriousness with which we take cruelty against our animals we are supporting the Animal Welfare (Sentencing) Bill, which seeks to increase the maximum custodial penalty for animal cruelty from six months to five years. Committee stage of the Bill in the House of Commons took place on 3 February.

Victoria Prentis
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
10th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent assessment he has made of the potential merits of banning the import of animal fur into the UK.

The Government shares the British public’s high regard for animal welfare and, after the transition period, the Government plans to retain current regulations banning the import of fur from domestic cats and dogs, and has laid secondary legislation to retain the ban on commercial seal hunts. Legislation has prohibited farming of animals for their fur since 2000 in England and Wales, and 2002 in Scotland and Northern Ireland.

Once the UK assumes an independent seat on international bodies such as CITES and OIE we will have an opportunity to promote our high standards in these international fora.

Once our future relationship with the EU has been established there will be an opportunity for the Government to consider further the steps it could take in relation to fur imports.

Victoria Prentis
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
10th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 7 December 2020 to Question 124350 on Pest Control: Animal Welfare, when he plans to bring forward legislative proposals on animal welfare and animal-related measures.

On 3 December, the Government launched an eight-week consultation on the ban of live animal exports for fattening or slaughter. The Government is also consulting on proposals to further improve animal welfare in transport more generally, such as reduced maximum journey times, animals being given more space and headroom during transport, stricter rules on transporting animals in extreme temperatures and tighter rules for transporting live animals by sea.

On 12 December, the Government launched proposals to ban keeping primates as pets in England, inviting the public to have their say on the issue over the next eight weeks. Findings from a recent call for evidence found that these animals' complex needs cannot be met in a home environment. Under these new plans, it will be an offence to keep a primate as a pet in England. Only those keeping primates to zoo level standards will be permitted to keep primates.

The Government is in the process of refining proposals for the manifesto commitments on the introduction of laws on animal sentience, a ban on the import of hunting trophies and tackling puppy smuggling, and will be publishing further detail in the coming weeks. We are still considering the best legislative vehicle to bring forward these reforms in the near future. We will be engaging with stakeholders and other Government departments as necessary.

Our manifesto commitment to introduce mandatory cat microchipping will be brought forward via secondary legislation in the coming months. The Government continues to support the passage of the Animal Welfare (Sentencing) Bill in Parliament to deliver our manifesto commitment to increase the maximum available penalty for the worst animal cruelty offences from six months to five years.

Victoria Prentis
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
9th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when he plans to publish his Department’s response to the consultation on the microchipping of cats in England that closed on 4 January 2020.

The Government is committed to improving the welfare of cats and has a manifesto commitment to introduce compulsory microchipping of cats. In October 2019 Defra published a call for evidence on compulsory microchipping for cats, which attracted over 3,000 responses. We will be publishing a summary of the responses alongside the launch of a public consultation shortly.

Victoria Prentis
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
2nd Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what discussions he has had with the Home Secretary on the legality of glue traps in capturing animals; and if he will make a statement.

The Secretary of State has had no such discussions or recent consultations.

However, this Government remains committed to high standards of animal welfare. We are in the process of developing a range of important animal welfare and animal-related measures to strengthen our position as a world leader in this field. This includes delivering our manifesto commitments to introduce new laws on animal sentience, to ban live exports, restrict the imports of trophies from endangered species and ban keeping primates as pets.

We are currently considering the best legislative vehicle to bring forward these reforms in the near future. We will be engaging with stakeholders and other Government departments as necessary.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
2nd Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent consultations he has had with stakeholders on the use of animal glue traps; and if he will make a statement.

The Secretary of State has had no such discussions or recent consultations.

However, this Government remains committed to high standards of animal welfare. We are in the process of developing a range of important animal welfare and animal-related measures to strengthen our position as a world leader in this field. This includes delivering our manifesto commitments to introduce new laws on animal sentience, to ban live exports, restrict the imports of trophies from endangered species and ban keeping primates as pets.

We are currently considering the best legislative vehicle to bring forward these reforms in the near future. We will be engaging with stakeholders and other Government departments as necessary.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
2nd Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent assessment he has made of the potential merits of making microchipping of domestic cats compulsory; and if he will make a statement.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave to the hon. Member for Plymouth, Sutton and Devonport on 29 October 2020, PQ UIN 107106.

Victoria Prentis
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
13th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the effect of fireworks on air pollution levels; and if he will make a statement.

An assessment of the effect of celebrations surrounding Bonfire Night (5th of November) on air quality is made annually as part of the Air Pollution in the UK report. The assessment is based on measurements from the national monitoring network which monitors concentrations of air pollutants in near real-time on the UK-AIR website. The latest report (for 2019) can be accessed at the following URL: https://uk-air.defra.gov.uk/library/annualreport/index. In the latest report, the effects of Bonfire Night celebrations are dealt with under section 6.1.3 Localised Particulate Pollution Episodes (pages 106 – 108).

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of establishing a food standards commission to ensure that the standard of international food imports is equivalent to existing UK food standards.

Our manifesto is clear that in all of our trade negotiations, we will not compromise on our high environmental protection, animal welfare and food standards. The EU Withdrawal Act will transfer all existing EU food safety provisions, including existing import requirements, onto the UK statute book.

We are already engaging with the agricultural sector as part of our trade discussions. We have not ruled out additional groups, and there is clear scope to review, re-task and reinforce what we have.

The Secretary of State regularly discusses a wide range of issues with Cabinet colleagues, and the Government will continue to work closely with the National Farmers’ Union and other relevant stakeholders across the food chain to understand the concerns about the impact of new trade deals. The Government has in place a range of stakeholder groups to feed into our policy development on trade. These include the Strategic Trade Advisory Group, the Agri-Food Expert Trade Advisory Group and various supply chain groups.

Defra has developed the UK Agricultural Market Monitoring Group, which allows officials in Defra and the Devolved Administrations to monitor UK agricultural markets, to share the latest stakeholder information and to provide warning of atypical market movements. It will help prepare the evidence base for the cause and possible range of interventions that may be needed in specific markets.

Victoria Prentis
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent discussions he has had with Cabinet colleagues on maintaining the current standards of food imports.

Our manifesto is clear that in all of our trade negotiations, we will not compromise on our high environmental protection, animal welfare and food standards. The EU Withdrawal Act will transfer all existing EU food safety provisions, including existing import requirements, onto the UK statute book.

We are already engaging with the agricultural sector as part of our trade discussions. We have not ruled out additional groups, and there is clear scope to review, re-task and reinforce what we have.

The Secretary of State regularly discusses a wide range of issues with Cabinet colleagues, and the Government will continue to work closely with the National Farmers’ Union and other relevant stakeholders across the food chain to understand the concerns about the impact of new trade deals. The Government has in place a range of stakeholder groups to feed into our policy development on trade. These include the Strategic Trade Advisory Group, the Agri-Food Expert Trade Advisory Group and various supply chain groups.

Defra has developed the UK Agricultural Market Monitoring Group, which allows officials in Defra and the Devolved Administrations to monitor UK agricultural markets, to share the latest stakeholder information and to provide warning of atypical market movements. It will help prepare the evidence base for the cause and possible range of interventions that may be needed in specific markets.

Victoria Prentis
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps he is taking to ensure that British farmers are not financially affected by food imports produced to lower food safety standards than those required in the UK.

Our manifesto is clear that in all of our trade negotiations, we will not compromise on our high environmental protection, animal welfare and food standards. The EU Withdrawal Act will transfer all existing EU food safety provisions, including existing import requirements, onto the UK statute book.

We are already engaging with the agricultural sector as part of our trade discussions. We have not ruled out additional groups, and there is clear scope to review, re-task and reinforce what we have.

The Secretary of State regularly discusses a wide range of issues with Cabinet colleagues, and the Government will continue to work closely with the National Farmers’ Union and other relevant stakeholders across the food chain to understand the concerns about the impact of new trade deals. The Government has in place a range of stakeholder groups to feed into our policy development on trade. These include the Strategic Trade Advisory Group, the Agri-Food Expert Trade Advisory Group and various supply chain groups.

Defra has developed the UK Agricultural Market Monitoring Group, which allows officials in Defra and the Devolved Administrations to monitor UK agricultural markets, to share the latest stakeholder information and to provide warning of atypical market movements. It will help prepare the evidence base for the cause and possible range of interventions that may be needed in specific markets.

Victoria Prentis
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
8th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what recent discussions she has had with Cabinet colleagues on the potential effect of her Department’s trade policy on the protection of animal welfare.

I am proud of our world-leading animal welfare standards and these will be upheld throughout our trade negotiations. We have established the Trade and Agriculture Commission in law, which will provide independent scrutiny of the effect on animal welfare our trade deals.

Elizabeth Truss
Minister for Women and Equalities
22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what assessment she has made of the need to introduce a trade, food and farming standards commission to ensure food imports continue to meet existing UK food standards after the transition period.

The approach of HM Government to food standards in trade deals is clear. We remain firmly committed to upholding our high environmental, food safety and animal welfare standards. Having left the EU, we will decide how we set and maintain our own laws, standards and regulations. We will remain global leaders in environmental protection and animal welfare standards, maintaining the high-quality of our produce for consumers at home and overseas.

The United Kingdom’s food standards, for both domestic production and imports, are overseen by the Food Standards Agency and Food Standards Scotland. These agencies provide independent advice to HM Government and the devolved administration in Scotland respectively. They will continue to do so in order to ensure that all food imports comply with the United Kingdom’s high standards.

