Baroness Ritchie of Downpatrick Portrait

Baroness Ritchie of Downpatrick

Labour - Life peer

Became Member: 16th October 2019


Common Frameworks Scrutiny Committee
17th Sep 2020 - 31st Dec 2023
Food, Poverty, Health and Environment Committee
30th Jan 2020 - 23rd Jun 2020
Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Committee
8th Jul 2015 - 3rd May 2017
Shadow SDLP Spokesperson (Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
6th May 2010 - 30th Mar 2015
Shadow SDLP Spokesperson (Energy and Climate Change)
6th May 2010 - 30th Mar 2015
Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Committee
23rd Jan 2012 - 30th Mar 2015


Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Baroness Ritchie of Downpatrick has voted in 456 divisions, and 3 times against the majority of their Party.

8 Dec 2021 - Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill - View Vote Context
Baroness Ritchie of Downpatrick voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 10 Labour No votes vs 38 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 125 Noes - 162
16 Mar 2022 - Health and Care Bill - View Vote Context
Baroness Ritchie of Downpatrick voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 24 Labour No votes vs 51 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 145 Noes - 179
12 Jul 2022 - Schools Bill [HL] - View Vote Context
Baroness Ritchie of Downpatrick voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 4 Labour No votes vs 29 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 82 Noes - 145
View All Baroness Ritchie of Downpatrick Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Lord Callanan (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
(44 debate interactions)
Lord Bethell (Conservative)
(41 debate interactions)
Lord Caine (Conservative)
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
(39 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
View all Baroness Ritchie of Downpatrick's debates

Lords initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Baroness Ritchie of Downpatrick, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.


Baroness Ritchie of Downpatrick has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

Baroness Ritchie of Downpatrick has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


Latest 50 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
12 Other Department Questions
27th Feb 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact of violent and abusive online pornography on violence against women and girls.

The Government Equalities Office published 2 reports in 2021 on the relationship between pornography and harmful sexual practices, including violence against women and girls. These are ‘The relationship between pornography use and harmful sexual behaviours’ and The relationship between pornography use and harmful sexual attitudes and behaviours: a literature review’. These are available on GOV.UK.

The reports indicate that there is not one single factor that leads someone to engage in harmful sexual behaviour, rather it is a combination of factors which interact with one another to differing effects on each individual. No causal link could be established between porn use and harmful sexual practices as the evidence can not establish if the use of porn leads to harmful sexual practices, or if it is the other way round. Conclusively establishing such a link would require impractical and unethical study conditions (exposing individuals who have never seen it, to porn).

Baroness Scott of Bybrook
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
26th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what recent assessment they have made of how the COP26 conference can benefit the people of Northern Ireland.

We are committed to working with Northern Ireland, as well as the other devolved nations, to ensure an inclusive and ambitious Presidency for the whole of the UK. COP26 has helped make sure our recovery from COVID-19 builds a better future – one with green jobs, cleaner air and increasing prosperity.

Through our domestic 'Together for our Planet' campaign we are building awareness and understanding of COP26 across the UK. For example, we ran our Creative Earth art competition in partnership with WWF inviting young people from around the UK to design artwork setting out their vision for the planet. The winning artworks were showcased at COP26, including a design from Alex in Northern Ireland who was the 13-16 age category winner.

We also worked with the devolved administrations to identify 'Together for our Planet Ambassadors' – individuals and organisations across the UK who are taking small steps to protect our planet and inspire wider climate action. One of our Ambassadors is a youth environmentalist, Emer Rafferty from Northern Ireland.

We also encouraged stakeholders from Northern Ireland who would like to be involved in events or showcasing in UKG managed spaces at COP26 to submit bids through an Expression of Interest process. All parts of the UK, including Northern Ireland, have been represented in the Green Zone programme that was published on 1 October.

7th Sep 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they plan to take to mobilise public and private climate finance ahead of COP26.

The UK Presidency is pushing developed countries to significantly increase their financial commitments for mitigation, adaptation and nature for developing countries and to align global financial flows with the Paris Agreement. This includes setting out a $100 billion delivery plan to be taken forward by Canada and Germany to demonstrate how developed countries are mobilising $100 billion a year.

Public finance will work in tandem with private finance and be used to mobilise far greater sums of private finance. The UK Presidency is working with other donors and multilateral development banks in collaboration with governments, to promote and support a range of targeted initiatives that tackle barriers to and promote investment into developing countries; such as supporting new market structures, improving policy environments, de-risking investments and creating incentives for deal flow. In April 2021 we founded GFANZ, the Glasgow Finance Alliance for Net Zero which accelerates the implementation of net zero commitments and mobilises capital to climate solutions. There are currently over 250 member firms from over 30 countries, representing assets of more than US$88 trillion.

7th Sep 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they have taken to prepare for COP26 in November.

COP26 is an event of global importance where the world must work together to secure a comprehensive and ambitious set of outcomes that accelerate climate action and get the world on track to a 1.5 degree pathway. This includes finalising the Paris Rulebook, supporting the full implementation of the Paris Agreement and addressing the gaps on ambition in reducing emissions this decade, mobilising finance, and adapting to our changing world.

COP26 logistical preparations are well established and we have a robust governance structure, involving close cooperation between Scottish, wider UK and international partners to ensure we host a safe and secure event that meets our objectives. Our preparations include a thorough risk assessment and mitigation plan along with a robust testing and exercise programme.

In terms of COVID, the COP26 unit has been working closely with public health officials, the Scottish Government, the WHO, the UNFCCC and all our partners to create a comprehensive set of COVID mitigations to ensure preparedness for the conference - the safety of participants and the local population is at the heart of all our planning. This includes a specific test, trace and protect regime, social distancing, enhanced ventilation, face coverings and vaccinations.

7th Sep 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they plan to take to ensure that sufficient progress is made on strengthening climate adaptation and resilience ahead of COP26.

Driving progress to support vulnerable communities and ecosystems, adapt to climate impacts and build resilience to long term risks is a top priority for the UK’s COP26 Presidency. We are working with countries, civil society, businesses and local communities to deliver effective, inclusive adaptation action and to harness the vital power of nature in minimising climate risk.

We are focussed on improving preparedness for climate-related disasters, through a focus on enhanced early warning and early action systems; and supporting national adaptation planning - including a push for countries to publish an Adaptation Communication ahead of COP26 to outline current progress and needs. We are working to mobilise and advance adaptation action across all scales, through parties and non-state actors - including increased support to enable further locally-led adaptation. We are also working to increase the availability, efficiency and accessibility of adaptation and disaster risk finance from public and private sources - including through the Taskforce on Access to finance that was launched by the UK and Fiji at the Climate and Development Ministerial earlier this year.

9th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what progress they have made on preparations for COP26.

Planning for COP26 is progressing in all areas and we are continuing to work closely with the venues and our delivery partners to ensure that we deliver the facilities and logistics needed for the event, in line with the requirements outlined by the UNFCCC.

Alongside summit preparations, the COP26 President, ministers and senior officials have been engaging with a wide range of UK and international partners.

