Ministry of Justice

The Ministry of Justice is a major government department, at the heart of the justice system. We work to protect and advance the principles of justice. Our vision is to deliver a world-class justice system that works for everyone in society.



Secretary of State

 Portrait

Robert Buckland
Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice

Shadow Ministers / Spokeperson
Labour
Lord Falconer of Thoroton (LAB - Life peer)
Shadow Spokesperson (Justice)

Liberal Democrat
Wera Hobhouse (LDEM - Bath)
Liberal Democrat Spokesperson (Justice)

Labour
David Lammy (LAB - Tottenham)
Shadow Lord Chancellor and Shadow Secretary of State for Justice
Lord Ponsonby of Shulbrede (LAB - Life peer)
Shadow Spokesperson (Justice)

Scottish National Party
Anne McLaughlin (SNP - Glasgow North East)
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Justice)

Liberal Democrat
Lord Marks of Henley-on-Thames (LDEM - Life peer)
Liberal Democrat Lords Spokesperson (Justice)

Plaid Cymru
Liz Saville Roberts (PC - Dwyfor Meirionnydd)
Shadow PC Spokesperson (Justice)
Junior Shadow Ministers / Deputy Spokesperson
Labour
Lyn Brown (LAB - West Ham)
Shadow Minister (Justice)
Alex Cunningham (LAB - Stockton North)
Shadow Minister (Justice)
Karl Turner (LAB - Kingston upon Hull East)
Shadow Minister (Justice)
Anna McMorrin (LAB - Cardiff North)
Shadow Minister (Justice)
Ministers of State
Lucy Frazer (CON - South East Cambridgeshire)
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
Parliamentary Under-Secretaries of State
Alex Chalk (CON - Cheltenham)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
Lord Wolfson of Tredegar (CON - Life peer)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
Scheduled Event
Tuesday 14th September 2021
Ministry of Justice
Legislation - Main Chamber
Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill – second reading
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Scheduled Event
Tuesday 14th September 2021
11:30
Ministry of Justice
Oral questions - Main Chamber
14 Sep 2021, 11:30 a.m.
Justice (including Topical Questions)
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Debates
Tuesday 20th July 2021
Select Committee Docs
Tuesday 27th July 2021
00:00
Select Committee Inquiry
Monday 26th April 2021
Women in Prison

This inquiry seeks to understand the progress made over the past 10 years to address female offending and reduce the …

Written Answers
Thursday 29th July 2021
Constitutional Reform Act 2005
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the findings of the Ministry of Justice’s review of the Constitutional Reform Act will …
Secondary Legislation
Friday 16th July 2021
Civil Procedure (Amendment No. 4) Rules 2021
These Rules amend the Civil Procedure Rules 1998 (S.I. 1998/3132) by—
Bills
Wednesday 21st July 2021
Judicial Review and Courts Bill 2021-22
A Bill to Make provision about the provision that may be made by, and the effects of, quashing orders; to …
Dept. Publications
Thursday 29th July 2021
10:00

Ministry of Justice Commons Appearances

Oral Answers to Questions is a regularly scheduled appearance where the Secretary of State and junior minister will answer at the Dispatch Box questions from backbench MPs

Other Commons Chamber appearances can be:
  • Urgent Questions where the Speaker has selected a question to which a Minister must reply that day
  • Adjornment Debates a 30 minute debate attended by a Minister that concludes the day in Parliament.
  • Oral Statements informing the Commons of a significant development, where backbench MP's can then question the Minister making the statement.

Westminster Hall debates are performed in response to backbench MPs or e-petitions asking for a Minister to address a detailed issue

Written Statements are made when a current event is not sufficiently significant to require an Oral Statement, but the House is required to be informed.

Most Recent Commons Appearances by Category
Jun. 29
Oral Questions
Nov. 20
Topical Questions
Jun. 10
Urgent Questions
Jul. 20
Written Statements
May. 25
Westminster Hall
View All Ministry of Justice Commons Contibutions

Bills currently before Parliament

Ministry of Justice does not have Bills currently before Parliament


Acts of Parliament created in the 2019 Parliament

Introduced: 20th May 2020

A Bill to make provision about the sentencing of offenders convicted of terrorism offences, of offences with a terrorist connection or of certain other offences; to make other provision in relation to terrorism; and for connected purposes.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Thursday 29th April 2021 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 27th February 2020

A Bill to implement the Hague Conventions of 1996, 2005 and 2007 and to provide for the implementation of other international agreements on private international law.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Monday 14th December 2020 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 8th January 2020

To require the Parole Board to take into account any failure by a prisoner serving a sentence for unlawful killing or for taking or making an indecent image of a child to disclose information about the victim.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Wednesday 4th November 2020 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 5th March 2020

A Bill to consolidate certain enactments relating to sentencing.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Thursday 22nd October 2020 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 7th January 2020

A bill to make in relation to marriage and civil partnership in England and Wales provision about divorce, dissolution and separation; and for connected purposes

This Bill received Royal Assent on Thursday 25th June 2020 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 21st January 2020

A bill to give effect to Law Commission recommendations relating to commencement of enactments relating to sentencing law and to make provision for pre-consolidation amendments of sentencing law

This Bill received Royal Assent on Monday 8th June 2020 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 11th February 2020

A Bill to make provision about the release on licence of offenders convicted of terrorist offences or offences with a terrorist connection; and for connected purposes.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Wednesday 26th February 2020 and was enacted into law.

Ministry of Justice - Secondary Legislation

These Rules amend the Civil Procedure Rules 1998 (S.I. 1998/3132) by—
These Rules amend the Criminal Procedure Rules 2020, S.I. 2020/759, as follows:
View All Ministry of Justice Secondary Legislation

Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Trending Petitions
Petition Open
117,724 Signatures
(2,729 in the last 7 days)
Petition Open
5,842 Signatures
(655 in the last 7 days)
Petition Open
15,898 Signatures
(236 in the last 7 days)
Petition Open
1,652 Signatures
(145 in the last 7 days)
Petitions with most signatures
Ministry of Justice has not participated in any petition debates
View All Ministry of Justice Petitions

Departmental Select Committee

Justice Committee

Commons Select Committees are a formally established cross-party group of backbench MPs tasked with holding a Government department to account.

At any time there will be number of ongoing investigations into the work of the Department, or issues which fall within the oversight of the Department. Witnesses can be summoned from within the Government and outside to assist in these inquiries.

Select Committee findings are reported to the Commons, printed, and published on the Parliament website. The government then usually has 60 days to reply to the committee's recommendations.


11 Members of the Justice Committee
Robert Neill Portrait
Robert Neill (Conservative - Bromley and Chislehurst)
Justice Committee Chair since 29th January 2020
Andy Slaughter Portrait
Andy Slaughter (Labour - Hammersmith)
Justice Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
Kieran Mullan Portrait
Kieran Mullan (Conservative - Crewe and Nantwich)
Justice Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
Maria Eagle Portrait
Maria Eagle (Labour - Garston and Halewood)
Justice Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
Sarah Dines Portrait
Sarah Dines (Conservative - Derbyshire Dales)
Justice Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
James Daly Portrait
James Daly (Conservative - Bury North)
Justice Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
Rob Butler Portrait
Rob Butler (Conservative - Aylesbury)
Justice Committee Member since 2nd March 2020
Janet Daby Portrait
Janet Daby (Labour - Lewisham East)
Justice Committee Member since 22nd February 2021
Angela Crawley Portrait
Angela Crawley (Scottish National Party - Lanark and Hamilton East)
Justice Committee Member since 25th May 2021
Laura Farris Portrait
Laura Farris (Conservative - Newbury)
Justice Committee Member since 8th June 2021
Kate Hollern Portrait
Kate Hollern (Labour - Blackburn)
Justice Committee Member since 13th July 2021
Justice Committee: Previous Inquiries

50 most recent Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department

15th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many applications have been received by the Court of Protection where the only asset is a Child Trust Fund.

The Court of Protection has received fifteen applications since August 2020 where the assets included a Child Trust Fund. Of the fifteen applications received, thirteen have resulted in a deputy being appointed. The remaining two applications resulted in ‘one off’ orders. In four cases, a Child Trust Fund was the sole asset and the court fees were waived.

Lord Wolfson of Tredegar
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
15th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many applications that have been received by the Court of Protection in respect of Child Trust Funds have resulted in a Deputy being appointed.

The Court of Protection has received fifteen applications since August 2020 where the assets included a Child Trust Fund. Of the fifteen applications received, thirteen have resulted in a deputy being appointed. The remaining two applications resulted in ‘one off’ orders. In four cases, a Child Trust Fund was the sole asset and the court fees were waived.

Lord Wolfson of Tredegar
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
15th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many associated Fee Waivers the Court of Protection has received in respect of Child Trust Fund applications; and how many have been granted.