Decisions on our standards are a matter for the United Kingdom and will be made separately from any trade agreement. HM Government will stand firm in trade negotiations to make sure that any future trade deals live up to the values of farmers and consumers across the United Kingdom.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent assessment he has made of the adequacy of law enforcement for crimes involving the illegal dumping of commercial fishing equipment in UK waters; and if he will make a statement.

The UK has been party to the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution by Garbage from Ships (MARPOL Annex V) since 1988, and the international requirements have been implemented in UK law through the 1998 and 2008 UK Regulations. Under these Regulations, discharge of all garbage into the sea is prohibited with very limited exceptions and in all cases the discharge of plastic is prohibited. In 2020 the Regulations were further revised to reflect the current international requirements.

During the 2020 revisions, the Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA) carried out a thorough review of the existing offences and penalties. As a result of this review, the scope of the type of garbage which may not be discharged to sea was widened. Under the 2020 Regulations it is an offence to fail to report the discharge of fishing gear which poses a significant threat to the marine environment or navigation.

The UK’s Port Waste Reception Facilities Regulations (S.I. 2003/1809) put legal obligations on ports and vessels to manage ship generated waste including fishing gear. The MCA has received ministerial approval to review the UK’s current regime on Port Waste Reception Facilities and this review will start in spring 2021.

Robert Courts
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what estimate he has made of the proportion of the income of private sector bus operators that has been met by (a) Government and (b) local authorities since the start of the covid-19 outbreak.

The COVID-19 Bus Services Support Grant (CBSSG) was established to help protect and increase bus services, allowing people?travelling to hospitals, supermarkets or their place of work to get to their destination safely and quickly, while helping ensure there is enough space for them to observe social distancing guidelines. There will be a reconciliation process after every 12 weeks of funding to ensure that no operator is made better or worse off by providing these services with government and local authority support. This will include collecting data on how much of their financial shortfall has been made up by local authority support.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what proportion of the additional costs incurred by (a) private operators of national rail services and (b) light rail and tram systems as a result from covid-19 have been met by the public purse.

Since the outbreak of COVID-19, the government has approved £3.5bn of additional expenditure to ensure that vital rail services continue to operate. From this additional expenditure, £2.9bn relates to the 2020/21 financial year. It is not yet possible to provide an estimate of the total cost incurred to date

On 23 May, £29m in support was announced to cover five light rail systems in England. This is intended to cover all reasonable additional costs incurred due to COVID-19 over the period of funding and allow them to operate a full service.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, on what date he confirmed emergency funding arrangements for (a) private operators of national rail services, (b) private operators of bus services, (c) Transport for London and (d) light rail and tram systems.

The Government recognises the importance of keeping public transport services running, and to provide stability and certainty to the transport industry at this turbulent time. The Secretary of State confirmed funding arrangements for a) national rail services on 23 March; b) bus services on 3 April and 23 May; c) Transport for London on 14 May; and d) light rail and tram systems on 24 April and 23 May.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many audits there have been on payments made to bus operators through the Coronavirus Bus Services Support Grant to date.

The COVID-19 Bus Services Support Grant of £167m initially, and a further £254m, for restarting services will help protect and increase services, allowing people?travelling to hospitals, supermarkets or their place of work to get to their destination safely and quickly, while helping ensure there is enough space for them to observe social distancing guidelines. The level of support offered to bus operators is based on the actual mileage of services provided to ensure that payments are only being made for buses that actually ran. Due diligence checks are made on every operator applying for the scheme, and there will be a reconciliation process after every 12 weeks of funding to ensure that no operator is made better or worse off by providing these services with government support.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
24th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what estimate she has made of the number of people whose universal credit payments have incurred errors in (a) Wales, (b) England and (c) the UK, in each year since 2015.

The Department is committed to ensuring we are paying the right people the right amount of Universal Credit.

We published our annual ‘Fraud and error in the benefit system: financial year 2019 to 2020 estimates’ report in May 2020, and this includes information and data across benefit types, including Universal Credit. It can be accessed online using the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/fraud-and-error-in-the-benefit-system-financial-year-2019-to-2020-estimates.

Data for previous financial years is also available via.gov.uk; however, changes in recording methodology mean that comparisons cannot be made with years prior to 2018/19.

The vast majority of benefit expenditure is paid correctly, with front line staff working hard to prevent overpayments from occurring. We are constantly improving our processes and continue to invest in the use of data and analytics to identify fraud and error.

Once rolled out, DWP expects the high-level design of Universal Credit to lead to around £1bn in benefit savings each year from reduced fraud and error.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
5th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people claimed personal independence payments on the basis of a degenerative neurological condition in (a) Wales and (b) Pontypridd constituency in each year since 2010.

The information you requested is not held by the Department. In the application process, claimants’ main disabling condition is only recorded for collation by the Department at assessment. It is not recorded at the point of application. The Department does not therefore hold data on the number of applicants to Personal Independence Payment (PIP) with particular conditions. Only those who have a disability assessment determination decision will have a main disabling condition recorded for them.

We do collect data on the main disability condition for those who have had a PIP clearance. The latest available data on PIP registrations and clearances split by geographical area (including region and parliamentary constituency), main disability, and by type of clearance (i.e. whether the claim was awarded, disallowed or withdrawn) for both new claims and reassessed claims, can be found at https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/

Guidance on how to use Stat-Xplore can be found here:

https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/webapi/online-help/index.html.

Justin Tomlinson
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
5th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what the average clearance time frame was for her Department to process a new personal independence payment claim in the period from March 2020 to August 2020; and what that average time taken was in that same period in 2019; and if she will make a statement.

The latest available data on Personal Independence Payment (PIP) clearance times covers claims cleared up to the end of July 2020. Therefore, the average clearance times are calculated from March 2020 to July 2020, and March 2019 to July 2019 respectively for comparison.

The median end to end clearance time for PIP New Claims in Great Britain for Normal Rules claimants was 21 weeks for claims cleared from March 2020 to July 2020, and was 15 weeks for claims cleared from March 2019 to July 2019.

[In Wales, the median end to end clearance time for PIP New Claims for Normal Rules claimants was 14 weeks for claims cleared from March 2020 – July 2020 and was 16 weeks for claims cleared from March 2019 – July 2019.]

Changes in the average end to end clearance time across from March 2020 to July 2020 reflect disruption due to COVID-19, including the development, testing and successful rollout of a new telephony assessment model to enable claims to be progressed robustly in the absence of face-to-face assessments to ensure we were not putting vulnerable people and our staff at risk.

Notes

Source: PIP ADS

  • PIP data includes normal rules claimants only and is for new claims only.
  • Figures have been rounded to the nearest whole number of weeks.
  • The status of claims as 'normal rules' and 'new claim/reassessment' is shown as at the point of clearance.
  • The figures quoted are the median clearance time of claims which are cleared in the given time period.
  • The median time is the middle value if you were to order all the times within the distribution from lowest value to highest value. The median is presented here instead of the mean because the mean can be unduly affected by outlying cases (e.g. cases where the person has been hard to reach due to being in prison, hospital, failed to attend the assessment on numerous occasions etc.)
  • The 'Registration to DWP decision (end to end)' clearance time is measured as the median time between the date of registration of the claim and the date of the DWP decision to either award or disallow the claim. It does not include claims that were withdrawn by the claimant or claims that were disallowed by DWP pre-referral to the Assessment Providers (e.g. for failure to meet basic eligibility criteria or failure to return the Part 2 form within the time limit).
  • Great Britain only.
  • The median clearance times for March 2019 – July 2019 and March 2020 – July 2020 are unpublished data. It should be used with caution and it may be subject to future revision.
  • From late March 2020 onwards, disruption due to COVID-19 affected volumes of clearances for all activities - Assessment Providers switched to paper based and telephony assessments rather than face to face assessments, and in the first few weeks of the COVID-19 pandemic efforts were made to clear residual claims in the system from before emergency measures were put in place, giving rise to an initial spike in clearance volumes. During the quarter ending July 2020, the effects of the disruption due to COVID-19 have reduced in some areas though they continue in many parts of the process.
Justin Tomlinson
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many universal credit applications her Department has received from claimants citing that a third or subsequent child was conceived as a result of rape in each year since 2015; and how many of those applications were received in (a) each UK region and nation and (b) the Pontypridd constituency in each of those years.

The policy to provide support for a maximum of two children was implemented in 2017. Statistics related to the policy, by nation, was published in July 2020 and can be accessed at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/child-tax-credit-and-universal-credit-claimants-statistics-related-to-the-policy-to-provide-support-for-a-maximum-of-2-children-april-2020

The table below provides data on the Number of Households Exempt from the policy to provide support for a maximum of two children due to Non-Consensual Conception, at April 2019 and April 2020.

Apr-20

Apr-19

East Midlands

20

10

East of England

30

10

London

50

10

North East

10

10

North West

50

10

South East

40

10

South West

20

10

West Midlands

50

20

Yorkshire and The Humber

30

10

Scotland

30

10

Wales

20

0

TOTAL (GB)

360

90

Notes:

  1. Regional information is only available for approximately 97% of data
  2. Figures are rounded to the nearest 10
  3. A number of households have exemptions in more than one category. They are counted once in each appropriate category and only once in the total

Due to Statistical disclosure controls data is not available for 2018 or at constituency level, to avoid the release of confidential data.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many universal credit applications her Department has (a) received from claimants citing that a third or subsequent child was conceived as a result of rape and (b) rejected as a result of a third or subsequent child being born after 5 April 2017.

Statistics related to the policy to provide support for a maximum of two children was published in July 2020 and can be accessed at

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/child-tax-credit-and-universal-credit-claimants-statistics-related-to-the-policy-to-provide-support-for-a-maximum-of-2-children-april-2020

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether new employers will be able to employ young people using the Kickstart scheme when that scheme is launched.

