David Lammy Portrait

David Lammy

Labour - Tottenham

Shadow Lord Chancellor and Shadow Secretary of State for Justice

(since April 2020)
Speaker's Advisory Committee on Works of Art
12th Dec 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Ecclesiastical Committee (Joint Committee)
31st Oct 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Ecclesiastical Committee (Joint Committee)
28th Oct 2015 - 3rd May 2017
Speaker's Advisory Committee on Works of Art
1st Jul 2015 - 3rd May 2017
Speaker's Advisory Committee on Works of Art
18th Nov 2010 - 30th Mar 2015
Ecclesiastical Committee (Joint Committee)
26th Oct 2010 - 30th Mar 2015
Draft Defamation Bill (Joint Committee)
24th Mar 2011 - 12th Oct 2011
Shadow Minister (Higher Education and Intellectual Property)
12th May 2010 - 8th Oct 2010
Minister of State (Department for Business, Innovation and Skills) (Higher Education and Intellectual Property)
9th Jun 2009 - 6th May 2010
Minister of State (Department for Innovation, Universities and Skills) (Higher Education & Intellectual Property)
5th Oct 2008 - 5th Jun 2009
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Innovation, Universities and Skills) (Skills)
29th Jun 2007 - 5th Oct 2008
Minister of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport) (Culture)
10th May 2005 - 28th Jun 2007
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Constitutional Affairs)
13th Jun 2003 - 10th May 2005
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health)
29th May 2002 - 13th Jun 2003
Public Administration Committee
5th Mar 2001 - 11th May 2001
Procedure Committee
25th Jan 2001 - 11th May 2001


Select Committee Meeting
Wednesday 3rd November 2021
13:45
Department Event
Tuesday 9th November 2021
11:30
Ministry of Justice
Oral questions - Main Chamber
9 Nov 2021, 11:30 a.m.
Justice (including Topical Questions)
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Department Event
Tuesday 14th December 2021
11:30
Ministry of Justice
Oral questions - Main Chamber
14 Dec 2021, 11:30 a.m.
Justice (including Topical Questions)
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Note: This event involves a Department with which this person is linked, and does not guarantee their actual attendance.
Division Votes
Tuesday 26th October 2021
Judicial Review and Courts Bill
voted No - in line with the party majority
One of 165 Labour No votes vs 0 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 321 Noes - 220
Speeches
Tuesday 26th October 2021
Judicial Review and Courts Bill

My hon. Friend’s championing of these issues is so important. The cupboard has been stripped bare and a real crisis …

Written Answers
Tuesday 28th September 2021
Mother and Baby Units: Prisons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many mothers assessed as suitable to keep their baby with them …
Early Day Motions
Thursday 4th June 2020
Legal Aid and Advice
That an humble Address be presented to Her Majesty, praying that the Civil Legal Aid (Remuneration) (Amendment) (Coronavirus) Regulations 2020 …
Bills
None available
MP Financial Interests
Monday 4th October 2021
1. Employment and earnings
24 September 2021, received £5,015 via Independent Talent Group, 40 Whitfield Street, Bloomsbury, London W1T 2RH, for presenting five shows …
EDM signed
Monday 18th January 2021
Godfrey Colin Cameron
That this House is deeply saddened by news of the death of Godfrey Colin Cameron, a hardworking member of Parliamentary …
Supported Legislation
Tuesday 26th February 2019
Terms of Withdrawal from the EU (Referendum) (No. 2) Bill 2017-19
The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, David Lammy has voted in 245 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All David Lammy Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

View all David Lammy's debates

Tottenham Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petitions with highest Tottenham signature proportion
Petition Open
238
of 10,656 signatures (2.23%)
Petition Open
225
of 13,170 signatures (1.71%)
Petition Open
718
of 48,852 signatures (1.47%)
Petition Open
265
of 18,766 signatures (1.41%)
Petition Open
105
of 7,755 signatures (1.35%)
Petitions with most Tottenham signatures
David Lammy has not participated in any petition debates

Latest EDMs signed by David Lammy

14th January 2021
David Lammy signed this EDM on Monday 18th January 2021

Godfrey Colin Cameron

Tabled by: Chris Stephens (Scottish National Party - Glasgow South West)
That this House is deeply saddened by news of the death of Godfrey Colin Cameron, a hardworking member of Parliamentary security staff and member of the PCS trade union who passed away aged just 55 after contracting covid-19; extends our sincere condolences to his devoted wife Hyacinth, children Leon and …
139 signatures
(Most recent: 8 Feb 2021)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 117
Scottish National Party: 15
Plaid Cymru: 3
Independent: 2
Alba Party: 1
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
6th July 2020
David Lammy signed this EDM as a sponsor on Monday 6th July 2020

Enforcement

Tabled by: Keir Starmer (Labour - Holborn and St Pancras)
That an humble Address be presented to Her Majesty, praying that the Taking Control of Goods and Certification of Enforcement Agents (Amendment) (No. 2) (Coronavirus) Regulations 2020 (S.I., 2020, No. 614), dated 19 June 2020, a copy of which was laid before this House on 19 June 2020, be annulled.
18 signatures
(Most recent: 15 Sep 2020)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 18
View All David Lammy's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by David Lammy, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.



174 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
12th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when he plans to respond to the letter from the hon. Member for Tottenham of 2 October 2020 on school funding.

I can confirm that a response to the letter dated 2 October 2020 has been sent to the hon. Member for Tottenham.

23rd Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what proportion of teachers employed by the state sector are non-UK EU nationals.

The Migration Advisory Committee’s report, ‘A full review of the Shortage Occupation List (May 2019)’, estimated that around 4% of secondary school teachers and around 2% of primary and nursery school teachers were born in the EEA (excluding the UK).

The Department publishes data on the nationality of Initial Teacher Training (ITT) trainees. In 2019-20, there were 28,859 postgraduate new entrants to ITT whose nationality was known (98% of all postgraduate new entrants). Of these, 5% (1,484) were EEA nationals (excluding the UK). This is the same proportion as in academic years 2018-19, 2017-18, and 2016-17.

23rd Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what effect the end of the transition period will have on UK students studying at universities in EU member states.

​The UK Government has negotiated a deal which allows us to leave the EU without disruption on 31 January 2020. Under the Withdrawal Agreement, EU rules and regulations will continue to apply in the UK during the transition period until 31 December 2020. Throughout the duration of the transition period UK students studying in the EU will be able to continue their studies as they do now.

Our future relationship with the EU will be negotiated during this transition period. Protecting the rights of both UK Nationals in the EU and EU citizens in the UK is an absolute priority for this government, and it is of mutual interest to both the UK and the EU to agree a future partnership that helps to create a new generation of globally mobile, culturally agile people who can succeed in an increasingly global marketplace.

This is supported by the new Political Agreement, published in October 2019, which makes clear that the UK remains committed to exploring ongoing cooperation with the EU on education, science and innovation.

23rd Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how many trade negotiators are employed by her Department.

I refer the Rt Hon Member for Tottenham to the answer I gave to the Hon Member for Dundee East on 23 January 2020, UIN: 5362.

Conor Burns
Minister of State (Northern Ireland Office)
23rd Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how many bilateral trade deals the Government will be able to sign on 1 February 2020.

We have an ambitious programme to maximise the opportunities of leaving the EU on the 31 January, including Free Trade Agreements (FTAs), championing the WTO and rules-based system, and securing market access wins. The government has a manifesto commitment to have free trade agreements with countries covering 80% of UK trade within 3 years of leaving the EU. This includes negotiating FTAs with the US, Australia, New Zealand and Japan in parallel to negotiations with the EU. We are planning to launch rest of world trade negotiations as soon as possible after we leave the EU.

Conor Burns
Minister of State (Northern Ireland Office)
22nd Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will meet the hon. Member for Tottenham to discuss (a) the funding of the Tottenham Hale link bridge and (b) correspondence from that hon, Member dated (i) 27 February and (ii) 25 June 2020.

My door is always open for the Hon Gentleman and my office will hopefully have contacted his to arrange such a meeting before this answer is published.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
30th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how much NHS trusts have spent on legal representation, preparation and counsel for coroner's inquests in each year since 2013.

Information on the total spend by National Health Service trusts regarding coroner’s inquests is not collated or held centrally. However, NHS Resolution, which handles clinical negligence claims for NHS bodies in England, has provided the following annual figures for inquest payments it has made on behalf of trusts as part of managing their clinical negligence claims.

Inquest payments

Financial year

Total

2013/14

£907,055

2014/15

£138,879

2015/16

£3,022,924

2016/17

£1,340,977

2017/18

£1,684,258

2018/19

£2,968,153

2019/20

£2,223,580

Grand Total

£12,285,826

Payments were made by NHS Resolution in accordance the rules of the Clinical Negligence Scheme for Trusts to support trusts at inquests and for associated costs to investigate entitlement to compensation. NHS Resolution has no involvement in any arrangements that an individual trust might make outside of the scheme.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
29th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many prisoners have been taken to hospital as a result of covid-19; and how many are being ventilated.

We do not hold information in the format requested.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
23rd Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many patients were able to access medicinal cannabis on the NHS in each month in 2019.

The NHS Business Services Authority does not hold information on the number of patients able to access medicinal cannabis on the National Health Service, and therefore this information is not held centrally.

I refer the hon Member to the answer I gave to the hon. Member for Inverclyde (Ronnie Cowan MP) on 23 January 2020 to Question 3830, which provides data on the number of cannabis-based medicines prescribed on an NHS prescription, dispensed in the community and submitted to the NHS Business Services Authority for reimbursement between January and October 2019 (October 2019 was the most recent dispensing data held at the time of production held the time of answering the question).

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
23rd Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many migrants from EU countries have been employed by the NHS in London in each year from 2015 to date.

NHS Digital publishes Hospital and Community Health Services workforce statistics for England. These include staff working in hospital trusts and clinical commissioning groups, but not staff working in primary care, local authorities or other providers.

The following table shows the number of non-United Kingdom European Union nationals employed in the National Health Service in England and London as at September 2019, latest available data and each year since 2015, headcount.

-

September 2015

September 2016

September 2017

September 2018

September 2019

England

52,808

59,796

61,974

63,484

65,992

London

17,732

19,567

20,395

20,782

21,464

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
23rd Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many migrants from EU countries have been employed by the NHS in England in each year from 2015 to date.

NHS Digital publishes Hospital and Community Health Services workforce statistics for England. These include staff working in hospital trusts and clinical commissioning groups, but not staff working in primary care, local authorities or other providers.

The following table shows the number of non-United Kingdom European Union nationals employed in the National Health Service in England and London as at September 2019, latest available data and each year since 2015, headcount.

-

September 2015

September 2016

September 2017

September 2018

September 2019

England

52,808

59,796

61,974

63,484

65,992

London

17,732

19,567

20,395

20,782

21,464

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
4th May 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many (a) barristers and (b) solicitors have made applications to the Self-employment Income Support Scheme during the covid-19 outbreak; and how many of those applications have been accepted.

The Self-Employment Income Support Scheme claims service opened on 13 May 2020, ahead of schedule. At this time no such information is available.

4th May 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how much has been received by (a) barristers and (b) solicitors through the self-employment Income Support Scheme due to the covid-19 outbreak to date.

The Self-Employment Income Support Scheme claims service opened on 13 May 2020, ahead of schedule. At this time there have been no payments made.

23rd Jan 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the cost to the public purse of preparations for the UK leaving the EU without a deal.

On 1 August 2019 the government made £2.1bn available for the 2019-20 financial year, to support preparations to leave the EU without a deal. Some of this funding supported measures necessary to prepare for the UK’s future outside the EU, whether via a deal or “no deal”.

This provision was additional to the £4.2bn of “core” funding already provided by the government between 2016-17 and 2019-20, for departments and devolved administrations to prepare for Brexit in any scenario.

Rishi Sunak
Chancellor of the Exchequer
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will publish her Department's submission to the The Independent Review of Administrative Law.

As the Lord Chancellor said when he gave evidence to the Public Administration and Constitutional Affairs Committee on 8 December (https://committees.parliament.uk/oralevidence/1369/default/), the Government will publish the report of the Independent Review of Administrative Law. We will consider publication of submissions made to the Review consistent with the usual disclosure provisions.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
4th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when she plans to answer Questions 12829 and 12830 tabled on 5 February 2020 by the Rt. Hon. Member for Tottenham.

The responses for UIN 12829 and 12830 were asnwered on 10th June 2020.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
5th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when the serious violence taskforce is next planned to meet.

The Serious Violence Taskforce was established in 2018 to oversee the implementation of the Serious Violence Strategy. It last met on 26 June 2019.

The Government remains incredibly grateful for the work of the Taskforce which brought together Ministers, senior leaders and key partners. The Taskforce influenced additional action and investment in this area, for example through the creation of the new £200m Youth Endowment Fund, the consultation on the new duty on agencies to reduce serious violence and the launch of the Independent Review of Drugs Misuse.

The Government’s Manifesto set out an ambitious package of reforms to deliver on the people’s priorities and tackle violent crime and safeguard people’s streets and neighbourhoods. The Prime Minister and Home Secretary are driving this with a new cross-Whitehall Crime and Justice Taskforce to ensure we use every lever at our disposal to fight crime.

We will consider the future role for the Serious Violence Taskforce in delivering these priorities, within this context.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
5th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when the serious violence taskforce last met.

The Serious Violence Taskforce was established in 2018 to oversee the implementation of the Serious Violence Strategy. It last met on 26 June 2019.

The Government remains incredibly grateful for the work of the Taskforce which brought together Ministers, senior leaders and key partners. The Taskforce influenced additional action and investment in this area, for example through the creation of the new £200m Youth Endowment Fund, the consultation on the new duty on agencies to reduce serious violence and the launch of the Independent Review of Drugs Misuse.

The Government’s Manifesto set out an ambitious package of reforms to deliver on the people’s priorities and tackle violent crime and safeguard people’s streets and neighbourhoods. The Prime Minister and Home Secretary are driving this with a new cross-Whitehall Crime and Justice Taskforce to ensure we use every lever at our disposal to fight crime.

We will consider the future role for the Serious Violence Taskforce in delivering these priorities, within this context.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
23rd Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people received (a) police cautions and (b) criminal records for offences relating to cannabis in each of the last 10 years.

The Ministry of Justice publishes official statistics on the number of police cautions and court convictions issued for possession of cannabis offences. Data for the period 2008 and 2018 can be found here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/criminal-justice-system-statistics-quarterly-december-2018

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
12th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, with reference to the letter from the hon. Member for Tottenham dated 14 October 2020, whether he plans to provide a date and time for a meeting on the Tottenham Hale Village.

The Department has now received the letter from the Hon. member for Tottenham and a response will be sent shortly.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
23rd Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how many social houses are projected to be built in England over the next five years.

The Government is committed to increasing the supply of social housing and has made £9 billion available through the Affordable Homes Programme to March 2022 to deliver approximately 250,000 new affordable homes in a wide range of tenures, including at least 12,500 for Social Rent.

We will renew the Affordable Homes Programme, building hundreds of thousands of new homes for a range of people in different places.

23rd Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how many affordable starter homes were built in (a) Tottenham, (b) Islington, (c) Barnet, (d) Haringey, (e) Enfield, (f) London and (g) England in each of the last four years.

Starter Homes were a policy of the previous administration which they decided not to take forward.

Data on the delivery of different types affordable housing by area is published at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/live-tables-on-affordable-housing-supply

23rd Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what steps he is taking to increase the provision of social housing in England.

The Government is committed to increasing the supply of genuinely affordable homes. We have made £9 billion available through the Affordable Homes Programme, delivering approximately 250,000 new affordable homes to March 2022. Councils can bid into this programme to secure funding for new council homes. We also abolished the Housing Revenue Account borrowing cap and have given councils a longer-term rent deal for 5 years from 2020. The total number of households on local authority waiting lists is down by 37 per cent compared to 2012. 464,000 affordable homes have been delivered in England since April 2010, including 141,000 new social rent homes.

We will also fulfil our manifesto commitment to renew the Affordable Homes Programme, building hundreds of thousands of new homes for a range of people across the country and providing further stability for councils to build new social homes.

20th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many (a) probation officers and (b) Probation Service officers have left the service every year since Transforming Rehabilitation was announced.

The information requested, from 1st June 2014, can be found at: Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service workforce statistics - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

‘Transforming rehabilitation: a strategy for reform’ was published on 9th May 2013. The National Probation Service (NPS) came into existence on 1st June 2014. The Ministry of Justice do not hold Probation Officer or Probation Service Officers leavers data from the previous Probation Trusts’ for the period between the announcement on 9th May 2013 to the point the NPS was formed on 1st June 2014 or for Community Rehabilitation Companies from the 1st of June 2014 until the services unified in June 2021.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
20th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many mothers assessed as suitable to keep their baby with them on the prison estate were not able to due to a lack of mother and baby placements in the most recent period for which figures are available.

No mother has been denied a place on a Mother and Baby Unit (MBU) in the Women’s Custodial Estate due to lack of capacity since 2017, when current data collection commenced.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
20th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the average distance is for a woman placed in the prison system to their home.

As of 17 September 2021, a woman in prison was on average 46 miles from their origin address.

There are complex and wide-ranging issues involved in transferring and locating prisoners, and allocation decisions must reflect both the specific needs and circumstances of the prisoner, including their security assessment, as well as the operating environment and range of services at the receiving prison.

HMPPS is committed to ensuring, where practicable, that prisoners are accommodated as close as possible to their resettlement communities and families. Whilst this is a priority, it is not always possible due to a variety of factors including wider population pressures, or where women have specific sentence planning needs which can only be met at certain establishments.

Around 97% of prisoners have an origin location; i.e. addresses that are recorded in our central IT system. If no address is given, an offender’s committal court address is used as a proxy for the area in which they are resident. This information is included in the data provided above. Those with no recorded origin are typically foreign nationals or those recently received into custody.

The numerical information provided has been drawn from administrative IT systems, which as with any large scale recording system are subject to possible error with data entry and processing.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
7th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many prisoner-on-staff hostage incidents there have been in each year since 2010.

Hostage incidents within prisons are rare occurrences and HMPPS has comprehensive contingencies in place to resolve them as safely as possible. We have trained negotiators and intervention staff who provide a range of tactical interventions to establishments experiencing incidents of this nature. If an immediate threat to life is identified HMPPS has an agreed protocol with the Armed Policing Portfolio to hand over control of the incident, however we have not needed to call on the protocol since 1989.

The table below provides details of hostage incidents, broken down by victim type each year from March 2010 to March 2021. We publish hostage data in the HMPPS annual digest, therefore we are unable to release data for the period from March 2021 to March 22 until the data is released in July 2022.

Prisoner on Staff Hostage incidents

Year

Number

2010

0

2011

0

2012

2

2013

1

2014

3

2015

2

2016

3

2017

1

2018

9

2019

3

2020

0

2021

0

Grand Total

24

Note: These figures have been drawn from the HMPPS Incident Reporting System. Care is taken when processing and analysing the returns but the detail collected is subject to the inaccuracies inherent in any large scale recording system. Although the figures are shown to the last case the figures may not be accurate to that level.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
7th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what estimate he has made of the (a) number and (b) proportion of prison cells out of commission as a result of poor maintenance in each of the last 10 years.

Over the past decade, prison capacity has been taken out of use both temporarily and on a longer-term basis for a number of reasons, including deterioration in the standard and condition of the accommodation. Accommodation is also taken out of use for essential maintenance and refurbishment. It is not possible, however, to provide a reasonable estimate as to which of these decisions was a result of ‘poor maintenance’.

We are investing £315m in capital funding over the next year to improve the condition of the existing estate. Some 1,900 places are currently out of use to enable this work along with more minor repairs. This will be supported by 1,000 temporary cells which can accommodate prisoners during maintenance and refurbishment work.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
7th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the ethnic breakdown is of people held on remand in each year since 2010.