Last month, COP President Designate Alok Sharma initiated a comprehensive round of consultations with the chairs of all UNFCCC negotiating groups to complement his ongoing informal engagement with international partners – which has included trips to Gabon, Ethiopia, Egypt and Nigeria already this year. And we continue to engage our international partners extensively at a technical level, as well as through our diplomatic network around the world.

25th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to work with trade unions in the global south on addressing climate change ahead of COP26.

The UK is committed to delivering an ambitious and inclusive COP26. We know that approaching our Presidency in a fair, inclusive and balanced way will lead to the most sustainable outcomes.

We will champion inclusivity throughout our COP Presidency and use our position as Presidency to empower and amplify the voices of those whose views are often most marginalised, addressing their needs and priorities in the run up to, and at the COP itself.

We are working with a diverse group of Friends of COP, leading figures from around the world who are sharing their expertise in support of a successful summit. This includes Sharan Burrow, General Secretary of the International Trade Union Confederation. We are also engaging regularly with the UNFCCC constituency focal points, which include the Trade Union non-governmental organisations.

29th Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to tackle race inequality in the workplace.

The Government’s Race Disparity Audit (RDA) and its website, Ethnicity Facts and Figures, was launched in October 2017. The website is world first and has been welcomed internationally for its open and data-driven approach to highlighting inequalities of outcomes.

In response to its findings, Government has taken action to increase diversity in employment.

This includes launching the Race at Work Charter which aims to increase ethnic minority representation in all sectors, and providing targeted employment support in twenty areas around the country with high rates of ethnic minority unemployment to boost earning potential.

In 2018/19, the Government consulted on options for exploring possibilities for employer- level ethnicity pay reporting. Following the consultation, Government met with businesses and representative organisations to understand the barriers to reporting. The Government is continuing to analyse this data and is committed to responding to the consultation by the end of the year.

In addition, this year the Commission on Race and Ethnic Disparities was established and is examining all aspects of continuing racial and ethnic disparities in Britain. It is building on the work of the Race Disparity Unit. The Commission is carrying out a deeper examination of what the causes of these disparities are, and is seeking to establish what works to address them effectively, including in employment and enterprise.

29th Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact of the Gender Recognition Act 2004 on trans people.

We want transgender people to be free to live and to prosper in modern Britain. We have looked carefully at the issues raised in the consultation, including the impact of the Gender Recognition Act 2004 on trans people. It is the Government’s view that the balance struck in this legislation is correct, in that there are proper checks and balances in the system and also support for people who want to change their legal sex.

We will make the gender recognition certificate process kinder and more straightforward. We will cut bureaucracy by enabling applications via gov.uk and will reduce the fee from £140 to a nominal amount. We know from our research that improving healthcare support is a priority for transgender people. That’s why three gender clinics will become operational this year, which should see waiting lists cut by around 1,600 patients by 2022 and why the GEO is providing funding for Dr Michael Brady, the UK’s National LGBT Health Advisor, and working with him and the NHS to improve transgender people’s experience.

28th Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the effectiveness of the Public Sector Equality Duty in respect of (1) undertaking, and (2) publishing, Equality Impact Assessments on Government policies.

The Public Sector Equality Duty (PSED) is a world leading policy that places a proactive equality duty on public bodies, and those exercising public functions, to consider the potential effects of key decisions on groups with protected characteristics. Government departments are each individually responsible for ensuring their compliance with the PSED.

Assessments of significant policy and operational changes are routinely undertaken by Departments and other public bodies as part of PSED compliance. There is however no statutory requirement to publish assessments and decisions on publication are a matter for the public body concerned, given the particular circumstances.

28th Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they have taken to address the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on BAME communities.

The Government has implemented significant measures to reduce the spread of the virus in all communities, especially for people who may be at higher risk. This includes ensuring that those in high-contact professions get targeted testing and translating key public health messages into different languages.

The Minister for Equalities, Kemi Badenoch MP, is also leading cross-government work on the findings of the Public Health England Report “COVID-19: review of disparities in risks and outcomes”. This includes reviewing the effectiveness and impact of current actions being undertaken by government departments and their agencies to directly lessen disparities in infection and death rates of COVID-19. She will shortly be submitting her first quarterly report to the Prime Minister updating him on progress with this work.

7th Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the effectiveness of the Crown Prosecution Service in ensuring access to justice for victims of crime.

Her Majesty’s Crown Prosecution Service Inspectorate (HMCPSI) is currently conducting a programme of CPS Area specific inspections to assess casework quality and treatment of victims and witnesses. These inspections have recognised some good work in what continues to be a very challenging environment. The CPS recognise that they still need to improve on their work with victims and witnesses and have commissioned a significant piece of research to better understand victims’ needs. The findings of this research will be used to inform their future work on improving communications with victims.

The CPS will also apply for special measures available to assist victims and witnesses to give their best evidence, this includes the use of court appointed intermediaries, screens and in certain cases pre-recording a victim’s evidence.

Lord Stewart of Dirleton
Advocate General for Scotland
7th Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to ensure that they act in accordance with the rule of law.

The freedoms and protections that we all enjoy rely on the rule of law. This is an important constitutional principle which this Government takes extremely seriously and which demands: equality under the law; access to independent and impartial justice; government subject to the law; law that is clear and certain.

The Law Officers have a particular role in respect of upholding the rule of law. I, and my fellow Law Officers, take that responsibility very seriously whenever we are called upon to provide advice.

Lord Stewart of Dirleton
Advocate General for Scotland
7th Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to improve the (1) effectiveness, and (2) efficiency, of the (a) Serious Fraud Office, and (b) Crown Prosecution Service, in tackling (i) fraud, and (ii) economic crime.

We are determined to make the UK a more hostile environment for all forms of economic crime – including fraud. As prosecuting agencies, both the CPS and SFO play a critical role in this aim and continue to deliver strong operational results.

We have strengthened our fight against economic crime through publication of a landmark Economic Crime Plan in July 2019, which brings together government, law enforcement and the private sector. We are making measurable progress in delivering the Economic Crime Plan with 34 of the actions complete and work well advanced on the remaining 18.

In 2020-21, the CPS prosecuted over 6,500 defendants for Fraud with an 85.6% conviction rate. The SFO successfully secured orders requiring the payment by defendants of almost £1.3 billion to the taxpayer over the past five years.

Lord Stewart of Dirleton
Advocate General for Scotland
7th Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they have taken to increase the number of prosecutions for offences relating to violence against women and girls.

Tackling offending against women and girls is a priority for this Government, as shown by the introduction of the landmark Domestic Abuse (DA) Act.

The CPS is working hard to deliver justice and protect the public and has recently published an ambitious 12-month domestic abuse programme to help narrow the disparity between reporting and criminal justice outcomes.

Rape and serious sexual offences can also disproportionately affect women and girls. The CPS is committed to securing justice in every possible rape case, which means significantly increasing the number they bring to court, year on year. It is improving collaboration with police and other partners to take an offender-centric approach to building these cases, expanding its specialist RASSO units and improving the support it gives rape victims.

The Ministry of Justice are investing £27m to create 700 new posts for Independent Domestic Violence Advisors and Independent Sexual Violence Advisors, and that figure will increase to 1000 by the end of 2024/2025. In order to support victims throughout the criminal justice process.