We welcome applications to set up Kickstart roles from employers from public, private and voluntary sectors, of all sizes and from both established and new enterprises. All employers applying to the scheme will be subject to checks to verify that they are legitimate organisations and can appropriately support any Kickstart participant taking a role with them.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
17th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans his Department has to review the Public Health England cervical screening programme guidance, particularly in reference to HIV testing for women presenting with cervical dysplasia.

There are no plans at present to review the cervical screening programme guidance to include human immunodeficiency virus testing in in colposcopy clinics, where further examination of the cervix is carried out.

Proposals to change an existing screening programme should be submitted to the United Kingdom National Screening Committee through its modification process, proposals are accepted throughout the year.

More information can be found at the following link: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/uk-nsc-evidence-review-process/uk-nsc-evidence-review-process

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
17th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans his Department has to improve the HIV testing rates in patients presenting with HIV indicator conditions in England.

HIV testing in England is currently provided through specialist sexual health services including on-line test kits and in some general practitioner practices and emergency departments. The Government recognises the importance of HIV testing to meet its commitment to end new HIV transmissions by 2030 and will consider issues relating to HIV testing as part of the development of the Sexual and Reproductive Health Strategy and the HIV Action Plan, which we plan to publish in 2021.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
17th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent discussions his Department has had with the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges on updating guidance on HIV indicator testing in line with NICE and BHIVA guidelines.

No specific discussions have been held with the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges. HIV testing in England is currently provided through specialist sexual health services including on-line test kits and in some general practitioner practices and emergency departments. The Government recognises the importance of HIV testing to meet its commitment to end new HIV transmissions by 2030 and will consider issues relating to HIV testing as part of the development of the Sexual and Reproductive Health Strategy and the HIV Action Plan, which we plan to publish in 2021.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the total value of contracts awarded to P14 Medical Limited in 2020 was to help deliver the Government’s response to covid-19.

All offers of personal protective equipment (PPE) from suppliers received the same eight stage assurance process which selected suppliers based on the product type, clinical acceptability, price, forecasted delivery dates, volume and financial standing. Approximately 400 officials from a number of Government departments managed this process which included negotiating with suppliers.

Three contracts with a total value of £276.5 million have been awarded to P14 Medical Limited for the supply of PPE. The Contract Award Notices and contracts have been published at the following links:

https://www.contractsfinder.service.gov.uk/Notice/4b73ab6f-61a1-4bcc-be05-c61a036ec4ed

https://www.contractsfinder.service.gov.uk/Notice/2e4153e4-1bd2-47f2-bcce-14afa977362b

https://www.contractsfinder.service.gov.uk/Notice/990396f9-0c69-45e5-b0c2-a04c921894a6?origin=SearchResults&p=1

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish the attendees at negotiations for the contracts awarded to P14 Medical Limited to help deliver the Government’s covid-19 response.

All offers of personal protective equipment (PPE) from suppliers received the same eight stage assurance process which selected suppliers based on the product type, clinical acceptability, price, forecasted delivery dates, volume and financial standing. Approximately 400 officials from a number of Government departments managed this process which included negotiating with suppliers.

Three contracts with a total value of £276.5 million have been awarded to P14 Medical Limited for the supply of PPE. The Contract Award Notices and contracts have been published at the following links:

https://www.contractsfinder.service.gov.uk/Notice/4b73ab6f-61a1-4bcc-be05-c61a036ec4ed

https://www.contractsfinder.service.gov.uk/Notice/2e4153e4-1bd2-47f2-bcce-14afa977362b

https://www.contractsfinder.service.gov.uk/Notice/990396f9-0c69-45e5-b0c2-a04c921894a6?origin=SearchResults&p=1

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
2nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the total value of service credits applied to the contracts awarded for Covid-19 testing since 1 March 2020.

No service credits have been applied.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
1st Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the total value of service credits applied to personal protective equipment procurement contracts was since 1 March 2020.

Service credits are not used in the contracts the Department has awarded to personal protective equipment suppliers.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
1st Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the value is of service credits applied to SITEL’s contract to run the Isolation Assurance Service.

Public Health England has not awarded any service level credits to the contractor working on the Isolation Assurance Service.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
28th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of the number of covid-19 vaccinations that have been allocated to (a) England, (b) Wales, (c) Scotland and (d) Northern Ireland; and if he will make a statement.

Vaccination deployment programmes are led by the health and social care services in each nation - NHS England and NHS Improvement, NHS Wales, NHS Scotland and Health and Social Care Northern Ireland.

The Government is working closely with the devolved administrations to ensure an aligned approach to COVID-19 vaccine deployment across the United Kingdom. We have procured vaccines on behalf of all parts of the country and the Government is working with the devolved administrations to ensure they are deployed efficiently and equitably across the UK.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
19th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent steps he has taken to tackle misinformation published about keto diets.

The ketogenic diet is a form of low carbohydrate diet. The Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition (SACN) is undertaking a risk assessment on lower carbohydrate diets compared to current Government advice for adults with type 2 diabetes. This report is due to be published later this year.

The SACN published its report on Carbohydrates and Health in July 2015 and concluded that the United Kingdom recommendation for total carbohydrates should be maintained at approximately 50% of total dietary energy.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
6th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will make it his policy to bring forward legislation to improve access to sexual and reproductive health services for women.

The Government has mandated local authorities in England to commission comprehensive open access sexual health services. Ensuring equal access to sexual and reproductive health services for both men and women will be a key theme of the new sexual and reproductive health strategy.

Development of the strategy was paused at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. However work is now underway and we plan to publish this in 2021.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
6th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to tackle period poverty.

The Government Equalities Office has responsibility for the period poverty taskforce. The Department of Health and Social Care, along with other Government departments, is committed to tackling period poverty. To support this, NHS England announced in March 2019 that it will offer period products to every hospital patient who needs them.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
6th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that trans men are able to access cervical cancer screening tests.

In England general practices are responsible for inviting eligible trans men to participate in National Health Service cervical screening at the appropriate intervals and for notifying them of their results in line with NHS Cervical Screening Programme guidance. Invitations are sent out using the current call and recall information technology system.

Health England has developed guidance for trans and non-binary individuals explaining who will be invited to participate in cervical screening as well as breast screening, bowel cancer screening and abdominal aortic aneurysm screening. It includes important information about the four screening programmes and how to access additional support and advice and can be found at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/nhs-population-screening-information-for-transgender-people

It is important therefore that individuals ensure that their general practitioner records are up to date, in order to ensure they are offered appropriate screening.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
6th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that trans men receive automatic invitations for cervical cancer screening tests.

In England general practices are responsible for inviting eligible trans men to participate in National Health Service cervical screening at the appropriate intervals and for notifying them of their results in line with NHS Cervical Screening Programme guidance. Invitations are sent out using the current call and recall information technology system.

Health England has developed guidance for trans and non-binary individuals explaining who will be invited to participate in cervical screening as well as breast screening, bowel cancer screening and abdominal aortic aneurysm screening. It includes important information about the four screening programmes and how to access additional support and advice and can be found at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/nhs-population-screening-information-for-transgender-people

It is important therefore that individuals ensure that their general practitioner records are up to date, in order to ensure they are offered appropriate screening.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
10th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many hospital admissions were made due to a concussion as a result of a sporting (a) event or (b) practice in England in each year since 2015.

Information is not available in format requested. It is not possible to specify that a concussion took place as the result of a sporting event or practice from the data collected.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
9th Dec 2020
To ask the Prime Minister, what recent assessment he has made of the potential merits of creating a Ministerial portfolio with responsibility for protections for future generations; and if he will make a statement.

Such considerations are already taken into account by Ministers in relation to their existing responsibilities. For example, the Government has a clear commitment to leave our environment in a better state for future generations.

A full list of Ministerial Responsibilities is published online: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/938090/List-of-Ministerial-Responsibilities.pdf.

Boris Johnson
Prime Minister, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, and Minister for the Union
3rd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how trained and recruited contact tracing staff were notified of the news that Serco was to reduce the number of contact tracers it was employing.

We keep staffing levels on the national non-National Health Service tracing service under constant review. As NHS Test and Trace became more locally targeted we reduced the number of non-NHS call handlers working for Serco and Sitel in the national service from 18,000 full time equivalents (FTEs) to 12,000 FTEs and then to 10,000 FTEs - Serco and Sitel providing 5,000 each. However, we have recently increased the numbers again to 7,000 FTEs for each supplier due to the rise in COVID-19 cases.

At each stage the Department has given the suppliers good notice of our intentions and the suppliers have acted in accordance with the terms of contractual arrangements and relevant notice period. All staff working on the service have been provided with training on handling difficult situations they may face during a call and they have also been made aware of wellbeing and support mechanisms available to them.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
3rd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what compassionate support training has been provided for contact tracers recruited through the national system.

We keep staffing levels on the national non-National Health Service tracing service under constant review. As NHS Test and Trace became more locally targeted we reduced the number of non-NHS call handlers working for Serco and Sitel in the national service from 18,000 full time equivalents (FTEs) to 12,000 FTEs and then to 10,000 FTEs - Serco and Sitel providing 5,000 each. However, we have recently increased the numbers again to 7,000 FTEs for each supplier due to the rise in COVID-19 cases.

At each stage the Department has given the suppliers good notice of our intentions and the suppliers have acted in accordance with the terms of contractual arrangements and relevant notice period. All staff working on the service have been provided with training on handling difficult situations they may face during a call and they have also been made aware of wellbeing and support mechanisms available to them.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
13th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many hospital admissions in England were classified as relating to injuries or accidents as a result of firework displays in each year since 2015.