The decision to remand an individual in custody or to grant bail is solely a matter for the courts acting in accordance with the Bail Act 1976 and the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders (LASPO) Act 2012, which provides a framework of remand in custody and creates a presumption in favour of bail for all defendants involved in criminal proceedings.

The Ministry of Justice holds information for remand outcomes broken down by ethnicity in the Magistrates’ and Crown Court at the following links:

Remand Population and Total Population by Ethnicity in England and Wales 2015-2020

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/1006270/Population_30June2021_Annual.ods

Remand Population by Magistrates Court

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/987718/remands-magistrates-court-tool-2020.xlsx

Remand Population by Crown Court

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/987720/remands-crown-court-tool-2020.xlsx

Research by the Youth Justice Board on Ethnic disproportionality in remand and sentencing in the youth justice system was published on 21 January 2021 and can be accessed via the following link:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/952483/Ethnic_disproportionality_in_remand_and_sentencing_in_the_youth_justice_system.pdf

Routine Youth Justice Statistics 2019/2020 released on 28th January show remand broken down by ethnicity: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/youth-justice-statistics-2019-to-2020

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
7th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many prison staff were dismissed for conducting inappropriate relationships with prisoners in each year since 2010.

HM Prison and Probation Service has conduct and discipline policies in place which set out the minimum standards of conduct expected of all civil servants. Staff must exercise particular care to ensure that their dealings with prisoners, former prisoners and their friends and relations are not open to abuse, misrepresentation or exploitation. Staff relationships with prisoners must be professional at all times, and the HMPPS Counter Corruption Unit proactively follows up on intelligence to detect and investigate potentially inappropriate relationships.

The table below shows the number of prison staff dismissed after conduct and discipline action due to inappropriate relationships with a prisoner/ex-prisoner from the years 2009/10 to 2019/20. The figure for 2020/21 will be available in November following publication of the 2020/21 HMPPS Staff Equalities Report.

Table 1: Prison staff1 dismissed2 after conduct and discipline3 action for inappropriate relationship with a prisoner / ex-prisoner 44, for years 2009/10 to 2019/20

2009-10

2010-11

2011-12

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

2019/20

Prison staff dismissed due to inappropriate relationship with a prisoner / ex-prisoner

13

15

6

8

11

9

9

3

7

13

8

Notes to tables:

1. Prison Staff relates to anyone working in HM Prison Service or the Youth Custody Service (YCS). Therefore it excludes anyone working in HQ or National Probation Service.

2. Information on the outcomes of any appeal is not included.

3. Conduct and discipline cases are defined as where a penalty has been imposed on a member of HMPPS staff for a reason of conduct

4. Staff subject to at least one conduct and discipline that was concluded during the year. If an individual had multiple charges then they will be counted only once.

5. Figures for 2020/21 will be published on 25 November 2021 in Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) Annual Staff Equalities Report.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
7th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many (a) knives, (b) guns, (c) other weapons and (d) illicit substances were seized from people visiting prisoners in (i) total and (ii) each prison in each year since 2010.

The HMPPS Annual Digest for the relevant years, where available, contains information in relation to weapons and illicit substances found within the estate. It does not contain data broken down into different classes of weapon. There is no available data in relation to the proportion of finds attributable to individuals visiting the prison estate.

The Government takes seriously the conveyance of weapons and other illicit items and substances into prisons.

In August 2019, the Government committed to invest £100 million in prison security in an ambitious new Security Investment Programme. One of the aims of the Programme was to reduce illicit items entering the prison estate.

Since then, we have installed 73 X-ray body scanners across the prison estate and to date have had over 9000 positive indications. The roll out of Enhanced Gate Security (EGS), replicating the tough measures used in airport screening, has resulted in hundreds of illicit items prevented from entering prisons.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
7th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many (a) charges, (b) prosecutions and (c) convictions there have been for the offence of prison mutiny in each year since 2010.

The offence of prison mutiny, contrary section 1 Prison Security Act 1992 is committed when two or more prisoners, on the premises of any prison, engage in conduct which is intended to further a common purpose of overthrowing lawful authority in that prison. The offence is aimed at behaviour intended to make a prison, or part of prison, ungovernable.

The Crime in Prison referral Agreement was published in May 2019 and includes riots, serious disorder, including prison mutiny as offences that mandate a referral to the police.

Please see below for the information on (b) prosecutions and (c) convictions for the offence of prison mutiny in England and Wales in each year from December 2013 to December 2020. Data from 2010 – 2013 is not readily available and would require additional work outside of the timeframe for a response.

Values

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

Prosecuted

0

14

0

21

38

21

3

9

Convicted

3

11

1

1

5

8

16

13

Sentenced

3

11

1

1

5

8

16

13

The Ministry of Justice is not able to provide data on (a) charges for the offence of prison mutiny; this information is not held centrally on the court proceedings database.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
7th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many domestic abuse survivors have had an application for legal aid denied in each year since 2010.

Legal aid is available to obtain an injunction to protect survivors of domestic violence. This is not subject to any upper means limit; applicants cannot be found financially ineligible for this form of support.

Save for the above, whether someone is a survivor of domestic violence is not recorded for types of legal aid for other categories of law, eligibility for which would be subject to the applicable means and merits tests.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
7th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many incidents of confiscation of the legal high known as spice there were in prisons in England and Wales in each year since 2010.

The HMPPS Annual Digest for the relevant years, where available, contains information in relation to the number of drug finds on the prison estate. The digest contains all available data on drug type and class.

The Government takes seriously the conveyance of drugs into prisons, including psychoactive substances. In April 2021 we published a National Prisons Drugs Strategy to reduce drug misuse in our prisons, in order to increase safety for both staff and prisoners, and contribute towards ensuring that prisons are places of opportunity and change for prisoners.

In September 2016, HMPPS became the first prison service in the world to introduce innovative mandatory drug tests for psychoactive substances. We have made it a criminal offence to possess psychoactive substances in prison and trained more than 300 sniffer dogs specifically to detect these drugs.

In August 2019, the Government committed to invest £100 million in prison security in an ambitious new Security Investment Programme. One of the aims of the Programme was to reduce the quantity of drugs entering the prison estate.

Since then, we have installed 73 X-ray body scanners across the prison estate and to date have had over 9000 positive indications. The roll out of Enhanced Gate Security (EGS), replicating the tough measures used in airport screening, has resulted in hundreds of illicit items being prevented from entering prisons.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
7th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many prisoners have (a) escaped from prison vans and (b) remain on the run set out by offences convicted and length of custodial sentence in each year since 2010.

A prisoner escapes when they are able to pass beyond the perimeter of a secure prison or the control of HMPPS escorting staff.

These offences are monitored closely to identify any trends and each incident is fully investigated to prevent future incidents and keep the public safe. Prisoners who escape or abscond can face extra time in prison.

Please see data below for (a) the number of prisoners who escaped from prison vans/vehicles and (b) remain on the run set out by offences convicted and length of custodial sentence in England and Wales from the 12 months ending 2011 to the 12 months ending March 2021. To note ‘vehicles’ includes all vehicles that an escape occurs from, not just prison escort vans.

Number of Escapes1 from Vehicles2, by main offence type at the time of escape, in England and Wales, 12 months ending March 2011 to 12 months ending March 2021

12 Months to March

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

Total

Offence Type

Violence against the person

2

1

1

1

5

Robbery

1

1

1

1

1

5

Theft offences

1

1

1

3

Miscellaneous crimes against society

1

1

Summary non-motoring

1

1

Offence not recorded3

2

2

2

2

1

1

1

11

Total

0

6

2

5

4

0

2

3

3

0

1

26

Note:

1 There were 26 escapes from vehicles between April 2010 and March 2021. None of the escapees currently remain at large as a result of these incidents.

2 "Vehicles" includes all vehicles that an escape occurred from, not just prison escort vans.

3 Escapees who were untried at the time of the escape have there offence not recorded as they were not convicted at the time of the incident.

Data Sources and Quality:

These figures have been drawn from the prison-NOMIS and HMPPS Incident Reporting System. Care is taken when processing and analysing returns but the detail is subject to the inaccuracies inherent in any large scale recording system. Although shown to the last case, the figures may not be accurate to that level.

Number of Escapes1 from Vehicles2 by custody type3,4,5 in England and Wales, 12 months ending March 2011 to 12 months ending March 2021

12 months to March

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

Total

Total

6

2

5

4

2

3

3

1

26

Remand

1

2

3

3

1

1

1

1

13

Untried

1

2

2

2

1

1

1

10

Convicted unsentenced

1

1

1

3

Sentenced

4

2

1

1

2

1

11

Determinate sentence

2

1

1

4

Less than 6 months

1

1

6 months

1

1

Greater than 6 months to less than 12 months

0

12 months to less than 4 years

1

1

4 years or more

1

1

Indeterminate Sentences

2

1

3

IPP

2

2

Life

1

1

Recalls

2

1

1

4

Not recorded/unknown

1

1

2

Notes

1 There were 26 escapes from vehicles between April 2010 and March 2021. None of the escapees currently remain at large as a result of these incidents.

2 Vehicles includes all vehicles that an escape occurred from, not just prison escort vans.

3 This table shows the custody type and judicially impose sentence length for the prisoner at the time of the incident.

4 As administrative data is used to extract this informaiton, it is not possible to calculate the amount of time the prisoner has or will serve in custody. Where an individual has been sentenced, the judiciall imposed sentence length covers the full sentence length (in days) given to the prisoner, including any time spent on probation after the custodial part of the sentence has been served.

5 Data pre-2015 was taken from a different data source, and as such is not directly comparable with data for 2015 onwards.

Data Sources and Quality:

These figures have been drawn from the prison-NOMIS and HMPPS Incident Reporting System. Care is taken when processing and analysing returns but the detail is subject to the inaccuracies inherent in any large scale recording system. Although shown to the last case, the figures may not be accurate to that level.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
7th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the longest waiting time was between (a) an application for an employment tribunal and (b) the date of the first hearing in each of the last 10 years.

Period

The maximum time (weeks) from receipt to first hearing

Single Claims 1

Multiple Claims 2

1st April 2020 - 31st March 2021

685

743

1st April 2019 - 31st March 2020

528

629

1st April 2018 - 31st March 2019

560

407

1st April 2017 - 31st March 2018

406

682

1st April 2016 - 31st March 2017

330

704

1st April 2015 - 31st March 2016

1063

530

1st April 2014- 31st March 2015

374

426

1st April 2013 - 31st March 2014

953

390

1st April 2012 - 31st March 2013

281

573

1st April 2011 - 31st March 2012

869

865

The figures in the table are high but could be attributed to a handful of cases which have been incorrectly recorded. We are unable to do a manual check as files are only retained for twelve months.

NOTES relating to the above data.

1 Single claims are made by a sole employee/worker, relating to alleged breaches of employment rights.

2 Multiple claims are where two or more people bring proceedings arising out of the same facts, usually against a common employer. In this instance the lead multiple claim would be listed for hearing. This table provides the maximum listing time for both single and lead multiple claim cases.

Data is taken from a live management information system and can change over time. Data provided is management information and therefore not subject to the same level of checks as official statistics.

The data provided is the most recent available and for that reason might differ from any previously published information.

Data has not been cross referenced with case files.

Although care is taken when processing and analysing the data, the details are subject to inaccuracies inherent in any large-scale case management system and is the best data that is available.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
7th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, which courts that have been closed since 2010 have yet to be sold; and what the cost to the Government has been of each of those court premises since they were closed.

The table below provides a list of former court buildings which are closed and unsold. Three of these buildings are currently being used as Nightingale courts as a temporary measure as we recover from the impacts of COVID-19.

Court

Notes

Holding Costs since closure

Chichester Magistrates’ Court and Combined Court

Operating as a temporary Nightingale court since 6 April 2021.

£556,242

Chorley Magistrates Court

£275,984

Exeter Magistrates Court

£91,784

Fleetwood Magistrates Court

Operating as a temporary Nightingale court since 24 August 2020.

£123,041

Harlow Magistrates Court

£153,362

Hartlepool Magistrates Court

We expect these costs to reduce by c.£200,000 due to a service charge rebate.

£476,193

Maidenhead Magistrates Court

£391,241

Scunthorpe Magistrates and County Court

£432,597

Telford County Court

Operating as a temporary Nightingale court since 17 July 2020.

£252,115

Holding costs include utilities, rates, maintenance and security, and with the exception of the Nightingale courts, are from the closure of the court until 31st August 2021. For the Nightingale courts, holding costs are calculated until their date of temporary reopening.

We assessed all unsold former court buildings as potential Nightingale courts, but due to condition issues and operational limitations, only the three buildings noted were suitable.

The decision to close any court is not taken lightly. It only happens following full public consultation and only when effective access to justice can be maintained. Courts that have closed were either underused, dilapidated or too close to another court.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
7th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what estimate he has made of the number of asylum cases from applicants from Afghanistan (a) in progress and (b) awaiting trial in the First-Tier Tribunal (Immigration and Asylum).

The information that would allow this question to be answered accurately is not held centrally. HMCTS is working to clear the outstanding caseload caused by the pandemic and will ensure that there is capacity to manage any additional appeals that may flow from the state of affairs in Afghanistan.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
7th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how much his Department has spent with each company providing agency staff to his Department in each year since 2010.

The information requested for is provided in the attached Tables.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
7th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many victims of domestic violence have had an application for legal aid denied when applying for a non-molestation order in each year since 2010.

Legal aid is available to obtain an injunction to protect survivors of domestic violence. This is not subject to any upper means limit; applicants cannot be found financially ineligible for this form of support. Applications are subject to a merits test to assess their suitability for legal aid funding. Please note that volumes relate to applications for legal aid and not individual applicants; an individual may submit more than one application for public funding. Less than 1.4% of applications for legal aid for a non-molestation order were refused since 2010. Less than 7% of applications for an occupation order were refused since 2010.

Applications for legal aid for occupation orders and non-molestation orders:

OCCUPATION ORDERS

YEAR

APPLICATIONS

REFUSALS

2010-2011

715

27

2011-2012

524

21

2012-2013

600

35

2013-2014

208

15

2014-2015

215

8

2015-2016

243

13

2016-2017

354

27

2017-2018

301

25

2018-2019

373

44

2019-2020

332

42

2020-2021

321

32

NON-MOLESTATION ORDERS

YEAR

APPLICATIONS

REFUSALS

2010-2011

11,649

35

2011-2012

10,520

14

2012-2013

11,495

25

2013-2014

15,261

68

2014-2015

14,121

131

2015-2016

13,461

132

2016-2017

13,251

235

2017-2018

13,399

307

2018-2019

13,189

406

2019-2020

16,148

391

2020-2021

21,790

403

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
7th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many victims of domestic violence have had an application for legal aid denied in relation to an application for an occupation order in each year since 2010.

Legal aid is available to obtain an injunction to protect survivors of domestic violence. This is not subject to any upper means limit; applicants cannot be found financially ineligible for this form of support. Applications are subject to a merits test to assess their suitability for legal aid funding. Please note that volumes relate to applications for legal aid and not individual applicants; an individual may submit more than one application for public funding. Less than 1.4% of applications for legal aid for a non-molestation order were refused since 2010. Less than 7% of applications for an occupation order were refused since 2010.

Applications for legal aid for occupation orders and non-molestation orders:

OCCUPATION ORDERS

YEAR

APPLICATIONS

REFUSALS

2010-2011

715

27

2011-2012

524

21

2012-2013

600

35

2013-2014

208

15

2014-2015

215

8

2015-2016

243

13

2016-2017

354

27

2017-2018

301

25

2018-2019

373

44

2019-2020

332

42

2020-2021

321

32

NON-MOLESTATION ORDERS

YEAR

APPLICATIONS

REFUSALS

2010-2011

11,649

35

2011-2012

10,520

14

2012-2013

11,495

25

2013-2014

15,261

68

2014-2015

14,121

131

2015-2016

13,461

132

2016-2017

13,251

235

2017-2018

13,399

307

2018-2019

13,189

406

2019-2020

16,148

391

2020-2021

21,790

403

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people were prosecuted for committing an offence under section 5 of the Sexual Offences (Amendment) Act 1992 in each of the last 10 years.

The Ministry of Justice has published information on prosecutions under the Sexual Offences (Amendment) Act 1992 in England and Wales, up to December 2020, available in the ‘Principal offence proceedings and outcomes by Home Office offence code’ data tool, which can be found here:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/987731/HO-code-tool-principal-offence-2020.xlsx

Data showing the number of defendants prosecuted under section 5 of this Act, in England and Wales from 2010 to 2020 (latest available) can be found in the attached table.

The data supplied is a subset of published information from the Courts Proceedings database.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many meetings (a) he has and (b) Ministers of his Department have had with the operator of Rainsbrook Secure Training Centre since inspectors issued an Urgent Notification in respect of that Centre in December 2020.

Following the invoking of the Urgent Notification protocol at Rainsbrook Secure Training Centre (STC) last December, Ministers called an urgent meeting with senior representatives from the provider MTC. HMPPS officials were then instructed to deploy to Rainsbrook to scrutinise actions taken by MTC in response to the Urgent Notification. Subsequent meetings were conducted between officials, with regard to monitoring the Urgent Notification action plan. As this is a contracted service the YCS/HMPPS contract management and commercial teams have met internally and with MTC on a regular basis.

We ordered the provider to take the immediate action necessary to address the unacceptable failings at Rainsbrook, including a focus on ensuring all children in the Reverse Cohorting Unit had a suitable amount of time out of their room. Whilst inspectors acknowledged that this issue had been addressed, and that the Youth Custody Service had strengthened its oversight of the STC, a second Urgent Notification was invoked on 18 June following a full inspection of the centre with reference to separate serious concerns.

We have now transferred all children from Rainsbrook to alternative appropriate accommodation. Separately, we are also considering the future of the centre, with a further announcement to be made on this position in due course following conclusion of the current commercial matters.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many prison officers have been (a) reprimanded, (b) dismissed and (c) convicted for being in possession of prohibited items including drugs while on duty in each of the last 10 years.

The information requested is not held centrally and could only be obtained at disproportionate cost. To answer this accurately each individual personnel file held on each prison officer in post over the last 10 years would need to be examined. Most older personnel files are still held in hard copy format and would need to be brought back from storage.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, if he will provide a breakdown of the most recent (a) rape and (b) sexual assault (i) prosecution and (ii) conviction statistics by the ethnicity of the alleged victim or victims.

Due to a lack of data collected on victim characteristics, we do not have any rape or sexual assault statistics available on prosecutions or convictions by victim ethnicity.

However, I am able to provide data on the estimated prevalence rates of rape and sexual assault by victim ethnicity. This can be found at Sexual offences prevalence and victim characteristics, England and Wales - Office for National Statistics (ons.gov.uk).

Information on the ethnicity of the alleged victim or victims of rape and sexual assault offences is not centrally held within the court proceedings database. Overall information on prosecutions and convictions for rape and sexual assault offences in England and Wales, up to December 2020, is available in the ‘Principal offence proceedings and outcomes by Home Office offence code’ data tool, which can be found here:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/987731/HO-code-tool-principal-offence-2020.xlsx

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, if he will publishe the backlog of outstanding cases at the start of July for each year since 2010 in every Crown Court open in England and Wales.

The number of outstanding cases by Crown Court for each year since 2014 is currently published as part of the National Statistics publication ‘Criminal Court Statistics Quarterly’ in the ‘Crown Court cases received, disposed, outstanding tool’. The published data for the second quarters of these years reflects the outstanding caseload in Crown Courts at the end of June of those respective years. The most recent data can be found in Criminal Statistics Quartely January to March 2021 linked below:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/criminal-court-statistics-quarterly-january-to-march-2021

and the received, disposed and outstanding tool can be accessed here:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/996073/cc_rdos_tool.xlsx

This data is only available split by individual Crown Court back to 2014.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many persons convicted of rape have received a sentence of less than (a) five, (b) seven and (c) 10 years imprisonment in each of the last 10 years.

