Ministry of Justice

The Ministry of Justice is a major government department, at the heart of the justice system. We work to protect and advance the principles of justice. Our vision is to deliver a world-class justice system that works for everyone in society.



Secretary of State

 Portrait

Dominic Raab
Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice

Shadow Ministers / Spokeperson
Labour
Lord Falconer of Thoroton (LAB - Life peer)
Shadow Spokesperson (Justice)

Liberal Democrat
Wera Hobhouse (LDEM - Bath)
Liberal Democrat Spokesperson (Justice)

Labour
David Lammy (LAB - Tottenham)
Shadow Lord Chancellor and Shadow Secretary of State for Justice
Lord Ponsonby of Shulbrede (LAB - Life peer)
Shadow Spokesperson (Justice)

Scottish National Party
Anne McLaughlin (SNP - Glasgow North East)
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Justice)

Liberal Democrat
Lord Marks of Henley-on-Thames (LDEM - Life peer)
Liberal Democrat Lords Spokesperson (Justice)

Plaid Cymru
Liz Saville Roberts (PC - Dwyfor Meirionnydd)
Shadow PC Spokesperson (Justice)
Junior Shadow Ministers / Deputy Spokesperson
Labour
Lyn Brown (LAB - West Ham)
Shadow Minister (Justice)
Alex Cunningham (LAB - Stockton North)
Shadow Minister (Justice)
Karl Turner (LAB - Kingston upon Hull East)
Shadow Minister (Justice)
Anna McMorrin (LAB - Cardiff North)
Shadow Minister (Justice)
Ministers of State
Victoria Atkins (CON - Louth and Horncastle)
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
Victoria Atkins (CON - Louth and Horncastle)
Minister for Afghan resettlement
Kit Malthouse (CON - North West Hampshire)
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
Parliamentary Under-Secretaries of State
Lord Wolfson of Tredegar (CON - Life peer)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
Scheduled Event
Tuesday 19th October 2021
14:00
Justice Committee - Oral evidence - Select & Joint Committees
19 Oct 2021, 2 p.m.
Women in Prison
View calendar
Scheduled Event
Tuesday 9th November 2021
11:30
Ministry of Justice
Oral questions - Main Chamber
9 Nov 2021, 11:30 a.m.
Justice (including Topical Questions)
Save to Calendar
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Debates
Monday 11th October 2021
Child Trust Funds
Lords Chamber
Select Committee Docs
Tuesday 26th October 2021
00:00
Call for Evidence
Call For Evidence
Select Committee Inquiry
Tuesday 21st September 2021
Imprisonment for Public Protection (IPP) sentences

More than 1,700 people are in prison serving indeterminate sentences for public protection, even though IPP sentences were abolished nearly …

Written Answers
Thursday 30th September 2021
Care Proceedings
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what figures his Department holds on the number of care orders issued …
Secondary Legislation
Thursday 9th September 2021
Gender Recognition (Disclosure of Information) (England and Wales) Order 2021
Section 22 of the Gender Recognition Act 2004 (“the Act”) provides that it is an offence for a person who …
Bills
Wednesday 21st July 2021
Judicial Review and Courts Bill 2021-22
A Bill to Make provision about the provision that may be made by, and the effects of, quashing orders; to …
Dept. Publications
Friday 15th October 2021
00:15
Consultation document
Consultations

Ministry of Justice Commons Appearances

Oral Answers to Questions is a regularly scheduled appearance where the Secretary of State and junior minister will answer at the Dispatch Box questions from backbench MPs

Other Commons Chamber appearances can be:
  • Urgent Questions where the Speaker has selected a question to which a Minister must reply that day
  • Adjornment Debates a 30 minute debate attended by a Minister that concludes the day in Parliament.
  • Oral Statements informing the Commons of a significant development, where backbench MP's can then question the Minister making the statement.

Westminster Hall debates are performed in response to backbench MPs or e-petitions asking for a Minister to address a detailed issue

Written Statements are made when a current event is not sufficiently significant to require an Oral Statement, but the House is required to be informed.

Most Recent Commons Appearances by Category
Sep. 22
Oral Questions
Nov. 20
Topical Questions
Jun. 10
Urgent Questions
Sep. 21
Westminster Hall
Sep. 22
Adjournment Debate
View All Ministry of Justice Commons Contibutions

Bills currently before Parliament

Ministry of Justice does not have Bills currently before Parliament


Acts of Parliament created in the 2019 Parliament

Introduced: 20th May 2020

A Bill to make provision about the sentencing of offenders convicted of terrorism offences, of offences with a terrorist connection or of certain other offences; to make other provision in relation to terrorism; and for connected purposes.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Thursday 29th April 2021 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 27th February 2020

A Bill to implement the Hague Conventions of 1996, 2005 and 2007 and to provide for the implementation of other international agreements on private international law.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Monday 14th December 2020 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 8th January 2020

To require the Parole Board to take into account any failure by a prisoner serving a sentence for unlawful killing or for taking or making an indecent image of a child to disclose information about the victim.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Wednesday 4th November 2020 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 5th March 2020

A Bill to consolidate certain enactments relating to sentencing.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Thursday 22nd October 2020 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 7th January 2020

A bill to make in relation to marriage and civil partnership in England and Wales provision about divorce, dissolution and separation; and for connected purposes

This Bill received Royal Assent on Thursday 25th June 2020 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 21st January 2020

A bill to give effect to Law Commission recommendations relating to commencement of enactments relating to sentencing law and to make provision for pre-consolidation amendments of sentencing law

This Bill received Royal Assent on Monday 8th June 2020 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 11th February 2020

A Bill to make provision about the release on licence of offenders convicted of terrorist offences or offences with a terrorist connection; and for connected purposes.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Wednesday 26th February 2020 and was enacted into law.

Ministry of Justice - Secondary Legislation

Section 22 of the Gender Recognition Act 2004 (“the Act”) provides that it is an offence for a person who has acquired protected information in an official capacity to disclose the information to any other person. “Protected information” is defined in section 22(2) as information relating to a person who has applied for a gender recognition certificate under the Act, and which concerns that application (or a subsequent application by them), or their gender prior to being granted a full gender recognition certificate. Section 22(3) defines where a person acquires protected information in an official capacity.
This Order amends the Compulsory Electronic Monitoring Licence Condition Order 2021 (S.I. 2021/330) (“the Earlier Order”). The Earlier Order requires an electronic monitoring condition to be included in the licence of persons described in that Order pursuant to section 62A of the Criminal Justice and Court Services Act 2000 (c. 43). The criteria include where a person is serving multiple sentences, whether the sentence which otherwise meets the criteria specified in that Order is the longest term; and whether the person is required to reside on licence at an address within a specified area, limited to those police areas listed in Schedule 1 to the Earlier Order. A person who meets each of the criteria is considered a qualifying offender.
View All Ministry of Justice Secondary Legislation

Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Trending Petitions
Petition Open
3,041 Signatures
(2,651 in the last 7 days)
Petition Open
3,854 Signatures
(1,446 in the last 7 days)
Petition Open
1,566 Signatures
(895 in the last 7 days)
Petition Open
231 Signatures
(145 in the last 7 days)
Petitions with most signatures
Petition Debates Contributed
134,934
Petition Closed
5 Sep 2020
closed 1 year, 1 month ago

The Government's manifesto stated “we will make intentional trespass a criminal offence”: an extreme, illiberal & unnecessary attack on ancient freedoms that would threaten walkers, campers, and the wider public. It would further tilt the law in favour of the landowning 1% who own half the country.

View All Ministry of Justice Petitions

Departmental Select Committee

Justice Committee

Commons Select Committees are a formally established cross-party group of backbench MPs tasked with holding a Government department to account.

At any time there will be number of ongoing investigations into the work of the Department, or issues which fall within the oversight of the Department. Witnesses can be summoned from within the Government and outside to assist in these inquiries.

Select Committee findings are reported to the Commons, printed, and published on the Parliament website. The government then usually has 60 days to reply to the committee's recommendations.