A count of finished admission episodes (FAEs) with a cause code of firework injury for each year from 2015-16 to 2019-20 is shown in the following table:

Activity in English National Health Service hospitals and English NHS commissioned activity in the independent sector

Year Period

FAEs

2015-16

168

2016-17

183

2017-18

164

2018-19

154

2019-20

153

Source: Hospital Episode Statistics, NHS Digital

Notes:

A FAE is the first period of admitted patient care under one consultant within one healthcare provider. FAEs are counted against the year or month in which the admission episode finishes. Admissions do not represent the number of patients, as a person may have more than one admission within the period.

Cause Code

A supplementary code that indicates the nature of any external cause of injury, poisoning or other adverse effects. Only the first external cause code which is coded within the episode is counted in HES. Recording of external cause is not mandatory and recording practice varies over time and regionally, care should be used when interpreting this data.

W39 - Firework injury

Assessing growth through time (admitted patient care)

HES figures are available from 1989-90 onwards. Changes to the figures over time need to be interpreted in the context of improvements in data quality and coverage (particularly in earlier years), improvements in coverage of independent sector activity (particularly from 2006-07) and changes in NHS practice. For example, apparent reductions in activity may be due to a number of procedures which may now be undertaken in outpatient settings and so no longer include in admitted patient HES data. Conversely, apparent increases in activity may be due to improved recording of diagnosis or procedure information.

It should be noted that HES include activity ending in the year in question and run from April to March, e.g. 2012-13 includes activity ending between 1 April 2012 and 31 March 2013.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
21st Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish the number of occasions where a resident in England seeking a coronavirus test was advised to travel to (a) Wales and (b) the Rhondda Cynon Taf borough to access a covid-19 test by the coronavirus testing website.

The Department does not publish data in the format requested.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
21st Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to ensure that the UK Government's coronavirus test booking website is not directing people to (a) Wales and (b) areas in Wales that are subject to local lockdown restrictions.

The Department does not publish data in the format requested.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
21st Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many tests have been taken by residents of England at the coronavirus test centres in Rhondda Cynon Taf since 1 September 2020.

The Department does not publish data in the format requested.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
17th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many instances of the misuse of coronavirus test and trace data have been reported to the Information Commissioner since regulations were introduced in England.

Since the introduction of the Coronavirus Act 2020 there have been five instances where the Department as data controller have reported a data breach to the Information Commissioner’s Office.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
17th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when the Data Protection Impact Assessment for the NHS Test and Trace system will be published.

A Data Protection Impact Assessment is currently in development for the National Health Service Test and Trace programme as a whole. It will continue to evolve and be kept under constant review as the programme develops. The NHS Test and Trace programme is committed to the highest ethical and data governance standards and we will continue to publish privacy information for the public setting out clearly the bases on which NHS Test and Trace is collecting personal data and the purposes for which it will be used.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
29th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to increase the number of consultants in hospitals.

In England, there are 49,068 full time equivalent (FTE) consultants employed in NHS trusts and clinical commissioning groups, up by 34.1% (12,475 FTE) since 2010.

It is the responsibility of National Health Service trusts to have staffing arrangements in place that deliver safe and effective care. This includes recruiting the appropriate professionals needed to support these levels and meet local needs.

The number of post-registration specialty training places that are available each year is set by Health Education England, based on its assessment of service gaps and predicted workforce needs.

Decisions about the NHS workforce in Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales are a matter for the devolved administrations of those countries.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
29th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the effect of a reduction in the recruitment of consultants on the rate of closures of A&E departments.

Overall, there are 49,068 full time equivalent (FTE) consultants employed in National Health Service trusts and clinical commissioning groups in England, up by 34.1% (12,475 FTE) since 2010.

It is the responsibility of NHS trusts to have staffing arrangements in place that deliver safe and effective care. This includes recruiting the appropriate professionals needed to support these levels and meet local needs.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
19th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of the effect on Uganda of the decision to reduce the funding allocated to the Official Development Assistance budget.

The seismic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the UK economy has forced us to take tough but necessary decisions, including temporarily reducing the overall amount we spend on ODA.

ODA allocations for the 2021-22 financial year have not yet been made. These will be decided through a rigorous business planning and budget allocation process in early 2021.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
10th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what recent assessment he has made of the effect of the end of the transition period on UK citizens' ability to travel to the EU from 1 January 2021; and if he will make a statement.

The Government has discussed arrangements with the EU for UK nationals travelling to the Schengen Area. Regrettably, the EU has consistently maintained that UK nationals will be treated as Third Country Nationals under the Schengen Borders Code from 1 January 2021. UK nationals will be able to travel visa-free for short stays for up to 90 days in a rolling 180-day period. UK nationals planning to stay longer will need permission from the relevant Member State. This may require applying for a visa and/or permit.

At border control in the EU, UK nationals will be subject to third country national rules.

Information about travel to Europe after the transition period is available on gov.uk: https://www.gov.uk/visit-europe-1-january-2021

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
30th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what discussions he has had with his Polish counterpart on that country's abortion laws.

We are closely monitoring developments in Poland following a ruling on 22 October by its Constitutional Tribunal that laws permitting abortion in certain cases are unconstitutional and the large-scale protests across Poland that this has prompted. It is for each country to establish its own laws on abortion. However, the UK firmly believes that supporting the comprehensive sexual and reproductive health and rights of women and girls, through evidence-based public health interventions, saves lives and supports prosperity. Evidence shows that restricting access to safe abortion does not make abortions less common: it only makes them less safe. The FCDO is a leading voice on gender issues, including sexual and reproductive health and rights, in multilateral fora such as the Council of Europe and the United Nations. The British Embassy in Warsaw is active on this agenda and in September ran a workshop for British and Polish NGOs active on women's rights.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
24th Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent discussions he has had with Cabinet colleagues on the potential merits of introducing legislative proposals to help protect access for consumers to local banking services.

The Treasury does not make assessments of the bank and building society branch network. In 2018, the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) undertook an analysis of branch closures as part of its Strategic Review of Retail Banking Business Models. This analysis can be found in Annex 1 of the final report.

The decision to close a branch is a commercial issue for banks and building societies and the Government does not intervene in these decisions. However, the Government does believe it is important the impact on communities is understood, considered and mitigated where possible. That is why the Government continues to be very supportive of the Access to Banking Standard (formerly the Access to Banking Protocol) which commits firms to ensure customers are well informed about branch closures, the bank’s reasons for closure and options for continued access to banking services. These include the Post Office, which allows 95% of business and 99% of personal banking customers to carry out their everyday banking at 11,500 Post Office branches across the UK.

In September 2020, the FCA published guidance setting out its expectation of firms when they are deciding to reduce their physical branches or the number of free-to-use ATMs. Firms are expected to carefully consider the impact of a planned closure on their customers’ everyday banking and cash access needs, and other relevant branch services and consider possible alternative access arrangements.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
24th Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will make an estimate of the number of high street bank branches that have closed in (a) England and (b) Wales in each year since 2015.

The Treasury does not make assessments of the bank and building society branch network. In 2018, the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) undertook an analysis of branch closures as part of its Strategic Review of Retail Banking Business Models. This analysis can be found in Annex 1 of the final report.

The decision to close a branch is a commercial issue for banks and building societies and the Government does not intervene in these decisions. However, the Government does believe it is important the impact on communities is understood, considered and mitigated where possible. That is why the Government continues to be very supportive of the Access to Banking Standard (formerly the Access to Banking Protocol) which commits firms to ensure customers are well informed about branch closures, the bank’s reasons for closure and options for continued access to banking services. These include the Post Office, which allows 95% of business and 99% of personal banking customers to carry out their everyday banking at 11,500 Post Office branches across the UK.

In September 2020, the FCA published guidance setting out its expectation of firms when they are deciding to reduce their physical branches or the number of free-to-use ATMs. Firms are expected to carefully consider the impact of a planned closure on their customers’ everyday banking and cash access needs, and other relevant branch services and consider possible alternative access arrangements.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
24th Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent assessment he has made of the effect of the Access to Banking Protocol on preventing bank and building society branch closures.

The Treasury does not make assessments of the bank and building society branch network. In 2018, the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) undertook an analysis of branch closures as part of its Strategic Review of Retail Banking Business Models. This analysis can be found in Annex 1 of the final report.

The decision to close a branch is a commercial issue for banks and building societies and the Government does not intervene in these decisions. However, the Government does believe it is important the impact on communities is understood, considered and mitigated where possible. That is why the Government continues to be very supportive of the Access to Banking Standard (formerly the Access to Banking Protocol) which commits firms to ensure customers are well informed about branch closures, the bank’s reasons for closure and options for continued access to banking services. These include the Post Office, which allows 95% of business and 99% of personal banking customers to carry out their everyday banking at 11,500 Post Office branches across the UK.

In September 2020, the FCA published guidance setting out its expectation of firms when they are deciding to reduce their physical branches or the number of free-to-use ATMs. Firms are expected to carefully consider the impact of a planned closure on their customers’ everyday banking and cash access needs, and other relevant branch services and consider possible alternative access arrangements.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
28th Sep 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 25 September 2020 to Question 93721 on Self-employment Income Support Scheme: Personal Care Services, which (a) industries and (b) businesses are included in the other service activities sector bracket when calculating the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme statistics.

The sector “Other service activities” includes the activities of membership organisations, the repair of computers and personal and household goods and a variety of personal service activities. A breakdown of the activities in the sector is provided below.