The Ministry of Justice has published information on prosecutions and convictions for rape and offences in England and Wales, up to December 2020, available in the ‘Outcomes by Offence’ data tool, which can be found here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/987715/outcomes-by-offence-2020.xlsx

In order to isolate rape offences, type ‘rape’ into the ‘Offence’ filter and select all results that appear (19C-19H). Rows 55 to 77 will display a range of values based on sentence lengths.

Rape and sexual violence are devastating crimes that have a long-lasting impact on victims. Provisions in the Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill, currently before Parliament, will ensure that all serious sexual offenders, including those convicted of rape, will be required to serve two-thirds of their sentence in prison if given a standard determinate sentence of more than 4 years.

It is regrettable that you voted against this.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
6th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the average fine given to an offender guilty of pet theft was in each of the last 10 years.

The government recognises the deep distress which the theft of a much-loved pet can cause. All reported crimes should be investigated and, where appropriate, taken through the courts and met with tough sentences. Theft is a criminal offence under the Theft Act 1968 and the maximum penalty is seven years’ imprisonment. The sentencing guidelines for theft, acknowledge that theft which causes emotional distress, or where the items stolen were of substantial value to the loser, regardless of monetary worth, will indicate a higher level of seriousness and the offender should be sentenced accordingly.

There are a range of offences under the Theft Act 1968 which could relate to the theft of a pet depending on the individual circumstances of the case. Centrally held information on theft offences does not identify if a pet specifically was stolen. The information may be held on court record but to be able to identify cases in which pets were stolen would require access to individual court records which would be of disproportionate cost.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
6th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what proportion of offenders found guilty of the theft of a pet received a custodial sentence in each of the last 10 years.

The government recognises the deep distress which the theft of a much-loved pet can cause. All reported crimes should be investigated and, where appropriate, taken through the courts and met with tough sentences. Theft is a criminal offence under the Theft Act 1968 and the maximum penalty is seven years’ imprisonment. The sentencing guidelines for theft, acknowledge that theft which causes emotional distress, or where the items stolen were of substantial value to the loser, regardless of monetary worth, will indicate a higher level of seriousness and the offender should be sentenced accordingly.

There are a range of offences under the Theft Act 1968 which could relate to the theft of a pet depending on the individual circumstances of the case. Centrally held information on theft offences does not identify if a pet specifically was stolen. The information may be held on court record but to be able to identify cases in which pets were stolen would require access to individual court records which would be of disproportionate cost.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
6th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many offenders were sentenced to four years or more for the theft of a pet in each of the last 10 years.

The government recognises the deep distress which the theft of a much-loved pet can cause. All reported crimes should be investigated and, where appropriate, taken through the courts and met with tough sentences. Theft is a criminal offence under the Theft Act 1968 and the maximum penalty is seven years’ imprisonment. The sentencing guidelines for theft, acknowledge that theft which causes emotional distress, or where the items stolen were of substantial value to the loser, regardless of monetary worth, will indicate a higher level of seriousness and the offender should be sentenced accordingly.

There are a range of offences under the Theft Act 1968 which could relate to the theft of a pet depending on the individual circumstances of the case. Centrally held information on theft offences does not identify if a pet specifically was stolen. The information may be held on court record but to be able to identify cases in which pets were stolen would require access to individual court records which would be of disproportionate cost.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
6th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many offenders were convicted of pet theft in each of the last 10 years.

The government recognises the deep distress which the theft of a much-loved pet can cause. All reported crimes should be investigated and, where appropriate, taken through the courts and met with tough sentences. Theft is a criminal offence under the Theft Act 1968 and the maximum penalty is seven years’ imprisonment. The sentencing guidelines for theft, acknowledge that theft which causes emotional distress, or where the items stolen were of substantial value to the loser, regardless of monetary worth, will indicate a higher level of seriousness and the offender should be sentenced accordingly.

There are a range of offences under the Theft Act 1968 which could relate to the theft of a pet depending on the individual circumstances of the case. Centrally held information on theft offences does not identify if a pet specifically was stolen. The information may be held on court record but to be able to identify cases in which pets were stolen would require access to individual court records which would be of disproportionate cost.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
6th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what proportion of pet thefts resulted in a prosecution being brought in each of the last 10 years.

The government recognises the deep distress which the theft of a much-loved pet can cause. All reported crimes should be investigated and, where appropriate, taken through the courts and met with tough sentences. Theft is a criminal offence under the Theft Act 1968 and the maximum penalty is seven years’ imprisonment. The sentencing guidelines for theft, acknowledge that theft which causes emotional distress, or where the items stolen were of substantial value to the loser, regardless of monetary worth, will indicate a higher level of seriousness and the offender should be sentenced accordingly.

There are a range of offences under the Theft Act 1968 which could relate to the theft of a pet depending on the individual circumstances of the case. Centrally held information on theft offences does not identify if a pet specifically was stolen. The information may be held on court record but to be able to identify cases in which pets were stolen would require access to individual court records which would be of disproportionate cost.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
28th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether his Department has carried out a risk assessment of the secure holding of CCTV footage filmed within his Department.

As has been the practice of successive Administrations, it is not government policy to comment on security procedures in government buildings.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
28th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether his Department permits (a) officials, (b) special advisors and (c) Ministers of his Department to access private email accounts from their office desktop computers, department-issued laptop computers or department-issued mobile phone devices.

I refer the Rt. Hon. Member to the Cabinet Office guidance to departments on use of private emails.

It is government policy not to comment on specific technical security controls; however, the incidental personal use of private email accounts from departmental systems is subject to our IT Acceptable Use Policy, in spare time.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
28th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether any departmental business has been conducted on private email addresses; and what mechanisms are in place to ensure that full records are kept of that business.

I refer the Rt. Hon. Member to the Cabinet Office guidance to departments on use of private emails.

It is government policy not to comment on specific technical security controls; however, the incidental personal use of private email accounts from departmental systems is subject to our IT Acceptable Use Policy, in spare time.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
15th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 20 October 2020 to Question 101946 on Prisoners: Babies, how many pregnant women have entered the prison estate since the death of a baby in HMP Bronzefield in October 2019.

We do not currently publish pregnancy data routinely.

As part of our fundamental review of policy relating to mothers and expectant mothers in prison, we have committed to providing national pregnancy data in future.

Further information on the review, including our findings and resulting reforms regarding data collection, can be found in our summary report published in July 2020:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/905559/summary-report-of-review-of-policy-on-mbu.pdf.

The tragic death of a baby at Bronzefield in September 2019 is subject to a number of ongoing investigations, including by the Prison and Probation Ombudsman. We will reflect any learning from the investigations in our new policy, which will be published shortly.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
14th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether his Department has referred any Freedom of Information requests received by his Department to the central Cabinet Office Clearing House on Freedom of Information requests for advice on handling, in the last two years.

I can confirm that the Ministry of Justice has referred a number of Freedom of Information requests to the Clearing House during the last two years.

Any FOI requests which are referred to the Clearing House are done so in line with the published criteria available on gov.uk. The Clearing House, which has been in existence since 2004, provides advice to ensure a consistent approach across government to requests for information.

The Ministry of Justice consistently receives some of the highest volumes of Freedom of Information requests compared to other Government Departments and has sustained performance above the Information Commissioner’s timeliness target of 90% for 43 consecutive months.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
7th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how much funding the Government has allocated to legal aid in England and Wales in each financial year since 2010.

The Lord Chancellor has a duty to ensure that legal aid is made available in accordance with the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act (2012), for cases where the relevant criteria, such as the financial eligibility of the applicant and/or the degree of legal merit in their case, is met, where applicable.

The Ministry of Justice works within HM Treasury allocations as shown in the Main and Supplementary Estimates (https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/hmt-main-estimates) each year. However, the nature of Legal Aid funding means that it is demand led, and as such the MoJ ensures sufficient allocation is made to cover the incurred costs.

Spend on legal aid since 2010 can be viewed at https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/legal-aid-statistics, which currently shows expenditure up to and including December 2020.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
20th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the backlog of outstanding cases was at (a) Teesside Magistrates' Court, (b) Teesside Combined Court and (c) Peterlee Magistrates' Court at the end of March in each year since 2010; and what the backlog of outstanding cases was at Hartlepool Magistrates' Court in each year since 2010 until that court was closed.

The information requested can be found in the tables below.

The first table represents the number of outstanding cases for Teesside Crown Court cases.

The second table represents the number of outstanding cases at Teesside, Peterlee and Hartlepool Magistrates Courts.

Teesside Crown Court cases are reported separately to Teesside Magistrates Court cases as they are different courts.

HMCTS refer to all cases as outstanding rather than a backlog. Strictly speaking, the data below provided below is thus based on outstanding cases and not backlog of cases. There will always be a ‘stock’ of outstanding cases based on the size of each site and mix of cases.

Teesside Crown

Trials

Sentences

Appeals

March 2020

497

133

50

March 2019

413

109

45

March 2018

435

82

24

March 2017

567

88

30

March 2016

604

77

30

March 2015

735

51

46

March 2014

702

77

28

March 2013

474

90

23

March 2012

457

67

16

March 2011

556

51

26

March 2010

615

63

28

Magistrates

Date

Teesside

Peterlee

Hartlepool

Mar-20

5,279

1,209

Mar-19

4,935

1,441

Mar-18

5,407

1,052

Mar-17

5,970

1,125

Mar-16

2,630

1,263

301

Mar-15

2,387

1,570

473

Mar-14

2,882

1,515

492

Mar-13

3,396

797

619

Mar-12

3,382

919

601

Mar-11

2,685

632

614

Mar-10

2,827

666

934

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
15th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, if he will publish details of any cases in which officials in his Department receive remuneration for paid work for organisations or companies outside of government.

On 23 April, the Cabinet Secretary wrote to the Chair of the Public Administration and Constitutional Affairs Committee on the management of outside interests in the Civil Service.

The Committee published this letter on 26 April. It can be found here: https://committees.parliament.uk/publications/5623/documents/55584/default/

The Cabinet Secretary’s letter sets out a series of steps to improve processes. This programme of work will also take account of any recommendations that emerge from Nigel Boardman’s review.

The Civil Service Management Code sets out, at paragraph 4.3.4, the requirement that civil servants must seek permission before accepting any outside employment which might affect their work either directly or indirectly. The applicable principles are those set out in the Business Appointment Rules. The Civil Service Management Code is published here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/civil-servants-terms-and-conditions.

Where the civil servant is a member of the departmental board any outside employment, as well as other relevant interests will be published as part of the Annual Report and Accounts or other transparency publication.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
24th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many cases have been transferred from the Magistrates' Court to the Crown Court in each of the last 10 years.

The Ministry of Justice has published information on the number of defendants sent to Crown Court for trial and sentencing in England and Wales up to December 2019, available in the ‘Magistrates’ Court’ data tool, which can be found here:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/888347/magistrates-court-tool-2019.xlsx

The pivot sheet shows the number of defendants sent for trial (row 27) and committed for sentencing (row 29) from the Magistrates’ Court to the Crown Court in each of the last 10 years.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
24th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many hearings were adjourned in (a) family, (b) criminal and (c) civil courts in each of the last three months.

The information requested is provided in the table below for hearings in the Crown Court and the magistrates’ courts:

Hearings adjourned in the Crown Court

October 2020

22,883

November 2020

21,630

December 2020

19,140

Hearings adjourned in the magistrates’ courts

October 2020

52,260

November 2020

43,840

December 2020

35,195

In the civil courts, we regularly publish data on hearings adjourned due to Covid-19 at the following link: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/hmcts-weekly-management-information-during-coronavirus-march-2020-to-february-2021. We have extracted the last three months of data in the table below. Data on hearings adjourned overall in the civil courts is not held centrally, and could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

Hearings adjourned in the civil courts due to Covid-19

November 2020

385

December 2020

177

January 2021

168

We do not hold data centrally on hearings adjourned in the family courts. Our case management system does record where a hearing has been vacated, but we do not hold information on whether this is because the hearing was adjourned, the case was concluded, or the hearing was not required.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
24th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many buildings currently used for Nightingale Courts will have their lease expire by June 2021.

Nightingale courts have provided a much-needed boost to the crown-court system, providing more capacity at a time of social distancing. As at 31 March we have 30 Nightingale courts open, providing a total of 60 courtrooms.

There are 19 Nightingale venues where hire agreements are currently due to expire at the end of June. We are exploring options to extend the leases in order to maximise the use of the court estate. We will continue to consider where Nightingale courts are needed for local operational reasons and we remain in close contact with the landlords of all existing venues.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, as of 12 February 2021, which (a) prisons or (b) Youth Offender Institutions have more than 100 suspected or confirmed cases of covid-19 among the prisoner population.

We have well-developed policies and procedures in place to manage outbreaks and infectious diseases. This means prisons and probation services are well prepared to take immediate action whenever cases or suspected cases are identified. Our measures so far have included restricting regimes, minimising inter-prison transfers and compartmentalising our prisons into different units to isolate the sick, shield the vulnerable and quarantine new arrivals.

Recognising the unique environment in prisons, we routinely test staff and offenders to bolster our defences against the virus, and conduct mass testing in outbreak sites – meaning we can identify more cases, isolate them earlier and move quickly to contain outbreaks and protect the NHS.

The below table shows the establishments which had more than 10 and 50 open positive cases as of 15 February 2021. Open positive cases are individuals who have tested positive and are either still in their isolation period or are still showing symptoms. Establishments that had more than 50 cases are not listed in the more than ten group, and no prisons or YOIs have more than 100 such cases.

More than 10 open cases

Altcourse, Bedford, Berwyn, Birmingham, Brinsford, Buckley Hall, Cardiff, Chelmsford, Drake Hall, Erlestoke, Gartree, Guys Marsh, High Down, Hindley, Lewes, Manchester, Moorland, Pentonville, Peterborough (Male), Ranby, Risley, Rye Hill, Stafford, Stocken, Stoke Heath, Thorn Cross, Wakefield, Wandsworth, Whatton and Wormwood Scrubs.

More than 50 open cases

Durham, Humber, Isle of Wight, Lindholme, New Hall, Oakwood, Verne, Wayland and Winchester

It should be noted that although care is taken when processing and analysing the returns, the detail collected is subject to the inaccuracies inherent in any large-scale recording system. Much of the data collected during the COVID-19 pandemic has been done at pace, with recording practices evolving as we understand more about the requirements and conditions we are facing. In order to present the timeliest information, the data presented in this table have not been subjected to the usual standard of quality assurance associated with official statistics.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, as of 12 February 2021, which (a) prisons or (b) Youth Offender Institutions have more than 50 suspected or confirmed cases of covid-19 among the prisoner population.

We have well-developed policies and procedures in place to manage outbreaks and infectious diseases. This means prisons and probation services are well prepared to take immediate action whenever cases or suspected cases are identified. Our measures so far have included restricting regimes, minimising inter-prison transfers and compartmentalising our prisons into different units to isolate the sick, shield the vulnerable and quarantine new arrivals.

Recognising the unique environment in prisons, we routinely test staff and offenders to bolster our defences against the virus, and conduct mass testing in outbreak sites – meaning we can identify more cases, isolate them earlier and move quickly to contain outbreaks and protect the NHS.

The below table shows the establishments which had more than 10 and 50 open positive cases as of 15 February 2021. Open positive cases are individuals who have tested positive and are either still in their isolation period or are still showing symptoms. Establishments that had more than 50 cases are not listed in the more than ten group, and no prisons or YOIs have more than 100 such cases.

More than 10 open cases

Altcourse, Bedford, Berwyn, Birmingham, Brinsford, Buckley Hall, Cardiff, Chelmsford, Drake Hall, Erlestoke, Gartree, Guys Marsh, High Down, Hindley, Lewes, Manchester, Moorland, Pentonville, Peterborough (Male), Ranby, Risley, Rye Hill, Stafford, Stocken, Stoke Heath, Thorn Cross, Wakefield, Wandsworth, Whatton and Wormwood Scrubs.

More than 50 open cases

Durham, Humber, Isle of Wight, Lindholme, New Hall, Oakwood, Verne, Wayland and Winchester

It should be noted that although care is taken when processing and analysing the returns, the detail collected is subject to the inaccuracies inherent in any large-scale recording system. Much of the data collected during the COVID-19 pandemic has been done at pace, with recording practices evolving as we understand more about the requirements and conditions we are facing. In order to present the timeliest information, the data presented in this table have not been subjected to the usual standard of quality assurance associated with official statistics.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, as of 12 February 2021, which (a) prisons and (b) Youth Offender Institutions have more than 10 suspected or confirmed cases of covid-19 among the prisoner population.

We have well-developed policies and procedures in place to manage outbreaks and infectious diseases. This means prisons and probation services are well prepared to take immediate action whenever cases or suspected cases are identified. Our measures so far have included restricting regimes, minimising inter-prison transfers and compartmentalising our prisons into different units to isolate the sick, shield the vulnerable and quarantine new arrivals.

Recognising the unique environment in prisons, we routinely test staff and offenders to bolster our defences against the virus, and conduct mass testing in outbreak sites – meaning we can identify more cases, isolate them earlier and move quickly to contain outbreaks and protect the NHS.

The below table shows the establishments which had more than 10 and 50 open positive cases as of 15 February 2021. Open positive cases are individuals who have tested positive and are either still in their isolation period or are still showing symptoms. Establishments that had more than 50 cases are not listed in the more than ten group, and no prisons or YOIs have more than 100 such cases.

More than 10 open cases

Altcourse, Bedford, Berwyn, Birmingham, Brinsford, Buckley Hall, Cardiff, Chelmsford, Drake Hall, Erlestoke, Gartree, Guys Marsh, High Down, Hindley, Lewes, Manchester, Moorland, Pentonville, Peterborough (Male), Ranby, Risley, Rye Hill, Stafford, Stocken, Stoke Heath, Thorn Cross, Wakefield, Wandsworth, Whatton and Wormwood Scrubs.

More than 50 open cases

Durham, Humber, Isle of Wight, Lindholme, New Hall, Oakwood, Verne, Wayland and Winchester

It should be noted that although care is taken when processing and analysing the returns, the detail collected is subject to the inaccuracies inherent in any large-scale recording system. Much of the data collected during the COVID-19 pandemic has been done at pace, with recording practices evolving as we understand more about the requirements and conditions we are facing. In order to present the timeliest information, the data presented in this table have not been subjected to the usual standard of quality assurance associated with official statistics.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many escapes there were from (a) prisons and (b) young offender institutions in 2020; and from which prison or institution those escapes took place.

Escapes from prisons and young offender institutions (YOI) are rare. On the rare occasions that they do occur, the prisoner, once returned to custody, is held in tougher conditions and faces further punishment.

Please see data below for the number of prisoner escapes in England and Wales in 2020 and the prison or institution from which the escape took place.

The data recorded is from April 2019 – March 2020.

Escapes 2019-2020:

From establishments – 1

From HMPPS Escorts – 1

In 2019, there was one escape from a prison establishment in the adult male estate HMP Channings Wood, a male Category C. The prisoner was later caught, returned to custody and received an additional sentence for absconding lawful custody. There were no escapes from YOIs in 2020.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many prisoners escaped from prisons in England and Wales in each of the last 10 years.

Escapes from prison are rare. Each and every escape is fully investigated and as part of this, any learning from the incident is analysed centrally to offer support to establishments. To ensure public protection prisoners who escape are held in stricter conditions when they are returned to custody. Please see data below for the number of prisoner escapes in England and Wales in each of the last 10 years. The data is recorded every year from April – March, for example, April 2019 – March 2020.