Lord Stewart of Dirleton
Advocate General for Scotland
11th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to increase the prosecution rate for rape.

The stark drop in the number of cases that have gone before a jury in recent years means too few victims are seeing justice. Closing the gap between reports of rape and prosecutions is an absolute priority for this Government. The CPS are undertaking extensive work to drive up and improve prosecutions through the Joint National RASSO Action Plan with the police, RASSO 2025, and the Operation Soteria pathways, which are currently underway in five CPS Areas.

Work already delivered by the CPS includes the publication of a National Independent Sexual Violence Adviser (ISVA) Framework outlining baseline standards around the CPS’ work with ISVAs, the publication of a memorandum of understanding with the police on seeking early advice to support effective and efficient decision-making in rape cases, and the publication of a digital walk through, which explains for victims the process of a criminal trial.

Lord Stewart of Dirleton
Advocate General for Scotland
7th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to improve the rate at which perpetrators of crime are charged in the criminal justice system.

The decision to charge suspects in England and Wales with criminal offences is made either by the police or by the CPS depending on the nature of the offence involved. The CPS make the decision to charge in serious cases but over the last five years the police have made the charging decision in 61% to 63% of the cases that are prosecuted by the CPS. In cases in which the CPS make the decision to charge, the CPS had a charging rate of between 74.5% and 77.7% over the last five years.

While the police and other investigators are responsible for conducting inquiries into any alleged crime and gathering evidence to inform a charging decision, prosecutors work closely with police during the investigation stage to assist with the building of strong cases. The recently introduced Director of Public Prosecution’s Guidance on Charging 6th Edition (DG6) supports this work to ensure cases are robustly prepared by police and prosecutors pre-charge.

This reflects aspects of the revised Attorney General’s Guidelines on Disclosure; both came into effect in England and Wales on the 31 December 2020.

Lord Stewart of Dirleton
Advocate General for Scotland
29th Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Neville-Rolfe on 27 December 2023 (HL1077), what level of Common User Charge was included in the modelling of the inflationary impact of the Border Target Operating Model.

In the Draft Border Target Operating Model (BTOM), published in April 2023 the UK Government asked industry to provide information on their readiness for the proposed regime. The questions included:

  1. What challenges exist for the private sector in meeting the proposed timeline for introducing the new model and how can specific business models for importing be further supported to prepare?

  2. What further detail is needed in order for businesses to prepare for and implement the new Border Target Operating Model?

A summary of responses from stakeholders can be found in the Final BTOM, published in August 2023. In response to stakeholder feedback on the Draft BTOM, we made a change to the timeline for the introduction of Sanitary and Phytosanitary (SPS) controls to give more businesses time to prepare. The Government is delivering a programme of engagement with stakeholders across all sectors in all parts of the country and with key European Union trading partners to ensure readiness. There are no current plans for further publications on industry readiness as such, although discussions with stakeholders continue.

However, we expect to publish the Government Response to the charging arrangements at government-run border control posts consultation in the coming weeks. Arrangements for physical checks for goods from the island of Ireland will be announced in due course - the UK Government is continuing to work with the Scottish and Welsh Government as well as the newly restored Northern Ireland Executive on this issue. We aim shortly to publish revised rules for importing animal products, plants and plant products into Great Britain for personal use, including those sent as post and parcels. All other supplementary guidance outlined in Annex H of the Final BTOM that was due to be published by end February 2024 has been released, and technical information surrounding the BTOM was issued in mid-February here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/border-target-operating-model-information-leaflets-for-businesses.

With regards to live testing, traders, carriers and hauliers have been selected to take part in operational testing in conjunction with Defra and local Port Health Authorities and include a mix of large and smaller traders where possible. The tests vary according to route route, mode and commodity. Onboarding of traders into the testing regime, including some smaller businesses, is ongoing at this time with operational testing continuing in March and April.

Estimates for the Common User Charge were included in the modelling of the inflationary impact of the Border Target Operating Model. The government used a wide array of data to input into the peer-reviewed model, including commercially sensitive data sources. To publish only a partial picture would not be in keeping with statistical propriety.

Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
29th Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Neville-Rolfe on 5 January (HL1361), which businesses have been selected to take part in live testing; how those businesses were selected; and whether the businesses include a mix of large and small operators.

In the Draft Border Target Operating Model (BTOM), published in April 2023 the UK Government asked industry to provide information on their readiness for the proposed regime. The questions included:

  1. What challenges exist for the private sector in meeting the proposed timeline for introducing the new model and how can specific business models for importing be further supported to prepare?

  2. What further detail is needed in order for businesses to prepare for and implement the new Border Target Operating Model?

A summary of responses from stakeholders can be found in the Final BTOM, published in August 2023. In response to stakeholder feedback on the Draft BTOM, we made a change to the timeline for the introduction of Sanitary and Phytosanitary (SPS) controls to give more businesses time to prepare. The Government is delivering a programme of engagement with stakeholders across all sectors in all parts of the country and with key European Union trading partners to ensure readiness. There are no current plans for further publications on industry readiness as such, although discussions with stakeholders continue.

However, we expect to publish the Government Response to the charging arrangements at government-run border control posts consultation in the coming weeks. Arrangements for physical checks for goods from the island of Ireland will be announced in due course - the UK Government is continuing to work with the Scottish and Welsh Government as well as the newly restored Northern Ireland Executive on this issue. We aim shortly to publish revised rules for importing animal products, plants and plant products into Great Britain for personal use, including those sent as post and parcels. All other supplementary guidance outlined in Annex H of the Final BTOM that was due to be published by end February 2024 has been released, and technical information surrounding the BTOM was issued in mid-February here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/border-target-operating-model-information-leaflets-for-businesses.

With regards to live testing, traders, carriers and hauliers have been selected to take part in operational testing in conjunction with Defra and local Port Health Authorities and include a mix of large and smaller traders where possible. The tests vary according to route route, mode and commodity. Onboarding of traders into the testing regime, including some smaller businesses, is ongoing at this time with operational testing continuing in March and April.

Estimates for the Common User Charge were included in the modelling of the inflationary impact of the Border Target Operating Model. The government used a wide array of data to input into the peer-reviewed model, including commercially sensitive data sources. To publish only a partial picture would not be in keeping with statistical propriety.

Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
29th Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Neville-Rolfe on 5 January (HL1357), what information and guidance that the final Border Target Operating Model committed to publish remains outstanding.

In the Draft Border Target Operating Model (BTOM), published in April 2023 the UK Government asked industry to provide information on their readiness for the proposed regime. The questions included:

  1. What challenges exist for the private sector in meeting the proposed timeline for introducing the new model and how can specific business models for importing be further supported to prepare?

  2. What further detail is needed in order for businesses to prepare for and implement the new Border Target Operating Model?

A summary of responses from stakeholders can be found in the Final BTOM, published in August 2023. In response to stakeholder feedback on the Draft BTOM, we made a change to the timeline for the introduction of Sanitary and Phytosanitary (SPS) controls to give more businesses time to prepare. The Government is delivering a programme of engagement with stakeholders across all sectors in all parts of the country and with key European Union trading partners to ensure readiness. There are no current plans for further publications on industry readiness as such, although discussions with stakeholders continue.