  • Activities of membership organisations

o Activities of business, employers and professional membership organisations

  • Activities of business and employers membership organisations
  • Activities of professional membership organisations

o Activities of trade unions

  • Activities of trade unions

o Activities of other membership organisations

  • Activities of religious organisations
  • Activities of political organisations
  • Activities of other membership organisations not elsewhere classified

  • Repair of computers and personal and household goods

o Repair of computers and communication equipment

  • Repair of computers and peripheral equipment
  • Repair of communication equipment

o Repair of personal and household goods

  • Repair of consumer electronics
  • Repair of household appliances and home and garden equipment
  • Repair of footwear and leather goods
  • Repair of furniture and home furnishings
  • Repair of watches, clocks and jewellery
  • Repair of other personal and household goods

  • Other personal service activities

o Washing and (dry-)cleaning of textile and fur products

o Hairdressing and other beauty treatment

o Funeral and related activities

o Physical well-being activities

o Other personal service activities not elsewhere classified

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
23rd Sep 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the effect on the economy of self-employed beauty industry workers being unable to carry out treatments as a result of covid-19 restrictions remaining in place for the next six months.

The Government recognises that this is a challenging time for the beauty sector, where businesses were required to stay closed for longer than some others.

The SEISS Grant Extension will help the self-employed who are currently actively trading but are facing reduced demand. The Government will provide an initial SEISS grant covering 20% of average monthly trading profits, paid out in a single instalment covering 3 months’ worth of profits, and capped at £1,875 in total. This grant will cover a three-month period from the start of November until the end of January. A second grant will cover a three-month period from the start of February until the end of April.

We will continue to monitor the impact of the restrictions necessary to curb the spread of Covid-19 on businesses and the economy and the need for further support.

Kemi Badenoch
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what equality impact assessment his Department made before making the decision not include periods of maternity leave in the monthly payment calculations for the Self Employment Income Support Scheme; and if he will publish that assessment.

HMT takes care to pay due regard to the equality impacts of its policy decisions relating to the Covid-19 outbreak, including the equality impacts of the Self Employment Income Support Scheme, in line with all legal requirements and the Government’s commitment to promoting equality.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if her Department will publish information on the number of females across the UK who have domestic abuse markers against their name and are currently missing for each year since 2010.

We have interpreted this question as referring to the number of females with a police marker indicating they are a potential victim of domestic abuse. The data requested is not held by the Home Office. Individual police forces may hold this data.

For the year ending March 2020, the Crime Survey for England and Wales (CSEW) showed that an estimated 2.3 million adults aged 16 to 74 years experienced domestic abuse in the last year.

Victoria Atkins
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
9th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the prevalence of animal abuse being used as a means coercive control in domestic abuse situations; and what plans the Government has to tackle that form of abuse.

Domestic abuse can encompass a wide range of behaviours and can affect all parts of a victim’s life and relationships. This includes the use of pets as a tool to coerce, control or threaten victims.

The Domestic Abuse Bill will help to better protect and support the victims of all forms of domestic abuse and help bring perpetrators to justice. As part of this, the Government will be strengthening legislation on controlling or coercive behaviour so that abusers can still be prosecuted even when they no longer live with their victims.

The statutory guidance which accompanies the legislation is designed to provide explanation of the different characteristics of domestic abuse, and includes reference to how pets may be used by perpetrators. The guidance will be published for a formal consultation after Royal Assent.

Additionally, this year the government will be publishing a new Domestic Abuse Strategy which will build on the work of the Bill to transform our response to domestic abuse.

Victoria Atkins
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
29th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many police cautions for antisocial behaviour were made in England and Wales in each year since 2010.

The Home office does not collect data on the number of police cautions issued for anti-social behaviour and has not estimated what proportion of time police officers spend dealing with anti-social behaviour incidents

It is for Chief Constables and Police and Crime Commissioners, as operational leaders and elected local representatives, to decide how best to respond to individual crimes and local priorities

To help ensure that the police have the resources they need to do so we have given them the biggest funding increase in a decade and are recruiting 20,000 additional officers by March 2023, which provides extra resource to protect the public and keep us safe.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
29th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much funding has been allocated to police forces to tackle crimes against animal welfare in (a) England and (b) Wales in each year since 2015.

The Home Office does not hold the requested information.

We have announced a provisional police funding settlement of up to £15.8 billion for 2021/22. This is a total increase of up to £636 million for the policing system which will enable police to cut crime and tackle offences including relating to animal welfare crimes.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
29th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate she has made of the proportion of police time spent dealing with instances of anti-social behaviour in each month since January 2020.

The Home office does not collect data on the number of police cautions issued for anti-social behaviour and has not estimated what proportion of time police officers spend dealing with anti-social behaviour incidents

It is for Chief Constables and Police and Crime Commissioners, as operational leaders and elected local representatives, to decide how best to respond to individual crimes and local priorities

To help ensure that the police have the resources they need to do so we have given them the biggest funding increase in a decade and are recruiting 20,000 additional officers by March 2023, which provides extra resource to protect the public and keep us safe.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
28th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many instances of anti-social behaviour were reported to the police in England and Wales in each month from January 2020 to January 2021.

The Home Office collects information on the number of incidents of Anti-social behaviour recorded by the police in England and Wales. This is published annually by the Office for National Statistics in Table P9 of its Police Force Area tables. The latest available data for 2019/20 including trends back to 2007/08 can be found here:

https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/crimeandjustice/datasets/policeforceareadatatables

Information below Police Force Area level is not held centrally.

Data is currently only collected by the Home Office from police forces on a quarterly basis, so it is not possible to provide monthly breakdowns.

The Home office does not currently collect data on the number of Criminal Behaviour Orders issued.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
28th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many Criminal Behaviour Orders have been made in (a) England and (b) Wales in each year since the introduction of those orders.

The Home Office collects information on the number of incidents of Anti-social behaviour recorded by the police in England and Wales. This is published annually by the Office for National Statistics in Table P9 of its Police Force Area tables. The latest available data for 2019/20 including trends back to 2007/08 can be found here:

https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/crimeandjustice/datasets/policeforceareadatatables

Information below Police Force Area level is not held centrally.

Data is currently only collected by the Home Office from police forces on a quarterly basis, so it is not possible to provide monthly breakdowns.

The Home office does not currently collect data on the number of Criminal Behaviour Orders issued.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
27th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, to publish the number of reported (a) animal welfare crimes and (b) pet thefts between February 2020 and December 2020 in (i) England and (ii) Wales.

The Home Office collects information from police forces in England on Wales on offences covered by the notifiable offence list. This is generally restricted to indictable offences, that are heard before a crown court, and triable either way offences, that commence in a magistrates court but may be heard in a crown court. Animal welfare crimes are not covered by the notifiable offence list.

Whilst pet thefts are covered by the notifiable offence list it is not possible to separately identify these crimes from others in the wider offence category of theft offences.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
27th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, to publish her Department’s committed spend on front-line police training on animal welfare crimes for each year since 2010 in (a) England and (b) Wales.

The Home Office does not hold the requested information.

We have announced a provisional police funding settlement of up to £15.8 billion for 2021/22. This is a total increase of up to £636 million for the policing system which will enable police to cut crime and tackle offences including relating to animal welfare crimes.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
27th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, to publish the average current rate of police officers per 100,000 people across (a) England and (b) Wales.

The Home Office publishes data on the number of officers per 100,00 people, for England and Wales annually in Table H4 of the accompanying tables of the “Police workforce, England and Wales” statistical bulletin, which is available here https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-workforce-england-and-wales-31-march-2020

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
22nd Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent assessment she has made of the effect of changes in the level of police funding on the number of (a) arrests and (b) convictions for offences related to animal cruelty in England and Wales; and if she will make a statement.

The Home Office have announced a provisional police funding settlement of up to £15.8 billion for 2021/22. This is a total increase of up to £636 million for the policing system which will enable police to cut crime and tackle offences including relating to animal cruelty.

For the latest data on prosecutions and conviction relating to animal cruelty, please see Parliamentary Question answer 138105, tabled on 14 January 2021.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
14th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much revenue was generated by the charge for overseas customer emails enquiries related to UK visa and immigration updates in each year since 2017.

The £2.74 email charge is levied to fund the commercial contract. The UK government believes it is right those who use and benefit directly from the UK immigration system make an appropriate contribution towards meeting its costs. Those who use the services are predominantly from outside the UK, with GOV.UK providing the main source of information and advice, free of charge.

The Home Office uses SITEL UK Ltd for the provision of Contact Centre Services (UK and International) including overseas customer email enquiries. Further details of the financial arrangement in place between the Home Office and SITEL UK Ltd including revenue generated by email enquiries, is not available due to it being commercially sensitive.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
6th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people received a police caution for a sexual offence in England and Wales in each year since 2015.

The Home Office publishes the investigative outcomes of crimes recorded by the police in England and Wales, including the number resolved through a police caution. This data is published on a quarterly basis and can be found here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-recorded-crime-open-data-tables

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
17th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 15 December to Question 128332, what assessment she has made of the effect of the covid-19 pandemic on her Department’s capacity in asylum operations intake units.

Pursuant to the answer of 15th December 2020, the temporary regional intake unit in Cardiff has been in operation since April 2020, as part of the Home Office response to the COVID pandemic.

There are no processing capacity limits on the additional temporary locations introduced to register asylum claims.

The Home Office aims to ensure all locations are sufficiently resourced to provide timely appointments to register asylum claims. Capacity is based upon demand and workforce availability at these temporary locations which enables them to cope with fluctuations in levels of asylum intake.