2010-11

2011-12

2012-13

2013-14

2014-15

2015-16

2016-17

2017-28

2018-19

2019-20

Prison

1

2

1

2

0

2

4

1

1

1

HMMPS Escort

1

2

0

2

1

3

3

3

2

1

TOTAL

2

4

1

4

1

5

7

4

3

2

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many times illegal drugs were confiscated on the HM Courts & Tribunals Service estate in the last five years.

The safety and security of court and tribunal users is paramount. HM Courts and Tribunals Service (HMCTS) has embedded a series of measures designed to keep its buildings, and the people within them (including staff, judiciary, contractors, jurors, and users) safe and secure. Among other things, security search on entry procedures are in place to ensure risks to personal safety are minimised. Details of the policy, including information on items not allowed into court and tribunal buildings are available online.

All illegal drugs discovered on court or tribunal users are confiscated and reported to the police. The data below includes that provided by HMCTS previous security contractors G4S and Mitie. G4S began recording numbers of drug confiscations in April 2017. Mitie began recording this in November 2018. Since April 2020 OCS has been HMCTS’ security provider. The numbers shown below relate specifically to the confiscation of drugs from persons on entry to court or tribunal buildings during ordinary security search procedures. Increased search procedures can take place when defendants enter into custody areas based on risk assessment and these can include a body search.

Financial Year

Drug Confiscations

2017/18 (G4S only)

364

2018/19 (G4S and Mitie-November onwards)

937

2019/20 (G4S and Mitie)

2988

April 2020 – January 2021 (OCS)

460

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what his Department's five largest outsourcing contracts are by (a) name and (b) cost of each to the exchequer.

The information requested is provided in the attached annex

The information provided is for the five largest contracts by total value over the lifetime of the contract.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many courts in England and Wales his Department plans to close in the next five years.

There are currently no plans to close any courts or tribunals beyond those already announced.

Recovering from the impacts of Covid-19 and keeping our courts and tribunals safe and open is our priority. Measures have been put in place so that court and tribunal rooms are Covid secure and cases have moved to virtual hearings where possible. We have opened Nightingale Courts providing more than 40 additional courtrooms and we are on track to provide a total of 60 courtrooms across the estate by the end of March.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what estimate his Department has made of the proportion of Crown Court cases where victims have dropped out due to delays caused by the case backlog.

This Government is acutely aware of the risk of victims withdrawing their support from prosecutions because of delays in the Crown Court. It is not possible to provide an estimate of the number of cases where victims have dropped out due to delays caused by the case backlog. However, the Ministry of Justice can provide some data on the number of prosecutions which ended because of the withdrawal of the support of a victim or witness. This can include victims and witnesses dropping out for a variety of reasons, including the impact of delays.

Between January to September 2020, 124 Crown Court case were ended by the prosecution because a witness was absent or withdrew from a trial. This represented 6% of all cracked trials in that 9-month period. By comparison, in 2019 456 Crown Court cases ended due to witness absence or withdrawal – 5.5% of all cracked trials in that year. In 2010, 943 Crown Court cases ended to witness absence or withdrawal – 5.1% of all cracked trials in that year.

Victims deserve to have their cases investigated seriously and pursued rigorously through the courts and we are investing millions to deliver swifter justice and support victims. In 2021-22, we will provide just under £140m for victim and witness support services. Criminal courts continue to recover from the pandemic – magistrates’ backlogs have fallen by 50,000 since last summer, cases dealt with in crown courts reached pre-Covid levels in December, and more rooms are now open for jury trials than before the pandemic.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many complaints he has received in relation to the management of private cemeteries in each of the last ten years.

Numbers of complaints received in relation to the management of private cemeteries are not collated but the department may receive communications from time to time. While private burial grounds are not covered by the same regulations and guidance that govern local authority burial grounds, MoJ anticipates that private cemeteries will adhere to those standards.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, as of 12 February 2021, how many and which (a) prisons or (b) Youth Offender Institutions have reported staffing sicknesses levels of over 20 per cent.

The data covering 12 February 2021 has not yet been published and will be included as part of the workforce statistics up to 31 March 2021; which is due to be published in the HMPPS Quarterly Workforce Statistics Bulletin on 20 May 2021.

The latest published data has been used to answer these questions and covers the period to 31 December 2020.

For staff who had reported sick on 31 December 2020, the following prisons showed sickness absence of over 10% of all staff: HMP Norwich, HMP Dartmoor, HMP Elmley, HMP Pentonville, HMP Holme House, and HMP Cookham Wood. They are all adult prisons apart from Cookham Wood which is a Young Offenders Institution (YOI).

There were no prisons or YOIs which had a sickness absence of over 20% on 31 December 2020.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, as of 12 February 2021, how many and which (a) prisons or (b) Youth Offender Institutions have reported staffing sicknesses levels of over 10 per cent.

The data covering 12 February 2021 has not yet been published and will be included as part of the workforce statistics up to 31 March 2021; which is due to be published in the HMPPS Quarterly Workforce Statistics Bulletin on 20 May 2021.

The latest published data has been used to answer these questions and covers the period to 31 December 2020.

For staff who had reported sick on 31 December 2020, the following prisons showed sickness absence of over 10% of all staff: HMP Norwich, HMP Dartmoor, HMP Elmley, HMP Pentonville, HMP Holme House, and HMP Cookham Wood. They are all adult prisons apart from Cookham Wood which is a Young Offenders Institution (YOI).

There were no prisons or YOIs which had a sickness absence of over 20% on 31 December 2020.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
18th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, if he will publish the scientific advice supporting the decision to keep courts open throughout the covid-19 lockdown announced in January 2021.

The HM Courts and Tribunals Service (HMCTS) approach to risk assessment is set out in our Organisational Risk Assessment (available on gov.uk), and is implemented on the ground by site-specific assessments carried out and kept under regular and frequent review. We work closely with Public Health officials to ensure our approach is entirely in line with prevailing standards and best practice.

Public Health experts have confirmed to HMCTS that our arrangements are strong enough to deal with the challenges provided by the new variants of the virus. In the first week of January we sought and received confirmation from Public Health experts that the policies we have in place to mitigate against the risks of transmission continue to be satisfactory. Public Health experts have confirmed that they are.

Public Health bodies consider scientific advice (including that on the new variant) when making their recommendations on Covid-secure arrangements for all workplaces. HMCTS and PHE officials work alongside one another to produce the documentation already published.

HMCTS’s guidance is published on Gov.uk and can found by using the web address below.

www.gov.uk/guidance/coronavirus-covid-19-courts-and-tribunals-planning-and-preparation

PHE agreed statement on the matter is published at the link below:

www.gov.uk/guidance/coronavirus-covid-19-courts-and-tribunals-planning-and-preparation#public-health-experts-confirm-court-and-tribunal-covid-secure-arrangements-appropriate

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
18th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, if he will publish the Public Health England guidance on the continued operation of HMCTS during the covid-19 lockdown announced in January 2021.

The HM Courts and Tribunals Service (HMCTS) approach to risk assessment is set out in our Organisational Risk Assessment (available on gov.uk), and is implemented on the ground by site-specific assessments carried out and kept under regular and frequent review. We work closely with Public Health officials to ensure our approach is entirely in line with prevailing standards and best practice.

Public Health experts have confirmed to HMCTS that our arrangements are strong enough to deal with the challenges provided by the new variants of the virus. In the first week of January we sought and received confirmation from Public Health experts that the policies we have in place to mitigate against the risks of transmission continue to be satisfactory. Public Health experts have confirmed that they are.

Public Health bodies consider scientific advice (including that on the new variant) when making their recommendations on Covid-secure arrangements for all workplaces. HMCTS and PHE officials work alongside one another to produce the documentation already published.

HMCTS’s guidance is published on Gov.uk and can found by using the web address below.

www.gov.uk/guidance/coronavirus-covid-19-courts-and-tribunals-planning-and-preparation

PHE agreed statement on the matter is published at the link below:

www.gov.uk/guidance/coronavirus-covid-19-courts-and-tribunals-planning-and-preparation#public-health-experts-confirm-court-and-tribunal-covid-secure-arrangements-appropriate

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
14th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many staff employed by Her Majesty’s Courts and Tribunals Service have been employed in courts and tribunals in each of the last five years.

Total number of HMCTS staff who work in operational roles in Courts and Tribunal locations using Court and Tribunal jurisdictions.

Courts & Tribs headcount

HMCTS staff

Agency staff

Total

as at 31 Dec 19

11772

1579

13351

as at 31 Dec 18

12343

1284

13627

as at 31 Dec 17

11998

1684

13682

as at 31 Dec 16

12916

1229

14145

as at 31 Dec 15

13870

881

14751

This excludes staff who are based in Courts and Tribunals who do not work directly in a Court and Tribunal such as some HR colleagues that work out of a Court location but are not working in a Court.

We have also excluded staff who would not be covered by selecting the jurisdictional split such as Enforcement, Frontline Support, HQ, Multi jurisdiction, Probate staff and NBC staff. This does not include contractor details because we do not hold this data in our HR data.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
14th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the cost to the public purse was in 2019-20 of the (a) recruitment of and (b) induction and initial training for (i) full-time district judges, (ii) deputy district judges and (iii) lay magistrates and each (A) full-time district judge, (B) deputy district judge and (C) lay magistrate.

Recruitment of judges in England and Wales is undertaken by the Judicial Appointments Commission (JAC). The JAC completed 35 recruitment exercises and made 979 recommendations in 2019/20, including 47 district judges, 151 deputy district judges and 17 district judges (magistrates’ court). The costs allocated to each exercise were £44,000 for district judges, £454,000 for deputy district judges and £60,000 for district judges (magistrates’ courts). Due to the different costs incurred for different exercises, judge level recruitment costs are not reported.

The Lord Chief Justice is responsible for judicial training, exercised through the Judicial College. As district judges are required to have previous judicial experience, induction training is tailored to meet the specific needs of each judge based on their previous sitting experience. Of the appointments made in 2019/20, three district judges were required to attend training at a total cost of £10,000. The cost of induction training for deputy district judges was £1.2m plus £873,000 in sitting in days. These are observation days at a hearing before and after training that must be completed by fee paid judges before presiding over a hearing. Induction training was also provided to 30 newly appointed deputy district judges (magistrates’ courts) at a total cost of £81,000. The Judicial College does not calculate the cost per judge of induction training.

In 2019-2020 1,033 magistrates were appointed. HMCTS are responsible for the recruitment and the delivery of training to magistrates and do not collate the costs of magistrate recruitment or training.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
14th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what proportion of members of the working groups which have shaped the new policy on magistrate recruitment are from Black, Asian and minority ethnic communities.

Members of the Recruitment and Attraction Steering Group (who are involved in the working groups) are magistrates and lay members of Advisory Committees in each region who were appointed following an Expression of Interest exercise. Diversity data for the Steering Group Members is not separately collated. Other working group members are comprised of officials from MoJ, HMCTS and Judicial Office and we do not separately collate their diversity data for this specific role.

The Judicial Office collate the diversity data of magistrates. Currently, diversity data of applicants to the magistracy is not collated as it is not mandatory for prospective applicants to provide this information. The Magistrates Recruitment and Attraction programme is developing a new recruitment system that will capture diversity data of applicants throughout the application process. The diversity data of appointed magistrates are published in the Judicial Diversity Statistics.

Leadership roles within the magistracy, including those within the Magistrates’ Leadership Executive, are undertaken by appointed magistrates. Leadership roles are openly advertised to all magistrates and filled through either an Expression of Interest exercise or following local selection processes. Diversity data of those who hold leadership roles is not separately collated.

The Judicial Office does not collate socio-economic data of new magistrates. The Judicial Diversity Statistics sets out data on magistrates’ ethnicity, age and gender. By March 2021, the aim is for all Judicial office holders to be encouraged to self-classify against a wider range of diversity characteristics including a means of defining a socio-economic background.

The Judicial Diversity Statistics are published annually and are available through this link: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/diversity-of-the-judiciary-2020-statistics

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
14th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many and what proportion of applicants to the magistracy were from Black, Asian or minority ethnic communities in each of the last five years; and what comparative assessment he has made of the the success rates of those applicants and other applicants in being appointed to the magistracy in the last five years.

Members of the Recruitment and Attraction Steering Group (who are involved in the working groups) are magistrates and lay members of Advisory Committees in each region who were appointed following an Expression of Interest exercise. Diversity data for the Steering Group Members is not separately collated. Other working group members are comprised of officials from MoJ, HMCTS and Judicial Office and we do not separately collate their diversity data for this specific role.

The Judicial Office collate the diversity data of magistrates. Currently, diversity data of applicants to the magistracy is not collated as it is not mandatory for prospective applicants to provide this information. The Magistrates Recruitment and Attraction programme is developing a new recruitment system that will capture diversity data of applicants throughout the application process. The diversity data of appointed magistrates are published in the Judicial Diversity Statistics.

Leadership roles within the magistracy, including those within the Magistrates’ Leadership Executive, are undertaken by appointed magistrates. Leadership roles are openly advertised to all magistrates and filled through either an Expression of Interest exercise or following local selection processes. Diversity data of those who hold leadership roles is not separately collated.

The Judicial Office does not collate socio-economic data of new magistrates. The Judicial Diversity Statistics sets out data on magistrates’ ethnicity, age and gender. By March 2021, the aim is for all Judicial office holders to be encouraged to self-classify against a wider range of diversity characteristics including a means of defining a socio-economic background.

The Judicial Diversity Statistics are published annually and are available through this link: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/diversity-of-the-judiciary-2020-statistics

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
14th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many and what proportion of leadership magistrates are from BAME communities; and what steps have been taken to encourage magistrates from BAME communities to apply for those positions.

Members of the Recruitment and Attraction Steering Group (who are involved in the working groups) are magistrates and lay members of Advisory Committees in each region who were appointed following an Expression of Interest exercise. Diversity data for the Steering Group Members is not separately collated. Other working group members are comprised of officials from MoJ, HMCTS and Judicial Office and we do not separately collate their diversity data for this specific role.

The Judicial Office collate the diversity data of magistrates. Currently, diversity data of applicants to the magistracy is not collated as it is not mandatory for prospective applicants to provide this information. The Magistrates Recruitment and Attraction programme is developing a new recruitment system that will capture diversity data of applicants throughout the application process. The diversity data of appointed magistrates are published in the Judicial Diversity Statistics.

Leadership roles within the magistracy, including those within the Magistrates’ Leadership Executive, are undertaken by appointed magistrates. Leadership roles are openly advertised to all magistrates and filled through either an Expression of Interest exercise or following local selection processes. Diversity data of those who hold leadership roles is not separately collated.

The Judicial Office does not collate socio-economic data of new magistrates. The Judicial Diversity Statistics sets out data on magistrates’ ethnicity, age and gender. By March 2021, the aim is for all Judicial office holders to be encouraged to self-classify against a wider range of diversity characteristics including a means of defining a socio-economic background.

The Judicial Diversity Statistics are published annually and are available through this link: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/diversity-of-the-judiciary-2020-statistics

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
14th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps are taken to ascertain the socio-economic background of new magistrates; and if he will publish the data on that measure.

Members of the Recruitment and Attraction Steering Group (who are involved in the working groups) are magistrates and lay members of Advisory Committees in each region who were appointed following an Expression of Interest exercise. Diversity data for the Steering Group Members is not separately collated. Other working group members are comprised of officials from MoJ, HMCTS and Judicial Office and we do not separately collate their diversity data for this specific role.

The Judicial Office collate the diversity data of magistrates. Currently, diversity data of applicants to the magistracy is not collated as it is not mandatory for prospective applicants to provide this information. The Magistrates Recruitment and Attraction programme is developing a new recruitment system that will capture diversity data of applicants throughout the application process. The diversity data of appointed magistrates are published in the Judicial Diversity Statistics.

Leadership roles within the magistracy, including those within the Magistrates’ Leadership Executive, are undertaken by appointed magistrates. Leadership roles are openly advertised to all magistrates and filled through either an Expression of Interest exercise or following local selection processes. Diversity data of those who hold leadership roles is not separately collated.

The Judicial Office does not collate socio-economic data of new magistrates. The Judicial Diversity Statistics sets out data on magistrates’ ethnicity, age and gender. By March 2021, the aim is for all Judicial office holders to be encouraged to self-classify against a wider range of diversity characteristics including a means of defining a socio-economic background.

The Judicial Diversity Statistics are published annually and are available through this link: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/diversity-of-the-judiciary-2020-statistics

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
14th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment he has made of the effect on the (a) age and (b) ethnic diversity of the magistracy of raising the compulsory age of retirement for magistrates.

The Impact Assessment and Equality Statement, published as part of our Judicial Mandatory Retirement Age consultation, outlined our assessment of the potential effects of our proposals to raise the mandatory retirement age for judicial office holders, including magistrates. Our analysis suggests that raising the mandatory retirement age could help to retain valuable judicial resource and expertise but that there could be a small impact on the diversity growth of the magistracy. We anticipate that any adverse impact will be offset by our ongoing work to recruit more diverse magistrates.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
14th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the attrition rate of staff at Her Majesty’s Courts and Tribunals Service has been in each of the last five years.

12 months to

Nov 2016

Nov 2017

Nov 2018

Nov 2019

Nov 2020

Attrition rate

9.2%

9.9%

10.2%

11.7%

10.6%

The methodology used to calculate the attrition rate is:

(Total annual leavers [12 months]/Average annual headcount [12 months])*100

The % are calculated using permanent and FTC staff headcount figures for on strength staff only.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
14th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many staff at Her Majesty’s Courts and Tribunals Service earn below £24,000 per annum.

As at 31 October 2020, the proportion of HMCTS staff, whose full-time equivalent salary is presently below £24,000, is 71.2% equating to 11,542 people.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
14th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many staff by (a) court and (b) pay band are employed by Her Majesty’s Courts and Tribunals Service.

The information requested is not readily available and to provide it would incur disproportionate cost.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
2nd Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how much has been spent from the public purse on replacing lost prison keys in each year since 2010.

Security is paramount within prisons and it is important that the risk of any potential key compromise is addressed as quickly as possible in order to protect the public. When a key/lock incident is reported an immediate investigation is undertaken to assess the risk and unless it is clear that security has not been compromised, locking mechanisms and keys will be replaced and/or other necessary remedial action will be taken.

The cost of a relock will depend upon the size of the prison establishment and on which keys have been lost or compromised. If a complete set of keys are lost, a full relock of the prison will be undertaken, whereas if a single key is lost only a partial relock will be needed, incurring a lower cost.

We hold contingency funding for key/lock incidents and the cost is met from individual Prison Group directorate budgets. The costs of relocks within private sector prisons are met in full by the private contractors at nil cost to the public purse.

The table below reflects the cost of full and partial relocks to the public purse each year since 2010.

Time Frame

Total Cost to the public purse (excluding VAT)

2010 - 2011

£337,552

2011 - 2012

0

2012 - 2013

0

2013 - 2014

£28,812

2014 - 2015

£46,396

2015 - 2016

£117,212

2016 - 2017

0

2017 - 2018

£441,649

2018- 2019

0

2019 - 2020

£344,456

2020- 04 December 2020

£2,821

Notes

1. Figures include re-locks arising from loss of keys and where keys have been forcibly taken from staff.

2. The figures quoted have been drawn from live administrative databases and may subsequently be amended. Due care is taken during processing and analysis, but the detail is subject to inaccuracies inherent in any large-scale recording system.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
2nd Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what estimate he has made of the cost of replacing lost prison keys in each year since 2010.

Security is paramount within prisons and it is important that the risk of any potential key compromise is addressed as quickly as possible in order to protect the public. When a key/lock incident is reported an immediate investigation is undertaken to assess the risk and unless it is clear that security has not been compromised, locking mechanisms and keys will be replaced and/or other necessary remedial action will be taken.