However, we expect to publish the Government Response to the charging arrangements at government-run border control posts consultation in the coming weeks. Arrangements for physical checks for goods from the island of Ireland will be announced in due course - the UK Government is continuing to work with the Scottish and Welsh Government as well as the newly restored Northern Ireland Executive on this issue. We aim shortly to publish revised rules for importing animal products, plants and plant products into Great Britain for personal use, including those sent as post and parcels. All other supplementary guidance outlined in Annex H of the Final BTOM that was due to be published by end February 2024 has been released, and technical information surrounding the BTOM was issued in mid-February here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/border-target-operating-model-information-leaflets-for-businesses.

With regards to live testing, traders, carriers and hauliers have been selected to take part in operational testing in conjunction with Defra and local Port Health Authorities and include a mix of large and smaller traders where possible. The tests vary according to route route, mode and commodity. Onboarding of traders into the testing regime, including some smaller businesses, is ongoing at this time with operational testing continuing in March and April.

Estimates for the Common User Charge were included in the modelling of the inflationary impact of the Border Target Operating Model. The government used a wide array of data to input into the peer-reviewed model, including commercially sensitive data sources. To publish only a partial picture would not be in keeping with statistical propriety.

Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
29th Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Neville-Rolfe on 5 January (HL1358), why they do not plan to publish the readiness assessment for the implementation of the Border Target Operating Model.

In the Draft Border Target Operating Model (BTOM), published in April 2023 the UK Government asked industry to provide information on their readiness for the proposed regime. The questions included:

  1. What challenges exist for the private sector in meeting the proposed timeline for introducing the new model and how can specific business models for importing be further supported to prepare?

  2. What further detail is needed in order for businesses to prepare for and implement the new Border Target Operating Model?

A summary of responses from stakeholders can be found in the Final BTOM, published in August 2023. In response to stakeholder feedback on the Draft BTOM, we made a change to the timeline for the introduction of Sanitary and Phytosanitary (SPS) controls to give more businesses time to prepare. The Government is delivering a programme of engagement with stakeholders across all sectors in all parts of the country and with key European Union trading partners to ensure readiness. There are no current plans for further publications on industry readiness as such, although discussions with stakeholders continue.

However, we expect to publish the Government Response to the charging arrangements at government-run border control posts consultation in the coming weeks. Arrangements for physical checks for goods from the island of Ireland will be announced in due course - the UK Government is continuing to work with the Scottish and Welsh Government as well as the newly restored Northern Ireland Executive on this issue. We aim shortly to publish revised rules for importing animal products, plants and plant products into Great Britain for personal use, including those sent as post and parcels. All other supplementary guidance outlined in Annex H of the Final BTOM that was due to be published by end February 2024 has been released, and technical information surrounding the BTOM was issued in mid-February here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/border-target-operating-model-information-leaflets-for-businesses.

With regards to live testing, traders, carriers and hauliers have been selected to take part in operational testing in conjunction with Defra and local Port Health Authorities and include a mix of large and smaller traders where possible. The tests vary according to route route, mode and commodity. Onboarding of traders into the testing regime, including some smaller businesses, is ongoing at this time with operational testing continuing in March and April.

Estimates for the Common User Charge were included in the modelling of the inflationary impact of the Border Target Operating Model. The government used a wide array of data to input into the peer-reviewed model, including commercially sensitive data sources. To publish only a partial picture would not be in keeping with statistical propriety.

Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
29th Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Neville-Rolfe on 5 January (HL1358), whether they plan to publish (1) the questions posed in the business readiness survey, and (2) a detailed summary of the responses from businesses, for the implementation of the Border Target Operating Model.

In the Draft Border Target Operating Model (BTOM), published in April 2023 the UK Government asked industry to provide information on their readiness for the proposed regime. The questions included:

  1. What challenges exist for the private sector in meeting the proposed timeline for introducing the new model and how can specific business models for importing be further supported to prepare?

  2. What further detail is needed in order for businesses to prepare for and implement the new Border Target Operating Model?

A summary of responses from stakeholders can be found in the Final BTOM, published in August 2023. In response to stakeholder feedback on the Draft BTOM, we made a change to the timeline for the introduction of Sanitary and Phytosanitary (SPS) controls to give more businesses time to prepare. The Government is delivering a programme of engagement with stakeholders across all sectors in all parts of the country and with key European Union trading partners to ensure readiness. There are no current plans for further publications on industry readiness as such, although discussions with stakeholders continue.

However, we expect to publish the Government Response to the charging arrangements at government-run border control posts consultation in the coming weeks. Arrangements for physical checks for goods from the island of Ireland will be announced in due course - the UK Government is continuing to work with the Scottish and Welsh Government as well as the newly restored Northern Ireland Executive on this issue. We aim shortly to publish revised rules for importing animal products, plants and plant products into Great Britain for personal use, including those sent as post and parcels. All other supplementary guidance outlined in Annex H of the Final BTOM that was due to be published by end February 2024 has been released, and technical information surrounding the BTOM was issued in mid-February here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/border-target-operating-model-information-leaflets-for-businesses.

With regards to live testing, traders, carriers and hauliers have been selected to take part in operational testing in conjunction with Defra and local Port Health Authorities and include a mix of large and smaller traders where possible. The tests vary according to route route, mode and commodity. Onboarding of traders into the testing regime, including some smaller businesses, is ongoing at this time with operational testing continuing in March and April.

Estimates for the Common User Charge were included in the modelling of the inflationary impact of the Border Target Operating Model. The government used a wide array of data to input into the peer-reviewed model, including commercially sensitive data sources. To publish only a partial picture would not be in keeping with statistical propriety.

Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
19th Dec 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Neville-Rolfe on 23 November 2023 (HL180), what are the timescales for commencing operational testing with users of the border before changes are implemented; how users will be identified and selected to undertake the operational testing; and how they will ensure that the users are representative of the logistics industry.

Cross-government testing is mainly focused on the connectivity of systems aligned to the implementation of the physical checking regime in April 2024. The cross-government team, led by the Cabinet Office, has already begun its operational testing programme with a number of internal tabletop exercises conducted between October and December. These will help ensure that live tests will be directed towards key aspects of the end to end process. The programme is moving towards live testing with users which will take place between February and April, prior to the implementation of the checking regime at the end of April. We are in the process of identifying users through both engagement with industry and our colleagues in local government and the Port Health Authorities. Operational testing is about the full end to end process and will cover each aspect of the supply chain including traders, hauliers and carriers.

Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
19th Dec 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Neville-Rolfe on 23 November 2023 (HL180), whether they have undertaken an assessment of whether the Sevington border facility will have the required capacity for physical checks from 30 April 2024.

The Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs carefully reviewed the provision of Border Control Post (BCP) facilities in Kent. It is the UK Government’s intention that SPS checks on goods arriving through the short straits should be undertaken at Sevington Inland BCP. This will ensure protection of the nation’s biosecurity and reduce import burdens for trade whilst also managing operating costs.

A key part of the review was consideration of the required capacity needed for SPS checks in Kent. The Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs is confident that Sevington BCP has sufficient capacity to handle the volume of expected checks at the Short Straits, as set out in the Border Operating Model, with robust, dynamic, and effective operational measures ready to call upon if needed.

Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
19th Dec 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Neville-Rolfe on 23 November 2023 (HL180), whether they plan to publish an assessment of the state of readiness of (1) the UK, and (2) EU member states, for the implementation of the Border Target Operating Model.

The UK Government is prepared for the implementation of the Border Target Operating Model and is working with EU member states to ensure they are prepared ahead of implementation in three stages: January 2024 (health certificates), April 2024 (physical checks) and October 2024 (safety and security).

The Government has monitored preparedness of businesses in both the UK and the EU through a readiness survey which has attracted over 2000 responses. The Government has also engaged directly with EU based businesses through a series of overseas visits to meet industry figures and raise awareness of the forthcoming controls. The Government is engaging UK businesses both via existing business-government engagement routes, and, on the BTOM specifically, through a series of commodity-specific webinars.

The Government has engaged with the European Commission directly, and with EU Member States individually on a government-government level to ensure that EU authorities are prepared for the controls.

Whilst we do not feel it is necessary to publish a readiness assessment, we will continue to monitor preparedness and to support businesses as the Border Target Operating Model is implemented.



Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
19th Dec 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Neville-Rolfe on 23 November 2023 (HL180), what potential risks have been identified as a result of the Government’s monitoring.

The Government has adopted a cross-departmental approach to identify and manage risks, including agreeing mitigations. I am chairing regular Small Ministerial Group meetings to ensure Ministerial oversight. Specific risks identified at present through cross-government monitoring include data monitoring availability, infrastructure readiness, West Coast checks start date, IT alignment, and the charging regime due for implementation once physical checks commence.

Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
19th Dec 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Neville-Rolfe on 22 November 2023 (HL136), whether they received representations from businesses and business groups that they would need all the information to prepare for the Border Target Operating Model at least six months or a year before implementation.

The Government initially published a draft model in April 2023. The purpose of the draft was to gather feedback from businesses to enable the Government to make changes based on their representations. Following this, the Government moved some of the implementation milestones in the final Border Target Operating Model in order to give businesses more time to prepare. The final Border Target Operating Model was published in August 2023 which gives businesses sufficient time to prepare ahead of the planned timetable. The first implementation milestone (health certificates) is at the end of January 2024, followed by a physical checking regime at the end of April 2024 and then safety and security checks in October 2024.

Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
11th Dec 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Neville-Rolfe on 23 November (HL183), whether they have undertaken an assessment of the potential impact of differing user charges at government run Border Control Posts and non-government run Border Control Posts on (1) traffic flows, (2) congestion, and (3) emissions.

Alongside other measures that are likely to have an economic impact on international trade, estimates for relevant user charges and fees - including the Common User Charge - were included in the modelling of the inflationary impact of the Border Target Operating Model.

We calculated the inflationary impact over a 3 year period through the academically peer-reviewed food price inflation model as its full effect on consumer food prices will not be immediate. As such, we have no plans for a formal review of measures introduced through implementation of the Border Target Operating Model one year after introduction. We will review the Border Target Operating Model in line with the Magenta Book guidance on evaluation and further announcements will be made to Parliament as and when required. The Magenta Book guidance can be found here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/media/5e96cab9d3bf7f412b2264b1/HMT_Magenta_Book.pdf

We have not identified any differential impact on traffic flows, congestion and emissions that might be caused by different levels of user charges.

Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
11th Dec 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the answer by Baroness Neville-Rolfe on 23 November (HL183), whether they plan to review the inflationary impact of the Border Target Operating Model once it has been fully in place for 12 months.

Alongside other measures that are likely to have an economic impact on international trade, estimates for relevant user charges and fees - including the Common User Charge - were included in the modelling of the inflationary impact of the Border Target Operating Model.

We calculated the inflationary impact over a 3 year period through the academically peer-reviewed food price inflation model as its full effect on consumer food prices will not be immediate. As such, we have no plans for a formal review of measures introduced through implementation of the Border Target Operating Model one year after introduction. We will review the Border Target Operating Model in line with the Magenta Book guidance on evaluation and further announcements will be made to Parliament as and when required. The Magenta Book guidance can be found here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/media/5e96cab9d3bf7f412b2264b1/HMT_Magenta_Book.pdf

We have not identified any differential impact on traffic flows, congestion and emissions that might be caused by different levels of user charges.

Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
11th Dec 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the answer by Baroness Neville-Rolfe on 23 November (HL183), whether the Common User Charge is being defined as a ‘tariff measure’ and therefore not included in its modelling of the inflationary impact of the Border Target Operating Model.

Alongside other measures that are likely to have an economic impact on international trade, estimates for relevant user charges and fees - including the Common User Charge - were included in the modelling of the inflationary impact of the Border Target Operating Model.

We calculated the inflationary impact over a 3 year period through the academically peer-reviewed food price inflation model as its full effect on consumer food prices will not be immediate. As such, we have no plans for a formal review of measures introduced through implementation of the Border Target Operating Model one year after introduction. We will review the Border Target Operating Model in line with the Magenta Book guidance on evaluation and further announcements will be made to Parliament as and when required. The Magenta Book guidance can be found here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/media/5e96cab9d3bf7f412b2264b1/HMT_Magenta_Book.pdf

We have not identified any differential impact on traffic flows, congestion and emissions that might be caused by different levels of user charges.

Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
9th Nov 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government whether they will repeat their modelling of (1) the inflationary impact of the Border Target Operating Model, and (2) the additional cost to be incurred by businesses resulting from the Border Target Operating Model, once a decision on a Common User Charge is published; and if so, whether they will publish any such further modelling.

The Government’s modelling of the inflationary impact of the Border Target Operating Model was based on an academically peer-reviewed food price inflation model and focused on quantifying the impact on relevant non-tariff measures - policy measures likely to have an economic impact on international trade as they affect the price or quantity of traded products. The food price inflation model is available here: https://ore.exeter.ac.uk/repository/bitstream/handle/10871/128070/Final%20Report_Defra_December%202021.pdf?sequence=2.

The non-tariff measures analysed included those related to checks (for example the cost of pre-notification, the cost of Export Health Certificates and port fees) as well as upstream impacts (for example administrative processing time, training, certificates of origin and security deposits or guarantees when moving agricultural goods under licence).

We used a range of data sources to quantify and assess the relative impact of the different non-tariff measures associated with the Border Target Operating Model. The data included commercially sensitive information that would not be appropriate to put into the public domain, and in accordance with the principles of statistical propriety we cannot publish a partial explanation that includes only the publicly available sources.

We will publish our plans for the Common User Charge shortly. The Common User Charge will apply to Government-run Border Control Posts in England and may be extended to include other Government-run Border Control Posts across Great Britain once infrastructure plans have been finalised. We do not expect to have to amend our calculation of inflationary impact following publication of these plans.



Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
9th Nov 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what assumptions they have made on the Common User Charge and charges to be applied at other Border Control Posts in (1) their modelling on the inflationary impact of the Border Target Operating Model, and (2) their modelling on the additional cost to be incurred by businesses as a result of the Border Target Operating Model.