Asylum claims registered at these temporary regional locations are processed in accordance with policy, fulfilling the UKs statutory obligations in relation to registering asylum claims in a Covid safe environment.

These are temporary arrangements which will be kept under review to align with HMG guidance. These changes do not represent a new operating model - they are contingency measures put in place during the COVID-19 epidemic in order to ensure that asylum seekers are able to safely register their claims.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
16th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate she has made of the cost to the public purse of opening the temporary Asylum Operations Regional Intake Unit in Cardiff.

The Home Office are unable to state what estimate has been made of the cost to the public purse of opening the temporary Asylum Operations Regional Intake Unit in Cardiff. Where possible we have reduced costs by retributing resources from within the Home Office and Other Governmental Departments. To obtain this information would require the interrogation of information held under multiple cost centres and could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

The Home Office are able to provide the total asylum costing for 2019/2020 and can be found at asy_04:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/immigration-protection-data-november-2020

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
16th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much revenue was generated in the last 12 months by the £2.74 charge for public enquiries to the UK Visas and Immigration Department via email.

The £2.74 email charge is levied to fund the commercial contract, as the UK government believes it is right those who use and benefit directly from the UK immigration system make an appropriate contribution towards meeting the costs of the immigration system.

Those who use the services are predominantly from outside the UK. Our web site gov.uk is the main source of information and advice and is free of charge.

Further details of the financial arrangement in place between the Home Office and SITEL UK Ltd for the provision of Contact Centre Services (UK and International) is not available due to it being commercially sensitive.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
10th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many and what proportion of asylum decision makers left their jobs within the first 12 months of employment in the Asylum Operations Regional Asylum Intake Unit in Cardiff.

The Home Office is unable to state how many and what proportion of asylum decision makers left their jobs within the first 12 months of employment in the Asylum Operations Regional Intake Unit in Cardiff. The temporary regional intake unit in Cardiff has been in operation since April 2020, as part of the Home Office response to the COVID pandemic.

In line with Government restrictions on travel and to continue to meet commitments during the COVID 19 restrictions, the Home Office temporarily introduced additional locations to register asylum claims in Glasgow, Belfast, Liverpool, Leeds, Solihull and Cardiff, which began taking appointments on 19 April 2020.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
9th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many asylum decision maker posts are currently vacant.

Asylum Operations has over recent years made good progress on increasing the number of decision makers and support staff. There are recruitment strategies in place to maintain staffing at the required levels to allow us to manage asylum intake and reduce the overall time to make initial asylum decisions. These include rolling recruitment campaigns, a staff retention strategy to ensure it retains its highly skilled asylum decision makers, and the further expansion of digital processes to increase case working flexibility. Recruitment has however been impacted by COVID-19, we are working to return staffing numbers back to pre-pandemic levels as soon as possible and with campaigns due to go live imminently.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
3rd Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she is taking to ensure that people who report (a) rape or (b) sexual assault to the police have access to specialist counselling and therapy (i) before trial and (ii) from the trial onwards.

Rape and sexual assault are devastating crimes and we want victims to have the confidence to report them, knowing they will get the support they need and that everything will be done to bring offenders to justice.

The Ministry of Justice has committed £32 million over three years from 2019 to 2022 to rape support centres across England and Wales to provide emotional and practical support to victims, which may include counselling and therapy. The Home Office is also providing £200,000 in 2020/21 to specialist sexual violence support services through its National Sexual Violence Support Fund.

We understand the importance of accessing therapy after going through a traumatic experience. Earlier this year the CPS launched a public consultation on guidance for pre-trial therapy. The updated guidance will provide prosecutors, the police and therapists with practical support in helping victims through this part of the justice process.

The Government is also conducting an end-to-end review of the criminal justice response to rape, which includes considering the role of support services in victims’ engagement throughout the criminal justice system.

Victoria Atkins
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
15th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many of the 81 articles in the 2012 Istanbul Convention on preventing and combating violence against women and girls have yet to be confirmed in UK law.

The UK signed the Istanbul Convention in 2012, signalling its strong commitment to tackling violence against women and girls (VAWG) and this Government remains committed to ratifying it.

The Preventing and Combating Violence Against Women and Domestic Violence (Ratification of Convention) Act 2017 requires Ministers to publish annual reports on their progress towards being able to ratify the Convention. The third such report was published on 31 October 2019.

We will shortly be publishing this year’s report on our progress, which will set out our compliance position and the steps we are taking towards ratification.

Victoria Atkins
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
15th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when she plans to publish the annual report on progress on UK ratification of the Istanbul Convention in line with the Government's responsibilities under section 2 of the Preventing and Combating Violence Against Women and Domestic Violence (Ratification of Convention) Act 2017.

The UK signed the Istanbul Convention in 2012, signalling its strong commitment to tackling violence against women and girls (VAWG) and this Government remains committed to ratifying it.

The Preventing and Combating Violence Against Women and Domestic Violence (Ratification of Convention) Act 2017 requires Ministers to publish annual reports on their progress towards being able to ratify the Convention. The third such report was published on 31 October 2019.

We will shortly be publishing this year’s report on our progress, which will set out our compliance position and the steps we are taking towards ratification.

Victoria Atkins
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
15th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she is taking to ensure that Article 4(3) of the 2012 Istanbul Convention on preventing and combating violence against women and girls is ratified into UK law.

The UK signed the Istanbul Convention in 2012, signalling its strong commitment to tackling violence against women and girls (VAWG) and this Government remains committed to ratifying it.

The Preventing and Combating Violence Against Women and Domestic Violence (Ratification of Convention) Act 2017 requires Ministers to publish annual reports on their progress towards being able to ratify the Convention. The third such report was published on 31 October 2019.

We will shortly be publishing this year’s report on our progress, which will set out our compliance position and the steps we are taking towards ratification.

Victoria Atkins
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
23rd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the potential merits of allocating long-term ring-fenced funding to ensure the (a) sustainability and (b) expansion of local LGBT services delivering specialist support to LGBT domestic abuse survivors.

It is important that all survivors of domestic abuse have access to appropriate support services according to their needs, and a range of funding exists to ensure the provision of such services.

The Home Office has provided £120,000 of funding each year since 2016 for the National LGBT Domestic Abuse helpline, which provides emotional and practical support for LGBT+ people who are experiencing or have experienced domestic abuse. We have provided additional funding to bolster the helpline during COVID-19.

To enable us to better understand the complex landscape for community-based support for all victims, including those who are LGBT+, the Designate Domestic Abuse Commissioner has agreed to undertake an in-depth exploration of the current community-based support landscape over 2020/21.

The Government will then work with the Commissioner to understand the needs identified and develop options on how best to address them.

Victoria Atkins
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
24th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what training his Department provides to junior officers to increase awareness of sexual harassment in the armed forces.

The Ministry of Defence (MOD) is absolutely clear there is no place for sexual offending in the Armed Forces. The Armed Forces are committed to addressing the issues of sexual harassment and sexual assault through a range of actions, including awareness campaigns and training presentations around sexual consent. Training is provided to all personnel, with junior officers benefitting from additional instruction to enable them to understand the standards expected of them, tackle unacceptable behaviours and support those under their command

The MOD recognises the great courage it takes to come forward and report a sexual offence and is committed to reducing the incidence of unacceptable behaviour and to holding perpetrators to account. All allegations are thoroughly investigated, and support provided to victims. Commanding Officers must always refer any allegation of rape and sexual assault, or any other offence which may have a sexual element, to the Service Police. Anyone found to fall short of the Services’ high standards or to have committed an offence is dealt with appropriately, up to and including imprisonment and dismissal from Service. While much has been and continues to be done, including the implementation of the Wigston and Gray reports, Defence recognises the scale of the task we must address and remains committed to tackling this challenge.

Detailed statistics about sexual offending in the Service Justice System are published annually as part of our commitment to openness and transparency, and are available from the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/sexual-offences-in-the-service-justice-system

24th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many instances of sexual harassment in the armed forces have been reported in each year since 2015.

The Ministry of Defence (MOD) is absolutely clear there is no place for sexual offending in the Armed Forces. The Armed Forces are committed to addressing the issues of sexual harassment and sexual assault through a range of actions, including awareness campaigns and training presentations around sexual consent. Training is provided to all personnel, with junior officers benefitting from additional instruction to enable them to understand the standards expected of them, tackle unacceptable behaviours and support those under their command

The MOD recognises the great courage it takes to come forward and report a sexual offence and is committed to reducing the incidence of unacceptable behaviour and to holding perpetrators to account. All allegations are thoroughly investigated, and support provided to victims. Commanding Officers must always refer any allegation of rape and sexual assault, or any other offence which may have a sexual element, to the Service Police. Anyone found to fall short of the Services’ high standards or to have committed an offence is dealt with appropriately, up to and including imprisonment and dismissal from Service. While much has been and continues to be done, including the implementation of the Wigston and Gray reports, Defence recognises the scale of the task we must address and remains committed to tackling this challenge.

Detailed statistics about sexual offending in the Service Justice System are published annually as part of our commitment to openness and transparency, and are available from the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/sexual-offences-in-the-service-justice-system

24th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what steps he is taking to tackle sexual harassment in the armed forces.