11 Members of the Justice Committee
Robert Neill Portrait
Robert Neill (Conservative - Bromley and Chislehurst)
Justice Committee Chair since 29th January 2020
Andy Slaughter Portrait
Andy Slaughter (Labour - Hammersmith)
Justice Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
Kieran Mullan Portrait
Kieran Mullan (Conservative - Crewe and Nantwich)
Justice Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
Maria Eagle Portrait
Maria Eagle (Labour - Garston and Halewood)
Justice Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
Sarah Dines Portrait
Sarah Dines (Conservative - Derbyshire Dales)
Justice Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
James Daly Portrait
James Daly (Conservative - Bury North)
Justice Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
Rob Butler Portrait
Rob Butler (Conservative - Aylesbury)
Justice Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
Janet Daby Portrait
Janet Daby (Labour - Lewisham East)
Justice Committee Member since 22nd February 2021
Angela Crawley Portrait
Angela Crawley (Scottish National Party - Lanark and Hamilton East)
Justice Committee Member since 25th May 2021
Laura Farris Portrait
Laura Farris (Conservative - Newbury)
Justice Committee Member since 8th June 2021
Kate Hollern Portrait
Kate Hollern (Labour - Blackburn)
Justice Committee Member since 13th July 2021
Justice Committee: Upcoming Events
Justice Committee - Oral evidence
Women in Prison
19 Oct 2021, 2 p.m.
At 2.30pm: Oral evidence
Laura Seebohm - Executive Director Innovation and Policy at Changing Lives
Vicky Davis - Eastwood Park Team Manager at The Nelson Trust
Dr Jenny Earle - Adviser to the London Prisons Mission at Safe Homes for Women Leaving Prison Initiative
At 3.30pm: Oral evidence
Sandra Fieldhouse - Inspector, Leader of the Women's Inspection Team at HM Inspectorate of Prisons
Juliet Lyon CBE - Chair at Independent Advisory Panel on Deaths in Custody
Sue McAllister CB, Prison and Probation Ombudsman

View calendar
Justice Committee: Previous Inquiries
Open justice: court reporting in the digital age The work of the Lord Chancellor Coronavirus (COVID-19): The impact on prison, probation and court systems Ageing prison population Children and young people in custody Ageing prison population Bailiffs: Enforcement of debt Children and young people in custody Court and Tribunal Reforms Criminal legal aid Work of the Crown Prosecution Service Director of Public Prosecutions Employment tribunal fees HM Inspectorate of Prisons report on HMP Liverpool HMP Birmingham The implications of Brexit for the justice system: follow-up Prison governance HM Chief Inspector of Probation Progress in the implementation of the Lammy Review's recommendations Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012 The Lord Chief Justice's Report for 2018 Ministry of Justice Annual Report and Accounts 2017-18 Work of the Parole Board Pre-appointment hearing for HM Chief Inspector of Probation Pre-commencement hearing: Chair of the Parole Board Prison Population 2022: planning for the future The role of the magistracy – follow up Serious Fraud Office Transforming Rehabilitation Transparency of Parole Board decisions Work of the Victims' Commissioner Work of the Attorney General The work of the Law Commission The work of the Ministry of Justice The work of the Solicitor General Work of the Serious Fraud Office Young adults in the criminal justice system The work of the Lord Chancellor Work of the Prison Service The Lord Chief Justice's report for 2017 inquiry

50 most recent Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department

20th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what figures his Department holds on the number of care orders issued by local authorities in England in each of the last 10 years.

Local Authorities do not issue care orders in England. They apply to the court for care orders to be made. In England and Wales, care orders are made by the Family Court or the Family Division of the High Court.

The latest information was released as part of the Family Court Statistics Quarterly release, on 30th September 2021 and will include this data for England and Wales combined up to 30 June 2021, https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/family-court-statistics-quarterly

James Cartlidge
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (and Assistant Government Whip)
21st Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to the Pregnancy, MBUs and Maternal Separation in Women’s Prisons Policy Framework, published on 20 September 2021, if he will make an assessment of potential risks of the policy changes made in that framework to the distinction between prison officers and healthcare staff in prisons.

Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service’s (HMPPS) new policy was developed following a fundamental review that involved extensive stakeholder consultation, including with Health partners; a resource impact assessment and a data protection impact assessment.

1) As per 2.1-2.8 of the policy, healthcare is commissioned through the health sector. The role of HMPPS is to ensure appropriate access to healthcare – including information sharing and physical access.

2) a) Medical professional organisations consulted include:

i) NHS England and NHS Improvement (including the central Health and Justice Team, Clinical Reference Groups and regional commissioners)

ii) Local prison healthcare providers commissioned by NHSE/I

iii) Public Health England (PHE)

iv) Public Health Wales (PHW)

v) The Royal College of Midwives

b) Criminal justice non-governmental organisations consulted include:

i) Voluntary sector organisations including Birth Companions, Born Inside, Hibiscus, Barnardo’s and Family Action

ii) Academics including Dr Shona Minson, Dr Lucy Baldwin and Dr Laura Abbott

iii) Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Prisons and Probation (HMIP)

iv) The Prison and Probation Ombudsman (PPO)

3) Where a contractor fails to implement the policy, contractual action will be taken as necessary. Policy implementation in both public and contracted prisons will be supported by a variety of assurance structures and processes, to monitor compliance. This includes external and independent assurance by HMIP, PPO and OFSTED.

4) A resource impact assessment has been undertaken for public prisons as part of the development of the new Policy Framework. This assessment identified a need for additional funding to support implementation in public prisons, which has been provided.

5) Resource impact assessments were also undertaken for contracted prisons as part of the development of the new Policy Framework requirements. These identified that no additional funding was required to fulfil new policy requirements.

6) National data on pregnancy and births and Mother and Baby Units is published annually as part of the HMPPS Annual Digest: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/hmpps-annual-digest-april-2020-to-march-2021. Data on abortions and pregnancy outcomes such as miscarriage and stillbirth are recorded on healthcare systems as they are medical in confidence.

Information on a prisoner’s caring responsibilities and children living in the community is monitored locally by prison Governors/Directors to ensure appropriate support can be provided to offenders and their families. We are developing changes to the initial reception questionnaire to enable national data collection that can be published.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
21st Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to the Pregnancy, MBUs and Maternal Separation in Women’s Prisons Policy Framework, published on 20 September 2021, what (a) medical professional organisations and (b) criminal justice non-governmental organisations were consulted during the development of that framework.

Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service’s (HMPPS) new policy was developed following a fundamental review that involved extensive stakeholder consultation, including with Health partners; a resource impact assessment and a data protection impact assessment.

1) As per 2.1-2.8 of the policy, healthcare is commissioned through the health sector. The role of HMPPS is to ensure appropriate access to healthcare – including information sharing and physical access.

2) a) Medical professional organisations consulted include:

i) NHS England and NHS Improvement (including the central Health and Justice Team, Clinical Reference Groups and regional commissioners)

ii) Local prison healthcare providers commissioned by NHSE/I

iii) Public Health England (PHE)

iv) Public Health Wales (PHW)

v) The Royal College of Midwives

b) Criminal justice non-governmental organisations consulted include:

i) Voluntary sector organisations including Birth Companions, Born Inside, Hibiscus, Barnardo’s and Family Action

ii) Academics including Dr Shona Minson, Dr Lucy Baldwin and Dr Laura Abbott

iii) Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Prisons and Probation (HMIP)

iv) The Prison and Probation Ombudsman (PPO)

3) Where a contractor fails to implement the policy, contractual action will be taken as necessary. Policy implementation in both public and contracted prisons will be supported by a variety of assurance structures and processes, to monitor compliance. This includes external and independent assurance by HMIP, PPO and OFSTED.

4) A resource impact assessment has been undertaken for public prisons as part of the development of the new Policy Framework. This assessment identified a need for additional funding to support implementation in public prisons, which has been provided.

5) Resource impact assessments were also undertaken for contracted prisons as part of the development of the new Policy Framework requirements. These identified that no additional funding was required to fulfil new policy requirements.

6) National data on pregnancy and births and Mother and Baby Units is published annually as part of the HMPPS Annual Digest: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/hmpps-annual-digest-april-2020-to-march-2021. Data on abortions and pregnancy outcomes such as miscarriage and stillbirth are recorded on healthcare systems as they are medical in confidence.

Information on a prisoner’s caring responsibilities and children living in the community is monitored locally by prison Governors/Directors to ensure appropriate support can be provided to offenders and their families. We are developing changes to the initial reception questionnaire to enable national data collection that can be published.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
21st Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to the Pregnancy, MBUs and Maternal Separation in Women’s Prisons Policy Framework, published on 20 September 2021, what steps he plans to take to help ensure compliance with that policy framework in contracted out prisons.

Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service’s (HMPPS) new policy was developed following a fundamental review that involved extensive stakeholder consultation, including with Health partners; a resource impact assessment and a data protection impact assessment.

1) As per 2.1-2.8 of the policy, healthcare is commissioned through the health sector. The role of HMPPS is to ensure appropriate access to healthcare – including information sharing and physical access.

2) a) Medical professional organisations consulted include:

i) NHS England and NHS Improvement (including the central Health and Justice Team, Clinical Reference Groups and regional commissioners)

ii) Local prison healthcare providers commissioned by NHSE/I

iii) Public Health England (PHE)

iv) Public Health Wales (PHW)

v) The Royal College of Midwives

b) Criminal justice non-governmental organisations consulted include:

i) Voluntary sector organisations including Birth Companions, Born Inside, Hibiscus, Barnardo’s and Family Action

ii) Academics including Dr Shona Minson, Dr Lucy Baldwin and Dr Laura Abbott

iii) Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Prisons and Probation (HMIP)

iv) The Prison and Probation Ombudsman (PPO)

3) Where a contractor fails to implement the policy, contractual action will be taken as necessary. Policy implementation in both public and contracted prisons will be supported by a variety of assurance structures and processes, to monitor compliance. This includes external and independent assurance by HMIP, PPO and OFSTED.

4) A resource impact assessment has been undertaken for public prisons as part of the development of the new Policy Framework. This assessment identified a need for additional funding to support implementation in public prisons, which has been provided.

5) Resource impact assessments were also undertaken for contracted prisons as part of the development of the new Policy Framework requirements. These identified that no additional funding was required to fulfil new policy requirements.