The cost of a relock will depend upon the size of the prison establishment and on which keys have been lost or compromised. If a complete set of keys are lost, a full relock of the prison will be undertaken, whereas if a single key is lost only a partial relock will be needed, incurring a lower cost.

We hold contingency funding for key/lock incidents and the cost is met from individual Prison Group directorate budgets. The costs of relocks within private sector prisons are met in full by the private contractors at nil cost to the public purse.

The table below reflects the cost of full and partial relocks to the public purse each year since 2010.

Time Frame

Total Cost to the public purse (excluding VAT)

2010 - 2011

£337,552

2011 - 2012

0

2012 - 2013

0

2013 - 2014

£28,812

2014 - 2015

£46,396

2015 - 2016

£117,212

2016 - 2017

0

2017 - 2018

£441,649

2018- 2019

0

2019 - 2020

£344,456

2020- 04 December 2020

£2,821

Notes

1. Figures include re-locks arising from loss of keys and where keys have been forcibly taken from staff.

2. The figures quoted have been drawn from live administrative databases and may subsequently be amended. Due care is taken during processing and analysis, but the detail is subject to inaccuracies inherent in any large-scale recording system.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
30th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many Preventing Future Death reports have been submitted by coroners to NHS trusts since 2013.

Coroners have a duty under regulations 28 and 29 of the Coroners (Investigations) Regulations 2013 to send the Chief Coroner their Prevention of Future Deaths (PFD) reports and the responses to them. These are uploaded to the Chief Coroner’s website under a number of categories. 1,447 PFD reports have been posted under the category of “Hospital Death (Clinical Procedures and medical management) related deaths”, since 2013. These however include PFD reports that were issued to private hospitals and will not include any reports issued to NHS Trusts for deaths in the community. Determining how many of the PFD reports were to NHS trusts alone could only be done at disproportionate cost.

The full list of PFD reports since 2013 can be accessed online at: https://www.judiciary.uk/subject/prevention-of-future-deaths/

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
13th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many (a) domestic violence case applicants and (b) sexual violence case applicants have applied for exceptional case funding in the last five years; and how many of those applicants have been successful.

Representation to obtain a protective injunction, or in family law matters where there is a history of violence, is available within the existing scope of the legal aid scheme, subject to eligibility criteria.

Exceptional Case Funding (ECF) exists to provide for cases which would not ordinarily be covered by the legal aid scheme. To qualify for ECF, applicants must meet the ECF criteria as set out in LASPO and described in the Lord Chancellor’s funding guidance. They must also be financially eligible for legal aid and their case must meet the merits criteria to qualify.

Any data on applications for ECF in cases of this type could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
12th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many specialist domestic violence courts have been in operation in each of the last 10 years.

Her Majesty’s Courts and Tribunals Service (HMCTS) does not hold data on how many Specialist Domestic Violence Courts (SDVC) have been in operation in each one of the last 10 years.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
12th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the annual cost is of running specialist domestic violence courts.

Her Majesty’s Courts and Tribunals Service (HMCTS), does not hold information on the annual cost of running Specialist Domestic Violence Courts (SDVCs) as the cost is shared across Criminal Justice Agencies and other stakeholders.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
3rd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many social service referrals were made to the family courts in each of the last 12 months.

Data on the number of referrals made by local authorities to the family courts is not held.

Information relating to the number of children involved in applications made under Parts IV and V of the Children Act 1989 to the family courts is published by the Ministry of Justice on a quarterly basis. Such applications would routinely be made by a local authority, but the Act provides that applications may also be made by the National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, or another person authorised by order of the Secretary of State to make an application.

The table below details the latest published statistics on the number of children involved in such applications.

Local authorities may also apply to the family courts for forced marriage protection orders (under the Forced Marriage (Civil Protection) Act 2007) and for female genital mutilation protection orders (under the Female Genital Mutilation Act 2003). Details of the number of such local authority applications made in the 12 months from July 2019 to June 2020 are included in the table below.

The latest Family Courts Statistics Quarterly publication can be accessed here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/family-court-statistics-quarterly-april-to-june-2020

Order type:

Quarter 3- July -September 2019

Quarter 4- October – December 2019

Quarter 1- January- March 2020

Quarter 2- April- June 2020

Local Authority Care or Accommodation: Care (or substitute supervision for care) Secure accommodation

5,856

123

5,706

129

5,627

121

5,926

94

Local Authority Supervision or Assessment:

Supervision order

Authority to refuse contact with a child in care

Education supervision

Education supervision - extension

Child assessment order

660

95

22

0

18

589

95

9

0

33

602

121

6

0

17

654

78

2

0

20

Emergency Protection:

Emergency protection

Emergency protection - extend or discharge

Warrant to assist emergency protection

327

15

0

377

20

0

329

9

0

289

6

0

Forced marriage Protection Orders (application made by relevant 3rd party i.e. Local Authority).

56

44

46

12

Female Genital Mutilation Protection Orders (application made by relevant 3rd party i.e. Local Authority).

17

15

12

4

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
12th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many external consultants have been employed to help implement temporary courts during the covid-19 outbreak.

No external consultants have been employed and no contracts have been awarded for the specific purpose of implementing temporary Nightingale courts.

The project to implement temporary Nightingale courts has been administered by an in-house team of HMCTS project and programme staff. While the project is in-house, HMCTS has engaged the services of Cushman and Wakefield - Commercial Real Estate Services to a value of approximately £43k to provide specialist support in negotiating licences for hire venues.

These additional hearing venues are being rapidly set up by HMCTS to alleviate the pressure on courts and tribunals resulting from the pandemic

HMCTS has published an update on their response to covid-19 in the criminal courts in England and Wales (https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/court-and-tribunal-recovery-update-in-response-to-coronavirus). This provides a comprehensive update on our recovery plans and includes details about Nightingale courts.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
12th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how much has been spent on external consultants employed to implement temporary courts during the covid-19 outbreak to date.

No external consultants have been employed and no contracts have been awarded for the specific purpose of implementing temporary Nightingale courts.

The project to implement temporary Nightingale courts has been administered by an in-house team of HMCTS project and programme staff. While the project is in-house, HMCTS has engaged the services of Cushman and Wakefield - Commercial Real Estate Services to a value of approximately £43k to provide specialist support in negotiating licences for hire venues.

These additional hearing venues are being rapidly set up by HMCTS to alleviate the pressure on courts and tribunals resulting from the pandemic

HMCTS has published an update on their response to covid-19 in the criminal courts in England and Wales (https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/court-and-tribunal-recovery-update-in-response-to-coronavirus). This provides a comprehensive update on our recovery plans and includes details about Nightingale courts.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
12th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, which companies have been awarded contracts to provide consultancy services to help implement temporary courts during the covid-19 outbreak.

No external consultants have been employed and no contracts have been awarded for the specific purpose of implementing temporary Nightingale courts.

The project to implement temporary Nightingale courts has been administered by an in-house team of HMCTS project and programme staff. While the project is in-house, HMCTS has engaged the services of Cushman and Wakefield - Commercial Real Estate Services to a value of approximately £43k to provide specialist support in negotiating licences for hire venues.

These additional hearing venues are being rapidly set up by HMCTS to alleviate the pressure on courts and tribunals resulting from the pandemic

HMCTS has published an update on their response to covid-19 in the criminal courts in England and Wales (https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/court-and-tribunal-recovery-update-in-response-to-coronavirus). This provides a comprehensive update on our recovery plans and includes details about Nightingale courts.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
12th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the planned timescale is for publishing the report by the Prison and Probation Ombudsman on the death of two babies in prisons.

The PPO’s final investigation reports into deaths are only published after an inquest has taken place. Reports are not published in advance of the inquest to avoid any possibility of influencing the verdict.

The Prisons and Probation Ombudsman (PPO) has advised me that she has concluded the independent investigation into the death of a baby at HMP Bronzefield and will shortly issue a draft report to the mother, the prison and the healthcare providers for fact checking, as well as to the coroner for information. A final report will then be produced and sent to the same stakeholders.

She has also advised that the independent investigation into the death of a baby at HMP Styal is ongoing, and that a timescale for publication of the report will not be available until its conclusion.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
12th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, if he will place a copy in the Library of the equalities impact assessment of the changes to custody time limits in the crown court.

The Equalities Impact Statement is publicly available on gov.UK: https://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2020/953/pdfs/uksipes_20200953_en.pdf

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
12th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the (a) composition and (b) remit is of the Scrutiny Panel set up to deal with racial disparity in the youth justice system.

The Race and Ethnicity Board, chaired by Ministry of Justice, oversees all work on reducing race and ethnic disparities in the criminal justice system for both children and adults. This board is designed to hold to account policy makers and agencies responsible for tackling disproportionality.

A range of other groups exist at local and national level to provide scrutiny and oversight of racial disparity in the youth justice system, sometimes as part of a broader focus on a particular area of practice or broader focus on equalities across the system.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
12th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what targets his Department has set for recruiting Black and ethnic minority staff to the prison service; and what progress his Department has made on achieving those targets.

In response to recommendation 28 of the Lammy Review 2017, HMPPS committed to a target of 14% of all staff recruited being from a Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) background by December 2020.

The latest published workforce statistics evidences information on recruitment diversity statistics. The following outcomes have been identified:

  • All Prison Officer Entry Levels: BAME candidates made up 18.2% of applicants and 11.0% of formal offers accepted between July 2018 and June 2020. These proportions varied over the quarters ranging from 14.5% to 29.9% for applicants, and 7.1% to 17.6% for offers formally accepted.

­- Public Sector Prison Officers: BAME candidates made up 17.4% of applicants and 10.7% of formal offers accepted between July 2018 and June 2020. These proportions varied over the quarters ranging from 12.0% to 25.2% for applicants and 7.1% to 17.2% for offers accepted.

­- Youth Custody Services Prison Officers: BAME candidates made up 31.9% of applicants and 22.7% of formal offers accepted over the whole period.

  • Officer Support Grades: BAME candidates made up 18.8% of applicants and 12.6% of formal offers accepted, with large variations between the quarters.

While the proportion of prison staff from diverse backgrounds is gradually rising, we recognise we must continue to do more. We continue to work hard to increase diversity in our prison workforce by ensuring we are listening and acting on the views of staff, making adjustments to selection processes to address any areas of disparity and targeting our efforts on areas which may not have a representative workforce.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
30th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the reforms made by Part 4 of the Criminal Justice and Courts Act 2015.

We continue to keep the provisions of the legislation under review. The Independent Review of Administrative Law (IRAL) was announced on 31st July; the independent Panel of experts is examining whether there is a need to reform judicial review.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
29th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether any recent (a) arrangements have been entered into and (b) contracts signed to provide for electronic tagging.

On the 13th May 2020 PQ42887 provided details of the new contracts that had been signed to deliver additional electronic tagging capacity for the End of Custody Temporary Release scheme in place during the Covid-19 outbreak.

On the 18th May 2020, the Ministry of Justice agreed a contract with Alcohol Monitoring Services Ltd for the provision of monitoring hardware and data analysis services. The contract was let in support of new legislation which came into force on the 19th May 2020 to allow for the roll out of the Alcohol Abstinence Monitoring Requirement across England and Wales which will begin shortly.

The contract was awarded through an appropriate existing public framework

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
29th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many prison staff have (a) been taken to and (b) required ventilation in hospital as a result of covid-19.

As of 31 August 2020, 68 prison staff had either been taken to hospital following a reported diagnosis of Covid-19 or had subsequently tested positive for COVID-19 in hospital.

This number includes staff not directly employed by HMPPS but who work within the prison such as healthcare and maintenance staff and includes staff in privately manged prisons. The number also includes some staff who were taken to hospital for non-COVID reasons and then subsequently tested positive in hospital.

The origins of the virus will often come from prison officers returning to the community, and we work hard to minimise the import of it into the prison estate.

We do not hold the figures on the number of the staff who required ventilation.

These figures have been drawn from the HMPPS COVID-19 data collection. Care is taken when processing and analysing returns, but the detail is subject to the inaccuracies inherent in any large-scale recording system particularly where data is self-reported.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
23rd Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what information he uses to measure the backlog of cases in civil and county courts.

The information requested is not held centrally.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
23rd Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what estimate he has made of the backlog of cases in civil and county courts.

The information requested is not held centrally.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
23rd Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many civil trials listed to be heard before county and civil courts excluding the High Court were outstanding as of 23 September 2020.

The information requested could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
23rd Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many outstanding civil trials were listed to be heard before the High Court as of 23 September 2020.

The information requested could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
23rd Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many outstanding civil hearings excluding trials were listed to be heard before county and civil courts excluding the High Court as of 23 September 2020.

The information requested could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
23rd Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many outstanding civil hearings excluding trials were listed to be heard before the High Court as of 23 September 2020.

The information requested could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
22nd Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps he has taken to appoint a reviewer of closed material procedures.

I note the Hon. Member’s interest and indeed that of other Members in this matter, and would seek to provide assurances that discussions are taking place on establishing the statutory review, which will be brought forward as soon as possible.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
22nd Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, when he plans to confirm a reviewer of closed material procedures in post.

I note the Hon. Member’s interest and indeed that of other Members in this matter, and would seek to provide assurances that discussions are taking place on establishing the statutory review, which will be brought forward as soon as possible.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
22nd Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether he has implemented the review of Closed Material Procedures in accordance with the statutory duty under the Justice and Security Act 2013.

I note the Hon. Member’s interest and indeed that of other Members in this matter, and would seek to provide assurances that discussions are taking place on establishing the statutory review, which will be brought forward as soon as possible.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
22nd Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to the Answer of 4 April 2019 to Question 240976, whether his Department made an announcement in relation to a review of the operation of sections 6 to 11 of the Justice and Security Act 2013.

I note the Hon. Member’s interest and indeed that of other Members in this matter, and would seek to provide assurances that discussions are taking place on establishing the statutory review, which will be brought forward as soon as possible.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
14th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many cases of violence against prison officers have been recorded in each of the last 10 years.

The number of recorded cases of violence against prison staff is published as part of the Safety in Custody statistics, the figures for each of the last ten years are provided below:

2010 - 2,848

2011 - 3,132

2012 - 2,987

2013 - 3,266

2014 - 3,640

2015 - 4,963

2016 - 6,844

2017 - 8,417

2018 - 10,203

2019 - 10,033

Figures for the first quarter of 2020, up until the end of March, show there were 2,290 incidents of violence against prison staff, a decrease of 4% from the previous quarter.

Violence against our hardworking prison officers is unacceptable, and we work closely with the police and Crown Prosecution Service to bring the perpetrators to justice. Additionally, our new Assaults on Emergency Workers Act means that those who attack them can expect an additional 12 months behind bars.

We are also giving officers PAVA pepper spray and body-worn cameras to make their jobs safer, as well as access to post incident care teams, occupational health support and counselling for those who need it. More widely, we are spending £100 million to bolster prison security, clamping down on the weapons, drugs and mobile phones that fuel violence and crime behind bars. This will fund tough airport-style security, body scanners and phone-blocking technology.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
14th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many cases of illegal substance misuse have been record in English and Welsh prisons in each year since 2010.

The number of individual cases of illegal substance misuse is not recorded, however, data and information on drug testing is routinely published and is available on the link below. Data on drugs tests in 2020/21 will be published in due course.

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/hmpps-annual-digest-april-2019-to-march-2020

Illicit substances pose significant challenges in our prisons which is why we have developed a comprehensive drugs strategy which provides prisons with guidance and examples of good practice to support them tackling drugs.

A crucial part of this strategy is the use of drug testing as it provides us with robust evidence on the prevalence of drug misuse and can be used to support security measures, identify and signpost into drug treatment, monitor treatment compliance and act as an incentive to engage in treatment and recovery.

We are also supporting prisons with £100 million of investment in additional airport-style security, including x-ray body scanners, designed to stop drugs entering prisons in the first place.

These measures are part of our wider investment to make jails safer, while working closely with healthcare providers to ensure prisoners have the support they need to live free of the influence of drugs upon release.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
14th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many and what proportion of (a) private and (b) public proceedings in family courts have been attended in person by parties litigant in each of the last ten years.

While a party to private or public law court proceedings may not be legally represented, they may have previously received legal advice.

The Department does not collect information on litigants in person in the family courts. This information could only be obtained from analysis of individual case files at disproportionate cost.

However, an indication of self-representation in family cases is identified in the case management systems used by Her Majesty’s Courts and Tribunals Service by the legal representation field being left blank. By focusing on cases with at least one hearing, the parties with no legal representative recorded give an approximation to the information requested. This is provided in the attached table which covers the year 2011 to 2019.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
14th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many and what proportion of employment tribunals have been attended by parties litigant in each of the last 10 years.

The information requested is not held centrally and could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

The term “litigant in person” (“party litigant” in Scotland) applies to Claimants without a legal representative. In the Employment Tribunal any person may be permitted to act as a representative, including a friend or relative.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
14th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many and what proportion of proceedings before the (a) First-Tier Immigration and Asylum Tribunal and (b) Upper-Tier Immigration and Asylum Tribunal were attended by parties litigant in each of the last 10 years.

The information requested is not held centrally and could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

The term “litigant in person” (“party litigant” in Scotland) applies to appellants without a legal representative. In the First-tier Tribunal (Immigration and Asylum Chamber) and Upper Tribunal (Immigration and Asylum Chamber) any person may be permitted to act as a representative, including an immigration advisor, friend, relative or litigation friend. The case management system cannot provide a statistical breakdown between different types of representative.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
14th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many and what proportion of proceedings before the First-Tier Social Entitlement Chamber were attended by parties litigant in each of the last 10 years.

The information requested is not held centrally.

The term “litigant in person” (“party litigant” in Scotland) applies to appellants without a legal representative. In the First-tier Tribunal, Social Entitlement Chamber (SEC) any person may be permitted to act as a representative, including a friend or a relative.

The case management systems used in the tribunals of the SEC (Social Security and Child Support; Criminal Injuries Compensation; and Asylum Support) cannot provide a breakdown between different types of representative.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
14th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many women have been released from prison without a confirmed permanent address in the last 12 months.

The latest available and validated data for the accommodation status of women released from prison up to March 2020 are published at the following link under Table 11: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/community-performance-quarterly-update-to-march-2020.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
14th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many children have been released from custody without a confirmed permanent address in the last 12 months.

Decisions on accommodation for children under the age of 18 who leave custody are taken at local level, so this data is not held centrally by MoJ. Local Authority-led Youth Offending Teams work closely with young offender institutions, secure training centres and secure children’s homes on accommodation arrangements so that any issues can be identified and resolved as early as possible before release. Arrangements for the child or young person’s accommodation are reviewed at regular intervals and in addition to the statutory ‘Duty To Refer’ requirements, local protocols have been developed to allow for cases of particular concern to be escalated within the relevant local authority. The Local Authority has a duty to accommodate children upon their release from custody.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
14th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what recent discussions he has had with Cabinet colleagues on the rule of law and negotiations on the UK's future relationship with the EU.

The Lord Chancellor speaks frequently with Cabinet colleagues on a range of matters. The Lord Chancellor remains committed to the Rule of Law, and through the Ministerial Code, all Ministers are required to consider their obligations against the overarching duty to comply with the law. The statement published on 10 September sets out the government’s legal position in relation to specific clauses in the UK Internal Market Bill.

The Government, as a whole, continues to pursue negotiations on the UK's future relationship with the EU and concluded the 8th round of negotiations on 10 September. Our position remains unchanged; we want a relationship with the EU which is based on friendly cooperation between sovereign equals and centred on free trade.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
14th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what estimate he has made of number of suspected offenders who were likely to be released early without the custody time limit extension.

Temporary legislation has been introduced to extend the length of the Custody Time Limit in the Crown Court by 56 days for 9 months. It does not apply retrospectively and defendants retain the right to apply for bail. The decision to release a defendant on bail is one taken by our independent Judiciary based on the specific circumstances of the case. There is therefore, no reliable statistic that answers this question.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
14th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many jury trials were outstanding in each of the last 12 months.