The Court of Protection has received fifteen applications since August 2020 where the assets included a Child Trust Fund. Of the fifteen applications received, thirteen have resulted in a deputy being appointed. The remaining two applications resulted in ‘one off’ orders. In four cases, a Child Trust Fund was the sole asset and the court fees were waived.

Lord Wolfson of Tredegar
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
15th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what they estimate to be the total number of unreleased Imprisonment for Public Protection prisoners broken down by (1) gender, and (2) ethnicity; and how many years are left on their tariff in each case.

The Government is committed to the protection of the public and the effective management of offenders. By law, prisoners serving indeterminate sentences who have completed their tariff will be released only when the independent Parole Board concludes that the risk they present to the public is capable of being safely managed in the community under probation supervision.

The following two tables show the number of unreleased prisoners serving an IPP sentence at 31 March 2021, by gender, ethnicity and the number of years to their tariff expiry, in England and Wales. The total number of IPP prisoners recorded in these two tables is 1,784.

Table 1

Gender

Number (Row Total)

Less than 1 year

1 year to less than 2 years

2 year to less than 3 years

3 year to less than 4 years

4 year to less than 5 years

5 or more years

Tariff expired

Tariff unavailable

Male

1,761

24

22

13

5

6

7

1,682

2

Female

23

0

0

0

0

0

0

23

0

Table 2

Ethnicity

Number (Row Total)

Less than 1 year

1 year to less than 2 years

2 year to less than 3 years

3 year to less than 4 years

4 year to less than 5 years

5 or more years

Tariff expired

Tariff unavailable

Asian or Asian British

92

3

0

2

2

1

1

83

0

Black or Black British

229

7

5

3

1

1

4

208

0

Mixed

70

0

3

0

0

0

0

67

0

Other ethnic group

8

0

0

0

0

0

0

8

0

White

1,380

14

14

8

2

4

2

1,334

2

Unrecorded

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

Not stated

4

0

0

0

0

0

0

4

0

The following two tables show the number of recalled prisoners serving an IPP sentence at 31 March 2021, by gender and ethnicity, in England and Wales. All recalled IPP prisoners are post tariff as it is not possible to release an IPP prisoner prior to the expiry of their minimum tariff date. The total number of IPP prisoners recorded in these two tables is 1,350.

Table 3

Gender

Number

Male

1,327

Female

23

Table 4

Ethnicity

Number

Asian or Asian British

42

Black or Black British

161

Mixed

74

Other ethnic group/Not Stated

4

White

1,069

The table below shows the number of unreleased prisoners serving an IPP sentence at 31 March 2021, by security category and the number of years to their tariff expiry, in England and Wales. The total number of IPP prisoners recorded in the below table is 1,784.

Table 5

Security Category

Number (Row Total)

Less than 1 year

1 year to less than 2 years

2 year to less than 3 years

3 year to less than 4 years

4 year to less than 5 years

5 or more years

Tariff expired

Tariff unavailable

A

17

1

1

0

0

1

0

14

0

B

323

2

1

3

1

2

5

309

0

C

871

7

13

9

4

4

1

831

2

D

548

14

7

1

0

0

0

526

0

Females (open and closed)

23

0

0

0

0

0

0

23

0

Others

2

0

0

0

0

0

0

2

0

A prisoner’s individual needs in relation to offending behaviour and resettlement, or their individual circumstances (such as medical requirements) may result in an individual being held in a prison of a higher category than their own approved category. Prisoners will not be allocated to a prison of a lower security category than the security category assigned to them personally.

Notes for all figures:

  1. These figures have been drawn from the Public Protection Unit Database and Prison-NOMIS held by Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service. As with any large scale recording systems, the figures are subject to possible errors with data migration and processing.
  2. Tariff refers to the length of time between date of sentence and tariff expiry date.
Lord Wolfson of Tredegar
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
15th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what they estimate to be the total number of recalled Imprisonment for Public Protection prisoners broken down by (1) gender, and (2) ethnicity; and how many years are left on their tariff in each case.

The Government is committed to the protection of the public and the effective management of offenders. By law, prisoners serving indeterminate sentences who have completed their tariff will be released only when the independent Parole Board concludes that the risk they present to the public is capable of being safely managed in the community under probation supervision.

The following two tables show the number of unreleased prisoners serving an IPP sentence at 31 March 2021, by gender, ethnicity and the number of years to their tariff expiry, in England and Wales. The total number of IPP prisoners recorded in these two tables is 1,784.

Table 1

Gender

Number (Row Total)

Less than 1 year

1 year to less than 2 years

2 year to less than 3 years

3 year to less than 4 years

4 year to less than 5 years

5 or more years

Tariff expired

Tariff unavailable

Male

1,761

24

22

13

5

6

7

1,682

2

Female

23

0

0

0

0

0

0

23

0

Table 2

Ethnicity

Number (Row Total)

Less than 1 year

1 year to less than 2 years

2 year to less than 3 years

3 year to less than 4 years

4 year to less than 5 years

5 or more years

Tariff expired

Tariff unavailable

Asian or Asian British

92

3

0

2

2

1

1

83

0

Black or Black British

229

7

5

3

1

1

4

208

0

Mixed

70

0

3

0

0

0

0

67

0

Other ethnic group

8

0

0

0

0

0

0

8

0

White

1,380

14

14

8

2

4

2

1,334

2

Unrecorded

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

Not stated

4

0

0

0

0

0

0

4

0

The following two tables show the number of recalled prisoners serving an IPP sentence at 31 March 2021, by gender and ethnicity, in England and Wales. All recalled IPP prisoners are post tariff as it is not possible to release an IPP prisoner prior to the expiry of their minimum tariff date. The total number of IPP prisoners recorded in these two tables is 1,350.

Table 3

Gender

Number

Male

1,327

Female

23

Table 4

Ethnicity

Number

Asian or Asian British

42

Black or Black British

161

Mixed

74

Other ethnic group/Not Stated

4

White

1,069

The table below shows the number of unreleased prisoners serving an IPP sentence at 31 March 2021, by security category and the number of years to their tariff expiry, in England and Wales. The total number of IPP prisoners recorded in the below table is 1,784.

Table 5

Security Category

Number (Row Total)

Less than 1 year

1 year to less than 2 years

2 year to less than 3 years

3 year to less than 4 years

4 year to less than 5 years

5 or more years

Tariff expired

Tariff unavailable

A

17

1

1

0

0

1

0

14

0

B

323

2

1

3

1

2

5

309

0

C

871

7

13

9

4

4

1

831

2

D

548

14

7

1

0

0

0

526

0

Females (open and closed)

23

0

0

0

0

0

0

23

0

Others

2

0

0

0

0

0

0

2

0

A prisoner’s individual needs in relation to offending behaviour and resettlement, or their individual circumstances (such as medical requirements) may result in an individual being held in a prison of a higher category than their own approved category. Prisoners will not be allocated to a prison of a lower security category than the security category assigned to them personally.

Notes for all figures:

  1. These figures have been drawn from the Public Protection Unit Database and Prison-NOMIS held by Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service. As with any large scale recording systems, the figures are subject to possible errors with data migration and processing.
  2. Tariff refers to the length of time between date of sentence and tariff expiry date.
Lord Wolfson of Tredegar
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
20th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the Ministry of Justice's review of the Constitutional Reform Act is considering giving ministers greater influence over senior judicial appointments.

The Government is considering what improvements can be made to the settlement left by the Constitutional Reform Act 2005. Our constitution is always evolving, and it is entirely proper, sixteen years on from the Act, to examine that settlement in the round and to take stock of subsequent debate and of continuing interest in both Houses.

The Lord Chancellor has said that he places great importance on taking an open and consultative approach to any proposals for reform, and the Government will make its plans known in due course.

Lord Wolfson of Tredegar
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
20th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the findings of the Ministry of Justice’s review of the Constitutional Reform Act will be published for public consultation; and if so, when.

The Government is considering what improvements can be made to the settlement left by the Constitutional Reform Act 2005. Our constitution is always evolving, and it is entirely proper, sixteen years on from the Act, to examine that settlement in the round and to take stock of subsequent debate and of continuing interest in both Houses.

The Lord Chancellor has said that he places great importance on taking an open and consultative approach to any proposals for reform, and the Government will make its plans known in due course.

Lord Wolfson of Tredegar
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
14th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many recommendations they have implemented from the report commissioned by the Ministry of Justice The Importance of Strengthening Female Offenders' Family and other Relationships to Prevent Reoffending and Reduce Intergenerational Crime, published on 18 June 2019.

The Government has made good progress in implementing the recommendations from Lord Farmer’s 2019 report on ‘The Importance of Strengthening Female Offenders’ Family and other Relationships to Prevent Reoffending and Reduce Intergenerational Crime’.