6) National data on pregnancy and births and Mother and Baby Units is published annually as part of the HMPPS Annual Digest: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/hmpps-annual-digest-april-2020-to-march-2021. Data on abortions and pregnancy outcomes such as miscarriage and stillbirth are recorded on healthcare systems as they are medical in confidence.

Information on a prisoner’s caring responsibilities and children living in the community is monitored locally by prison Governors/Directors to ensure appropriate support can be provided to offenders and their families. We are developing changes to the initial reception questionnaire to enable national data collection that can be published.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
21st Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to the Pregnancy, MBUs and Maternal Separation in Women’s Prisons Policy Framework, published on 20 September 2021, what estimate he has made of the additional annual resource impact of implementing that framework across all public sector prisons in England and Wales.

Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service’s (HMPPS) new policy was developed following a fundamental review that involved extensive stakeholder consultation, including with Health partners; a resource impact assessment and a data protection impact assessment.

1) As per 2.1-2.8 of the policy, healthcare is commissioned through the health sector. The role of HMPPS is to ensure appropriate access to healthcare – including information sharing and physical access.

2) a) Medical professional organisations consulted include:

i) NHS England and NHS Improvement (including the central Health and Justice Team, Clinical Reference Groups and regional commissioners)

ii) Local prison healthcare providers commissioned by NHSE/I

iii) Public Health England (PHE)

iv) Public Health Wales (PHW)

v) The Royal College of Midwives

b) Criminal justice non-governmental organisations consulted include:

i) Voluntary sector organisations including Birth Companions, Born Inside, Hibiscus, Barnardo’s and Family Action

ii) Academics including Dr Shona Minson, Dr Lucy Baldwin and Dr Laura Abbott

iii) Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Prisons and Probation (HMIP)

iv) The Prison and Probation Ombudsman (PPO)

3) Where a contractor fails to implement the policy, contractual action will be taken as necessary. Policy implementation in both public and contracted prisons will be supported by a variety of assurance structures and processes, to monitor compliance. This includes external and independent assurance by HMIP, PPO and OFSTED.

4) A resource impact assessment has been undertaken for public prisons as part of the development of the new Policy Framework. This assessment identified a need for additional funding to support implementation in public prisons, which has been provided.

5) Resource impact assessments were also undertaken for contracted prisons as part of the development of the new Policy Framework requirements. These identified that no additional funding was required to fulfil new policy requirements.

6) National data on pregnancy and births and Mother and Baby Units is published annually as part of the HMPPS Annual Digest: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/hmpps-annual-digest-april-2020-to-march-2021. Data on abortions and pregnancy outcomes such as miscarriage and stillbirth are recorded on healthcare systems as they are medical in confidence.

Information on a prisoner’s caring responsibilities and children living in the community is monitored locally by prison Governors/Directors to ensure appropriate support can be provided to offenders and their families. We are developing changes to the initial reception questionnaire to enable national data collection that can be published.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
21st Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to the Pregnancy, MBUs and Maternal Separation in Women’s Prisons Policy Framework, published on 20 September 2021, when and in what form he plans to publish statistics on the (a) numbers and (b) outcomes for (i) individuals who have experienced pregnancy, the post-natal period, and/or pregnancy outcomes within 12 months of entering prison or during a sentence, (ii) mothers and child-rearing individuals applying for and spending time on MBUs with their children and (iii) mothers, child-rearing individuals and adoptive parents separated from children up to the age of two years old in the 12 months prior to entering prison, as a result of imprisonment, or following time on an MBU.

Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service’s (HMPPS) new policy was developed following a fundamental review that involved extensive stakeholder consultation, including with Health partners; a resource impact assessment and a data protection impact assessment.

1) As per 2.1-2.8 of the policy, healthcare is commissioned through the health sector. The role of HMPPS is to ensure appropriate access to healthcare – including information sharing and physical access.

2) a) Medical professional organisations consulted include:

i) NHS England and NHS Improvement (including the central Health and Justice Team, Clinical Reference Groups and regional commissioners)

ii) Local prison healthcare providers commissioned by NHSE/I

iii) Public Health England (PHE)

iv) Public Health Wales (PHW)

v) The Royal College of Midwives

b) Criminal justice non-governmental organisations consulted include:

i) Voluntary sector organisations including Birth Companions, Born Inside, Hibiscus, Barnardo’s and Family Action

ii) Academics including Dr Shona Minson, Dr Lucy Baldwin and Dr Laura Abbott

iii) Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Prisons and Probation (HMIP)

iv) The Prison and Probation Ombudsman (PPO)

3) Where a contractor fails to implement the policy, contractual action will be taken as necessary. Policy implementation in both public and contracted prisons will be supported by a variety of assurance structures and processes, to monitor compliance. This includes external and independent assurance by HMIP, PPO and OFSTED.

4) A resource impact assessment has been undertaken for public prisons as part of the development of the new Policy Framework. This assessment identified a need for additional funding to support implementation in public prisons, which has been provided.

5) Resource impact assessments were also undertaken for contracted prisons as part of the development of the new Policy Framework requirements. These identified that no additional funding was required to fulfil new policy requirements.

6) National data on pregnancy and births and Mother and Baby Units is published annually as part of the HMPPS Annual Digest: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/hmpps-annual-digest-april-2020-to-march-2021. Data on abortions and pregnancy outcomes such as miscarriage and stillbirth are recorded on healthcare systems as they are medical in confidence.

Information on a prisoner’s caring responsibilities and children living in the community is monitored locally by prison Governors/Directors to ensure appropriate support can be provided to offenders and their families. We are developing changes to the initial reception questionnaire to enable national data collection that can be published.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
21st Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many Slavery and Trafficking Reparation Orders under the Modern Slavery Act 2015 have been made for victims of the Daesh atrocities in each year since the passing of that Act.

The Ministry of Justice holds data on prosecutions and court outcomes for modern slavery offences; however, centrally held information in the courts proceedings database cannot identify the exact circumstances of the offence that led to a slavery or trafficking reparation order, for example, to identify that it was issued under the Modern Slavery Act 2015 as a result of a Daesh atrocity. This information may be held on court record but can only be obtained by manually searching court records at disproportionate cost.

James Cartlidge
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (and Assistant Government Whip)
21st Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of resources available to effectively tackle court backlogs in the recovery from the covid-19 outbreak.

We have taken decisive action to ensure the courts have sufficient resources to tackle our outstanding caseloads in the recovery from the Covid-19 pandemic.

We spent over a quarter of a billion pounds on recovery last financial year, making court buildings safe, rolling out new technology for remote hearings and recruiting an additional 1,600 HMCTS staff. We will run each Crown Court site to its fullest, with no limit on sitting days this financial year, so more cases can be heard and waiting times can come down. Following the lifting of social distancing restrictions, we are in the process of fully reopening our existing physical estate. We have also extended 32 of our Nightingale courtrooms until March 2022 to maximise our sitting capacity this year.

James Cartlidge
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (and Assistant Government Whip)
20th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the average distance is for a woman placed in the prison system to their home.

As of 17 September 2021, a woman in prison was on average 46 miles from their origin address.

There are complex and wide-ranging issues involved in transferring and locating prisoners, and allocation decisions must reflect both the specific needs and circumstances of the prisoner, including their security assessment, as well as the operating environment and range of services at the receiving prison.

HMPPS is committed to ensuring, where practicable, that prisoners are accommodated as close as possible to their resettlement communities and families. Whilst this is a priority, it is not always possible due to a variety of factors including wider population pressures, or where women have specific sentence planning needs which can only be met at certain establishments.

Around 97% of prisoners have an origin location; i.e. addresses that are recorded in our central IT system. If no address is given, an offender’s committal court address is used as a proxy for the area in which they are resident. This information is included in the data provided above. Those with no recorded origin are typically foreign nationals or those recently received into custody.

The numerical information provided has been drawn from administrative IT systems, which as with any large scale recording system are subject to possible error with data entry and processing.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
14th Sep 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Wolfson of Tredegar on 21 July (HL1789), what steps they plan to take to prevent pregnancy among biologically female transgender prisoners in the male prison estate.

Sex between prisoners is not permitted. Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service ensure the safety of all prisoners by managing prisoners on a case-by-case basis and consider any relevant risks (including risks to, or from, the prisoner, as well as the risk of self-harm).

The NHS England and NHS Improvement constitution mandates that all healthcare delivered within prisons must be equivalent to healthcare delivered in the community and the fact that a patient is a prisoner should not impair their access to any healthcare they require.

All secure and detained settings therefore ensure that prisoners have access to appropriate contraceptives, which are prescribed or made available as necessary. This applies to both the men’s and women’s estate and includes all prisoners .

There have been no recorded incidents of prisoners becoming pregnant in the male prison estate.

Lord Wolfson of Tredegar
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
14th Sep 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Wolfson of Tredegar on 21 July (HL1789), whether biologically female transgender prisoners in the male prison estate have access to contraceptive devices.

Sex between prisoners is not permitted. Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service ensure the safety of all prisoners by managing prisoners on a case-by-case basis and consider any relevant risks (including risks to, or from, the prisoner, as well as the risk of self-harm).