The table below provides the number of outstanding trial cases at the Crown Court by month, between March 2019 and March 2020.

Year

Month

Outstanding trial cases at the Crown Court

2019

Mar

25,360

Apr

25,925

May

26,140

Jun

26,341

Jul

26,728

Aug

27,185

Sep

27,272

Oct

28,155

Nov

28,629

Dec

29,403

2020

Jan

30,179

Feb

31,019

Mar

31,686

March 2020 is the latest period for which National Statistics broken down by type of case are published in England and Wales. National Statistics for the period to June 2020 will be published on September 24, 2020.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
14th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, if he will publish the cases in the crown court backlog by type of case.

The volume of outstanding cases at the Crown Court is published by case type as part of the National Statistics bulletin Criminal Court Statistics Quarterly.

The latest published data is available to March 2020.

National Statistics for the period to June 2020 will be published on September 24, 2020.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
14th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how much revenue has been raised by the court closure programme in the last 10 years.

Since 2010, £322m has been raised from the sale of surplus court and tribunal buildings. Since 2015 sale proceeds totalling £211m have been reinvested as part of the HMCTS reform programme.

The closure of any court is not taken lightly – it only happens following full public consultation. We have been clear that courts have only closed where they were underused, dilapidated or too close to one another.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
14th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what estimate he has made of the reduction in court capacity as a result of court closures in the last 10 years.

Since 2010, the permanent court and tribunal estate has reduced from a total of 605 operational court and tribunal buildings to 330 operational court and tribunal buildings.

The closure of any court is not taken lightly – it only happens following full public consultation. We have been clear that courts have only closed where they were underused, dilapidated or too close to one another and in each case, we have only agreed to close the court where sufficient capacity existed in other nearby courts to accommodate the work of the closing courts.

HMCTS has published an update on their response to Covid-19 in the criminal courts in England and Wales (https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/court-and-tribunal-recovery-update-in-response-to-coronavirus). This includes details on the use of Nightingale courts and our plans to open additional locations.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
14th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, which contractors have received tenders from his Department in the last 12 months.

The information requested could only be obtained at disproportionate cost. The name of each contractor which has submitted a bid on a running tender is not held centrally.

The MoJ will consider each contractor bid within the necessary criteria and award the tender based on the most suitable candidate to provide the required goods or service, ensuring value for money.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
14th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many prisoners have been released in error in each of the last 10 years.

A release in error may occur from prison or from court. A prisoner is released in error if they are released earlier than their correct release date. They will be unlawfully at large until they are returned to custody, unless they are subsequently released correctly.

Releases in error are rare and the vast majority are returned to custody very quickly. We work closely with the police to recapture offenders at large and investigate each of these incidents thoroughly to see what lessons can be learned.

Please find below the number of prisoners released in error in England and Wales, since 2010. The data is the 12 months ending March 2010 to 12 months ending March 2020.

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

68

63

42

44

50

49

64

72

66

62

50

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
14th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many cases of violence against court staff have been recorded in each of the last 10 years.

HMCTS takes the safety and security of its staff very seriously. Court and tribunal buildings, the policy and operating procedures in place across the organisation, and training programmes are all designed to ensure a safe working environment. There are specific controls in place to manage the risks faced by court and tribunal staff.

The data available on instances of physical violence against court and tribunal staff goes back to 2013-14. Before that, data was not systematically recorded. For the seven-year period for which we have data, the number of incidents of violence towards HMCTS court staff totals 171. This is broken down between financial years as follows:

2019-20 - 35

2018-19 - 30

2017-18 - 18

2016-17 - 26

2015-16 - 26

2014-15 - 19

2013-14 - 17

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
16th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, when his Department plans to publish the pay award for prison officers following the recommendations made by the Prison Service Pay Review Body.

The Government’s response to the recommendations made by the Prison Service Pay Review Body (PSPRB) was announced by Written Ministerial Statement today (Tuesday 21 July 2020). The announcement confirms the pay award for operational prison staff for 2020/21.

The full report and recommendations made by the PSPRB have also been published online. The WMS and report can be found here – (https://www.parliament.uk/business/publications/written-questions-answers-statements/written-statement/Commons/2020-07-21/HCWS408/).

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether it remains his Department's policy to maintain virtual court hearings as the covid-19 lockdown restrictions are eased.

Audio and video technology has long played a role in the court room – they are not a new phenomenon. In response to the current pandemic, HMCTS have increased the capacity for telephone and video hearings so that participants can join hearings remotely where appropriate. Audio and video hearings provide an additional channel for progressing a case, and the decision to hold a hearing this way is for the judge, panel or magistrate, taking into account the needs of the parties and the nature of the hearing.

Our scaled-up audio and video capability includes more BT MeetMe teleconferencing accounts and the roll-out of virtual rooms, via a cloud video platform, to all jurisdictions. Separately, as part of the £1bn HMCTS reform programme, we are testing a bespoke video hearings service that will support court users before and during a hearing.

We will continue to provide options for the use of audio and video technology in hearings and their use will remain subject to judicial discretion.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, if he will publish the covid-19 risk assessments for each building used by HMCTS.

Our organisational risk assessment, which has been published on gov.uk, gives an overview of our assessment of risks across the organisation and details the safety measures in place. We constantly monitor the arrangements in all our buildings to ensure that they continue to meet the standards required - in doing this, we adopt a structured approach, using a local assessment tool.

Across HMCTS we have a range of workplaces with differing requirements and this provides a flexible framework for managers to effectively assess the risks and manage the safety measures for individual buildings. The tool helps to ensure that potential risks are constantly monitored, that swift action can be taken where necessary, and that anything significant that can’t be resolved quickly at local level is promptly escalated.

The local assessments are dynamic documents that are updated regularly. It is important that we are always able to provide the most up to date information about the safety measures in place for any specific building. To this end, and to ensure that people have the most up to date information, we are not publishing local assessments online as they are rapidly changing. We are, however, providing electronic copies of them to court and tribunal users on request. We ask that requests are made locally, to individual sites across our estate.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether he plans to convert empty public buildings into temporary courts to tackle the backlog of cases as a result of the covid-19 outbreak.

I refer the Rt Hon Member to my answer of 16 June, to Question 56017.

HM Courts and Tribunals Service (HMCTS) officials are looking at how we make the best possible use of the existing estate, as well as creating more capacity. This means considering whether any recently closed courts which are still owned by HMCTS are suitable for reopening, and identifying alternative spaces to further extend provision.

We are looking at a range of venues that may be appropriate. Any additional capacity will need to meet standards for safety and security and be compliant with Covid-19 public health guidance

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps he is taking to tackle the backlog of cases in Magistrates’ Courts and Crown Courts as the covid-19 lockdown restrictions are eased.

COVID-19 has been an unprecedented challenge for the criminal justice system, but we have kept courts open and cases flowing through the system throughout. The UK has been a global leader and we are ahead of comparable systems, keeping our system open and functioning throughout COVID-19. The most time-critical hearings have continued to take place in the Magistrates’ Courts, including hearings where the defendant is in custody or there is a risk to the public, as well as dealing with applications to extend custody time limits.

In the Crown Court, whilst jury trials were paused we kept the system moving, disposing of over 5,000 cases. Jury trials were restarted on 18 May, and by mid-July all courts will have reopened. This has all been enabled through significantly increased use of technology, with over 6,500 cases heard remotely, and with close collaboration and joint working with partners and stakeholders across the criminal justice system.

There is more we need to do and HMCTS are pursuing an ambitious plan to continue to increase capacity, including increasing the use of video and audio enabled justice via a national rollout of Cloud Video Platform (CVP), expanded opening hours, and exploring ways to gain additional court capacity. This will all be set out in more detail in a Courts Recovery Plan which will be published soon.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps his Department is taking to ensure effective communication between prisoners and their lawyers during the covid-19 outbreak.

Alongside the closure of courts, the Government suspended all but exceptional visits to prisons in March. This was to ensure the safety of both prisoners and our staff through the pandemic.

Despite the absence of physical visits, prisoners do maintain the right to access legal advice, and we have looked to ensure that prisoners have continued to have the tools to make contact with their legal representatives via telephone, video link or written correspondence.

Since the outbreak of the pandemic we have enhanced the capability of prison videoconferencing facilities, particularly to support priority court work such as sentencing hearings and prisoners approaching their parole hearing dates. We have made use of the additional 1,250 mobile phones issued to prisons without in-cell telephony in order to facilitate private conversations with legal advisors, alongside encouraging Governors to ensure prisoners can have conversations with their representatives in confidence.

We are also taking steps to increase the available capacity of video conferencing across the estate through increased operating hours to include longer hours during the weekdays, and at some locations on Saturdays. This will sit alongside renewed guidance to all governors on the importance of making sure that adequate time for legal advice is made available to prisoners where possible.

Alongside this work, we are increasing the physical number of video link outlets at some critical sites where capacity is limited, as well as to support specialist courts including Youth and women’s prisons, together with the re-purposing of some unused spaces within prisons for more video link capacity.

Over the coming weeks, we are also looking to resume face-to-face access, where possible, in line with the easing of Government restrictions and advice from Public Health England. Advice to governors will be published as part of the National Framework.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, on what date he plans to enable legal practitioners to (a) attend Her Majesty’s Prisons and (b) take effective instructions from their clients.

Alongside the closure of courts, the Government suspended all but exceptional visits to prisons in March. This was to ensure the safety of both prisoners and our staff through the pandemic.

Despite the absence of physical visits, prisoners do maintain the right to access legal advice, and we have looked to ensure that prisoners have continued to have the tools to make contact with their legal representatives via telephone, video link or written correspondence.

Since the outbreak of the pandemic we have enhanced the capability of prison videoconferencing facilities, particularly to support priority court work such as sentencing hearings and prisoners approaching their parole hearing dates. We have made use of the additional 1,250 mobile phones issued to prisons without in-cell telephony in order to facilitate private conversations with legal advisors, alongside encouraging Governors to ensure prisoners can have conversations with their representatives in confidence.

We are also taking steps to increase the available capacity of video conferencing across the estate through increased operating hours to include longer hours during the weekdays, and at some locations on Saturdays. This will sit alongside renewed guidance to all governors on the importance of making sure that adequate time for legal advice is made available to prisoners where possible.

Alongside this work, we are increasing the physical number of video link outlets at some critical sites where capacity is limited, as well as to support specialist courts including Youth and women’s prisons, together with the re-purposing of some unused spaces within prisons for more video link capacity.

Over the coming weeks, we are also looking to resume face-to-face access, where possible, in line with the easing of Government restrictions and advice from Public Health England. Advice to governors will be published as part of the National Framework.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps he is taking to prioritise cases in which a person on remand has a Custody Time Limit that (a) has expired and (b) is about to expire.

HMCTS is working closely with the Judiciary and criminal justice agencies to ensure that cases that need to be prioritised can be. The introduction of emergency legislation enabling the courts to make greater use of audio and video technology for any preliminary hearings where appropriate, has ensured that priority cases, including custody cases, have been heard.

The prioritisation of cases and trials is a judicial decision and the senior judiciary has issued the following guidance:

https://www.judiciary.uk/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/Note-on-Listing-Magistrates-SPJ-DSPJ-14.04.20-FINAL.pdf

https://www.judiciary.uk/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/27032020_Protocol-for-CTL-cases_FINAL-signed-1.pdf

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many violent crimes in England and Wales have been disposed of by way of a community resolution order in (a) 2020 to date and (b) each of the last five years.

The Home Office publishes data on police recorded outcomes including Community Resolutions. This is available up to the year ending December 2019.

A link to the data can be found here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/crime-outcomes-in-england-and-wales-statistics

The number of recorded Community Resolution outcomes by year, grouped by offence, in England and Wales, is as follows:

Year

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

Offence group

Possession of weapons offences

1082

1058

1758

2093

1644

Sexual offences

603

617

648

633

502

Violence against the person

42185

38420

36514

35054

30134

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many sexual crimes in England and Wales have been disposed of by way of a community resolution order in (a) 2020 to date and (b) each of the last five years.

The Home Office publishes data on police recorded outcomes including Community Resolutions. This is available up to the year ending December 2019.

A link to the data can be found here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/crime-outcomes-in-england-and-wales-statistics

The number of recorded Community Resolution outcomes by year, grouped by offence, in England and Wales, is as follows:

Year

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

Offence group

Possession of weapons offences

1082

1058

1758

2093

1644

Sexual offences

603

617

648

633

502

Violence against the person

42185

38420

36514

35054

30134

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many weapons offences England and Wales have been disposed of by way of a community resolution order in (a) 2020 to date and (b) each of the last five years.

The Home Office publishes data on police recorded outcomes including Community Resolutions. This is available up to the year ending December 2019.

A link to the data can be found here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/crime-outcomes-in-england-and-wales-statistics

The number of recorded Community Resolution outcomes by year, grouped by offence, in England and Wales, is as follows:

Year

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

Offence group

Possession of weapons offences

1082

1058

1758

2093

1644

Sexual offences

603

617

648

633

502

Violence against the person

42185

38420

36514

35054

30134

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how much the 2,000 electronic tags cost for the End of Custody Temporary Release scheme.

In March, prisons were facing a significant challenge to minimise the impact of COVID-19 due to offenders living in close proximity and typically sharing cells. Without action, Public Health England (PHE) expected the infection curve would occur faster in prisons than in the general population and subsequently create earlier demand for hospital intervention. PHE advised that action was necessary to avoid thousands of prisoners, including children in custody, becoming infected and overwhelming local NHS services. Given the unpredictable nature of the situation, a range of measures were introduced to provide a variety of tools that could be used to a greater or lesser extent depending on how the outbreak developed.

The early release schemes were one element of that approach to containing the spread of the virus in prisons. We have also worked to reduce numbers on remand, created extra cells, limited prisoner movements and jails have implemented ‘compartmentalisation’, meaning staff have isolated those prisoners with symptoms, shielded the vulnerable and quarantined new arrivals. These measures have helped to contain the spread of the virus and limit deaths significantly, compared to initial estimates.

In considering early releases, the priority of HM Prison and Probation Service has been to put the safety of the public first which is why offenders must meet strict eligibility criteria and pass a risk assessment to be released early.

Our upper estimate for the number of prisoners eligible was 4,000, based solely on the sentences that prisoners were serving. Electronic monitoring is a fundamental part of the scheme which helps us to ensure public safety so it is essential that we had tags available for every prisoner released early. This is why we acquired 2,000 electronic monitoring tags at a cost of £3,775,000.

Releases under the scheme continue and we are considering alternative uses for tags elsewhere in the criminal justice system in support of our ambition to make full use of the benefits of electronic monitoring technology.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what access prisoners have to educational resources during the lockdown due to the covid-19 outbreak.

In accordance with advice from Public Health England (PHE) and in order to keep all staff and prisoners safe, temporary measures have been introduced during the pandemic to restrict prison regimes and cease all non-essential activities involving groups of people. This includes education.

We are, however, investing in measures to improve the time prisoners are spending in their cells, support family contact, and incentivise good behaviour. We have worked collaboratively with our Prison Education Framework (PEF) and Dynamic Purchasing System (DPS) providers to develop and provide learning materials, in cell activity packs and learning packs for as many prisoners as possible. We continue to work with local providers on the development and delivery of additional support materials to meet new and emerging needs.

In Young Offender Institutions (YOIs) and Secure Training Centres (STCs) the pandemic has meant the schedule of daily activities in establishments has had to be adjusted to minimise infection risk and protect children and staff. Education is currently being delivered in small groups in Secure Children’s Homes (SCHs), Oakhill STC, and Parc YOI, whilst adhering to physical distancing principles - and through provision and assessment education packs for those in other establishments.

The latest National Framework for Prison Regimes and Services was released on 2 June and provides a conditional roadmap towards how prisons will operate whilst COVID-19 remains a threat. Where certain activities can resume such as education services, we should expect them to do so with considerable restrictions and adaptations in the interests of safety, although we will look for innovative ways to deliver them. The Framework was published on GOV.UK and can be accessed via the following link;

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-national-framework-for-prison-regimes-and-services

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many prisoners have been incarcerated across the prison estate in each year since 2000.

The information requested is in the table below. The table provides prison population figures taken from 30 June every year between 2000-2019 and the current prison population as of 29 May 2020.

Prison population per year from 2000 to 2020

Date (from 30th June every year)

Prison Population

2000

65,194

2001

66,403

2002

71,218

2003

73,657

2004

74,488

2005

76,190

2006

77,982

2007

79,734

2008

83,194

2009

83,391

2010

85,002

2011

85,374

2012

86,048

2013

83,842

2014

85,509

2015

86,193

2016

85,134

2017

85,863

2018

82,773

2019

82,710

2020 (29 May 2020)

80,032

The information from the table can be found at:

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many cases were reported of violence committed by prisoners against prison staff in each month of (a) 2019 and (b) 2020 to date.

The number of cases of reported violence committed by prisoners against prison staff in each month are published as part of the Safety in Custody statistics, a summary of the figures for 2019 is provided below:

January – 835

February – 841

March – 863

April – 868

May – 894

June – 855

July – 857

August – 834

September – 771

October – 844

November – 763

December – 770

These figures have been drawn from the HMPPS Incident Reporting System. Care is taken when processing and analysing the returns but the detail collected is subject to the inaccuracies inherent in any large scale recording system. Although the figures are shown to the last individual the figures may not be accurate to that level.

The figures for January to March 2020 are not yet available and will be published on July 30th.

Our prison staff work incredibly hard, and we do not underestimate the challenges they face. We will continue to with the police and Crown Prosecution Service to ensure prosecutions of those who assault them. We also provide post incident care teams, occupational health support and counselling for those who need it.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many covid-19 (a) infections and (b) deaths have taken place in each prison in England and Wales.

The Government has put robust measures in place to protect staff and offenders from COVID-19 and introduce ‘compartmentalisation’, to isolate those prisoners with symptoms, shield the vulnerable and quarantine new arrivals.

Overall, prisons are seeing a decline in the numbers of new cases. The data in the table below shows the number of confirmed COVID-19 cases broken down by prison as of Friday 12 June 2020. These figures reflect the total number of recorded positive cases of COVID-19 since the first confirmed cases in mid-March, not the number of live cases. It includes individuals that have recovered.

The numbers reported will be affected by a number of variables, including the availability of testing locally which can result in differences between sites and regions and as self-reported (for staff) through HMPPS management lines for central collation. As figures are as reported by prisons they may be subject to revision.

To date the Ministry of Justice has not collected data on asymptomatic prisoners and staff as it is not the government policy to test asymptomatic cases.