So far, 17 recommendations have been completed, including increased access to family contact for women in custody through the rollout of video calling and email reply systems in all women’s prisons, the installation of in-cell telephony in all closed women’s prisons, improvements to Release on Temporary Licence (ROTL) policy, and routine access to telephone contact for women and primary carers in court custody suites.

We are continuing to work across the MOJ, HMPPS, and wider government to take forward Lord Farmer’s recommendations.

Lord Wolfson of Tredegar
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
14th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, following the judgment in the case of FDJ v the Secretary of State for Justice on 2 July, whether it is their policy to treat biologically male prisoners in possession of a Gender Recognition Certificate as women for all purposes.

The Ministry of Justice and Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service policy framework ‘The Care and Management of Individuals who are Transgender’ sets out how decisions regarding transgender prisoners are taken.

Prisoners with a Gender Recognition Certificate (GRC) are housed and managed in line with their legal gender. This is in line with the Equality Act 2010 which prohibits discrimination based on gender reassignment. If a prisoner presents risk that cannot be managed in the estate matching their legal gender, the individual is referred to a Complex Case Board, chaired by a senior prison manager. The board then decides the most appropriate location for the prisoner after thoroughly considering all relevant risks, including risk to others, risk from others and the risk of self-harm. Where a transgender woman with a GRC is placed in the women’s estate, we consider any risks she may pose to other women in the estate, with use of separate accommodation where appropriate.

We are committed to treating all prisoners fairly, lawfully and decently.

Lord Wolfson of Tredegar
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
20th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what information his Department holds on the average daily distance travelled by prison officers and staff working at HMP Springhill and HMP Grendon from their home to place of work.

The information requested is not held and could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Alex Chalk
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
20th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many pre-constructed concrete sections per week have been delivered to the (a) Five Wells and (b) Glen Parva sites from the commencement of construction to date; and over what time period those deliveries took place.

The total number of pre-constructed concrete sections delivered to Glen Parva to 21 July 2021 is 5,951. Delivery has been variable between the first delivery which took place on 26 January 2021 and the latest update. This averages out at 234 panels per week. The deliveries to the site are still ongoing.

HMP Five Wells has incorporated 15,183 pre-constructed concrete panels during the installation period between September 2019 to September 2020, averaging out at 290 panels a week. The reason for the variance between the number of panels delivered to each site is due to the difference in delivery stage between the projects. HMP Five Wells has fully completed its pre-cast concrete installation at the point of reporting whereas Glen Parva is still ramping up installation process as of 29 April 2021.

We estimate that there will be around 600-700 permanent jobs created at both HMP Five Wells & Glen Parva once they are open. We will not have a final number of jobs created until these prions are open. An operator has not yet been appointed for Glen Parva and the Department does not currently collect granular workforce data from private prison providers, which includes HMP Five Wells. To publish this data or require the provider to do so would require significant changes to the contracts of all private prison providers and we currently have no plans to do this.

We have interpreted ‘indirectly employed jobs’ as those not employed by the prison operators but indirectly via contractors or part of the supply chain for prison operation. We do not hold this information.

Alex Chalk
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
20th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what estimate he has made of the number directly employed permanent jobs that will be created at each of the new Five Wells and Glen Parva prisons; and how many of those jobs have been filled to date.

The total number of pre-constructed concrete sections delivered to Glen Parva to 21 July 2021 is 5,951. Delivery has been variable between the first delivery which took place on 26 January 2021 and the latest update. This averages out at 234 panels per week. The deliveries to the site are still ongoing.

HMP Five Wells has incorporated 15,183 pre-constructed concrete panels during the installation period between September 2019 to September 2020, averaging out at 290 panels a week. The reason for the variance between the number of panels delivered to each site is due to the difference in delivery stage between the projects. HMP Five Wells has fully completed its pre-cast concrete installation at the point of reporting whereas Glen Parva is still ramping up installation process as of 29 April 2021.

We estimate that there will be around 600-700 permanent jobs created at both HMP Five Wells & Glen Parva once they are open. We will not have a final number of jobs created until these prions are open. An operator has not yet been appointed for Glen Parva and the Department does not currently collect granular workforce data from private prison providers, which includes HMP Five Wells. To publish this data or require the provider to do so would require significant changes to the contracts of all private prison providers and we currently have no plans to do this.

We have interpreted ‘indirectly employed jobs’ as those not employed by the prison operators but indirectly via contractors or part of the supply chain for prison operation. We do not hold this information.

Alex Chalk
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
20th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what estimate he has made of the number of indirectly employed jobs that will be created at each of the new Five Wells and Glen Parva prisons; and whether any of those positions have been filled to date.

The total number of pre-constructed concrete sections delivered to Glen Parva to 21 July 2021 is 5,951. Delivery has been variable between the first delivery which took place on 26 January 2021 and the latest update. This averages out at 234 panels per week. The deliveries to the site are still ongoing.

HMP Five Wells has incorporated 15,183 pre-constructed concrete panels during the installation period between September 2019 to September 2020, averaging out at 290 panels a week. The reason for the variance between the number of panels delivered to each site is due to the difference in delivery stage between the projects. HMP Five Wells has fully completed its pre-cast concrete installation at the point of reporting whereas Glen Parva is still ramping up installation process as of 29 April 2021.

We estimate that there will be around 600-700 permanent jobs created at both HMP Five Wells & Glen Parva once they are open. We will not have a final number of jobs created until these prions are open. An operator has not yet been appointed for Glen Parva and the Department does not currently collect granular workforce data from private prison providers, which includes HMP Five Wells. To publish this data or require the provider to do so would require significant changes to the contracts of all private prison providers and we currently have no plans to do this.

We have interpreted ‘indirectly employed jobs’ as those not employed by the prison operators but indirectly via contractors or part of the supply chain for prison operation. We do not hold this information.

Alex Chalk
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
20th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many staff, not directly employed by the prison, were employed at HMP Berwyn by the end of each year for (a) 2017, (b) 2018, (c) 2019 and (d) 2020; and whether he plans for that number to increase over the next three years.

HMPPS does not hold information about the number of non-directly employed staff who work at HMP Berwyn. This information is held by the individual service providers or supplier and each would have their own plans for potential future recruitment.

Alex Chalk
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
20th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many times the Ambulance Service was called out to deal with incidents at HMP Berwyn in (a) 2017, (b) 2018, (c) 2019 and (d) 2020.

In line with policy at HMP Berwyn, when a medical emergency procedure is activated it is standard response for the communications room to call for an ambulance. This is in partnership with the prison’s healthcare providers – Betsi Cadwaladr University Health Board and Welsh Ambulance Service Trust. HMPPS does not hold information about the number of times the ambulance service has been called to attend the prison as the information is held by the Welsh Ambulance Service Trust.

HMP Berwyn works closely with colleagues in the police and have a dedicated police team on site to support with incidents where required. Information about the number of times the police and other enforcement services have been called to attend HMP Berwyn is held by the police.

Alex Chalk
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
20th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many times (a) the Police and (b) other enforcement services were called out to deal with incidents at HMP Berwyn in (i) 2017, (ii) 2018, (iii) 2019 and (iv) 2020.

In line with policy at HMP Berwyn, when a medical emergency procedure is activated it is standard response for the communications room to call for an ambulance. This is in partnership with the prison’s healthcare providers – Betsi Cadwaladr University Health Board and Welsh Ambulance Service Trust. HMPPS does not hold information about the number of times the ambulance service has been called to attend the prison as the information is held by the Welsh Ambulance Service Trust.

HMP Berwyn works closely with colleagues in the police and have a dedicated police team on site to support with incidents where required. Information about the number of times the police and other enforcement services have been called to attend HMP Berwyn is held by the police.

Alex Chalk
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
14th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the average number of miles a woman in prison is held from her home address.

As of 30 June 2021, a woman in prison was on average 47 miles from their origin address.

There are complex and wide-ranging issues involved in transferring and locating prisoners, and allocation decisions must reflect both the specific needs and circumstances of the prisoner, including their security assessment, as well as the operating environment and range of services at the receiving prison.

HMPPS is committed to ensuring, where practicable, that prisoners are accommodated as close as possible to their resettlement communities and families. Whilst this is a priority, it is not always possible due to a variety of factors including wider population pressures, or where women have specific sentence planning needs which can only be met at certain establishments.

Around 97% of prisoners have an origin location; i.e. addresses that are recorded in our central IT system. If no address is given, an offender’s committal court address is used as a proxy for the area in which they are resident. This information is included in the data provided above. Those with no recorded origin are typically foreign nationals or those recently received into custody.

The numerical information provided has been drawn from administrative IT systems, which as with any large scale recording system are subject to possible error with data entry and processing.