The NHS England and NHS Improvement constitution mandates that all healthcare delivered within prisons must be equivalent to healthcare delivered in the community and the fact that a patient is a prisoner should not impair their access to any healthcare they require.

All secure and detained settings therefore ensure that prisoners have access to appropriate contraceptives, which are prescribed or made available as necessary. This applies to both the men’s and women’s estate and includes all prisoners .

There have been no recorded incidents of prisoners becoming pregnant in the male prison estate.

Lord Wolfson of Tredegar
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
14th Sep 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Wolfson of Tredegar on 21 July (HL1789), how many pregnancies have been reported in the male prison estate in each of the last five years; and whether they will provide a breakdown of the outcomes of any such pregnancies.

Sex between prisoners is not permitted. Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service ensure the safety of all prisoners by managing prisoners on a case-by-case basis and consider any relevant risks (including risks to, or from, the prisoner, as well as the risk of self-harm).

The NHS England and NHS Improvement constitution mandates that all healthcare delivered within prisons must be equivalent to healthcare delivered in the community and the fact that a patient is a prisoner should not impair their access to any healthcare they require.

All secure and detained settings therefore ensure that prisoners have access to appropriate contraceptives, which are prescribed or made available as necessary. This applies to both the men’s and women’s estate and includes all prisoners .

There have been no recorded incidents of prisoners becoming pregnant in the male prison estate.

Lord Wolfson of Tredegar
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
20th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many mothers assessed as suitable to keep their baby with them on the prison estate were not able to due to a lack of mother and baby placements in the most recent period for which figures are available.

No mother has been denied a place on a Mother and Baby Unit (MBU) in the Women’s Custodial Estate due to lack of capacity since 2017, when current data collection commenced.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
20th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what recent steps his Department has taken to tackle the backlog of cases before the immigration and employment tribunals in (a) Enfield North constituency, (b) Greater London and (c) England.

Despite the enormous challenges they have faced during the last 18 months, both the Employment Tribunals and Immigration and Asylum Chamber (IAC) remained open throughout the pandemic. Both the employment tribunals and the IAC have adapted to remote ways of working and running hearings virtually, to ensure ongoing access to justice where cases cannot be heard in person. The IAC has also expanded the online Reform service (MyHMCTS) to enable most appellants to engage with the tribunal digitally. We have run ambitious recruitment campaigns across both jurisdictions, to expand our judicial capacity and boost caseworker numbers. This has been bolstered in the employment tribunal by a significant increase in our sitting day allocation for FY21/22, from 30k (FY20/21) to 37.5k (FY21/22).

James Cartlidge
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (and Assistant Government Whip)
20th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many (a) probation officers and (b) Probation Service officers have left the service every year since Transforming Rehabilitation was announced.

The information requested, from 1st June 2014, can be found at: Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service workforce statistics - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

‘Transforming rehabilitation: a strategy for reform’ was published on 9th May 2013. The National Probation Service (NPS) came into existence on 1st June 2014. The Ministry of Justice do not hold Probation Officer or Probation Service Officers leavers data from the previous Probation Trusts’ for the period between the announcement on 9th May 2013 to the point the NPS was formed on 1st June 2014 or for Community Rehabilitation Companies from the 1st of June 2014 until the services unified in June 2021.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
20th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps he is taking to ensure that people who were given requirements as part of a community order or suspended sentence order but were unable to undertake them as a result of covid-19 restrictions complete those requirements.

Throughout the pandemic, the Probation Service has worked hard to minimise the disruption caused by COVID-19. It has been keeping the public safe by prioritising accredited programmes for offenders who pose the highest risk of harm and developing alternatives where formal in-person programmes have not been possible. Group work resumed in April.

The Government is also clear that people whose unpaid work requirements have been impacted by the pandemic should work their hours and the Probation Service is working closely with the judiciary and HM Courts and Tribunal Service to extend community orders, where necessary, so hours can be worked.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
20th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what recent assessment his Department has made of trends in the level of recruitment and retention of probation officers in (a) Enfield and (b) Greater London.

The Probation Service is committed to increasing recruitment to fill Probation Officer vacancies, particularly in areas with significant local employment market challenges. The Probation Service recruited a total of 1,007 trainee probation officers in 2020/2021 and are committed to recruiting 1,500 trainee probation officers in 2021/2022.

Following the transfer of over 7,000 staff from private sector Community Rehabilitation Companies into the Probation Service at the end of June 2021, there were 4,456 full time equivalent (FTE) Band 4 probation officers in post nationally as at 30 June 2021. This figure is an increase of 844 (23.4%) since 30 June 2020 and an increase of 919 FTE (26%) probation officers compared to 31 March 2021.

In June 2021, there were 637 probation officers and 225 trainee probation officers in post in the London Probation Service. One probation officer joined the Local Delivery Unit cluster Barnet, Brent and Enfield between June 2014 to June 2021. Overall, 50 probation officers joined the London Probation Service between 2014/2015 to June 2021/2022.

The leaving rate for probation officers at the London Probation Service was 7.5% for 12 months to 30 June 2021. Over the past seven years, the leaving rate has varied between 6.1% and 10.9%.

The leaving rate for probation officers at the LDU cluster Barnet, Brent and Enfield was 8.7% for 12 months to 30 June 2021. Over the past seven years the leaving rate has varied between 4.1% and 11.8%.

The first National Probation Service Recruitment & Retention Strategy was published internally to all Probation Service staff in April following extensive engagement with colleagues and stakeholders across Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service.  At the centre of this strategy is our commitment to make sure we have great people, in the right roles, with the resources they need to do their jobs in the probation service.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
13th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to the Annual Report of the Independent Monitoring Board at HMP/YOI Styal 2021, published on 8 September 2021, what steps he is taking to ensure that maintenance and refurbishment works at HMP/YOI Styal are (a) completed in a timely manner and (b) value for money.

We are working closely with the facilities management provider Amey to manage any maintenance and refurbishment projects.

We are currently producing a report which covers fire risks, decency and structural integrity of the prison and an outline business case for a fire safety improvement project.

Initially the contractor’s supply chain had a limited number of suppliers, which resulted in cost estimates for work submitted being excessive and these were rejected by the MoJ team. The MoJ has instructed that the supply chain is broadened to include more SME companies to tender for these works. This determination to use SME companies has led to some delays but it means that there are much better procurement options that will provide more effective and value for money solutions.

The local Service Delivery Manager will continue to challenge all costs which they feel are excessive and escalate them to the Regional Estates Manager, who has regular commercial and project meetings with the contractor’s management. The Service Delivery Manager also monitors the on-site performance and will check repairs and any projects to ensure they have been completed and are to the required standard.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
13th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to the Annual Report of the Independent Monitoring Board at HMP/YOI Styal 2021, published on 8 September 2021, over what timescale works to ensure (a) fire safety, (b) other health and safety and (c) decency is restored to all accommodation at HMP/YOI Styal will be completed.

We are working closely with the facilities management provider Amey to manage any maintenance and refurbishment projects.

We are currently producing a report which covers fire risks, decency and structural integrity of the prison and an outline business case for a fire safety improvement project.

Initially the contractor’s supply chain had a limited number of suppliers, which resulted in cost estimates for work submitted being excessive and these were rejected by the MoJ team. The MoJ has instructed that the supply chain is broadened to include more SME companies to tender for these works. This determination to use SME companies has led to some delays but it means that there are much better procurement options that will provide more effective and value for money solutions.

The local Service Delivery Manager will continue to challenge all costs which they feel are excessive and escalate them to the Regional Estates Manager, who has regular commercial and project meetings with the contractor’s management. The Service Delivery Manager also monitors the on-site performance and will check repairs and any projects to ensure they have been completed and are to the required standard.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
16th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, which companies have supplied Union Jack flags to his Department since 2019.

We have purchased two Union flags for our headquarters building since 2019. These have been provided by our Facilities Management provider (Amey) and were both manufactured in the United Kingdom

Information for our HM Prison and Probation and HM Courts and Tribunals Service properties can only be provided at disproportionate cost.

James Cartlidge
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (and Assistant Government Whip)
16th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many and what proportion of the Union Jack flags purchased by his Department in each of the last two years were manufactured in the UK.

We have purchased two Union flags for our headquarters building since 2019. These have been provided by our Facilities Management provider (Amey) and were both manufactured in the United Kingdom

Information for our HM Prison and Probation and HM Courts and Tribunals Service properties can only be provided at disproportionate cost.

James Cartlidge
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (and Assistant Government Whip)
13th Sep 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have (1) to improve awareness of restorative justice throughout the criminal justice system, and (2) to increase the capacity of (a) professional, and (b) volunteer, restorative justice practitioners.

The Government continues to support the provision of good quality, victim-focussed restorative justice to help victims cope and recover from the effects of crime.

Under the Code of Practice for Victims of Crime (Victims’ Code), all victims have the right to receive information about how to access restorative justice services in their local area.

The new Victims’ Code, which was published in November last year and came into force on 1 April this year, includes information which explains what restorative justice is and how it works. As part of the launch of the new Code, the Ministry of Justice engaged in publicity to raise awareness of the Code and victims’ rights therein. Criminal justice agencies also used internal communications to raise awareness of victims’ rights among practitioners.