Establishment

Staff Cases

Prisoner Cases

Total Number of Cases by Establishment

Altcourse

24

15

39

Ashfield

0

0

0

Askham Grange

4

0

4

Aylesbury

~

0

~

Bedford

6

~

~

Belmarsh

12

7

19

Berwyn

33

40

73

Birmingham

22

~

~

Brinsford

22

5

27

Bristol

~

0

~

Brixton

0

~

~

Bronzefield

6

~

~

Buckley Hall

~

~

5

Bullingdon

~

0

~

Bure

~

0

~

Cardiff

24

22

46

Channings Wood

15

9

24

Chelmsford

10

~

~

Coldingley

5

~

~

Cookham Wood

~

~

~

Dartmoor

~

~

4

Deerbolt

8

~

~

Doncaster

12

8

20

Dovegate

8

~

~

Downview

4

0

4

Drake Hall

25

41

66

Durham

46

4

50

East Sutton Park

0

0

0

Eastwood Park

~

0

~

Elmley

5

0

5

Erlestoke

~

~

~

Exeter

0

0

0

Featherstone

~

~

5

FelthamA

~

~

~

FelthamB

6

~

~

Ford

~

~

~

Forest Bank

4

5

9

Foston Hall

~

~

~

Frankland

12

~

~

Full Sutton

6

0

6

Garth

7

0

7

Gartree

25

9

34

Grendon

0

0

0

Guys Marsh

0

0

0

Hatfield

~

~

5

Haverigg

~

6

~

Hewell

37

9

46

High Down

14

~

~

Highpoint

12

~

~

Hindley

10

~

~

Hollesley Bay

~

~

~

Holme House

23

17

40

Hull

~

0

~

Humber

41

10

51

Huntercombe

~

~

5

Isis

4

6

10

Isle of Wight

~

0

~

Kirkham

5

~

~

Kirklevington Grange

~

0

~

Lancaster Farms

~

0

~

Leeds

4

~

~

Leicester

6

5

11

Lewes

~

0

~

Leyhill

0

0

0

Lincoln

~

4

~

Lindholme

10

0

10

Littlehey

9

6

15

Liverpool

20

~

~

Long Lartin

~

~

5

Low Newton

0

~

~

Lowdham Grange

~

0

~

Maidstone

~

~

~

Manchester

19

20

39

Medway (Adult)

0

0

0

Moorland

~

~

~

New Hall

~

5

~

North Sea Camp

~

0

~

Northumberland

14

~

~

Norwich

6

0

6

Nottingham

~

0

~

Oakwood

25

19

44

Onley

16

7

23

ParcA

~

0

~

ParcB

4

7

11

Pentonville

15

4

19

Peterborough Female

0

0

0

Peterborough Male

16

~

~

Portland

0

0

0

Prescoed

4

~

~

Preston

43

16

59

Ranby

7

5

12

Risley

20

16

36

Rochester

0

0

0

Rye Hill

6

~

~

Send

~

0

~

Stafford

5

0

5

Stanford Hill

0

~

~

Stocken

4

~

~

Stoke Heath

~

4

~

Springhill

0

~

~

Styal

~

0

~

Sudbury

~

~

4

Swaleside

~

0

~

Swansea

10

12

22

Swinfen Hall

5

6

11

Thameside

4

10

14

The Mount

9

5

14

The Verne

~

0

~

Thorn Cross

~

0

~

Usk

13

16

29

Wakefield

~

~

6

Wandsworth

~

11

~

Warren Hill

0

0

0

Wayland

0

0

0

Wealstun

~

0

~

Werrington

0

0

0

Wetherby

~

0

~

Whatton

0

~

~

Whitemoor

10

6

16

Winchester

23

~

~

Woodhill

23

0

23

Wormwood Scrubs

14

6

20

Wymott

14

15

29

Total estate wide

963

495

1458

The symbol ~ denotes suppressed values of 3 or fewer (and totals that would allow values of 3 or fewer to be calculated) to avoid the risk of identifying individuals.

*Data is split between Feltham A and Feltham B to account for different age groups

**Data is split between Parc A and B to account for different age groups

***Data is split for male and female sites at Peterborough

The tables below show the number of prisoners and prison staff who have sadly died having tested positive for COVID-19 or having shown symptoms. It is a matter for coroners to determine a cause of death. The data in the tables is correct as of Friday 12 June 2020.

Establishment

Number of prisoner deaths

HMP/YOI Altcourse

2

HMP/YOI Bedford

1

HMP/YOI Belmarsh

1

HMP Berwyn

1

HMP Channings Wood

2

HMP Durham

1

HMP Gartree

1

HMP Leicester

1

HMP Littlehey

3

HMP/YOI Low Newton

1

HMP/YOI Manchester

1

HMP/YOI New Hall

1

HMP Oakwood

1

HMP/YOI Peterborough

1

HMP Rye Hill

1

HMP/YOI Sudbury

1

HMP Usk

1

HMP Whatton

1

HMP Winchester

1

Total

23

Establishment

Number of prison staff deaths

HMP Dovegate

1

HMP/YOI Hollesley Bay

1

HMP/YOI Manchester

1

HMP/YOI Pentonville

2

HMP Thameside

1

HMP Usk

1

HMP/YOI Wymott

2

Total

9

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what proportion of new prison officers have left the profession within (a) one year, (b) two years and (c) three years of joining that profession.

Since 2016, we have recruited around 4,000 new prison officers who have worked through unprecedented challenges to protect prisoners and the public.

A larger workforce means more leavers, but we are working hard to retain staff with better pay, additional training to progress their careers, and significant investment in tools to keep them safe. All staff have access to services including 24/7 counselling, and occupational health assessments. In addition, there is work being undertaken directly with Governors to address local issues that will support experienced staff and new recruits to remain in the service.

The attached table includes proportion of Band 3-5 leavers.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many applications for legal aid have been made to the Legal Aid Agency in each month in 2020; and how many of those applications have been successful.

Information was recently released to answer PQs 42892 & 42893 for the calendar year 2019.

At the time of writing the Legal Aid Agency’s most recent quarterly National Statistics publication covers up to and including the third quarter of the financial year 2019/2020. Data for January – March 2020 inclusive is scheduled to be released on 25 June 2020 at which time monthly breakdowns of the information sought will be available upon request.

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/legal-aid-statistics

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many times the Legal Aid Agency has assessed that legal aid has been overpaid to a provider in each month in 2020.

Information was recently released to answer PQs 42892 & 42893 for the calendar year 2019.

At the time of writing the Legal Aid Agency’s most recent quarterly National Statistics publication covers up to and including the third quarter of the financial year 2019/2020. Data for January – March 2020 inclusive is scheduled to be released on 25 June 2020 at which time monthly breakdowns of the information sought will be available upon request.

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/legal-aid-statistics

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many tests for covid-19 his Department has supplied to (a) prisoners and (b) prison officers who have presented as being asymptomatic.

The Government has put robust measures in place to protect staff and offenders from COVID-19 and introduce ‘compartmentalisation’, to isolate those prisoners with symptoms, shield the vulnerable and quarantine new arrivals.

Overall, prisons are seeing a decline in the numbers of new cases. The data in the table below shows the number of confirmed COVID-19 cases broken down by prison as of Friday 12 June 2020. These figures reflect the total number of recorded positive cases of COVID-19 since the first confirmed cases in mid-March, not the number of live cases. It includes individuals that have recovered.

The numbers reported will be affected by a number of variables, including the availability of testing locally which can result in differences between sites and regions and as self-reported (for staff) through HMPPS management lines for central collation. As figures are as reported by prisons they may be subject to revision.

To date the Ministry of Justice has not collected data on asymptomatic prisoners and staff as it is not the government policy to test asymptomatic cases.

Establishment

Staff Cases

Prisoner Cases

Total Number of Cases by Establishment

Altcourse

24

15

39

Ashfield

0

0

0

Askham Grange

4

0

4

Aylesbury

~

0

~

Bedford

6

~

~

Belmarsh

12

7

19

Berwyn

33

40

73

Birmingham

22

~

~

Brinsford

22

5

27

Bristol

~

0

~

Brixton

0

~

~

Bronzefield

6

~

~

Buckley Hall

~

~

5

Bullingdon

~

0

~

Bure

~

0

~

Cardiff

24

22

46

Channings Wood

15

9

24

Chelmsford

10

~

~

Coldingley

5

~

~

Cookham Wood

~

~

~

Dartmoor

~

~

4

Deerbolt

8

~

~

Doncaster

12

8

20

Dovegate

8

~

~

Downview

4

0

4

Drake Hall

25

41

66

Durham

46

4

50

East Sutton Park

0

0

0

Eastwood Park

~

0

~

Elmley

5

0

5

Erlestoke

~

~

~

Exeter

0

0

0

Featherstone

~

~

5

FelthamA

~

~

~

FelthamB

6

~

~

Ford

~

~

~

Forest Bank

4

5

9

Foston Hall

~

~

~

Frankland

12

~

~

Full Sutton

6

0

6

Garth

7

0

7

Gartree

25

9

34

Grendon

0

0

0

Guys Marsh

0

0

0

Hatfield

~

~

5

Haverigg

~

6

~

Hewell

37

9

46

High Down

14

~

~

Highpoint

12

~

~

Hindley

10

~

~

Hollesley Bay

~

~

~

Holme House

23

17

40

Hull

~

0

~

Humber

41

10

51

Huntercombe

~

~

5

Isis

4

6

10

Isle of Wight

~

0

~

Kirkham

5

~

~

Kirklevington Grange

~

0

~

Lancaster Farms

~

0

~

Leeds

4

~

~

Leicester

6

5

11

Lewes

~

0

~

Leyhill

0

0

0

Lincoln

~

4

~

Lindholme

10

0

10

Littlehey

9

6

15

Liverpool

20

~

~

Long Lartin

~

~

5

Low Newton

0

~

~

Lowdham Grange

~

0

~

Maidstone

~

~

~

Manchester

19

20

39

Medway (Adult)

0

0

0

Moorland

~

~

~

New Hall

~

5

~

North Sea Camp

~

0

~

Northumberland

14

~

~

Norwich

6

0

6

Nottingham

~

0

~

Oakwood

25

19

44

Onley

16

7

23

ParcA

~

0

~

ParcB

4

7

11

Pentonville

15

4

19

Peterborough Female

0

0

0

Peterborough Male

16

~

~

Portland

0

0

0

Prescoed

4

~

~

Preston

43

16

59

Ranby

7

5

12

Risley

20

16

36

Rochester

0

0

0

Rye Hill

6

~

~

Send

~

0

~

Stafford

5

0

5

Stanford Hill

0

~

~

Stocken

4

~

~

Stoke Heath

~

4

~

Springhill

0

~

~

Styal

~

0

~

Sudbury

~

~

4

Swaleside

~

0

~

Swansea

10

12

22

Swinfen Hall

5

6

11

Thameside

4

10

14

The Mount

9

5

14

The Verne

~

0

~

Thorn Cross

~

0

~

Usk

13

16

29

Wakefield

~

~

6

Wandsworth

~

11

~

Warren Hill

0

0

0

Wayland

0

0

0

Wealstun

~

0

~

Werrington

0

0

0

Wetherby

~

0

~

Whatton

0

~

~

Whitemoor

10

6

16

Winchester

23

~

~

Woodhill

23

0

23

Wormwood Scrubs

14

6

20

Wymott

14

15

29

Total estate wide

963

495

1458

The symbol ~ denotes suppressed values of 3 or fewer (and totals that would allow values of 3 or fewer to be calculated) to avoid the risk of identifying individuals.

*Data is split between Feltham A and Feltham B to account for different age groups

**Data is split between Parc A and B to account for different age groups

***Data is split for male and female sites at Peterborough

The tables below show the number of prisoners and prison staff who have sadly died having tested positive for COVID-19 or having shown symptoms. It is a matter for coroners to determine a cause of death. The data in the tables is correct as of Friday 12 June 2020.

Establishment

Number of prisoner deaths

HMP/YOI Altcourse

2

HMP/YOI Bedford

1

HMP/YOI Belmarsh

1

HMP Berwyn

1

HMP Channings Wood

2

HMP Durham

1

HMP Gartree

1

HMP Leicester

1

HMP Littlehey

3

HMP/YOI Low Newton

1

HMP/YOI Manchester

1

HMP/YOI New Hall

1

HMP Oakwood

1

HMP/YOI Peterborough

1

HMP Rye Hill

1

HMP/YOI Sudbury

1

HMP Usk

1

HMP Whatton

1

HMP Winchester

1

Total

23

Establishment

Number of prison staff deaths

HMP Dovegate

1

HMP/YOI Hollesley Bay

1

HMP/YOI Manchester

1

HMP/YOI Pentonville

2

HMP Thameside

1

HMP Usk

1

HMP/YOI Wymott

2

Total

9

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many magistrates there are in England and Wales, and what proportion of magistrates are from a Black, Asian or Ethnic Minority background.

As at 1st April 2019, there were 14,348 magistrates in England and Wales. Approximately 12% (1,653) identified themselves as from a Black, Asian or Ethnic Minority background. This data is published in the annual Judicial Diversity Statistics.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many convictions have been secured in England and Wales for new offences under the Coronavirus Act 2020; and how many of those offences have been successfully appealed.

National Statistics on convictions for the first and second quarter of 2020 are due for publication in August and November 2020, with detailed offence level data for the whole of 2020 planned for publication in May 2021. Our statisticians are currently considering what suitable data from court management information systems could be gathered and prioritised for quality assurance and publication before then related to Covid-19 impacts, including potentially convictions for offences under the act. They will notify users through regular statistical publications.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
11th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many and what proportion of (a) directly and (b) non-directly employed HMPPS staff are currently (i) working from home, (ii) furloughed or (iii) attending the workplace, by grade; and if he will make a statement.

HMPPS is committed to the principle of maintaining social distancing and regular hand hygiene to protect staff and those in our care from COVID-19.

In HMPPS HQ, nearly all staff are working from home and able to carry out their usual duties. Only a small handful of staff continue to go into work where absolutely necessary. The vast majority of operational staff in prisons, however, continue to attend the workplace – for these staff we are providing PPE where appropriate. In probation, most offenders are being supervised remotely, enabling most probation staff to work remotely. Some probation staff will be required to attend the workplace for face-to-face appointments with the most complex and high-risk offenders. No HMPPS staff have been furloughed.

We are unable to provide data on the total number of HMPPS staff working from home (as this is collected by exception), nor can we provide data broken down by grade or by direct/non-direct employment status.

However, we are able to provide the total number of public sector prison and probation staff who are working from home and unable fulfil all of their usual duties outside of their usual place of work. The following table provides that information as at 8 May and also a breakdown of those staff as a proportion of our overall headcount of directly employed staff, and split for key operational grades.

HMPPS Service area

Total staff1

Proportion of total staff in post (headcount)

Staff at key operational grades2

Proportion of key operational grade staff in post (headcount)

Public sector prison staff including Youth Offender Institutes (directly employed staff only)

130

less than 1%

20

less than 1%

National Probation Service staff including Approved Premises

1280

11%

960

11%

Total

1400

3%

980

3%

Source: HMPPS COVID-19 absences data collection

1 Numbers may not sum due to rounding

2 Key operational grades refer to:

Prisons: Operational Support and Band 3-5 Prison Officers

National Probation Service: Residential workers and case administrators (approved Premises) Band 3-5 Probation Officers (NPS and Approved Premises)

Data Sources & Quality

These figures have been drawn from the HMPPS COVID-19 data collection. Care is taken when processing and analysing returns but the detail is subject to the inaccuracies inherent in any large scale recording system. Although shown to the last case, the figures may not be accurate to that level. This data has been self-reported and has not yet been checked against our central databases.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
11th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many and what proportion of (a) directly and (b) non-directly employed staff in his Department are currently (i) working from home, (ii) furloughed or (iii) attending the workplace, by grade; and if he will make a statement.

The Ministry of Justice is made up of HMCTS, HMPPS, an HQ, executive agencies and departmental ALBs. The figures below show all civil servants in this category excluding HMCTS and HMPPS. The majority of staff are working from home (approximated to 100%, as per the table below). A small number go into offices where there is a business need or because of personal circumstances, however this figure changes day-by-day. None have been furloughed.

MOJ (excluding HMPPS and HMCTS) payroll staff as at 30th April 2020

Senior Civil Servant

167

G7/G6

1,355

SEO

1,483

HEO (inc Fast Streamers)

1,361

EO

1,537

AO

1,692

AA

87

Not Known

39

Total

7,721

The figures below show non-payroll staff, who are non-directly employed. These include agency staff, interim managers, specialist contractors and consultants. The majority of staff are working from home (approximated to 100%, as per the table below). A small number go into offices where there is a business need or because of personal circumstances, however this figure changes day-by-day. None have been furloughed.

MOJ (excluding HMPPS and HMCTS) non-payroll staff as at 31st March 2020

Non-payroll staff

371

Non-payroll staff are not assigned to civil service grades, so the total is provided only.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
11th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many and what proportion of (a) directly and (b) non-directly employed HMCTS staff are currently (i) working from home, (ii) furloughed or (iii) attending the workplace, by grade; and if he will make a statement.

Our workforce is working in exceptional circumstances to keep the justice system running. We are committed to supporting our key worker staff by enabling them to work from home, work flexible hours or maintain social distancing in a physical location.

HMCTS has 18,973 staff (including permanent, Fixed Term Contract and Agency and Contractors) of which, as at 13 May 2020 a) the number of directly employed staff in HMCTS who are furloughed is Zero (i) 5293 staff (28%) are working from home (ii) 8303 staff (43%) are attending the workplace.

The number of non-directly employed agency HMCTS staff as at 30 Apr 2020 is 2383 of which 753 agency workers are currently fully/part furloughed. There are 495 agency workers who are fully furloughed. Therefore, of the overall agency headcount we have 38.3% of the overall agency headcount either fully/part furloughed and the fully furloughed equates to 20.77% of the overall agency headcount are furloughed.

We do not distinguish between our agency and directly employed staff in our data collection so the agency figures for working from home and attending the workplace are included in the overall figures provided above

We have also provided a breakdown of staff working from home by grade, however, we are not able to provide the same breakdown by grade for those attending the workplace. This is because our data collection is by exception rather than on all staff; i.e. we record the details of staff who fall into specific categories of work such as working from home or absence and then calculate the number attending the workplace by deducting all of the various work and absence categories from our overall headcount figure. Please note that all data provided is administrative data.

Admin Data - Working from Home by Grade as at 13 May 2020

Row Labels

Working from Home Headcount

% of total Working From Home

SCS

62

1%

Band A

434

8%

Band B

886

17%

Band C (& Fast Streamers)

593

11%

Band D

983

19%

Band E

1569

30%

Band F

45

1%

Not known

250

5%

Contractors

471

9%

Total

5293

6th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many applications have been made to the Legal Aid Agency hardship fund in each of the last six months; and what the average amount was paid to successful applicants.

The LAA is working to ensure it can continue to support the legal support sector, helping them maintain access to justice to their vulnerable clients. Details of what financial relief may be available for practitioners facing cashflow problems can be viewed at https://www.gov.uk/guidance/financial-relief-for-legal-aid-practitioners.

Historically, the LAA received a very low number of applications for payments made on grounds of hardship, usually numbering between 20 and 30 per year. As each claim was considered individually, the precise details of those claims processed over the last six months could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, MoJ have brought in regulation changes which substantially lower the thresholds at which a hardship claim can be submitted. As a result of the increase in claims anticipated by these amendments, these claims are now being more closely monitored. These regulation changes were introduced on 1st May, and therefore data in this capacity will be generated going forward, as such claims are received.

We will continue to work with the sector to ensure that the most vulnerable in society are provided with the representation and support they need through our legal aid system.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
4th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many prisoners have been released because they have come to the end of their sentence and were known to be going to no fixed abode in (a) February, (b) March and (c) April 2020.

The data on the number of prisoners released without a fixed address in February and March is due to be published on gov.uk on 30 July as part of the quarterly community performance statistics. The data for April 2020 is not yet available but is due for publication in July 2021.

It is vital that everyone leaving prison has somewhere safe and secure to live, as a platform to access the services and support needed to stop offending especially at this difficult time. It is our intention to make sure that no prisoner will be released without housing and health support being in place and we have set up seven Homelessness Prevention Taskforces to provide accommodation support for those eligible for early release and those in the community experiencing accommodation difficulties. We are also working in collaboration with several public, private and voluntary sector providers to secure a range of accommodation options.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
4th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many instances of self-harm by prisoners have been recorded in (a) February, (b) March and (c) April 2020.

Data about self-harm in prisons in England and Wales is published quarterly. The most recent figures, up to December 2019, can be viewed at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/safety-in-custody-quarterly-update-to-december-2019. Figures for January to March 2020 will be published on 30 July, and figures for April to June on 29 October.

Self-harm remains a huge concern. This is why we must continue to make prisons safer and ensure prisoners can access the support they need.