The Government’s modelling of the inflationary impact of the Border Target Operating Model was based on an academically peer-reviewed food price inflation model and focused on quantifying the impact on relevant non-tariff measures - policy measures likely to have an economic impact on international trade as they affect the price or quantity of traded products. The food price inflation model is available here: https://ore.exeter.ac.uk/repository/bitstream/handle/10871/128070/Final%20Report_Defra_December%202021.pdf?sequence=2.

The non-tariff measures analysed included those related to checks (for example the cost of pre-notification, the cost of Export Health Certificates and port fees) as well as upstream impacts (for example administrative processing time, training, certificates of origin and security deposits or guarantees when moving agricultural goods under licence).

We used a range of data sources to quantify and assess the relative impact of the different non-tariff measures associated with the Border Target Operating Model. The data included commercially sensitive information that would not be appropriate to put into the public domain, and in accordance with the principles of statistical propriety we cannot publish a partial explanation that includes only the publicly available sources.

We will publish our plans for the Common User Charge shortly. The Common User Charge will apply to Government-run Border Control Posts in England and may be extended to include other Government-run Border Control Posts across Great Britain once infrastructure plans have been finalised. We do not expect to have to amend our calculation of inflationary impact following publication of these plans.



Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
9th Nov 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government whether they intend to publish (1) their full modelling on the inflationary impact of the Border Target Operating Model, and (2) their full modelling on the additional cost to be incurred by businesses as a result of the Border Target Operating Model; and if so, when.

The Government’s modelling of the inflationary impact of the Border Target Operating Model was based on an academically peer-reviewed food price inflation model and focused on quantifying the impact on relevant non-tariff measures - policy measures likely to have an economic impact on international trade as they affect the price or quantity of traded products. The food price inflation model is available here: https://ore.exeter.ac.uk/repository/bitstream/handle/10871/128070/Final%20Report_Defra_December%202021.pdf?sequence=2.

The non-tariff measures analysed included those related to checks (for example the cost of pre-notification, the cost of Export Health Certificates and port fees) as well as upstream impacts (for example administrative processing time, training, certificates of origin and security deposits or guarantees when moving agricultural goods under licence).

We used a range of data sources to quantify and assess the relative impact of the different non-tariff measures associated with the Border Target Operating Model. The data included commercially sensitive information that would not be appropriate to put into the public domain, and in accordance with the principles of statistical propriety we cannot publish a partial explanation that includes only the publicly available sources.

We will publish our plans for the Common User Charge shortly. The Common User Charge will apply to Government-run Border Control Posts in England and may be extended to include other Government-run Border Control Posts across Great Britain once infrastructure plans have been finalised. We do not expect to have to amend our calculation of inflationary impact following publication of these plans.



Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
9th Nov 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what contingency planning they have undertaken to manage any disruption to imports to the UK resulting from any potential problems with the implementation of the Border Target Operating Model.

Government departments are engaging with stakeholders across all affected sectors in all parts of the United Kingdom and the EU to ensure that they understand the coming changes outlined in the Border Target Operating Model and are ready to continue to move goods across the border. We have not identified any specific risk of disruption to imports to the UK as a consequence of the BTOM at this stage and will continue to engage with all parts of the supply chain ahead of each implementation stage.

In implementing this new control regime for the first time on EU imports we are carefully monitoring the range of potential risks, including those that may impact food supply-chains.

We are working with importers to try to manage those risks in a structured way, considering whether there are appropriate contingencies which we or they can deploy if and when required.

In accordance with usual practice, we will undertake a programme of operational testing with users of the border prior to the changes being implemented to ensure that any potential issues are identified and resolved. We recognise this new model for importing Sanitary and Phytosanitary goods will require some businesses and their supply-chains to adapt their business models.

Information is being shared through a series of live and virtual engagement events and communications outlining actions required as a result of the new changes. Guidance is available on GOV.UK.

Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
8th Nov 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of businesses' readiness to operate under the Border Target Operating Model.

The Border Target Operating Model was published in August 2023, setting out the timeline for import controls which will be implemented from the end of January 2024. The biosecurity and security reasons for these changes are set out in the Border Target Operating Model. The publication of the Border Target Operating Model gave clarity to businesses about which import controls will be introduced and when, and gave sufficient time for businesses to prepare.

The Government engaged extensively with stakeholders prior to the publication of the final Border Target Operating Model and in response to stakeholder feedback some of the implementation milestones were moved in order to give businesses more time to prepare. Stakeholder readiness for the implementation of the Border Target Operating Model has therefore been taken into account and prioritised throughout.

It is the responsibility of businesses who are impacted by these changes to prepare for upcoming controls. To help businesses with these changes, the Government is carrying out a comprehensive programme of engagement both in the UK and in the EU to ensure businesses understand the changes, and are therefore prepared for the new 2024 import controls.

The Government has not received significant feedback from stakeholders to suggest that they are not prepared for the introduction of new controls. The Government will continue to engage with and support business as the Border Target Operating Model is implemented from the end of January 2024.

Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
8th Nov 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government to what extent the planned engagement with stakeholders will inform a decision on readiness to proceed with implementation of the Border Target Operating Model from January 2024.

The Border Target Operating Model was published in August 2023, setting out the timeline for import controls which will be implemented from the end of January 2024. The biosecurity and security reasons for these changes are set out in the Border Target Operating Model. The publication of the Border Target Operating Model gave clarity to businesses about which import controls will be introduced and when, and gave sufficient time for businesses to prepare.

The Government engaged extensively with stakeholders prior to the publication of the final Border Target Operating Model and in response to stakeholder feedback some of the implementation milestones were moved in order to give businesses more time to prepare. Stakeholder readiness for the implementation of the Border Target Operating Model has therefore been taken into account and prioritised throughout.

It is the responsibility of businesses who are impacted by these changes to prepare for upcoming controls. To help businesses with these changes, the Government is carrying out a comprehensive programme of engagement both in the UK and in the EU to ensure businesses understand the changes, and are therefore prepared for the new 2024 import controls.

The Government has not received significant feedback from stakeholders to suggest that they are not prepared for the introduction of new controls. The Government will continue to engage with and support business as the Border Target Operating Model is implemented from the end of January 2024.

Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
18th Sep 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government whether they will publish (1) their full modelling on the inflationary impact of the Border Target Operating Model, and (2) modelling on the additional cost to be incurred by businesses as a result of the Border Target Operating Model.

The Border Target Operating Model (BTOM) outlines a pragmatic and phased implementation approach starting from January 31 2024, designed to give all relevant parties sufficient time to prepare ahead of its introduction.

We will continue to engage with and monitor the sentiment of stakeholders across all parts of the United Kingdom, affected sectors, and our trading partners around the world to ensure readiness for the phased introduction of our new model.

The Government will run a series of in-person and online engagement events, and publish guidance detailing actions required as a result of the changes on GOV.UK. For example, we will work closely with our key trading partners to ensure the capacity and availability of certifiers for Export Health Certificates does not become a barrier to trade.

To ensure our own readiness for implementing the Model, departments with specific responsibilities will run and end-to-end operational testing, working with industry to identify any issues and support a smooth transition for each phase of the Model.