The Ministry of Justice funds Police and Crime Commissioners (PCCs) to provide victim support services including commissioning restorative justice services to meet local need. Individual PCCs determine the capacity of restorative justice services required and the model of service appropriate for their area. PCCs are also able to utilise other funding streams outside of their MoJ grant for restorative justice.

In addition to the PCC commissioned schemes, the Government-funded national Homicide Service includes access to restorative justice services as part of the package of support it provides to families bereaved by homicide. Further restorative justice capacity is also made available in the youth justice system and by HM Prison and Probation Service.

Lord Wolfson of Tredegar
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
13th Sep 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Wolfson of Tredegar on 20 July (HL1761), what is their policy on whether prisoners whose sex assigned at birth was female should use female pronouns to refer to prisoners who identify as female but were assigned male at birth if such prisoners (1) have, or (2) do not have, a Gender Recognition Certificate; and whether there would be any consequences for failing to use female pronouns in such cases.

The Ministry of Justice and Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service are committed to advancing equality and eliminating discrimination, harassment and victimisation, including based on gender reassignment status as defined in section 7 of the Equality Act 2010. The prohibition on discrimination in relation to gender reassignment applies regardless of whether someone has a Gender Recognition Certificate.

Incidents where a prisoner uses incorrect pronouns for another prisoner will be considered on a case-by-case basis, in line with the Prisoner Discipline Procedures policy and the Prison Rules. Prisoners may sometimes make an honest mistake in relation to pronouns and disciplinary action would not usually be appropriate in those circumstances. However, if an officer deems it appropriate to place a prisoner on report, the rule against ‘using threatening, abusive or insulting words or behaviour’ (PR 51 (20) may apply. The adjudicator will weigh each incident on its own merits. The policy stipulates that an offence motivated by another person’s protected characteristic(s) under the Equality Act 2010 is an aggravating factor and may merit referral to an Independent Adjudicator.

Lord Wolfson of Tredegar
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
16th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what recent progress has been made on reviewing the parole system.

As announced in October 2020, a Root and Branch Review of the parole system is currently underway. This review will draw together the reforms and changes that have taken place in the parole system in recent years. It is focusing on issues such as the future constitution of the Parole Board, ways in which to improve the overall transparency of the parole system, the possibility of public parole hearings in some cases and allowing for victims to observe hearings if they wish. This will fulfil our manifesto commitments made before the last general election.

The full terms of reference of the Review can be read here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/parole-system-reform/terms-of-reference

I intend to report on the progress of the Root and Branch Review later this year.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
13th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 15 July to Question 29878 on Sexual Offences: Rehabilitation, how many and what proportion of biologically male transgender prisoners in the male estate have accessed accredited Sex Offender Treatment Programmes in each of the last five years.

The data HMPPS hold on transgender prisoners (published in the annual HMPPS Offender Equalities Report) is snapshot data and importantly has not historically included prisoners who have a Gender Recognition Certificate, due to legal restrictions. There was no data gathering exercise in 2020 due to the pandemic. HMPPS are actively working on ways to improve the scope and quality of data held on transgender prisoners while still respecting their rights and privacy.

Analysis of accredited programme participation for each year’s transgender offender cohort requires a data matching exercise as these pieces of information are held in separate data sets. A response could only be obtained at disproportionate costs as the analyses would be new and require significant resource to ensure accuracy and reliability.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
20th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what recent discussions his Department has had with the Welsh Government on producing disaggregated criminal justice data for Wales.

The then Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice was due to discuss data and other issues with the Counsel General for Wales on 16 September, but the meeting was postponed because of the reshuffle. His successor looks forward to early engagement with the Welsh Government on issues of mutual interest.

James Cartlidge
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (and Assistant Government Whip)
20th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many legal aid (a) providers and (b) offices were practising in cases of (a) claims against public authorities, (b) community care, (c) discrimination, (d) education, (e) housing and debt, (f) immigration and asylum, (g) family law, (h) clinical negligence, (i) mental health, (j) public law, (k) welfare benefits in each year from September 2012 to September 2021.

The Legal Aid Agency frequently reviews market capacity to make sure there is adequate provision around the country and moves quickly to ensure provision where gaps may appear.

Operational system data on the volume of providers holding legal aid contracts at any given time is subject to change due to the internal management and updating of contract schedules, which may impact both real time and historic data.

Civil legal aid providers (firms) and offices in each year, broken down by category of law enquired about, from 2012 to most recent quarter:

Volume of Providers (firms)

Category of Law

Apr-12

Sep-12

Apr-13

Apr-14

Apr-15

Apr-16

Apr-17

Apr-18

Apr-19

Apr-20

Apr-21

Sep-21

Claims Against the Public Authorities

63

62

58

54

53

65

65

64

80

74

71

70

Community Care

85

84

83

71

91

87

81

76

94

88

83

82

Discrimination

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

17

18

17

Education

24

23

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

8

13

10

Housing and Debt

346

332

368

345

323

305

286

254

295

265

245

238

Immigration Asylum

197

194

239

226

199

182

166

141

203

189

176

172

Immigration Other*

198

195

Family

1,557

1,507

1,352

1,269

1,211

1,160

1,090

1,003

1,029

992

959

937

Clinical Negligence

169

166

166

156

142

107

106

100

100

99

95

93

Mental Health

172

171

168

160

176

169

158

147

156

147

135

135

Public Law

87

85

83

79

74

92

89

84

110

99

95

95

Welfare Benefits

286

274

0

14

15

15

16

14

52

41

38

36

Volume of Offices

Category of Law

Apr-12

Sep-12

Apr-13

Apr-14

Apr-15

Apr-16

Apr-17

Apr-18

Apr-19

Apr-20

Apr-21

Sep-21

Claims Against the Public Authorities

83

82

79

74

72

80

80

78

119

112

104

101

Community Care

140

139

131

115

163

142

136

124

146

137

129

127

Discrimination

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

23

22

21

Education

28

27

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

18

22

19

Housing and Debt

537

524

710

652

606

560

525

475

480

436

407

397

Immigration Asylum

228

224

405

376

323

285

262

229

303

281

263

257

Immigration Other*

229

225

Family

2,328

2,273

2,254

2,134

2,001

1,890

1,732

1,616

1,713

1,654

1,575

1,537

Clinical Negligence

291

285

285

267

248

196

191

180

175

170

164

159

Mental Health

193

192

189

179

200

189

173

161

181

172

159

157

Public Law

111

108

107

101

95

111

108

102

155

141

130

130

Welfare Benefits

364

353

0

13

15

14

15

13

50

39

36

34

*ceased as separate category

James Cartlidge
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (and Assistant Government Whip)
20th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, when he plans to publish his Department's review of youth custodial remand.

The Ministry of Justice committed to look into the use of custodial remand for youth following a recommendation by the Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse.

My officials have concluded the engagement and data collection stages of the review; its conclusions and our next steps will be published in due course.

The Government is already taking action to improve the remand framework and process. The proposals in the Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill will strengthen the tests applied by the courts to ensure children are only remanded to custody as a last resort and will require courts to record their reasons for any custodial remand.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
16th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, if he will undertake a review of sentencing guidelines for defendants convicted of sexual offences against minors.

Sentencing guidelines are developed by the Sentencing Council for England and Wales, which is independent of Parliament and Government.

The Sentencing Council recently consulted on revisions to its child sexual offences sentencing guidelines, which set out the approach courts should take when sentencing cases where no sexual activity takes places or the targeted child does not exist, for instance in police sting operations, as well as a new guideline for the offence of sexual communication with a child. The Council is currently analysing responses to the consultation, and it is anticipated that revised versions of the guidelines will be published next year.

James Cartlidge
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (and Assistant Government Whip)
17th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many firms of solicitors held a (a) civil and (b) criminal legal aid contract as of 1 September 2021.

There are currently 1,080 Providers who hold a Criminal Legal Aid Contract. There are currently 1,401 Providers who hold a Civil Legal Aid Contract. This data is correct as at 17th September 2021. Please note for the figures provided that firms may have more than one office.

The Legal Aid Agency frequently reviews market capacity to make sure there is adequate provision around the country and moves quickly to ensure provision where gaps may appear.

Operational system data on the volume of providers holding legal aid contracts at any given time is subject to change due to the internal management and updating of contract schedules, which may impact both real time and historic data.

Criminal legal aid providers (firms) and offices in each year, from September 2012 to September 2021:

Apr-12

Sep-12

Apr-13

Apr-14

Apr-15

Apr-16

Apr-17

Apr-18

Apr-19

Apr-20

Apr-21

Sep-21

Firms

1,652

1621

1,595

1,513

1,425

1,386

1,310

1,266

1,194

1,154

1,090

1,080

Offices

2,318

2292

2,258

2,142

2,040

1,969

1,981

1,913

1,802

1,717

1,589

1,565

James Cartlidge
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (and Assistant Government Whip)
17th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many (a) providers and (b) offices in criminal legal aid there were from September 2012 to September 2021.