Lord Wolfson of Tredegar
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
20th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to the Annual Report of the Independent Monitoring Board at HMP Onley, published on 20 July 2021, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of capacity in Category D prisons in London and the South-East; and what assessment he has made of the effect on the (a) rehabilitation and (b) resettlement of prisoners in custody a large distance away from their families.

In recent months we have taken a number of units out of use that no longer meet current fire safety standards. This has inevitably had an impact on the availability of category D (open) places in London and the South-East. In the short term, these reductions in places are being offset by installation of good-quality temporary units at a number of critical sites, while we plan for their replacement on a permanent basis.

We have committed more than £4 billion to make significant progress in delivering 18,000 additional prison places across England and Wales by the mid-2020s, and expansion of the category D estate is included in this. We are currently assessing which sites may be suitable for expansion.

Open prisons are classified as a national resource, meaning that some prisoners are held in open conditions outside of their immediate home region. However, open prisons have a successful track record of supporting prisoners realise their release plans despite the geographical distance from home that can affect some prisoners. All open prisons have established links with local employers to provide access to job opportunities while in custody through Release on Temporary Licence. Through collaboration with New Futures Network, there is also a national network of organisations that facilitate employment in custody and after release. In all cases, open prisons work to ensure that, where possible, the job can be retained on release. Alternatively, they may be released with transferrable skills that are to a recognised industry standard that would enable them to be employed in their home area.

We recognise that closeness to home is important for maintaining family ties, however given restraints in existing geography and infrastructure, we are not always able to hold prisoners close to home while having access to the right services or opportunities. The Model for Operational Delivery for Resettlement prisons covers resettlement for both Category C and Category D prisoners to ensure there is equality in service delivery regardless of where they are located within the estate. Onley is a training and resettlement prison and like other closed prisons is able to provide prisoners with a range of opportunities for rehabilitation and resettlement while they are waiting for an open prison place to become available.

Alex Chalk
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
13th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what was the (1) median, and (2) mean, length of stay in days for sentenced prisoners at each women's prison for each of the last 10 years.

Table 1 shows the total number of prisoner releases, and mean and median time spent in all female prisons for those released between 2011 and 2020, broken down by year and releasing prison establishment.

Table 2 shows the total number of sentenced prisoner receptions, and mean and median time spent on remand in all female prisons for those received into prison between 2011 to 2020, broken down by year and reception prison establishment.

Table 3 shows the total number of convicted unsentenced prisoner receptions and mean and median time spent on pre-trial remand in all female prisons for those received into prison between 2011 to 2020, broken down by year and reception prison establishment.

Table 4 shows the total number of sentenced prisoner receptions, and mean and median time spent on convicted unsentenced remand in all female prisons for those received into prison between 2011 to 2020, broken down by year and reception prison establishment.

Lord Wolfson of Tredegar
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
13th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what was the (1) median, and (2) mean, length of stay in days for remanded prisoners at each women’s prison for each of the last 10 years.

Table 1 shows the total number of prisoner releases, and mean and median time spent in all female prisons for those released between 2011 and 2020, broken down by year and releasing prison establishment.

Table 2 shows the total number of sentenced prisoner receptions, and mean and median time spent on remand in all female prisons for those received into prison between 2011 to 2020, broken down by year and reception prison establishment.

Table 3 shows the total number of convicted unsentenced prisoner receptions and mean and median time spent on pre-trial remand in all female prisons for those received into prison between 2011 to 2020, broken down by year and reception prison establishment.

Table 4 shows the total number of sentenced prisoner receptions, and mean and median time spent on convicted unsentenced remand in all female prisons for those received into prison between 2011 to 2020, broken down by year and reception prison establishment.

Lord Wolfson of Tredegar
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
13th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what wa the (1) median, and (2) mean, length of stay in days for prisoners at each women’s prison who have been (a) remanded pre-trial, and (b) remanded pre- sentence, for each of the last 10 years.

Table 1 shows the total number of prisoner releases, and mean and median time spent in all female prisons for those released between 2011 and 2020, broken down by year and releasing prison establishment.

Table 2 shows the total number of sentenced prisoner receptions, and mean and median time spent on remand in all female prisons for those received into prison between 2011 to 2020, broken down by year and reception prison establishment.

Table 3 shows the total number of convicted unsentenced prisoner receptions and mean and median time spent on pre-trial remand in all female prisons for those received into prison between 2011 to 2020, broken down by year and reception prison establishment.

Table 4 shows the total number of sentenced prisoner receptions, and mean and median time spent on convicted unsentenced remand in all female prisons for those received into prison between 2011 to 2020, broken down by year and reception prison establishment.

Lord Wolfson of Tredegar
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many meetings (a) he has and (b) Ministers of his Department have had with the operator of Rainsbrook Secure Training Centre since inspectors issued an Urgent Notification in respect of that Centre in December 2020.

Following the invoking of the Urgent Notification protocol at Rainsbrook Secure Training Centre (STC) last December, Ministers called an urgent meeting with senior representatives from the provider MTC. HMPPS officials were then instructed to deploy to Rainsbrook to scrutinise actions taken by MTC in response to the Urgent Notification. Subsequent meetings were conducted between officials, with regard to monitoring the Urgent Notification action plan. As this is a contracted service the YCS/HMPPS contract management and commercial teams have met internally and with MTC on a regular basis.

We ordered the provider to take the immediate action necessary to address the unacceptable failings at Rainsbrook, including a focus on ensuring all children in the Reverse Cohorting Unit had a suitable amount of time out of their room. Whilst inspectors acknowledged that this issue had been addressed, and that the Youth Custody Service had strengthened its oversight of the STC, a second Urgent Notification was invoked on 18 June following a full inspection of the centre with reference to separate serious concerns.

We have now transferred all children from Rainsbrook to alternative appropriate accommodation. Separately, we are also considering the future of the centre, with a further announcement to be made on this position in due course following conclusion of the current commercial matters.

Alex Chalk
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what progress the review has made on the handling and supervision of Khairi Saadallah.

This was a terrible crime, and the Court imposed a whole life order on Khairi Saadallah.

The Probation Service has completed a Serious Further Offence (SFO) review into how Saadallah was managed, which has been shared with those bereaved relatives and surviving victims who requested it. The SFO review identified some improvement actions in relation to risk assessment practice and case recording, which are being delivered as part of a formal action plan.

Additionally, there was a review into how we can more effectively support terrorism-risk offenders with mental health problems and so better address risk. The findings are aligned with the Rapid Review of Mental Health Provision for Offenders, commissioned by the Criminal Justice Task Force.

An independent reviewer is also undertaking a Serious Case Review looking at how the relevant agencies worked together under the Multi-Agency Public Protection Arrangements (MAPPA) to manage the risk he posed.

Alex Chalk
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, if he will provide a list of relevant orders and the type of conviction that leads to each said order.

On conviction of an offence in the Crown Court or a magistrates' court, the court may impose orders on the offender. These are known as ancillary orders. Some ancillary orders are aimed at redressing the harm caused by an offender, others aim to prevent future re-offending or repeat victimisation.

In certain situations, the court must impose an ancillary order, in other situations it is up to the court to decide whether an ancillary order is appropriate or necessary, taking into account the circumstances of the offence and the offender.

Sentencing guidelines, issued by the independent Sentencing Council, identify ancillary orders that are particularly likely to be relevant to individual offences. Further information on ancillary orders, including a non-exhaustive list of such orders, is available on the Council’s website at: https://www.sentencingcouncil.org.uk/explanatory-material/magistrates-court/item/ancillary-orders/1-introduction-to-ancillary-orders/

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what his timetable is to bring forward legislative proposals for the increase in magistrates' retirement age.

Measures to raise the mandatory retirement age of judicial office holders, including magistrates, from 70 to 75 have been brought forward as part of the Public Service Pensions and Judicial Offices Bill, introduced in the House of Lords on 19 July 2021.

The Bill also includes a transitional provision to enable magistrates between the age of 70 and 75 on commencement of the new mandatory retirement age to apply to return to the bench, subject to business need. The process by which such applications are to be made and considered will be set out in the autumn and we will be contacting eligible retired magistrates to invite them to express their interest in re-joining the bench.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, if he will list the circumstances in which the name of the victim of an alleged rape may not be disclosed to the defendant.

The disclosure of a victim’s name to a defendant charged with a criminal offence is a fundamental aspect of ensuring the defendant can prepare a defence at court and thus receives a fair trial.

The one circumstance in which the name of the victim of an alleged rape would not be disclosed to the defendant during proceedings in a criminal court would be if, following an application by the CPS, the court made a witness anonymity order under section 88 of the Coroners and Justice Act 2009 in respect of the victim who was due to give evidence in the case and whose name had not already been disclosed during the investigation or earlier stages of the proceedings. The court must apply a number of stringent tests before granting such an order. These include that the proposed order is necessary, that it is in the interests of justice that the witness should testify and, having regard to all the circumstances, the effects of making the order would be consistent with the defendant receiving a fair trial.