The Ministry of Defence (MOD) is absolutely clear there is no place for sexual offending in the Armed Forces. The Armed Forces are committed to addressing the issues of sexual harassment and sexual assault through a range of actions, including awareness campaigns and training presentations around sexual consent. Training is provided to all personnel, with junior officers benefitting from additional instruction to enable them to understand the standards expected of them, tackle unacceptable behaviours and support those under their command

The MOD recognises the great courage it takes to come forward and report a sexual offence and is committed to reducing the incidence of unacceptable behaviour and to holding perpetrators to account. All allegations are thoroughly investigated, and support provided to victims. Commanding Officers must always refer any allegation of rape and sexual assault, or any other offence which may have a sexual element, to the Service Police. Anyone found to fall short of the Services’ high standards or to have committed an offence is dealt with appropriately, up to and including imprisonment and dismissal from Service. While much has been and continues to be done, including the implementation of the Wigston and Gray reports, Defence recognises the scale of the task we must address and remains committed to tackling this challenge.

Detailed statistics about sexual offending in the Service Justice System are published annually as part of our commitment to openness and transparency, and are available from the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/sexual-offences-in-the-service-justice-system

16th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, whether the UKCA mark and its application for construction products or other materials applies to rings constructed for wrestling or boxing; and if he will make a statement.

In order for the UKCA mark to be applied to a construction product, the product must meet the definition of a construction product as set out by the United Kingdom Construction Products Regulations, and be covered by either a United Kingdom designated standard or United Kingdom Technical Assessment.

Wrestling and boxing rings in themselves do not meet this definition of construction products, and are covered by neither a United Kingdom designated standard, nor a United Kingdom Technical Assessment, under the United Kingdom Construction Products Regulations. They therefore do not need to be UKCA-marked in order to be placed on the market of Great Britain.

If the component parts of a wrestling or boxing ring have been marketed as individual products for use in construction, however, they will be subject to the same rules as construction products, which may include the requirement to apply the UKCA mark.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
7th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what guidance his Department has published on domestic abuse victims' rights to stay in their home; and what recent discussions he has with the specialist domestic abuse sector on developing cost-effective housing pathways for domestic abuse victims.

In November 2018 the Government issued new statutory guidance for local authorities to improve access to social housing for victims of domestic abuse who are in a refuge or other form of safe temporary accommodation: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/753667/Improving_access_to_social_housing_for_victims_of_domestic_abuse.pdf

The guidance also sets out how local authorities can use their existing powers to support victims to remain safely in their homes if they choose to do so.

In addition, in August 2020 Government updated guidance for victims of domestic abuse which includes details of trusted sources of advice, including on housing matters: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/domestic-abuse-how-to-get-help

My officials regularly engage with the domestic abuse sector on a number of issues relating to housing.

12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether needing to breast feed a child is a legitimate reason to (a) postpone or (b) be exempted from jury service.

Breastfeeding jurors who wish to undertake jury service can discuss their needs with the court to ensure that they can be supported during their service. This support could include providing a place to express milk and suitable storage for expressed milk. HMCTS will be guided by the needs of the individual and will meet any reasonable request wherever possible.

All jurors, including breastfeeding women, can apply to change the date of their jury service to another date within a 12-month period of the original summons. This is known as a deferral. If a juror believes they cannot serve at any time during those 12 months, they can apply to be excused. Deferral and excusal applications are considered by summoning officers at the Jury Central Summoning Bureau (JCSB) Each application is carefully considered on its own merits and in light of individual circumstances.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what provisions his Department have put in place to support breast feeding women who are called to undertake jury service.

Breastfeeding jurors who wish to undertake jury service can discuss their needs with the court to ensure that they can be supported during their service. This support could include providing a place to express milk and suitable storage for expressed milk. HMCTS will be guided by the needs of the individual and will meet any reasonable request wherever possible.

All jurors, including breastfeeding women, can apply to change the date of their jury service to another date within a 12-month period of the original summons. This is known as a deferral. If a juror believes they cannot serve at any time during those 12 months, they can apply to be excused. Deferral and excusal applications are considered by summoning officers at the Jury Central Summoning Bureau (JCSB) Each application is carefully considered on its own merits and in light of individual circumstances.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the average waiting time was to examine digital devices at Digital Investigation Units across the UK in the most recent period for which figures are available.

HMPPS Digital Media Investigation Unit is a specialist Digital Team whose responsibilities include the extraction of data from illicit mobile devices found in prison custody.

Average waiting times for centrally processed devices are relatively short – under 5 days.

In addition, Digital Media Investigation Unit has put in place capability for local extraction within prisons. The average waiting time for these interrogations is not held centrally.


It is important to note that these waiting times are not directly comparable with Law Enforcement Partners due to different operating contexts. DMIU does not extract data from every illicit device found in custody and on occasion some devices may be sent to Law Enforcement partners when dealing with specific investigations. Data for such waiting times is not held centrally.

The data provided is specific to those extractions completed by HMPPS relating to HMPPS cases and therefore does not include any other Digital Investigation Units such as the Police or related Law Enforcement Agencies.

Alex Chalk
Assistant Whip
24th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether he plans to publish the end to end review on rape before the end of 2019-21 parliamentary session.

The Government recognises that the decline in the number of rape and serious sexual offences being charged and prosecuted in England and Wales is a cause for significant concern. That is why we are carrying out an end-to end review of how the Criminal Justice System responds to rape. Through this review we are working with operational partners from across the Criminal Justice system including the police, CPS and victims’ groups to ensure we can improve the way rape cases are dealt with.

The Government intends to publish the report in the Spring.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
25th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, for what reasons the Government has not published its end-to-end review of rape; and if he will make a statement.

The Government recognises that the decline in the number of rape and serious sexual offences being charged and prosecuted in England and Wales is a cause for significant concern. That is why we are carrying out an end-to-end review of how the Criminal Justice System responds to rape. Through this review we are working with operational partners from across the Criminal Justice system including the police, CPS and victims’ groups to ensure we can improve the way rape cases are dealt with.

The Government wants to make sure that the final report, when published, is as well evidenced and effective as possible, so that it delivers meaningful and long-lasting change. In order to take into account recently published work, including the EVAW ‘Shadow Review’ document, and make sure we define the right actions for the police, CPS and courts to take, we think it is right to delay publication until this spring – a decision that was supported by organisations across the victims’ sector.

We will update the House in due course on the progress of the report.

Alex Chalk
Assistant Whip
8th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many youth cautions have been given by the police for a sexual offence in England and Wales in each year from 2015.

There are two types of caution available for children aged 10-17: a youth caution and a youth conditional caution. These can be used as an alternative to prosecution for any offence admitted by a child where there is sufficient evidence for a realistic prospect of conviction, but it is not in the public interest to prosecute. A youth conditional caution has conditions attached - where there is no reasonable excuse for non-compliance with conditions, criminal proceedings may be brought.

The table below shows the aggregated number of both types of youth caution where the principal offence (where there is more than one offence, the principal offence is the more serious) was a sexual offence. 8,552 cautions were issued to children in the year ending March 2019, meaning that cautions where the principal offence was a sexual offence made up around 2% of all cautions issued to children in that year.

Year ending March

Offence type

2015[1]

2016

2017

2018

2019

Sexual offences

303

277

248

151

133

This information can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/youth-justice-statistics-2018-to-2019 in the document "Youth Justice Statistics: 2018 to 2019: supplementary tables", chapter 1, table 1.12.

The Sexual Offences Act 2003 significantly modernised and strengthened the laws on sexual offences in England and Wales to provide extra protection to people from sexual exploitation. The sentences available to the courts for offences under the Act are significant and reflect the seriousness of the offending.

The Home Office also publishes the investigative outcomes of crimes recorded by the police in England and Wales, including the number resolved through a police caution. This data is published quarterly and can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-recorded-crime-open-data-tables

Any discrepancies between the two sets of data are due to differences in recording practices.

[1] In the year ending March 2016 the offence groups used as the reason for giving a youth caution were updated to match the groups used in crime statistics. Therefore, data broken down by offence group from the year ending March 2016 onwards are not directly comparable with previous data.

Alex Chalk
Assistant Whip
6th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people have received a police caution for rape in England and Wales in each year since 2015.

The Criminal Justice and Courts Act 2015 placed new restrictions on the use of Cautions for Indictable only offences (such as Rape) for offenders over 18. This restricted their use to exceptional circumstances, and only with the consent of the Director of Public Prosecutions.

The Ministry of Justice has published information on police cautions issued for rape offences, up to December 2018, in the ‘Outcomes by Offence’ data tool, available here:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/802314/outcomes-by-offence-tool-2018.xlsx

Using the data tool above, type ‘rape’ in the ‘Offence’ filter. Select all options (19C-H, using ‘Select Multiple Items’ tickbox) in order to see police cautions for all rape offences. Number of cautions issued can be identified for each year from 2008 to 2018 in Row 23.

The figures relate to defendants for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe.

The Out of Court Disposals framework is currently being reformed following the announcement of the Lord Chancellor in the Sentencing White Paper in September 2020:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/918187/a-smarter-approach-to-sentencing.pdf. Legislation will be brought forward in due course.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
9th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many employment claims were waiting to be heard by a tribunal in each quarter since 2017.

Whilst we do not hold data relating to claims awaiting hearing, the outstanding caseload in the Employment Tribunal for each quarter since 2017 until June 2020 can be found in these published statistics. https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/tribunal-statistics-quarterly-april-to-june-2020

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
8th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 7 December 2020 to Question 123733 on HM Courts & Tribunals Service: Finance, how much and what proportion of the £3.364 million of additional covid-19-related funding for tribunals he plans spend on (a) immigration tribunals, (b) social security tribunals, (c) employment tribunals and (d) other tribunals.