We have refreshed our partnership with the Samaritans by awarding a grant of £500,000 each year until 2021. This supports the specialist Listeners scheme, through which selected prisoners are trained to provide emotional support to their fellow prisoners.

We are also improving the effectiveness of the Assessment, Care in Custody and Teamwork procedures to better support those at risk of harming themselves.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
4th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many (a) men and (b) women in prison have died by suicide in (i) January, (ii) February, (iii) March and (iv) April 2020.

The numbers of self-inflicted deaths in the first three months of 2020 are set out below. Figures for April 2020 are not available yet; they will be published on 30 July.

MenWomen
January 202060
February 202030
March 202040

These figures are provisional. Other deaths where we are awaiting further information may later be classified as self-inflicted.

Too many prisoners are taking their own lives. That is one of the reasons we introduced the key worker scheme in 2018, supported by the recruitment of extra prison officers, so that every offender can get dedicated support and have someone to talk to.

We have given over 25,000 staff better training to identify and support those at risk of suicide and self-harm, and we are improving the effectiveness of the Assessment, Care in Custody and Teamwork process to support those at risk. We are also investing an extra £2.75 billion to modernise prisons, combat drug use and improve the environment in which offenders live.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
4th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many (a) men and (b) women in prison have died from natural causes that may have been exacerbated by contracting covid-19.

We are working hard to contain the spread of COVID-19 in the prison system as part of the national plan to protect the NHS and save lives. In our prisons and in the community, we are implementing a range of measures to reduce the spread of the transmission of the virus and the numbers of lives sadly lost.

As of 5pm on Tuesday, 12 May, we are aware of 19 men and 2 women in prison and 8 men and 2 women under probation supervision who have died from natural causes that may have been exacerbated by contracting COVID-19.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
4th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many (a) men and (b) women under probation supervision have died from natural causes that may have been exacerbated by contracting covid-19.

We are working hard to contain the spread of COVID-19 in the prison system as part of the national plan to protect the NHS and save lives. In our prisons and in the community, we are implementing a range of measures to reduce the spread of the transmission of the virus and the numbers of lives sadly lost.

As of 5pm on Tuesday, 12 May, we are aware of 19 men and 2 women in prison and 8 men and 2 women under probation supervision who have died from natural causes that may have been exacerbated by contracting COVID-19.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
4th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many (a) prisoners and (b) prison staff have been tested for covid-19 to date.

On 24 April, the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, announced the rollout of COVID-19 testing for all essential workers and symptomatic members of their household, including prison staff, those working in Approved Premises (APs) and probation staff (including private sector service providers) in England. We have referred over 3,000 HMPPS staff for testing to date.

In Wales, testing for prison, AP and probation staff and symptomatic members of their household is being delivered through local resilience forum arrangements and through Local Health Boards.

For prisoners, tests will be conducted on symptomatic prisoners on site. The testing capacity and availability can vary between establishments, depending on local circumstances at the time.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
4th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the ethnic background is of prisoners who have (a) tested positive for covid-19 and (b) died due to covid-19.

The Ministry of Justice is following Public Health England (PHE) advice on the shielding of vulnerable staff members and service-users. We are currently considering the risk posed to staff and service-users from black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) backgrounds as part of our steadfast commitment to safety, as well as our duty of care to our staff and those in our custody.

We do collect data on the ethnic background of prisoners who have a) tested positive for COVID-19 and (b) died due to COVID-19. We also collect data on prison and probation staff who have died due to COVID-19, though this does not include contractors other than employees of private prisons.

The Ministry of Justice recognises the need to capture ethnicity data and has built this into elements of the current reporting requirements. While we do collect self-reported test results from staff members, we are still in the process of linking this data to our HR records in order to assess it by protected characteristics, including ethnicity. The Ministry of Justice will continue to review COVID-19 data collection and how it can be built on and refined in line with General Data Protection Regulation and data protection legislation.

The data in the table below is correct as of 5pm on Tuesday, 12 May.

Ethnic background

Prisoners

Staff

Confirmed cases

Deaths

Confirmed Cases

Deaths

Prison

Probation

White British

314

19

N/K

4

1

Black British

33

1

N/K

3

0

Asian/Asian British

35

1

N/K

0

0

Mixed/other/unrecorded

22

0

N/K

0

3*

Total

404

21

N/K

7

4

*Agency staff information not available.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
4th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the ethnic background is of (a) prison and (b) probation staff who have (i) tested positive for covid-19 and (b) died due to covid-19.

The Ministry of Justice is following Public Health England (PHE) advice on the shielding of vulnerable staff members and service-users. We are currently considering the risk posed to staff and service-users from black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) backgrounds as part of our steadfast commitment to safety, as well as our duty of care to our staff and those in our custody.

We do collect data on the ethnic background of prisoners who have a) tested positive for COVID-19 and (b) died due to COVID-19. We also collect data on prison and probation staff who have died due to COVID-19, though this does not include contractors other than employees of private prisons.

The Ministry of Justice recognises the need to capture ethnicity data and has built this into elements of the current reporting requirements. While we do collect self-reported test results from staff members, we are still in the process of linking this data to our HR records in order to assess it by protected characteristics, including ethnicity. The Ministry of Justice will continue to review COVID-19 data collection and how it can be built on and refined in line with General Data Protection Regulation and data protection legislation.

The data in the table below is correct as of 5pm on Tuesday, 12 May.

Ethnic background

Prisoners

Staff

Confirmed cases

Deaths

Confirmed Cases

Deaths

Prison

Probation

White British

314

19

N/K

4

1

Black British

33

1

N/K

3

0

Asian/Asian British

35

1

N/K

0

0

Mixed/other/unrecorded

22

0

N/K

0

3*

Total

404

21

N/K

7

4

*Agency staff information not available.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
4th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what new contracts have been signed to deliver additional electronic tagging capacity for the temporary release scheme during the covid-19 outbreak.

We have been working with our existing suppliers to ensure we have the equipment required for the End of Custody Temporary Release (ECTR) scheme and have also signed two new contracts to deliver additional electronic tagging capacity.

An agreement was signed on 7th April 2020 with Buddi Ltd and on 22nd April 2020 with Attenti EM UK to provide 2000 electronic monitoring tags between them.

Both contracts are for 6 months duration with the provision to extend by a further 18 months if required. The services of these suppliers were contracted using the government’s existing Digital Marketplace G-Cloud framework and both have extensive UK and international experience in providing electronic monitoring technology.

We are considering alternative uses for tags not required for the ECTR scheme.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
4th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps his Department has taken to identify the number of (a) chambers and (b) solicitors firms facing financial difficulties due to the covid-19 outbreak.

We have maintained ongoing engagement with key representative bodies including the Law Society, Bar Council and other practitioner groups to identify the scale of the financial difficulties experienced across the legal services sector. This approach has enabled us to evaluate how the financial support from the Treasury is assisting the wider industry.

We have recently changed the rules around hardship payments, so that criminal legal aid practitioners can access payment for completed work sooner in a large number of additional cases, assisting the sector to continue operations during the crisis. We are also considering the wider issues relating to civil and criminal legal aid sustainability.

Our immediate priority is to enable workflow across the sector so that chambers and solicitors firms operate at increased capacity as soon as is practicable.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
4th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment his Department has made of the potential number of (a) chambers and (b) solicitors firms that will cease trading in the next (i) six months and (ii) twelve months due to financial pressures caused by the covid-19 outbreak.

We have maintained ongoing engagement with key representative bodies including the Law Society, Bar Council and other practitioner groups to identify the scale of the financial difficulties experienced across the legal services sector. This approach has enabled us to evaluate how the financial support from the Treasury is assisting the wider industry.

We have recently changed the rules around hardship payments, so that criminal legal aid practitioners can access payment for completed work sooner in a large number of additional cases, assisting the sector to continue operations during the crisis. We are also considering the wider issues relating to civil and criminal legal aid sustainability.

Our immediate priority is to enable workflow across the sector so that chambers and solicitors firms operate at increased capacity as soon as is practicable.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
4th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many applications have been made for legal aid to the Legal Aid Agency in each of the last 12 months; and what proportion of those applications were successful.

Applications for civil legal aid, January – December 2019

Month

Applications volumes

Applications successful

Proportion successful (%)

Jan-2019

9,710

9,011

93%

Feb-2019

9,441

8,736

93%

Mar-2019

10,573

9,822

93%

Apr-2019

9,919

9,185

93%

May-2019

10,577

9,807

93%

Jun-2019

9,652

8,994

93%

Jul-2019

11,337

10,548

93%

Aug-2019

9,861

9,181

93%

Sep-2019

9,762

9,079

93%

Oct-2019

11,341

10,523

93%

Nov-2019

10,262

9,518

93%

Dec-2019

8,615

8,033

93%

Applications for criminal legal aid, January – December 2019

Month

Volume of applications

Volume granted

Proportion successful (%)

Jan

28,209

27,174

96%

Feb

24,337

23,450

96%

Mar

26,075

25,215

97%

Apr

24,309

23,511

97%

May

26,705

25,765

96%

Jun

24,147

23,306

97%

Jul

27,035

26,188

97%

Aug

23,920

23,191

97%

Sep

23,633

22,901

97%

Oct

26,325

25,556

97%

Nov

23,923

23,153

97%

Dec

20,781

20,119

97%

Note: some applications classed as ‘unsuccessful’ may have been rejected for administrative reasons, as opposed to being refused for not meeting relevant eligibility criteria. An application may be refused due to a lack of merit in the case and/or the applicant not qualifying for public funding financially.

Identification and recovery of overpayments to providers, January – December 2019:

No. of Payment Errors

% of overall claims where error found

No. of Recoveries

% of errors where recovery made

% of £ paid in error recovered

Jan-19

1,631

1.37%

1611

98.77%

99.72%

Feb-19

1,263

1.00%

1244

98.50%

99.64%

Mar-19

1,307

1.02%

1291

98.78%

99.69%

Apr-19

1,186

0.82%

1167

98.40%

98.62%

May-19

737

0.49%

721

97.83%

98.52%

Jun-19

1,077

0.74%

1059

98.33%

99.21%

Jul-19

748

0.50%

733

97.99%

99.57%

Aug-19

574

0.39%

553

96.34%

99.59%

Sep-19

1047

0.75%

1026

97.99%

99.20%

Oct-19

1,539

1.02%

1519

98.70%

99.83%

Nov-19

845

0.56%

818

96.80%

99.42%

Dec-19

993

0.72%

977

98.39%

99.63%

These figures refer to errors concerning either the submission or assessment of claims.

A list of all legal aid providers holding a contract to deliver services can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/directory-of-legal-aid-providers. This can be filtered to show those providers holding a criminal legal aid contract only.

Whilst we hold robust data for individual self-employed advocates, they are generally paid directly by the Legal Aid Agency via their own individual legal aid account number, rather than via any chambers they may be tenanted at. Self-employed advocates also receive their instructions from the contract-holding solicitor with conduct of the matter, rather than via a contract with the Legal Aid Agency.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
4th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many times the Legal Aid Agency has assessed that legal aid has been overpaid to a provider in each of the last 12 months.

Applications for civil legal aid, January – December 2019

Month

Applications volumes

Applications successful

Proportion successful (%)

Jan-2019

9,710

9,011

93%

Feb-2019

9,441

8,736

93%

Mar-2019

10,573

9,822

93%

Apr-2019

9,919

9,185

93%

May-2019

10,577

9,807

93%

Jun-2019

9,652

8,994

93%

Jul-2019

11,337

10,548

93%

Aug-2019

9,861

9,181

93%

Sep-2019

9,762

9,079

93%

Oct-2019

11,341

10,523

93%

Nov-2019

10,262

9,518

93%

Dec-2019

8,615

8,033

93%

Applications for criminal legal aid, January – December 2019

Month

Volume of applications

Volume granted

Proportion successful (%)

Jan

28,209

27,174

96%

Feb

24,337

23,450

96%

Mar

26,075

25,215

97%

Apr

24,309

23,511

97%

May

26,705

25,765

96%

Jun

24,147

23,306

97%

Jul

27,035

26,188

97%

Aug

23,920

23,191

97%

Sep

23,633

22,901

97%

Oct

26,325

25,556

97%

Nov

23,923

23,153

97%

Dec

20,781

20,119

97%

Note: some applications classed as ‘unsuccessful’ may have been rejected for administrative reasons, as opposed to being refused for not meeting relevant eligibility criteria. An application may be refused due to a lack of merit in the case and/or the applicant not qualifying for public funding financially.

Identification and recovery of overpayments to providers, January – December 2019:

No. of Payment Errors

% of overall claims where error found

No. of Recoveries

% of errors where recovery made

% of £ paid in error recovered

Jan-19

1,631

1.37%

1611

98.77%

99.72%

Feb-19

1,263

1.00%

1244

98.50%

99.64%

Mar-19

1,307

1.02%

1291

98.78%

99.69%

Apr-19

1,186

0.82%

1167

98.40%

98.62%

May-19

737

0.49%

721

97.83%

98.52%

Jun-19

1,077

0.74%

1059

98.33%

99.21%

Jul-19

748

0.50%

733

97.99%

99.57%

Aug-19

574

0.39%

553

96.34%

99.59%

Sep-19

1047

0.75%

1026

97.99%

99.20%

Oct-19

1,539

1.02%

1519

98.70%

99.83%

Nov-19

845

0.56%

818

96.80%

99.42%

Dec-19

993

0.72%

977

98.39%

99.63%

These figures refer to errors concerning either the submission or assessment of claims.

A list of all legal aid providers holding a contract to deliver services can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/directory-of-legal-aid-providers. This can be filtered to show those providers holding a criminal legal aid contract only.

Whilst we hold robust data for individual self-employed advocates, they are generally paid directly by the Legal Aid Agency via their own individual legal aid account number, rather than via any chambers they may be tenanted at. Self-employed advocates also receive their instructions from the contract-holding solicitor with conduct of the matter, rather than via a contract with the Legal Aid Agency.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
4th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many times the Legal Aid Agency has been successful in seeking repayment of overpaid legal aid to a provider in each of the last 12 months.

Applications for civil legal aid, January – December 2019

Month

Applications volumes

Applications successful

Proportion successful (%)

Jan-2019

9,710

9,011

93%

Feb-2019

9,441

8,736

93%

Mar-2019

10,573

9,822

93%

Apr-2019

9,919

9,185

93%

May-2019

10,577

9,807

93%

Jun-2019

9,652

8,994

93%

Jul-2019

11,337

10,548

93%

Aug-2019

9,861

9,181

93%

Sep-2019

9,762

9,079

93%

Oct-2019

11,341

10,523

93%

Nov-2019

10,262

9,518

93%

Dec-2019

8,615

8,033

93%

Applications for criminal legal aid, January – December 2019

Month

Volume of applications

Volume granted

Proportion successful (%)

Jan

28,209

27,174

96%

Feb

24,337

23,450

96%

Mar

26,075

25,215

97%

Apr

24,309

23,511

97%

May

26,705

25,765

96%

Jun

24,147

23,306

97%

Jul

27,035

26,188

97%

Aug

23,920

23,191

97%

Sep

23,633

22,901

97%

Oct

26,325

25,556

97%

Nov

23,923

23,153

97%

Dec

20,781

20,119

97%

Note: some applications classed as ‘unsuccessful’ may have been rejected for administrative reasons, as opposed to being refused for not meeting relevant eligibility criteria. An application may be refused due to a lack of merit in the case and/or the applicant not qualifying for public funding financially.

Identification and recovery of overpayments to providers, January – December 2019:

No. of Payment Errors

% of overall claims where error found

No. of Recoveries

% of errors where recovery made

% of £ paid in error recovered

Jan-19

1,631

1.37%

1611

98.77%

99.72%

Feb-19

1,263

1.00%

1244

98.50%

99.64%

Mar-19

1,307

1.02%

1291

98.78%

99.69%

Apr-19

1,186

0.82%

1167

98.40%

98.62%

May-19

737

0.49%

721

97.83%

98.52%

Jun-19

1,077

0.74%

1059

98.33%

99.21%

Jul-19

748

0.50%

733

97.99%

99.57%

Aug-19

574

0.39%

553

96.34%

99.59%

Sep-19

1047

0.75%

1026

97.99%

99.20%

Oct-19

1,539

1.02%

1519

98.70%

99.83%

Nov-19

845

0.56%

818

96.80%

99.42%

Dec-19

993

0.72%

977

98.39%

99.63%

These figures refer to errors concerning either the submission or assessment of claims.

A list of all legal aid providers holding a contract to deliver services can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/directory-of-legal-aid-providers. This can be filtered to show those providers holding a criminal legal aid contract only.

Whilst we hold robust data for individual self-employed advocates, they are generally paid directly by the Legal Aid Agency via their own individual legal aid account number, rather than via any chambers they may be tenanted at. Self-employed advocates also receive their instructions from the contract-holding solicitor with conduct of the matter, rather than via a contract with the Legal Aid Agency.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
4th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many (a) chambers and (b) solicitors firms are registered as practising solely in criminal legal aid.

Applications for civil legal aid, January – December 2019

Month

Applications volumes

Applications successful

Proportion successful (%)

Jan-2019

9,710

9,011

93%

Feb-2019

9,441

8,736

93%

Mar-2019

10,573

9,822

93%

Apr-2019

9,919

9,185

93%

May-2019

10,577

9,807

93%

Jun-2019

9,652

8,994

93%

Jul-2019

11,337

10,548

93%

Aug-2019

9,861

9,181

93%

Sep-2019

9,762

9,079

93%

Oct-2019

11,341

10,523

93%

Nov-2019

10,262

9,518

93%

Dec-2019

8,615

8,033

93%

Applications for criminal legal aid, January – December 2019

Month

Volume of applications

Volume granted

Proportion successful (%)

Jan

28,209

27,174

96%

Feb

24,337

23,450

96%

Mar

26,075

25,215

97%

Apr

24,309

23,511

97%

May

26,705

25,765

96%

Jun

24,147

23,306

97%

Jul

27,035

26,188

97%

Aug

23,920

23,191

97%

Sep

23,633

22,901

97%

Oct

26,325

25,556

97%

Nov

23,923

23,153

97%

Dec

20,781

20,119

97%

Note: some applications classed as ‘unsuccessful’ may have been rejected for administrative reasons, as opposed to being refused for not meeting relevant eligibility criteria. An application may be refused due to a lack of merit in the case and/or the applicant not qualifying for public funding financially.

Identification and recovery of overpayments to providers, January – December 2019:

No. of Payment Errors

% of overall claims where error found

No. of Recoveries

% of errors where recovery made

% of £ paid in error recovered

Jan-19

1,631

1.37%

1611

98.77%

99.72%

Feb-19

1,263

1.00%

1244

98.50%

99.64%

Mar-19

1,307

1.02%

1291

98.78%

99.69%

Apr-19

1,186

0.82%

1167

98.40%

98.62%

May-19

737

0.49%

721

97.83%

98.52%

Jun-19

1,077

0.74%

1059

98.33%

99.21%

Jul-19

748

0.50%

733

97.99%

99.57%

Aug-19

574

0.39%

553

96.34%

99.59%

Sep-19

1047

0.75%

1026

97.99%

99.20%

Oct-19

1,539

1.02%

1519

98.70%

99.83%

Nov-19

845

0.56%

818

96.80%

99.42%

Dec-19

993

0.72%

977

98.39%

99.63%

These figures refer to errors concerning either the submission or assessment of claims.

A list of all legal aid providers holding a contract to deliver services can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/directory-of-legal-aid-providers. This can be filtered to show those providers holding a criminal legal aid contract only.

Whilst we hold robust data for individual self-employed advocates, they are generally paid directly by the Legal Aid Agency via their own individual legal aid account number, rather than via any chambers they may be tenanted at. Self-employed advocates also receive their instructions from the contract-holding solicitor with conduct of the matter, rather than via a contract with the Legal Aid Agency.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)