The Model represents an estimated £520 million saving for all importers compared to the Model originally planned for introduction in 2022. The actual cost to business will greatly depend on how businesses adapt their business models and supply chains to integrate the Model. As outlined in the BTOM, we estimate the costs of the Model at £330 million per annum overall, across all EU imports, which is around 0.13% of the overall value of EU goods imports to Great Britain. We estimate the measures introduced through the BTOM would have a minimal impact on consumer food price inflation of less than 0.2% in total over a 3-year period.

In contrast, an outbreak of a major disease could have a much more significant impact: the 2001 Foot and Mouth disease cost £12.8 billion in 2022 prices, £4.8 billion of which was cost to Government and £8 billion cost to the private sector.

The Government ran a consultation on charges for Government owned Border Control Posts from 12 June to 9 July, including a call for views on our intention to administer a single Common User Charge for eligible Sanitary and Phytosanitary consignments at government-run Border Control Posts. The outcome of this consultation will be published shortly.

Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
18th Sep 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what contingency planning they have undertaken to manage any disruption to imports to the UK resulting from any potential problems with the implementation of the Border Target Operating Model.

The Border Target Operating Model (BTOM) outlines a pragmatic and phased implementation approach starting from January 31 2024, designed to give all relevant parties sufficient time to prepare ahead of its introduction.

We will continue to engage with and monitor the sentiment of stakeholders across all parts of the United Kingdom, affected sectors, and our trading partners around the world to ensure readiness for the phased introduction of our new model.

The Government will run a series of in-person and online engagement events, and publish guidance detailing actions required as a result of the changes on GOV.UK. For example, we will work closely with our key trading partners to ensure the capacity and availability of certifiers for Export Health Certificates does not become a barrier to trade.

To ensure our own readiness for implementing the Model, departments with specific responsibilities will run and end-to-end operational testing, working with industry to identify any issues and support a smooth transition for each phase of the Model.

The Model represents an estimated £520 million saving for all importers compared to the Model originally planned for introduction in 2022. The actual cost to business will greatly depend on how businesses adapt their business models and supply chains to integrate the Model. As outlined in the BTOM, we estimate the costs of the Model at £330 million per annum overall, across all EU imports, which is around 0.13% of the overall value of EU goods imports to Great Britain. We estimate the measures introduced through the BTOM would have a minimal impact on consumer food price inflation of less than 0.2% in total over a 3-year period.

In contrast, an outbreak of a major disease could have a much more significant impact: the 2001 Foot and Mouth disease cost £12.8 billion in 2022 prices, £4.8 billion of which was cost to Government and £8 billion cost to the private sector.

The Government ran a consultation on charges for Government owned Border Control Posts from 12 June to 9 July, including a call for views on our intention to administer a single Common User Charge for eligible Sanitary and Phytosanitary consignments at government-run Border Control Posts. The outcome of this consultation will be published shortly.

Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
18th Sep 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the readiness of EU vets for undertaking processes related to importing goods into the UK under the Border Target Operating Model.

The Border Target Operating Model (BTOM) outlines a pragmatic and phased implementation approach starting from January 31 2024, designed to give all relevant parties sufficient time to prepare ahead of its introduction.

We will continue to engage with and monitor the sentiment of stakeholders across all parts of the United Kingdom, affected sectors, and our trading partners around the world to ensure readiness for the phased introduction of our new model.

The Government will run a series of in-person and online engagement events, and publish guidance detailing actions required as a result of the changes on GOV.UK. For example, we will work closely with our key trading partners to ensure the capacity and availability of certifiers for Export Health Certificates does not become a barrier to trade.

To ensure our own readiness for implementing the Model, departments with specific responsibilities will run and end-to-end operational testing, working with industry to identify any issues and support a smooth transition for each phase of the Model.

The Model represents an estimated £520 million saving for all importers compared to the Model originally planned for introduction in 2022. The actual cost to business will greatly depend on how businesses adapt their business models and supply chains to integrate the Model. As outlined in the BTOM, we estimate the costs of the Model at £330 million per annum overall, across all EU imports, which is around 0.13% of the overall value of EU goods imports to Great Britain. We estimate the measures introduced through the BTOM would have a minimal impact on consumer food price inflation of less than 0.2% in total over a 3-year period.

In contrast, an outbreak of a major disease could have a much more significant impact: the 2001 Foot and Mouth disease cost £12.8 billion in 2022 prices, £4.8 billion of which was cost to Government and £8 billion cost to the private sector.

The Government ran a consultation on charges for Government owned Border Control Posts from 12 June to 9 July, including a call for views on our intention to administer a single Common User Charge for eligible Sanitary and Phytosanitary consignments at government-run Border Control Posts. The outcome of this consultation will be published shortly.

Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
18th Sep 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the readiness of (1) EU exporters, and (2) rest of world exporters, for importing goods into the UK under the implementation of the Border Target Operating Model.

The Border Target Operating Model (BTOM) outlines a pragmatic and phased implementation approach starting from January 31 2024, designed to give all relevant parties sufficient time to prepare ahead of its introduction.

We will continue to engage with and monitor the sentiment of stakeholders across all parts of the United Kingdom, affected sectors, and our trading partners around the world to ensure readiness for the phased introduction of our new model.

The Government will run a series of in-person and online engagement events, and publish guidance detailing actions required as a result of the changes on GOV.UK. For example, we will work closely with our key trading partners to ensure the capacity and availability of certifiers for Export Health Certificates does not become a barrier to trade.

To ensure our own readiness for implementing the Model, departments with specific responsibilities will run and end-to-end operational testing, working with industry to identify any issues and support a smooth transition for each phase of the Model.

The Model represents an estimated £520 million saving for all importers compared to the Model originally planned for introduction in 2022. The actual cost to business will greatly depend on how businesses adapt their business models and supply chains to integrate the Model. As outlined in the BTOM, we estimate the costs of the Model at £330 million per annum overall, across all EU imports, which is around 0.13% of the overall value of EU goods imports to Great Britain. We estimate the measures introduced through the BTOM would have a minimal impact on consumer food price inflation of less than 0.2% in total over a 3-year period.

In contrast, an outbreak of a major disease could have a much more significant impact: the 2001 Foot and Mouth disease cost £12.8 billion in 2022 prices, £4.8 billion of which was cost to Government and £8 billion cost to the private sector.

The Government ran a consultation on charges for Government owned Border Control Posts from 12 June to 9 July, including a call for views on our intention to administer a single Common User Charge for eligible Sanitary and Phytosanitary consignments at government-run Border Control Posts. The outcome of this consultation will be published shortly.

Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
18th Sep 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government when they will announce a decision on the proposed Common User Charge under the Border Target Operating Model.

The Border Target Operating Model (BTOM) outlines a pragmatic and phased implementation approach starting from January 31 2024, designed to give all relevant parties sufficient time to prepare ahead of its introduction.

We will continue to engage with and monitor the sentiment of stakeholders across all parts of the United Kingdom, affected sectors, and our trading partners around the world to ensure readiness for the phased introduction of our new model.

The Government will run a series of in-person and online engagement events, and publish guidance detailing actions required as a result of the changes on GOV.UK. For example, we will work closely with our key trading partners to ensure the capacity and availability of certifiers for Export Health Certificates does not become a barrier to trade.