In the answer to question 123733 we set out the proportion of the additional Covid-related funding announced in September 2020 which could be directly attributed to each of the major jurisdictions as well as spend which benefits multiple jurisdictions. The majority of Covid recovery spend is for costs such as additional cleaning of the court estate, the provision of additional safety and security works, the provision of technology to enable remote hearings which have been critical to Tribunals this year, and the provision of some additional court rooms (often referred to as ‘Nightingale Courts’). Much of this spend will be of direct benefit to Tribunals but cannot be directly attributed to it. Very little of the spend is directly attributable to a single tribunal, and so I am unable to provide a further breakdown.

We are also investing record amounts which will also improve our resilience going forward, including £153m investment in 20/21 to improve court and tribunal buildings – the biggest single investment in court estate maintenance for more than 20 years.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
3rd Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what estimate he has made of the number of outstanding (a) rape and (b) sexual offences court cases in (a) England and (b) Wales in each year since 2015.

The number of outstanding rape and sexual offences court cases at the Crown Court in England and Wales each year since 2015 are presented in the table below:

Offence

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

Sexual Offences

England

6,368

5,898

4,983

2,829

3,167

Wales

308

257

268

160

217

Rape

England

2,605

2,443

2,023

970

1,057

Wales

117

107

89

58

57

The number of defendants dealt with in completed cases for sexual offences and rape that spend over two years between first listing at the magistrates’ courts to completion in England and Wales each year since 2015 are as follows:

Offence

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

Sexual Offences

England

83

108

151

153

125

Wales

2

10

0

3

3

Rape

England

40

42

59

50

50

Wales

1

3

0

1

1

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
3rd Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what estimate he has made of the number of outstanding (a) rape and (b) sexual offences court cases waiting more than two years for an outcome in (a) England and (b) Wales.

The number of outstanding rape and sexual offences court cases at the Crown Court in England and Wales each year since 2015 are presented in the table below:

Offence

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

Sexual Offences

England

6,368

5,898

4,983

2,829

3,167

Wales

308

257

268

160

217

Rape

England

2,605

2,443

2,023

970

1,057

Wales

117

107

89

58

57

The number of defendants dealt with in completed cases for sexual offences and rape that spend over two years between first listing at the magistrates’ courts to completion in England and Wales each year since 2015 are as follows:

Offence

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

Sexual Offences

England

83

108

151

153

125

Wales

2

10

0

3

3

Rape

England

40

42

59

50

50

Wales

1

3

0

1

1

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
3rd Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of amending section 41 of the Youth Justice and Criminal Evidence Act 1999 to ensure that it is fit for purpose in the digital age.

The Government wants to ensure that victims of sexual offences are treated with dignity and respect in court.

Section 41 of the Youth Justice and Criminal Evidence Act 1999 provides critical protection for complainants in sex offence cases, by restricting the introduction of a complainant’s sexual history by the defence in sexual offence cases.

In 2017, we carefully looked at how the law was working in practice and found that the law was operating as Parliament intended, while striking the balance between the need to protect complainants and ensure defendants receive a fair trial.

As part of the End to End Review of the Criminal Justice’s system response to rape we are working to ensure disclosure is proportionate, taking into account the increasing digital nature of evidence.

The Government will publish its initial findings and recommendations for action in due course and we are committed to continuing work with partners from across the criminal justice system after that to improve the system in the longer term.

Alex Chalk
Assistant Whip
2nd Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many prosecutions were made under the Animal Welfare Act 2006 relating to the use of inhumane animal traps across (a) England and (b) Wales in each year since 2015.

The Ministry of Justice has published information on prosecutions and convictions made under the Animal Welfare Act 2006 in England and Wales, up to December 2019 in the ‘Principal offence proceedings and outcomes by Home Office offence code’ data tool, available here:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/938554/HO-code-tool-principal-offence-2019.xlsx

Offences under the Animal Welfare Act 2006 relating to the use of inhumane animal traps are included within the offences ‘Causing, permitting or failing to prevent unnecessary suffering’ and ‘Carrying out, permitting, causing to be carried out or failing to prevent prohibited procedure on protected animal’. It is not possible to disaggregate the requested offence from within these general offences. Offences specifically related to inhumane animal traps may be held on court record but can only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Using the data tool linked above, enter the following Home Office offence codes into the ‘Offence code’ filter, in order to isolate data on prosecutions associated with each offence:

  • 108/29 - Causing, permitting or failing to prevent unnecessary suffering,
  • 108/30 - Carrying out, permitting, causing to be carried out or failing to prevent prohibited prohibited procedure on protected animal.

In order to identify breakdowns across England and Wales, use the ‘Police Force Area’ filter and select either all areas of Wales, or all of England.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
2nd Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many prosecutions have been made under Section 4 of the Animal Welfare Act each year since 2015.

The Ministry of Justice has published information on prosecutions and convictions made under Section 4 of the Animal Welfare Act 2006 in England and Wales, up to December 2019 in the ‘Principal offence proceedings and outcomes by Home Office offence code’ data tool, available here:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/938554/HO-code-tool-principal-offence-2019.xlsx

Offences contrary to Section 4 of the Animal Welfare Act include:

  • Causing unnecessary suffering to a protected animal
  • Aiding and abetting the causing of unnecessary suffering to a protected animal
  • Responsible person failing to prevent the causing of unnecessary suffering to an animal

These are collectively housed under the Home Office offence code 108/29. In the data tool above, enter ‘10829’ into the ‘Offence code’ filter in order to see prosecutions under this offence, in Row 31, each year since 2013.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
1st Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how much and what proportion of the £80 million of additional covid-19-related funding for HM Courts & Tribunals Service announced on 6 September 2020 is planned to be spent on (a) criminal court services, (b) civil court services, and (c) tribunal services.

A jurisdictional breakdown of forecast expenditure in relation to the additional covid-19-related funding for HM Courts & Tribunals Service announced on 6 September 2020 is provided below.

The financial forecast is provisional, as at 30th November, and reflects latest projections of judicial demand and supply, physical court room capacity and current recovery trajectories. This forecast remains subject to change during the recovery phase, as resources are deployed in line with HMCTS recovery priorities.

Jurisdiction

£000’s

% of total

Crime

27,515

34%

Civil and Family

14,116

17%

Tribunals

3,364

4%

Probate

400

0%

Multi-Jurisdiction

35,351

44%

Total

80,738

*Multi-jurisdiction includes services accounted for at a national basis, for which a jurisdiction is not identifiable in the financial system – examples include resources working across jurisdictions to manage priorities and demand, corporate services, telephone conferencing.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
20th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many (a) stakeholder group meetings, (b) literature reviews and (c) expert interviews have been undertaken to examine the role of juries and courts in rape cases as part of the Government's Rape Review.

The Government recognises that the decline in the number of rape and serious sexual offences being charged and prosecuted in England and Wales is a cause for significant concern.
As such an end-to-end review of the criminal justice response to rape and serious sexual offences was commissioned in March 2019 by the National Criminal Justice Board (CJB). A sub-group of the CJB made up of experts and operational partners from across the criminal justice system is driving forward the review

To answer your questions in turn:
a) The review has established a Stakeholder Reference Group, which is made up of victim organisations, and is consulted to ensure the review considers the victim experience of the whole criminal justice system. The review team has met with this group three times, in May 2019, February 2020 and April 2020. Members of the Group have also been engaged by the Review team separately to discuss specific elements of the review.
b) The review has commissioned a Literature Review of research currently in the public domain that studies the end to end progression of rape cases in England and Wales, including findings relevant to the role of juries and courts
c) Five expert interviews were undertaken with barristers as part of a wider suite of qualitative and quantitative work which included 23 focus groups and in-depth interviews and 691 surveys with police officers, specialist victims support services including Independent Sexual Violence Advisers (ISVAs), barristers, HMCTS and CPS prosecutors.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
20th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether the Government's Rape Review will examine potential barriers to reporting rape and sexual offences crimes for migrant victims.

In March 2019 the National Criminal Justice Board (CJB) commissioned a review to consider the decline in the number of rape and serious sexual offences being charged and prosecuted in England and Wales. A sub-group of the CJB is driving forward the review and continues to gather and analyse detailed views from key groups and agencies across the criminal justice system.

The review is currently focussed on understanding how the system’s response to rape cases can be improved from the time a report is made to when a case reaches court, as such barriers to reporting fall outside of the scope.

The Government is committed to ensuring that all victims of rape and sexual violence have access to high-quality support services to help them cope with and, as far as possible, recover from the effects of crime. These services are available to all, provided by specialist local organisations at a physical location, free of charge and regardless of whether a person reported the crime to police.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
13th May 2020
What assessment he has made of the adequacy of information for women seeking to access abortion services in Northern Ireland.

Abortion services are now a matter for the Department of Health in Northern Ireland.

I am pleased that some service provision has commenced through existing sexual and reproductive health services in the Belfast, Northern and Western Trust areas. Information on these services is available through the Informing Choices NI helpline and the Central Booking Service.

I hope that longer-term services can be commissioned as soon as possible in the current circumstances, consistent with the Regulations we made.

The Abortion (Northern Ireland) Regulations 2020 which were laid in March have now been replaced with the Abortion (Northern Ireland) (No. 2) Regulations 2020 , which were laid in the House today. These regulations come into effect on 14th May and revoke the earlier regulations. Their legal effect in supporting the provision of services remains consistent, with a small correction having been made to address the concerns of the JCSI, so services can continue on the same basis.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Northern Ireland Office)
15th Jan 2020
What recent assessment he has made of the economic effect on low-income families of the roll-out of universal credit in Wales.

Work is the most effective route out of poverty. Universal Credit makes it easier for people to move into work and keep more of what they earn.

We have listened to concerns and as a result ensured that claimants can access 100% advance payments on day one of a Universal Credit claim and continue to receive Housing Benefit for two weeks after transitioning.

Simon Hart
Secretary of State for Wales