There are currently 1,080 Providers who hold a Criminal Legal Aid Contract. There are currently 1,401 Providers who hold a Civil Legal Aid Contract. This data is correct as at 17th September 2021. Please note for the figures provided that firms may have more than one office.

The Legal Aid Agency frequently reviews market capacity to make sure there is adequate provision around the country and moves quickly to ensure provision where gaps may appear.

Operational system data on the volume of providers holding legal aid contracts at any given time is subject to change due to the internal management and updating of contract schedules, which may impact both real time and historic data.

Criminal legal aid providers (firms) and offices in each year, from September 2012 to September 2021:

Apr-12

Sep-12

Apr-13

Apr-14

Apr-15

Apr-16

Apr-17

Apr-18

Apr-19

Apr-20

Apr-21

Sep-21

Firms

1,652

1621

1,595

1,513

1,425

1,386

1,310

1,266

1,194

1,154

1,090

1,080

Offices

2,318

2292

2,258

2,142

2,040

1,969

1,981

1,913

1,802

1,717

1,589

1,565

James Cartlidge
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (and Assistant Government Whip)
14th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to Proven reoffending statistics: July to September 2019, published on 29 July 2021, Section 7 and Table C1a, whether the Fines category includes fines given (a) using the Single Justice Procedure and (b) in open court.

The ‘fines’ disposal type category presented in the Proven Reoffending Statistics publications does include fines given using the Single Justice Procedure and in open court, provided the associated offence is:

  • Recordable

  • Committed in England and Wales

  • Prosecuted by the police

  • Not a breach offence

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
16th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, when his Department plans to respond to the Criminal Injury Compensation Scheme Review 2020.

I am grateful to all who took the time to contribute views to our consultation aimed at making the Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme simpler and more accessible.

We are carefully reviewing responses and will aim to publish the Government’s response in due course.

Tom Pursglove
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
14th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps his Department will take to reduce the delays in registration with the Office of the Public Guardian.

OPG has seen an increase in the time taken to process an LPA since COVID-19 began impacting the workplace. LPAs are paper documents that require a physical staff presence in an office to process and register. Although staff have been in the office throughout the pandemic, the need to comply with social distancing rules reduced the capacity to deal with LPAs.

As government restrictions for England and Wales have gradually eased, OPG have seen an increase in LPA applications which has added to pre-existing backlogs. These issues combined have generated the delays to LPA registrations, which are currently taking up to 20 weeks to process with a current year-to-date average for 2021/22 of 57 working days.

OPG are working hard to reduce the delays and clear the backlog. Steps being taken include:

  • Ensuring that there are as many people in the office as possible to process LPAs in a safe way
  • Allocating more staff from across the organisation to deal with the registrations of LPAs
  • A recruitment drive continues with new staff due to start shortly
  • Overtime

I expect the registration timelines to gradually decrease. I appreciate the delays are frustrating for customers and fall below the service standards that OPG aims to deliver.

As part of a wider transformation programme, my department is currently consulting on modernising LPAs, which could provide the opportunity for less reliance on paper, and significantly improve the speed of service.

Tom Pursglove
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
9th Sep 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans, if any, they have to provide dedicated funding for restorative justice to provide equal access across the country and avoid discriminating against either (1) offenders, or (2) victims.

The Government recognises the value of restorative justice and the benefits it can bring to enable victims to cope and recover, and for offenders to be part of that process.

As part of the core funding provided to Police Crime and Commissioners (PCCs) for victim support services, they are able to commission restorative justice services according to their local need. This year, MoJ has allocated around £64.3m to PCCs for core funding. For information, in 20/21, PCCs spent around £3.7m from their core funding on restorative justice. PCCs are also able to utilise other funding streams outside of their MoJ grant for restorative justice.

In addition, the Government has provided £4.6m this financial year to fund the Homicide Service. This service provides practical and emotional support to families bereaved by Homicide, including access to restorative justice services

Baroness Scott of Bybrook
Baroness in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
14th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 13 September 2021 to Question 45034 on Ministry of Justice: Listed Buildings, if he will publish a list of the (a) properties classified as heritage assets owned by his Department, (b) the most recent estimate of the value of those properties and (c) the annual income derived from those properties as opposed to the details of the body responsible for advising him on their maintenance.

I refer the honourable member to the answer given to PQ 45034 dated Monday 13 September 2021.

https://questions-statements.parliament.uk/written-questions/detail/2021-09-08/45034

James Cartlidge
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (and Assistant Government Whip)
14th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people are waiting to have their legal cases heard in court in (a) Morley and Outwood constituency and (b) West Yorkshire.

The tables below show the number of cases outstanding in West Yorkshire as at March 2021 in respect of Magistrates cases, Crown Court cases and family cases. We are unable to provide data in respect of the number of victims or defendants waiting for their cases to be heard or data specific to Morley and Outwood constituency. To obtain this data would incur disproportionate costs.

Civil

Criminal-Non SJP

Criminal SJP

Enforcement

Bradford Magistrates

47

4,099

10,477

129

Kirklees Magistrates

111

1,492

293

110

Leeds Magistrates

70

5,127

3,911

285

Below are the number of outstanding family cases in the West Yorkshire courts.

Court Name

Private

Public

Bradford

501

Huddersfield

310

Leeds

811

597

Wakefield

309

Location

Trials Outstanding

Sentencing Outstanding

Appeals Outstanding

Total outstanding

Defendants O/S (Trial cases)

Court: BRADFORD CROWN

771

146

67

984

898

Court: LEEDS CROWN

1533

293

50

1876

1,870

James Cartlidge
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (and Assistant Government Whip)
16th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to the letter sent to all MPs on 13 September 2021 from the Minister for Safeguarding and Afghan Resettlement regarding an update on casework to the Home Office on Afghanistan, whether his Department will respond to correspondence from hon. Members on the further evacuation of Afghan individuals if the case (a) has and (b) has not already been raised by an hon. Member with her Department.

Given the very difficult circumstances in Afghanistan, we cannot pursue cases concerning Afghan people in country in the usual ways. The Home Office is logging all the cases it has received, and it is considering how this data will be used in the future. Accordingly, please signpost individuals to gov.uk to check for the latest information about Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy (ARAP) Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy: further information on eligibility criteria and offer details - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk) and the Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme (ACRS) (Afghan citizens’ resettlement scheme - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)) rather than seek to pursue cases on their behalf.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
13th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, when he plans to publish details of the Afghanistan Citizens Resettlement Scheme.

The Government has worked at pace to develop and launch the Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme (ACRS), which will provide a safe and legal route for up to 20,000 Afghans in the region over the coming years, with 5,000 in the first year – one of the most generous schemes in British history.

On Monday 13th September the Government published a policy statement which set out further details on the policy and operation of the ACRS, and the package of integration support that will be offered to those arriving through the Scheme, published on gov.uk

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
6th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, when he last met Ministers in the Welsh Government.

The Secretary of State for Justice looks forward to meeting Welsh Government ministers in his new role.

His predecessor and his ministerial team were in frequent contact with Welsh Government ministers, the most recent meeting being between Minister Chalk and the Welsh Government’s Minister for Social Justice, Jane Hutt MS, on 1 July 2021.

James Cartlidge
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (and Assistant Government Whip)
14th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps his Department is taking to tackle the backlog in Nottinghamshire's family courts.

The protection of children, particularly those who are most vulnerable, is a priority for this government and this has never been more important than during this period. The family courts were quick to respond to the pandemic and I am extremely grateful for the dedication of family justice professionals at this unprecedented time.

Record levels of judicial sitting days have been listed at the family court in Nottingham throughout the pandemic and these high levels of sittings continue. The court is utilising the new powers introduced via Practice Direction 36, which enables suitable cases to be dealt with via alternative methods other than a court hearing.

In March this year, we launched the £1m Family Mediation Voucher Scheme, to encourage and support separating parents to explore mediation before coming to court. In August, ministers confirmed an additional £800,000 would go towards the scheme, helping around 2000 more families. We want to ensure that every parent is able to resolve their case in the most effective way, including through mediation where safe and appropriate.

We continue to focus on reducing the outstanding caseload by investing in more judicial sitting days and increasing the overall level of disposals. Cases with the most significant safeguarding issues remain our priority, and where suitable, cases are being heard remotely to continue maximising our use of our estate.

James Cartlidge
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (and Assistant Government Whip)
14th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to the findings of Urgent Notification: HMP & YOI Chelmsford, published by HM Chief Inspector of Prisons on 27 August 2021 that (a) chronic failings at Chelmsford have now been evident for at least a decade and (b) despite serious concerns about the prison’s work to prevent suicide or self-harm being raised in 2018, outcomes had deteriorated further, what steps (i) the Government has taken to ensure progress on those matters in the last five years and (ii) he will take to help ensure the lives of prisoners at HMP Chelmsford are protected.

We accept that HMP Chelmsford needs to improve and prior to the Urgent Notification, it began receiving specialist support through the Prison Performance Support Programme (PPSP) – which provides intensive support to some of our most challenging prisons.

To date, around £6 million has been invested through the PPSP allowing repairs to address decency, advanced technology to improve security, family ties and additional staffing to support improvement.