To ensure our own readiness for implementing the Model, departments with specific responsibilities will run and end-to-end operational testing, working with industry to identify any issues and support a smooth transition for each phase of the Model.

The Model represents an estimated £520 million saving for all importers compared to the Model originally planned for introduction in 2022. The actual cost to business will greatly depend on how businesses adapt their business models and supply chains to integrate the Model. As outlined in the BTOM, we estimate the costs of the Model at £330 million per annum overall, across all EU imports, which is around 0.13% of the overall value of EU goods imports to Great Britain. We estimate the measures introduced through the BTOM would have a minimal impact on consumer food price inflation of less than 0.2% in total over a 3-year period.

In contrast, an outbreak of a major disease could have a much more significant impact: the 2001 Foot and Mouth disease cost £12.8 billion in 2022 prices, £4.8 billion of which was cost to Government and £8 billion cost to the private sector.

The Government ran a consultation on charges for Government owned Border Control Posts from 12 June to 9 July, including a call for views on our intention to administer a single Common User Charge for eligible Sanitary and Phytosanitary consignments at government-run Border Control Posts. The outcome of this consultation will be published shortly.

Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
18th Sep 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of their readiness to introduce the Border Target Operating Model.

The Border Target Operating Model (BTOM) outlines a pragmatic and phased implementation approach starting from January 31 2024, designed to give all relevant parties sufficient time to prepare ahead of its introduction.

We will continue to engage with and monitor the sentiment of stakeholders across all parts of the United Kingdom, affected sectors, and our trading partners around the world to ensure readiness for the phased introduction of our new model.

The Government will run a series of in-person and online engagement events, and publish guidance detailing actions required as a result of the changes on GOV.UK. For example, we will work closely with our key trading partners to ensure the capacity and availability of certifiers for Export Health Certificates does not become a barrier to trade.

To ensure our own readiness for implementing the Model, departments with specific responsibilities will run and end-to-end operational testing, working with industry to identify any issues and support a smooth transition for each phase of the Model.

The Model represents an estimated £520 million saving for all importers compared to the Model originally planned for introduction in 2022. The actual cost to business will greatly depend on how businesses adapt their business models and supply chains to integrate the Model. As outlined in the BTOM, we estimate the costs of the Model at £330 million per annum overall, across all EU imports, which is around 0.13% of the overall value of EU goods imports to Great Britain. We estimate the measures introduced through the BTOM would have a minimal impact on consumer food price inflation of less than 0.2% in total over a 3-year period.

In contrast, an outbreak of a major disease could have a much more significant impact: the 2001 Foot and Mouth disease cost £12.8 billion in 2022 prices, £4.8 billion of which was cost to Government and £8 billion cost to the private sector.

The Government ran a consultation on charges for Government owned Border Control Posts from 12 June to 9 July, including a call for views on our intention to administer a single Common User Charge for eligible Sanitary and Phytosanitary consignments at government-run Border Control Posts. The outcome of this consultation will be published shortly.

Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
6th Jun 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what contingency planning has been undertaken to manage any disruption to imports to the UK resulting from any potential problems with the implementation of the Border Target Operating Model.

The government published the draft Border Target Operating Model in April. This sets out plans to phase in security and biosecurity controls from 31 October in a way which implements critical protections at the UK border, while ensuring these new controls are as simple as possible for businesses to comply with.

We developed the draft document alongside the Scottish and Welsh Governments and officials from the Northern Ireland Executive, and continue to work collaboratively to design and be able to implement a model for the whole of the UK.

We are also working closely with businesses to get this right. During the engagement period on the draft model we have spoken to UK and international businesses and their supply chains to help them understand the new requirements and gather their views on them. We have listened closely to the feedback we received from stakeholders and are carefully considering what more we can do to support business readiness for the introduction of new controls before the final TOM is published later this summer.

We have also been working through our embassies across the EU to ensure readiness in Member States. The final version of the model we publish will respond to the feedback we have had and will set out further detail to support supply chain readiness.

While businesses will need to prepare for new requirements, we will continue to take a pragmatic approach to the introduction of border controls to ensure trade is not disrupted.

Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
30th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what recent steps they have taken, together with Her Majesty's Revenue and Customs, to help prevent disruption at UK ports during the Christmas 2021 period.

The Government has engaged extensively with ports and carriers to ensure they are ready for the end of staged customs controls. We are confident that arrangements are in place to ensure the continued flow of trade over the Christmas period.

​The Government has invested £470 million for new infrastructure to carry out customs and biosecurity checks, including £200 million Port Infrastructure Fund grants for ports to build infrastructure onsite and £270 million for Inland Sites.

12th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the Common Frameworks scrutiny process; and what is the expected date for completion of the (1) examination, and (2) final publication, of all Frameworks.

Parliamentary scrutiny is a key stage in the delivery of a Common Framework; Government officials remain in regular contact with relevant Parliamentary committees about this matter. The Government anticipates that frameworks will be made available for Parliamentary scrutiny in the Autumn and that the Devolved Administrations will follow a broadly similar timetable. The Government and the Devolved Administrations are committed to delivering Common Frameworks by the end of 2021. Following this, Common Frameworks will be kept under periodic review.

Lord True
Leader of the House of Lords and Lord Privy Seal
12th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have for further discussions with the Northern Ireland Executive regarding the need to complete their scrutiny of the outstanding Common Frameworks.

The majority of Common Frameworks intersect with the policy areas covered in Northern Ireland Protocol. Common Frameworks contain the governance structures needed to manage divergence arising as a consequence of new or amended EU law applied through the Protocol. Reporting on any divergence arising from the Protocol will be a matter for the relevant Common Framework-owning departments and their Devolved Administration counterparts to consider.

The Northern Ireland Executive has provided provisional confirmation for 21 Common Frameworks. Of the remaining 32 active areas in which a Common Framework is required, 28 Common Frameworks have now been provisionally confirmed and one has been fully implemented. Once sufficiently progressed, the Northern Ireland Executive will be sharing their Frameworks with the Northern Ireland Assembly to allow for Parliamentary Scrutiny in the same way colleagues across the UK Government will be sharing the provisionally confirmed Frameworks with the UK Parliament.

12th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, in relation to the Common Frameworks programme, what plans they have to support measures on reporting policy divergence between Great Britain and Northern Ireland through the Protocol on Ireland/Northern Ireland.

The majority of Common Frameworks intersect with the policy areas covered in Northern Ireland Protocol. Common Frameworks contain the governance structures needed to manage divergence arising as a consequence of new or amended EU law applied through the Protocol. Reporting on any divergence arising from the Protocol will be a matter for the relevant Common Framework-owning departments and their Devolved Administration counterparts to consider.

The Northern Ireland Executive has provided provisional confirmation for 21 Common Frameworks. Of the remaining 32 active areas in which a Common Framework is required, 28 Common Frameworks have now been provisionally confirmed and one has been fully implemented. Once sufficiently progressed, the Northern Ireland Executive will be sharing their Frameworks with the Northern Ireland Assembly to allow for Parliamentary Scrutiny in the same way colleagues across the UK Government will be sharing the provisionally confirmed Frameworks with the UK Parliament.