Victims of rape are currently granted lifetime anonymity under the Sexual Offences (Amendment) Act 1992 and although this does not include anonymity from the defendant, publishing details of the victim, such as their name, address, place of education or work, is a criminal offence.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
12th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what advice they have received about the level of vaccination required for (1) prisoners, and (2) prison officers, in order to prevent future outbreaks of COVID-19 in prisons.

Public Health England advice is that we should aim for the highest possible level of vaccination coverage, and higher coverage will help limit outbreaks. Even with a fully vaccinated population, however, smaller outbreaks could occur, because the vaccine does not offer complete protection. The risk of outbreaks is also influenced by other factors including the local demographics, previous exposure, and community prevalence.

HMPPS strongly encourages all staff and prisoners to have the COVID-19 vaccine. We ask employees to let us know when they have had each dose of the COVID-19 vaccine by recording their vaccine status on our HR system. As the disclosure of their vaccine status is entirely voluntary, it means the self-declaration rates presented below will be lower than the actual number of staff who have been vaccinated.

Lord Wolfson of Tredegar
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
12th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they intend to take as a result of the European Commission's rejection of the UK's application to join the Lugano Convention.

The Government is aware of the European Commission’s notification that it is not in a position to give its consent to UK accession to the Lugano Convention 2007. However, we understand that member states have not yet been given an opportunity to formally vote on that position.

We are committed to ensuring cross-border legal disputes can be resolved smoothly, in the interests of families, consumers and businesses both in the UK and across Europe. We maintain that we meet the criteria for accession – it is open to countries outside the EU; all non-EU parties to Lugano support UK membership.

Lord Wolfson of Tredegar
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
12th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment the (1) Cabinet Office, and (2) Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office, have made of the impact of the UK not becoming a party to the Lugano Convention.

The Government is committed to ensuring cross-border legal disputes can be resolved smoothly, in the interests of families, consumers and businesses both in the UK and across Europe. From 1st January this year cross border disputes are managed through the domestic arrangements of the UK and EU / EFTA states as well as our international agreements under the Hague Conventions.

Lord Wolfson of Tredegar
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
16th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many refunds went unclaimed for power of attorney fees overcharged by the Office of the Public Guardian when the refund scheme closed on 31 January 2021.

The LPA refund scheme officially ran from 1 February 2018 to 31 January 2021, however OPG are still accepting written requests for a refund from customers. The online application form is no longer in use and OPG are no longer advertising the scheme.

As of June 2021, £16,463,993.76 worth of refunds have been made and 324,937 claims have been received.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
16th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, if he will take steps to notify all those entitled to refunds for overcharged deputyship fees in advance of closing the refund scheme in October 2022.

Information about the deputyship refund scheme is currently available on Gov.UK. Although this information will be removed in October 2022, the Office of the Public Guardian (OPG) will still accept applications after this date.

Eligible customers who were still receiving supervision received their refund automatically from OPG.

It is not OPGs intention to contact customers who are no longer under supervision, as in most cases such customers are likely to have died or changed address, in which case it is for the executors or representatives of the estate to apply for a refund. OPG ran an awareness campaign to encourage customers no longer under supervision to apply for a refund.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
14th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 22 April 2021 to Question 183091 on Prisons: Gender Recognition, how many biologically (a) male, and (b) female prisoners have obtained a Gender Recognition Certificate while incarcerated in each of the last five years.

No data is held centrally on the number of prisoners with Gender Recognition Certificates (GRCs) in English and Welsh prisons. Nobody is obliged to disclose that they have a GRC.

Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service and the Ministry of Justice are actively pursuing ways to improve data relating to gender and gender identity, whilst also continuing to respect the rights and privacy of those who hold GRCs. This year's transgender annual data collection exercise will, for the first time, collect anonymised information on the number of prisoners known to hold GRCs in the prison estate and this information will be published within the Offender Annual Equalities Report in the autumn.

Alex Chalk
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
15th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, if he will commit to developing a rehabilitation strategy for male prisoners that is in line with the Female Offender Strategy.

Evidence shows that a gender-specific approach for women is the most effective way to address the often multiple and complex issues that underly women’s offending behaviour. That is why we launched the Female Offender Strategy in 2018 to improve outcomes for women at all points of the justice system by taking a gender and trauma informed approach.

A wide range of work is underway to help rehabilitate both male and female offenders. We know that having somewhere to live, a job, a healthy lifestyle and helping the individual address their underlying and often complex needs are essential to reducing their likelihood of reoffending. This enables them to make a positive contribution to society.

That is why we are strengthening rehabilitation in prisons by creating a Prisoner Education Service focussed on work-based training and skills to improve employment outcomes for offenders on release. The HMPPS New Futures Network also continues to broker partnerships between prisons and employers, which can result in work opportunities for serving prisoners, through prison industries workshops and workplace Release on Temporary Licence. We are also improving employment outcomes by increasing the number of DWP Prison Work Coaches across the estate, which means that prior to release, prisoners can access advice and support on employment and benefits.

In January, this Government announced a £70 million package on tackling some of the key drivers of reoffending, and £80 million on expanding drug treatment services in England to address offenders’ substance misuse issues, divert them on to effective community sentences and reduce drug-related crime and deaths. The £70 million package includes launching transitional accommodation for those leaving prison who would otherwise be homeless in five probation regions and working collaboratively with 16 prisons to test new innovative approaches to ensure offenders resettle back into the community and turn their backs on crime.

On the 26 June we successfully implemented our reforms to create a unified Probation Service. We have retained a key role for the private and voluntary sectors by awarding contracts worth nearly £200m over the next 3 years to a range of organisations to deliver vital rehabilitative services such as accommodation support, education, training and employment, and support to address other issues such as access to mental health services and additional support to meet the specific needs of female offenders.

We are committed to providing all offenders with an opportunity to turn their backs on crime. However, this is not something the Ministry of Justice can do in isolation, it needs to be a combined effort across government and local partners in order to make a significant and lasting change. That is why we are leading work across Government to address the complex issues that increase the likelihood of reoffending when a prisoner is released. There are no plans to develop a distinct rehabilitation strategy for male prisoners.

Alex Chalk
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
15th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many and what proportion of offenders of the Offender Personality Disorder pathway programme are (a) male and (b) female.

The Offender Personality Disorder (OPD) pathway is a clinically led joint initiative with the NHS. It is not a single intervention rather a series of different interventions tailored for individuals based on clinical need.

The number and proportions of men and women in custody and in the community who had been screened into the OPD pathway as of 30 June 2021 is displayed in the table below. The figures relate to all those within the Probation Service caseload who are identified as being eligible for OPD services. Being screened into the programme does not mean an individual will automatically receive intervention. This is an administrative process to identify those who may fit the programme criteria. Intervention pathways are determined through further assessment and sentence planning.

Gender

People managed by the Probation Service screened into the OPD pathway (as of 30/06/21)

Proportion of all people managed by the Probation Service who had been screened into the OPD pathway (as of 30/06/21)

Male

33,757

94.0%

Female

2,164

6.0%

Although care is taken when processing and analysing the data, the details are subject to inaccuracies inherent in any large-scale case management system and is the best data that is available. The data may differ slightly to that of the published statistics where data was run on a different date.

Alex Chalk
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
15th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to paragraph 2 on page 5 of the Female Offender Strategy, published in June 2018, what estimate he has made of the number of (a) male and b) female prisoners who have experienced chaotic lifestyles.

It is important to understand the personal circumstances and needs of offenders who receive custody and community disposals, if we are to effectively support their rehabilitation.

Information on the criminogenic and responsivity needs of offenders is captured through the Offender Assessment System (OASyS). The most recent figures were published on 18 July 2019 in the ‘Identified needs of offenders in custody and the community from OASyS,’ based on a snapshot as at 30 June 2018.

These figures show that females assessed in custody had a higher average number of needs per person (5.05) than males in custody (4.88), and higher than both females (3.81) and males (3.72) in the community.

Females in custody had a higher prevalence of relationship needs (80%) than males in custody (69%), as well as accommodation (64% compared to 56%), drugs (50% compared to 45%), alcohol (22% compared to 17%) and employability needs (66% compared to 62%).

Alex Chalk
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
16th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what estimate he has made of (a) the initial cost of implementing the Short Sentence Function across all Probation Service Regions in England and Wales, and (b) the additional annual running cost for HMPPS resulting from Short Sentence Function implementation.

Following the unification of the Probation Service on 26 June 2021, short sentence functions will be established in all Probation Service regions to provide a responsive, multi-agency approach for all people in prison serving short prison sentences.

The short sentence function was implemented in Wales in August 2020 as an early adopter region.  The remaining Probation Regions have started the planning process to introduce within all Probation Service Regions over the next 12 months.