We are working hard to reduce self-harm and the number of those taking their lives in custody. Vulnerable prisoners are supported through the ACCT case management and we are currently rolling out further improvements to this framework. We have also given 25,000 new and existing staff self-harm and suicide prevention training to help them better support prisoners with complex needs and refreshed our partnership with the Samaritans who provide the excellent Listeners scheme, which trains selected prisoners to provide emotional support to their fellow prisoners.

There is evidence of progress at HMP Chelmsford during 2018/19 and 2019/20, prior to the pandemic. The April 2019 Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Prisons (HMIP) Independent Review of Progress report noted some positive progress including:

“…reasonable progress in addressing violence, supported by additional national and regional resources” as well as “…good progress in improving the quality of care to those at risk [of self-harm].”

It also noted that the “Governor continued to set a clear vision for the prison and had retained the support of those around her” and that “regional and national resources had been used to good effect”.

The report acknowledged the benefits of additional central investment, including complete refurbishment of two landings, new flooring in cells and communal areas, new showers and new serveries. Since the inspection an x-ray body scanner was also installed at the prison – to prevent the flow of illicit items which fuel instability.

An initial detailed plan of action is being developed in response to the Urgent Notification and will include actions beyond those already agreed under the PPSP. This will outline how we are addressing the immediate concerns at the prison and will be published in due course.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
14th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what support she is giving to children resettled in the UK under the Vulnerable Children Resettlement Scheme who originate from Afghanistan and who have family in Afghanistan who are part of a religious minority.

The vast majority of children resettled under the Vulnerable Children Resettlement Scheme (VCRS) were done so as part of a family group. The scheme ended in 2021. The Government’s refugee family reunion policy allows a partner and children under 18 of those granted protection in the UK to join the adult sponsor here, if they formed part of the family unit before the sponsor fled their country. This includes those who are part of a religious minority.

All those brought to the UK under Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy (ARAP) and Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme (ACRS) will have the right to work, access to education and healthcare and be able to apply for public funds. To ensure they will be supported properly, changes will be made to legislation so that, if necessary, people arriving under ARAP and ACRS do not need to meet the habitual residence test.

They will also receive comprehensive integration support as they start their new lives in the UK. A package of support to acclimatise to the UK, learn English, and find work, will enable rapid self-sufficiency and social integration in UK communities.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
14th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether the family of young people who are in the UK under the Vulnerable Children Resettlement Scheme can join their children under (a) the Afghanistan Citizens Resettlement Scheme or (b) another route to allow a family to be united.

The vast majority of children resettled under the Vulnerable Children Resettlement Scheme (VCRS) were done so as part of a family group. The scheme ended in 2021. The Government’s refugee family reunion policy allows a partner and children under 18 of those granted protection in the UK to join the adult sponsor here, if they formed part of the family unit before the sponsor fled their country. This includes those who are part of a religious minority.

All those brought to the UK under Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy (ARAP) and Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme (ACRS) will have the right to work, access to education and healthcare and be able to apply for public funds. To ensure they will be supported properly, changes will be made to legislation so that, if necessary, people arriving under ARAP and ACRS do not need to meet the habitual residence test.

They will also receive comprehensive integration support as they start their new lives in the UK. A package of support to acclimatise to the UK, learn English, and find work, will enable rapid self-sufficiency and social integration in UK communities.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
15th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to the oral contribution of the Minister for Safeguarding and Afghan Resettlement of 13 September 2021, Official Report, Column 700, what support his Department plans to provide to help Afghan nationals preserve their (a) language and (b) culture when they are resettled in the UK.

Under Operation Warm Welcome, we are taking a cross-government approach to ensuring Afghans arriving in the UK are able to rebuild their lives, find work, pursue education and integrate with their local communities.

They will also receive comprehensive integration support as they start their new lives in the UK. A package of support to acclimatise to the UK, learn English, and find work, will enable rapid self-sufficiency and social integration in UK communities.

As part of this, we are creating a portal where people, organisations and businesses can register offers of support. This could include volunteering, offers of employment or to provide professional skills pro bono, including helping those arriving deal with trauma, or offering donations of mobile phones, mobile credit or data, laptops, access to training, clothes and toys. This will complement the Afghanistan housing portal which has been set up to collect offers of additional housing support.

We will also be extending the Community Sponsorship Scheme (CSS) so that friends and neighbours, charities and faith groups can come together to support a family through the ACRS. We will make it easier and quicker for community groups to become sponsors so that more people can play a direct role in the warm welcome we will extend to these new members of our communities.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
16th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many providers of criminal legal aid services there were in each year from 2012-13 to the most recent quarter for which figures are available.

The Legal Aid Agency frequently reviews market capacity to make sure there is adequate provision around the country and moves quickly to ensure provision where gaps may appear.

Operational system data on the volume of providers holding legal aid contracts at any given time is subject to change due to the internal management and updating of contract schedules, which may impact both real time and historic data.

Criminal legal aid providers (firms) and offices in each year, from 2012 to most recent quarter:

Year

Apr-12

Apr-13

Apr-14

Apr-15

Apr-16

Apr-17

Apr-18

Apr-19

Apr-20

Apr-21

Sep-21

Providers

1,652

1,595

1,513

1,425

1,386

1,310

1,266

1,194

1,154

1,090

1,080

Offices

2,318

2,258

2,142

2,040

1,969

1,981

1,913

1,802

1,717

1,589

1,565

Civil legal aid providers (firms) and offices in each year, from 2012 to most recent quarter:

Year

Apr-12

Apr-13

Apr-14

Apr-15

Apr-16

Apr-17

Apr-18

Apr-19

Apr-20

Apr-21

Sep-21

Providers

2,129

1,811

1,700

1,785

1,697

1,601

1,448

1,560

1,497

1,435

1,401

Offices

3,242

3,133

2,944

2,931

2,769

2,609

2,369

2,536

2,439

2,316

2,258

Civil legal aid providers (firms) and offices in each year, broken down by category of law enquired about, from 2012 to most recent quarter:

Volume of Providers (firms)

Category of Law

Apr-12

Apr-13

Apr-14

Apr-15

Apr-16

Apr-17

Apr-18

Apr-19

Apr-20

Apr-21

Sep-21

Claims Against the Public Authorities

63

58

54

53

65

65

64

80

74

71

70

Community Care

85

83

71

91

87

81

76

94

88

83

82

Discrimination

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

17

18

17

Education

24

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

8

13

10

Immigration Asylum

197

239

226

199

182

166

141

203

189

176

172

Immigration Other*

198

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

Family

1,557

1,352

1,269

1,211

1,160

1,090

1,003

1,029

992

959

937

Clinical Negligence

169

166

156

142

107

106

100

100

99

95

93

Mental Health

172

168

160

176

169

158

147

156

147

135

135

Public Law

87

83

79

74

92

89

84

110

99

95

95

Welfare Benefits

286

0

14

15

15

16

14

52

41

38

36

Volume of Offices

Category of Law

Apr-12

Apr-13

Apr-14

Apr-15

Apr-16

Apr-17

Apr-18

Apr-19

Apr-20

Apr-21

Sep-21

Claims Against the Public Authorities

83

79

74

72

80

80

78

119

112

104

101

Community Care

140

131

115

163

142

136

124

146

137

129

127

Discrimination

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

23

22

21

Education

28

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

18

22

19

Immigration Asylum

228

405

376

323

285

262

229

303

281

263

257

Immigration Other*

229

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

Family

2,328

2,254

2,134

2,001

1,890

1,732

1,616

1,713

1,654

1,575

1,537

Clinical Negligence

291

285

267

248

196

191

180

175

170

164

159

Mental Health

193

189

179

200

189

173

161

181

172

159

157

Public Law

111

107

101

95

111

108

102

155

141

130

130

Welfare Benefits

364

0

15

15

15

17

15

71

56

52

50

*ceased as individual/separate category

James Cartlidge
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (and Assistant Government Whip)
16th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many offices were providing criminal legal aid services in (a) each year from 2012-13 to 2020-21 and (b) the most recent quarter for which figures are available.

The Legal Aid Agency frequently reviews market capacity to make sure there is adequate provision around the country and moves quickly to ensure provision where gaps may appear.

Operational system data on the volume of providers holding legal aid contracts at any given time is subject to change due to the internal management and updating of contract schedules, which may impact both real time and historic data.