We have begun evaluating the Short Term Sentence Team model in Wales since it went live in August 2020 and will be evaluating 2 further early adopter regions in Yorkshire and the Humber and the North West. This research will primarily focus on process evaluation but we will monitor recall rates and reoffending in order to assess the longer-term impact, aiming to publish interim process evaluation findings and then the final report including findings on impact by summer 2023.

At this stage, we are piloting these teams within existing resource by reorganising current probation resource in the community, so that we can focus efforts on this cohort and grow expertise within teams.

In the longer-term, as part of our annual £155m investment in probation in 2019-20 and in this year, recruitment of additional probation practitioners means that we expect resource in resettlement and in community sentence management teams to increase, and this would include the resource focused on this group of offenders.

Alex Chalk
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment he has made of the impact on (a) cohorts in receipt of short sentences, (b) the Probation Service and (c) prisons of the Short Sentence Function implemented in Wales as an early adopter in August 2020.

Following the unification of the Probation Service on 26 June 2021, short sentence functions will be established in all Probation Service regions to provide a responsive, multi-agency approach for all people in prison serving short prison sentences.

The short sentence function was implemented in Wales in August 2020 as an early adopter region.  The remaining Probation Regions have started the planning process to introduce within all Probation Service Regions over the next 12 months.

We have begun evaluating the Short Term Sentence Team model in Wales since it went live in August 2020 and will be evaluating 2 further early adopter regions in Yorkshire and the Humber and the North West. This research will primarily focus on process evaluation but we will monitor recall rates and reoffending in order to assess the longer-term impact, aiming to publish interim process evaluation findings and then the final report including findings on impact by summer 2023.

At this stage, we are piloting these teams within existing resource by reorganising current probation resource in the community, so that we can focus efforts on this cohort and grow expertise within teams.

In the longer-term, as part of our annual £155m investment in probation in 2019-20 and in this year, recruitment of additional probation practitioners means that we expect resource in resettlement and in community sentence management teams to increase, and this would include the resource focused on this group of offenders.

Alex Chalk
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
14th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to the Annual Report of the Independent Monitoring Board at HMP Maidstone: For reporting year March 2020 – February 2021, published on 13 July 2021, what steps he is taking to support effective collaboration between the HM Prison and Probation Service and Home Office Immigration Enforcement to (a) improve communication and end-of-sentence management for foreign national prisoners, (b) reduce the number of detainees held under IS91 provisions and (c) ensure that those detainees held under IS91 provisions are no longer held in closed prisons.

The Ministry of Justice welcomes the findings of IMB’s report and takes the concerns raised seriously. The Board found positive practices during their visit, but we recognise that the establishment still has a way to go. Some of the issues raised have been exacerbated or delayed by the impact of Covid-19 and are expected to improve as regime restrictions are lifted.

33185

HMPPS and the Home Office hold regular bilateral meetings to support the management of FNOs. HMP Maidstone have an embedded Immigration Prison Team who run daily appointments for FNOs to seek advice on their case and better manage the expectations of FNOs prior to their removal. Covid-19 has hampered efforts to remove FNOs due to a significant decrease in available flights, however, efforts have continued to remove FNOs via removal schemes throughout the pandemic.

Individuals who are risk assessed as suitable for transfer to an Immigration Removal Centre (IRC) will be placed on a waiting list, operated by the Home Office, but will remain in prison accommodation pending that transfer. Transfers will take place as soon as reasonably and operationally practicable. When an individual is deemed unsuitable for a transfer to the immigration removal estate, their circumstances continue to be regularly reviewed. Changes in circumstance can impact this decision and individuals may, on re-assessment, be then considered suitable and accepted for transfer into an IRC.

During the pandemic, covid safe measures such as single occupancy and reverse cohorting (where new intake is separated from the general population) across the IRC estate has resulted in a slower flow of time served foreign national offenders suitable for the estate being transferred, however, where such moves can be operationally set up and space allows, the Home Office have continued to move such individuals and continue to do so.

33186 & 33187

As part of the Home Office’s response to the Stephen Shaw’s follow-up report in 2018, an internal review of the quality of interpreter services in IRCs was undertaken. The review findings have helped to inform the development of a new Detention Services Order (DSO) on interpretation services and translation devices, which includes guidance on the translation of documentation. The Home Office aims to publish this DSO by the Autumn. As part of this work HMPPS and the Home Office will review the provision of translated documents to individuals held under immigration powers in prison.

33188

In March 2020 HMPPS stood up COVID-19 Gold Command to stand alongside the normal incident Gold arrangements, as a direct response to the emerging global pandemic. The aim of the introduction of this function, was to help and support prison group directors and governors in manging COVID-19, offering guidance as to managing a new and complicated set of factors. COVID-19 Gold drew senior HMPPS leaders together with experts from other related fields such as Public Heath England/Wales. Our COVID-19 operational guidance team drafted and published a set of Exceptional Delivery Models, drawing on experience from experts, which were set as templates for establishments, upon which to base their safe delivery. Gold command have processed and authorised these delivery models, when establishments have evidenced it is safe for them to enhance their regime provision.

Whilst HMPPS have effectively been operating in ‘Command Mode’ since March 2020, governors and prison group directors have still maintained a degree of autonomy over the day-to-day running of their establishments, therefore governors have never had their control removed.

33189

The IMB receive an annual budget from the Ministry of Justice (MoJ) to support all essential activities and any necessary transformation for the organisation. They are responsible for ensuring compliance with the financial controls in place across the Civil Service and the MoJ, including those mandated by HM Treasury and the Cabinet Office. The IMB Report for Maidstone was published on 13 July, and issues raised within it are currently being assessed by the Department.

Alex Chalk
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
14th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to the Annual Report of the Independent Monitoring Board at HMP Maidstone: For reporting year March 2020 – February 2021, published on 13 July 2021, what steps he is taking in collaboration with the Home Secretary to ensure that Home Office Immigration Enforcement documents required to be signed by foreign national prisoners and detainees are provided in languages that those prisoners and detainees can fully understand.

The Ministry of Justice welcomes the findings of IMB’s report and takes the concerns raised seriously. The Board found positive practices during their visit, but we recognise that the establishment still has a way to go. Some of the issues raised have been exacerbated or delayed by the impact of Covid-19 and are expected to improve as regime restrictions are lifted.

33185

HMPPS and the Home Office hold regular bilateral meetings to support the management of FNOs. HMP Maidstone have an embedded Immigration Prison Team who run daily appointments for FNOs to seek advice on their case and better manage the expectations of FNOs prior to their removal. Covid-19 has hampered efforts to remove FNOs due to a significant decrease in available flights, however, efforts have continued to remove FNOs via removal schemes throughout the pandemic.

Individuals who are risk assessed as suitable for transfer to an Immigration Removal Centre (IRC) will be placed on a waiting list, operated by the Home Office, but will remain in prison accommodation pending that transfer. Transfers will take place as soon as reasonably and operationally practicable. When an individual is deemed unsuitable for a transfer to the immigration removal estate, their circumstances continue to be regularly reviewed. Changes in circumstance can impact this decision and individuals may, on re-assessment, be then considered suitable and accepted for transfer into an IRC.

During the pandemic, covid safe measures such as single occupancy and reverse cohorting (where new intake is separated from the general population) across the IRC estate has resulted in a slower flow of time served foreign national offenders suitable for the estate being transferred, however, where such moves can be operationally set up and space allows, the Home Office have continued to move such individuals and continue to do so.

33186 & 33187

As part of the Home Office’s response to the Stephen Shaw’s follow-up report in 2018, an internal review of the quality of interpreter services in IRCs was undertaken. The review findings have helped to inform the development of a new Detention Services Order (DSO) on interpretation services and translation devices, which includes guidance on the translation of documentation. The Home Office aims to publish this DSO by the Autumn. As part of this work HMPPS and the Home Office will review the provision of translated documents to individuals held under immigration powers in prison.

33188

In March 2020 HMPPS stood up COVID-19 Gold Command to stand alongside the normal incident Gold arrangements, as a direct response to the emerging global pandemic. The aim of the introduction of this function, was to help and support prison group directors and governors in manging COVID-19, offering guidance as to managing a new and complicated set of factors. COVID-19 Gold drew senior HMPPS leaders together with experts from other related fields such as Public Heath England/Wales. Our COVID-19 operational guidance team drafted and published a set of Exceptional Delivery Models, drawing on experience from experts, which were set as templates for establishments, upon which to base their safe delivery. Gold command have processed and authorised these delivery models, when establishments have evidenced it is safe for them to enhance their regime provision.

Whilst HMPPS have effectively been operating in ‘Command Mode’ since March 2020, governors and prison group directors have still maintained a degree of autonomy over the day-to-day running of their establishments, therefore governors have never had their control removed.

33189

The IMB receive an annual budget from the Ministry of Justice (MoJ) to support all essential activities and any necessary transformation for the organisation. They are responsible for ensuring compliance with the financial controls in place across the Civil Service and the MoJ, including those mandated by HM Treasury and the Cabinet Office. The IMB Report for Maidstone was published on 13 July, and issues raised within it are currently being assessed by the Department.

Alex Chalk
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
14th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to the Annual Report of the Independent Monitoring Board at HMP Maidstone: For reporting year March 2020 – February 2021, published on 13 July 2021, what assessment he has made of the compatibility of the lack of provision of appropriately translated Home Office documents referred to on page 17 of that report with the requirements of the Equality Act 2010.

The Ministry of Justice welcomes the findings of IMB’s report and takes the concerns raised seriously. The Board found positive practices during their visit, but we recognise that the establishment still has a way to go. Some of the issues raised have been exacerbated or delayed by the impact of Covid-19 and are expected to improve as regime restrictions are lifted.

33185

HMPPS and the Home Office hold regular bilateral meetings to support the management of FNOs. HMP Maidstone have an embedded Immigration Prison Team who run daily appointments for FNOs to seek advice on their case and better manage the expectations of FNOs prior to their removal. Covid-19 has hampered efforts to remove FNOs due to a significant decrease in available flights, however, efforts have continued to remove FNOs via removal schemes throughout the pandemic.

Individuals who are risk assessed as suitable for transfer to an Immigration Removal Centre (IRC) will be placed on a waiting list, operated by the Home Office, but will remain in prison accommodation pending that transfer. Transfers will take place as soon as reasonably and operationally practicable. When an individual is deemed unsuitable for a transfer to the immigration removal estate, their circumstances continue to be regularly reviewed. Changes in circumstance can impact this decision and individuals may, on re-assessment, be then considered suitable and accepted for transfer into an IRC.

During the pandemic, covid safe measures such as single occupancy and reverse cohorting (where new intake is separated from the general population) across the IRC estate has resulted in a slower flow of time served foreign national offenders suitable for the estate being transferred, however, where such moves can be operationally set up and space allows, the Home Office have continued to move such individuals and continue to do so.

33186 & 33187

As part of the Home Office’s response to the Stephen Shaw’s follow-up report in 2018, an internal review of the quality of interpreter services in IRCs was undertaken. The review findings have helped to inform the development of a new Detention Services Order (DSO) on interpretation services and translation devices, which includes guidance on the translation of documentation. The Home Office aims to publish this DSO by the Autumn. As part of this work HMPPS and the Home Office will review the provision of translated documents to individuals held under immigration powers in prison.

33188

In March 2020 HMPPS stood up COVID-19 Gold Command to stand alongside the normal incident Gold arrangements, as a direct response to the emerging global pandemic. The aim of the introduction of this function, was to help and support prison group directors and governors in manging COVID-19, offering guidance as to managing a new and complicated set of factors. COVID-19 Gold drew senior HMPPS leaders together with experts from other related fields such as Public Heath England/Wales. Our COVID-19 operational guidance team drafted and published a set of Exceptional Delivery Models, drawing on experience from experts, which were set as templates for establishments, upon which to base their safe delivery. Gold command have processed and authorised these delivery models, when establishments have evidenced it is safe for them to enhance their regime provision.

Whilst HMPPS have effectively been operating in ‘Command Mode’ since March 2020, governors and prison group directors have still maintained a degree of autonomy over the day-to-day running of their establishments, therefore governors have never had their control removed.

33189

The IMB receive an annual budget from the Ministry of Justice (MoJ) to support all essential activities and any necessary transformation for the organisation. They are responsible for ensuring compliance with the financial controls in place across the Civil Service and the MoJ, including those mandated by HM Treasury and the Cabinet Office. The IMB Report for Maidstone was published on 13 July, and issues raised within it are currently being assessed by the Department.

Alex Chalk
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
14th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to the Annual Report of the Independent Monitoring Board at HMP Maidstone: For reporting year March 2020 – February 2021, published on 13 July 2021, what steps he is taking to support the restoration of local governor control of that establishment.

The Ministry of Justice welcomes the findings of IMB’s report and takes the concerns raised seriously. The Board found positive practices during their visit, but we recognise that the establishment still has a way to go. Some of the issues raised have been exacerbated or delayed by the impact of Covid-19 and are expected to improve as regime restrictions are lifted.

33185

HMPPS and the Home Office hold regular bilateral meetings to support the management of FNOs. HMP Maidstone have an embedded Immigration Prison Team who run daily appointments for FNOs to seek advice on their case and better manage the expectations of FNOs prior to their removal. Covid-19 has hampered efforts to remove FNOs due to a significant decrease in available flights, however, efforts have continued to remove FNOs via removal schemes throughout the pandemic.

Individuals who are risk assessed as suitable for transfer to an Immigration Removal Centre (IRC) will be placed on a waiting list, operated by the Home Office, but will remain in prison accommodation pending that transfer. Transfers will take place as soon as reasonably and operationally practicable. When an individual is deemed unsuitable for a transfer to the immigration removal estate, their circumstances continue to be regularly reviewed. Changes in circumstance can impact this decision and individuals may, on re-assessment, be then considered suitable and accepted for transfer into an IRC.

During the pandemic, covid safe measures such as single occupancy and reverse cohorting (where new intake is separated from the general population) across the IRC estate has resulted in a slower flow of time served foreign national offenders suitable for the estate being transferred, however, where such moves can be operationally set up and space allows, the Home Office have continued to move such individuals and continue to do so.

33186 & 33187

As part of the Home Office’s response to the Stephen Shaw’s follow-up report in 2018, an internal review of the quality of interpreter services in IRCs was undertaken. The review findings have helped to inform the development of a new Detention Services Order (DSO) on interpretation services and translation devices, which includes guidance on the translation of documentation. The Home Office aims to publish this DSO by the Autumn. As part of this work HMPPS and the Home Office will review the provision of translated documents to individuals held under immigration powers in prison.

33188

In March 2020 HMPPS stood up COVID-19 Gold Command to stand alongside the normal incident Gold arrangements, as a direct response to the emerging global pandemic. The aim of the introduction of this function, was to help and support prison group directors and governors in manging COVID-19, offering guidance as to managing a new and complicated set of factors. COVID-19 Gold drew senior HMPPS leaders together with experts from other related fields such as Public Heath England/Wales. Our COVID-19 operational guidance team drafted and published a set of Exceptional Delivery Models, drawing on experience from experts, which were set as templates for establishments, upon which to base their safe delivery. Gold command have processed and authorised these delivery models, when establishments have evidenced it is safe for them to enhance their regime provision.

Whilst HMPPS have effectively been operating in ‘Command Mode’ since March 2020, governors and prison group directors have still maintained a degree of autonomy over the day-to-day running of their establishments, therefore governors have never had their control removed.

33189

The IMB receive an annual budget from the Ministry of Justice (MoJ) to support all essential activities and any necessary transformation for the organisation. They are responsible for ensuring compliance with the financial controls in place across the Civil Service and the MoJ, including those mandated by HM Treasury and the Cabinet Office. The IMB Report for Maidstone was published on 13 July, and issues raised within it are currently being assessed by the Department.

Alex Chalk
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
14th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to the Annual Report of the Independent Monitoring Board at HMP Maidstone: For reporting year March 2020 – February 2021, what steps he is taking to ensure that there is adequate funding for appropriate technology services for Independent Monitoring Boards.

The Ministry of Justice welcomes the findings of IMB’s report and takes the concerns raised seriously. The Board found positive practices during their visit, but we recognise that the establishment still has a way to go. Some of the issues raised have been exacerbated or delayed by the impact of Covid-19 and are expected to improve as regime restrictions are lifted.

33185

HMPPS and the Home Office hold regular bilateral meetings to support the management of FNOs. HMP Maidstone have an embedded Immigration Prison Team who run daily appointments for FNOs to seek advice on their case and better manage the expectations of FNOs prior to their removal. Covid-19 has hampered efforts to remove FNOs due to a significant decrease in available flights, however, efforts have continued to remove FNOs via removal schemes throughout the pandemic.

Individuals who are risk assessed as suitable for transfer to an Immigration Removal Centre (IRC) will be placed on a waiting list, operated by the Home Office, but will remain in prison accommodation pending that transfer. Transfers will take place as soon as reasonably and operationally practicable. When an individual is deemed unsuitable for a transfer to the immigration removal estate, their circumstances continue to be regularly reviewed. Changes in circumstance can impact this decision and individuals may, on re-assessment, be then considered suitable and accepted for transfer into an IRC.