Criminal legal aid providers (firms) and offices in each year, from 2012 to most recent quarter:

Year

Apr-12

Apr-13

Apr-14

Apr-15

Apr-16

Apr-17

Apr-18

Apr-19

Apr-20

Apr-21

Sep-21

Providers

1,652

1,595

1,513

1,425

1,386

1,310

1,266

1,194

1,154

1,090

1,080

Offices

2,318

2,258

2,142

2,040

1,969

1,981

1,913

1,802

1,717

1,589

1,565

Civil legal aid providers (firms) and offices in each year, from 2012 to most recent quarter:

Year

Apr-12

Apr-13

Apr-14

Apr-15

Apr-16

Apr-17

Apr-18

Apr-19

Apr-20

Apr-21

Sep-21

Providers

2,129

1,811

1,700

1,785

1,697

1,601

1,448

1,560

1,497

1,435

1,401

Offices

3,242

3,133

2,944

2,931

2,769

2,609

2,369

2,536

2,439

2,316

2,258

Civil legal aid providers (firms) and offices in each year, broken down by category of law enquired about, from 2012 to most recent quarter:

Volume of Providers (firms)

Category of Law

Apr-12

Apr-13

Apr-14

Apr-15

Apr-16

Apr-17

Apr-18

Apr-19

Apr-20

Apr-21

Sep-21

Claims Against the Public Authorities

63

58

54

53

65

65

64

80

74

71

70

Community Care

85

83

71

91

87

81

76

94

88

83

82

Discrimination

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

17

18

17

Education

24

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

8

13

10

Immigration Asylum

197

239

226

199

182

166

141

203

189

176

172

Immigration Other*

198

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

Family

1,557

1,352

1,269

1,211

1,160

1,090

1,003

1,029

992

959

937

Clinical Negligence

169

166

156

142

107

106

100

100

99

95

93

Mental Health

172

168

160

176

169

158

147

156

147

135

135

Public Law

87

83

79

74

92

89

84

110

99

95

95

Welfare Benefits

286

0

14

15

15

16

14

52

41

38

36

Volume of Offices

Category of Law

Apr-12

Apr-13

Apr-14

Apr-15

Apr-16

Apr-17

Apr-18

Apr-19

Apr-20

Apr-21

Sep-21

Claims Against the Public Authorities

83

79

74

72

80

80

78

119

112

104

101

Community Care

140

131

115

163

142

136

124

146

137

129

127

Discrimination

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

23

22

21

Education

28

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

18

22

19

Immigration Asylum

228

405

376

323

285

262

229

303

281

263

257

Immigration Other*

229

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

Family

2,328

2,254

2,134

2,001

1,890

1,732

1,616

1,713

1,654

1,575

1,537

Clinical Negligence

291

285

267

248

196

191

180

175

170

164

159

Mental Health

193

189

179

200

189

173

161

181

172

159

157

Public Law

111

107

101

95

111

108

102

155

141

130

130

Welfare Benefits

364

0

15

15

15

17

15

71

56

52

50

*ceased as individual/separate category

James Cartlidge
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (and Assistant Government Whip)
16th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many civil legal aid providers there were (a) in each year from 2012-2013 to 2020-21 and (b) for the last quarter for which figures are available.

The Legal Aid Agency frequently reviews market capacity to make sure there is adequate provision around the country and moves quickly to ensure provision where gaps may appear.

Operational system data on the volume of providers holding legal aid contracts at any given time is subject to change due to the internal management and updating of contract schedules, which may impact both real time and historic data.

Criminal legal aid providers (firms) and offices in each year, from 2012 to most recent quarter:

Year

Apr-12

Apr-13

Apr-14

Apr-15

Apr-16

Apr-17

Apr-18

Apr-19

Apr-20

Apr-21

Sep-21

Providers

1,652

1,595

1,513

1,425

1,386

1,310

1,266

1,194

1,154

1,090

1,080

Offices

2,318

2,258

2,142

2,040

1,969

1,981

1,913

1,802

1,717

1,589

1,565

Civil legal aid providers (firms) and offices in each year, from 2012 to most recent quarter:

Year

Apr-12

Apr-13

Apr-14

Apr-15

Apr-16

Apr-17

Apr-18

Apr-19

Apr-20

Apr-21

Sep-21

Providers

2,129

1,811

1,700

1,785

1,697

1,601

1,448

1,560

1,497

1,435

1,401

Offices

3,242

3,133

2,944

2,931

2,769

2,609

2,369

2,536

2,439

2,316

2,258

Civil legal aid providers (firms) and offices in each year, broken down by category of law enquired about, from 2012 to most recent quarter:

Volume of Providers (firms)

Category of Law

Apr-12

Apr-13

Apr-14

Apr-15

Apr-16

Apr-17

Apr-18

Apr-19

Apr-20

Apr-21

Sep-21

Claims Against the Public Authorities

63

58

54

53

65

65

64

80

74

71

70

Community Care

85

83

71

91

87

81

76

94

88

83

82

Discrimination

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

17

18

17

Education

24

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

8

13

10

Immigration Asylum

197

239

226

199

182

166

141

203

189

176

172

Immigration Other*

198

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

Family

1,557

1,352

1,269

1,211

1,160

1,090

1,003

1,029

992

959

937

Clinical Negligence

169

166

156

142

107

106

100

100

99

95

93

Mental Health

172

168

160

176

169

158

147

156

147

135

135

Public Law

87

83

79

74

92

89

84

110

99

95

95

Welfare Benefits

286

0

14

15

15

16

14

52

41

38

36

Volume of Offices

Category of Law

Apr-12

Apr-13

Apr-14

Apr-15

Apr-16

Apr-17

Apr-18

Apr-19

Apr-20

Apr-21

Sep-21

Claims Against the Public Authorities

83

79

74

72

80

80

78

119

112

104

101

Community Care

140

131

115

163

142

136

124

146

137

129

127

Discrimination

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

23

22

21

Education

28

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

18

22

19

Immigration Asylum

228

405

376

323

285

262

229

303

281

263

257

Immigration Other*

229

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

Family

2,328

2,254

2,134

2,001

1,890

1,732

1,616

1,713

1,654

1,575

1,537

Clinical Negligence

291

285

267

248

196

191

180

175

170

164

159

Mental Health

193

189

179

200

189

173

161

181

172

159

157

Public Law

111

107

101

95

111

108

102

155

141

130

130

Welfare Benefits

364

0

15

15

15

17

15

71

56

52

50

*ceased as individual/separate category

James Cartlidge
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (and Assistant Government Whip)
16th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many offices were providing civil legal aid in (a) in year from 2012-13 to 2020-21 and (b) the last quarter for which figures are available.

The Legal Aid Agency frequently reviews market capacity to make sure there is adequate provision around the country and moves quickly to ensure provision where gaps may appear.

Operational system data on the volume of providers holding legal aid contracts at any given time is subject to change due to the internal management and updating of contract schedules, which may impact both real time and historic data.

Criminal legal aid providers (firms) and offices in each year, from 2012 to most recent quarter:

Year

Apr-12

Apr-13

Apr-14

Apr-15

Apr-16

Apr-17

Apr-18

Apr-19

Apr-20

Apr-21

Sep-21

Providers

1,652

1,595

1,513

1,425

1,386

1,310

1,266

1,194

1,154

1,090

1,080

Offices

2,318

2,258

2,142

2,040

1,969

1,981

1,913

1,802

1,717

1,589

1,565

Civil legal aid providers (firms) and offices in each year, from 2012 to most recent quarter:

Year

Apr-12

Apr-13

Apr-14

Apr-15

Apr-16

Apr-17

Apr-18

Apr-19

Apr-20

Apr-21

Sep-21

Providers

2,129

1,811

1,700

1,785

1,697

1,601

1,448

1,560

1,497

1,435

1,401

Offices

3,242

3,133

2,944

2,931

2,769

2,609

2,369

2,536

2,439

2,316

2,258

Civil legal aid providers (firms) and offices in each year, broken down by category of law enquired about, from 2012 to most recent quarter:

Volume of Providers (firms)

Category of Law

Apr-12

Apr-13

Apr-14

Apr-15

Apr-16

Apr-17

Apr-18

Apr-19

Apr-20

Apr-21

Sep-21

Claims Against the Public Authorities

63

58

54

53

65

65

64

80

74

71

70

Community Care

85

83

71

91

87

81

76

94

88

83

82

Discrimination

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

17

18

17

Education

24

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

8

13

10

Immigration Asylum

197

239

226

199

182

166

141

203

189

176

172

Immigration Other*

198

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

Family

1,557

1,352

1,269

1,211

1,160

1,090

1,003

1,029

992

959

937

Clinical Negligence

169

166

156

142

107

106

100

100

99

95

93

Mental Health

172

168

160

176

169

158

147

156

147

135

135

Public Law

87

83

79

74

92

89

84

110

99

95

95

Welfare Benefits

286

0

14

15

15

16

14

52

41

38

36

Volume of Offices

Category of Law

Apr-12

Apr-13

Apr-14

Apr-15

Apr-16

Apr-17

Apr-18

Apr-19

Apr-20

Apr-21

Sep-21

Claims Against the Public Authorities

83

79

74

72

80

80

78

119

112

104

101

Community Care

140

131

115

163

142

136

124

146

137

129

127

Discrimination

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

23

22

21

Education

28

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

18

22

19

Immigration Asylum

228

405

376

323

285

262

229

303

281

263

257

Immigration Other*

229

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

Family

2,328

2,254

2,134

2,001

1,890

1,732

1,616

1,713

1,654

1,575

1,537

Clinical Negligence

291

285

267

248

196

191

180

175

170

164

159

Mental Health

193

189

179

200

189

173

161

181

172

159

157

Public Law

111

107

101

95

111

108

102

155

141

130

130

Welfare Benefits

364

0

15

15

15

17

15

71

56

52

50

*ceased as individual/separate category

James Cartlidge
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (and Assistant Government Whip)