During the pandemic, covid safe measures such as single occupancy and reverse cohorting (where new intake is separated from the general population) across the IRC estate has resulted in a slower flow of time served foreign national offenders suitable for the estate being transferred, however, where such moves can be operationally set up and space allows, the Home Office have continued to move such individuals and continue to do so.

33186 & 33187

As part of the Home Office’s response to the Stephen Shaw’s follow-up report in 2018, an internal review of the quality of interpreter services in IRCs was undertaken. The review findings have helped to inform the development of a new Detention Services Order (DSO) on interpretation services and translation devices, which includes guidance on the translation of documentation. The Home Office aims to publish this DSO by the Autumn. As part of this work HMPPS and the Home Office will review the provision of translated documents to individuals held under immigration powers in prison.

33188

In March 2020 HMPPS stood up COVID-19 Gold Command to stand alongside the normal incident Gold arrangements, as a direct response to the emerging global pandemic. The aim of the introduction of this function, was to help and support prison group directors and governors in manging COVID-19, offering guidance as to managing a new and complicated set of factors. COVID-19 Gold drew senior HMPPS leaders together with experts from other related fields such as Public Heath England/Wales. Our COVID-19 operational guidance team drafted and published a set of Exceptional Delivery Models, drawing on experience from experts, which were set as templates for establishments, upon which to base their safe delivery. Gold command have processed and authorised these delivery models, when establishments have evidenced it is safe for them to enhance their regime provision.

Whilst HMPPS have effectively been operating in ‘Command Mode’ since March 2020, governors and prison group directors have still maintained a degree of autonomy over the day-to-day running of their establishments, therefore governors have never had their control removed.

33189

The IMB receive an annual budget from the Ministry of Justice (MoJ) to support all essential activities and any necessary transformation for the organisation. They are responsible for ensuring compliance with the financial controls in place across the Civil Service and the MoJ, including those mandated by HM Treasury and the Cabinet Office. The IMB Report for Maidstone was published on 13 July, and issues raised within it are currently being assessed by the Department.

Alex Chalk
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what information or evidence of impairment has to be provided by a court user to HM Courts and Tribunals Service before reasonable adjustments will be considered.

HMCTS will provide reasonable adjustments for court and tribunal users with disabilities and takes steps to avoid treating people less favourably because of their disability. Court and tribunal users are encouraged to get in touch with HMCTS to discuss any particular adjustments they may need. HMCTS staff will sensitively ask those needing reasonable adjustments what support they require in order to be able to provide reasonable adjustments. We are committed to providing reasonable adjustments for all of those people with hearing loss to be able to access hearings in person.

Reasonable adjustment guidance and broader disability guidance is provided to all HMCTS staff for in person hearings and remote hearings. All guidance raises awareness of the issues people with hearing loss may face, and the reasonable adjustments which may help them to fully participate in hearings. Guidance also provides practical help for staff to ensure they know what hearing enhancement equipment is available in their buildings for users and how to use it. It includes a checklist for making sure that staff have time to test hearing enhancement equipment and are comfortable with how it’s used.

The Judiciary of England and Wales is constitutionally independent of Government, so the MoJ does not issue guidance to the judiciary. Judicial guidance on equal treatment is provided through access to the Equal Treatment Bench Book (ETBB), published by the Judicial College, and learning materials which provide explicit guidance on working with diverse individuals such as those who have hearing loss.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what guidance his Department (a) has given and (b) plans to give to (i) HM Courts and Tribunals Service personnel and (ii) the Judiciary on enabling hearing impaired users to use specialist equipment assessed as suitable for them at attended Court hearings; and if he will make a statement.

HMCTS will provide reasonable adjustments for court and tribunal users with disabilities and takes steps to avoid treating people less favourably because of their disability. Court and tribunal users are encouraged to get in touch with HMCTS to discuss any particular adjustments they may need. HMCTS staff will sensitively ask those needing reasonable adjustments what support they require in order to be able to provide reasonable adjustments. We are committed to providing reasonable adjustments for all of those people with hearing loss to be able to access hearings in person.

Reasonable adjustment guidance and broader disability guidance is provided to all HMCTS staff for in person hearings and remote hearings. All guidance raises awareness of the issues people with hearing loss may face, and the reasonable adjustments which may help them to fully participate in hearings. Guidance also provides practical help for staff to ensure they know what hearing enhancement equipment is available in their buildings for users and how to use it. It includes a checklist for making sure that staff have time to test hearing enhancement equipment and are comfortable with how it’s used.

The Judiciary of England and Wales is constitutionally independent of Government, so the MoJ does not issue guidance to the judiciary. Judicial guidance on equal treatment is provided through access to the Equal Treatment Bench Book (ETBB), published by the Judicial College, and learning materials which provide explicit guidance on working with diverse individuals such as those who have hearing loss.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether the needs of a hearing impaired court user for reasonable adjustment to enable them to access hearings in person are met in all cases; and if he will make a statement.

HMCTS will provide reasonable adjustments for court and tribunal users with disabilities and takes steps to avoid treating people less favourably because of their disability. Court and tribunal users are encouraged to get in touch with HMCTS to discuss any particular adjustments they may need. HMCTS staff will sensitively ask those needing reasonable adjustments what support they require in order to be able to provide reasonable adjustments. We are committed to providing reasonable adjustments for all of those people with hearing loss to be able to access hearings in person.

Reasonable adjustment guidance and broader disability guidance is provided to all HMCTS staff for in person hearings and remote hearings. All guidance raises awareness of the issues people with hearing loss may face, and the reasonable adjustments which may help them to fully participate in hearings. Guidance also provides practical help for staff to ensure they know what hearing enhancement equipment is available in their buildings for users and how to use it. It includes a checklist for making sure that staff have time to test hearing enhancement equipment and are comfortable with how it’s used.

The Judiciary of England and Wales is constitutionally independent of Government, so the MoJ does not issue guidance to the judiciary. Judicial guidance on equal treatment is provided through access to the Equal Treatment Bench Book (ETBB), published by the Judicial College, and learning materials which provide explicit guidance on working with diverse individuals such as those who have hearing loss.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many persons convicted of rape have received a sentence of less than (a) five, (b) seven and (c) 10 years imprisonment in each of the last 10 years.

The Ministry of Justice has published information on prosecutions and convictions for rape and offences in England and Wales, up to December 2020, available in the ‘Outcomes by Offence’ data tool, which can be found here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/987715/outcomes-by-offence-2020.xlsx

In order to isolate rape offences, type ‘rape’ into the ‘Offence’ filter and select all results that appear (19C-19H). Rows 55 to 77 will display a range of values based on sentence lengths.

Rape and sexual violence are devastating crimes that have a long-lasting impact on victims. Provisions in the Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill, currently before Parliament, will ensure that all serious sexual offenders, including those convicted of rape, will be required to serve two-thirds of their sentence in prison if given a standard determinate sentence of more than 4 years.

It is regrettable that you voted against this.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether he plans to re-open Hartlepool Magistrates Court.

There are no plans to re-open this court and we are working with the local council to find an alternative use for the former court property.

Hartlepool Magistrates’ and County Court closed in 2017 following a full public consultation and workloads were successfully transferred to Teesside Magistrates’ Court and Middlesbrough County Court.

We will continue to keep our court and tribunal estate under close review to make sure it meets our operational requirements.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, if he will publishe the backlog of outstanding cases at the start of July for each year since 2010 in every Crown Court open in England and Wales.

The number of outstanding cases by Crown Court for each year since 2014 is currently published as part of the National Statistics publication ‘Criminal Court Statistics Quarterly’ in the ‘Crown Court cases received, disposed, outstanding tool’. The published data for the second quarters of these years reflects the outstanding caseload in Crown Courts at the end of June of those respective years. The most recent data can be found in Criminal Statistics Quartely January to March 2021 linked below:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/criminal-court-statistics-quarterly-january-to-march-2021

and the received, disposed and outstanding tool can be accessed here:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/996073/cc_rdos_tool.xlsx

This data is only available split by individual Crown Court back to 2014.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, if he will provide a breakdown of the most recent (a) rape and (b) sexual assault (i) prosecution and (ii) conviction statistics by the ethnicity of the alleged victim or victims.

Due to a lack of data collected on victim characteristics, we do not have any rape or sexual assault statistics available on prosecutions or convictions by victim ethnicity.

However, I am able to provide data on the estimated prevalence rates of rape and sexual assault by victim ethnicity. This can be found at Sexual offences prevalence and victim characteristics, England and Wales - Office for National Statistics (ons.gov.uk).

Information on the ethnicity of the alleged victim or victims of rape and sexual assault offences is not centrally held within the court proceedings database. Overall information on prosecutions and convictions for rape and sexual assault offences in England and Wales, up to December 2020, is available in the ‘Principal offence proceedings and outcomes by Home Office offence code’ data tool, which can be found here:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/987731/HO-code-tool-principal-offence-2020.xlsx

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)