Tulip Siddiq Portrait

Tulip Siddiq

Labour - Hampstead and Kilburn

First elected: 7th May 2015

Shadow Minister (Treasury)

(since December 2021)

Select Committees
Finance Bill (since January 2024)
Child Support (Enforcement) Bill
22nd Feb 2023 - 1st Mar 2023
Employment Relations (Flexible Working) Bill
30th Nov 2022 - 7th Dec 2022
Worker Protection (Amendment of Equality Act 2010) Bill
16th Nov 2022 - 23rd Nov 2022
Financial Services and Markets Bill
12th Oct 2022 - 3rd Nov 2022
Public Service Pensions and Judicial Offices Bill [HL]
19th Jan 2022 - 27th Jan 2022
Shadow Minister (Education)
10th Apr 2020 - 4th Dec 2021
Women and Equalities Committee
11th Jun 2018 - 6th Nov 2019
Public Administration and Constitutional Affairs Committee
4th Jun 2018 - 6th Nov 2019
Women and Equalities Committee
11th Sep 2017 - 4th Jun 2018
Shadow Minister (Education) (Early Years)
9th Oct 2016 - 26th Jan 2017
Women and Equalities Committee
6th Jul 2015 - 26th Oct 2015


Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Tulip Siddiq has voted in 670 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Tulip Siddiq Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Andrew Griffith (Conservative)
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
(63 debate interactions)
Simon Clarke (Conservative)
(18 debate interactions)
Bim Afolami (Conservative)
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
(15 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
HM Treasury
(202 debate contributions)
Department for Education
(42 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
Legislation Debates
Financial Services and Markets Act 2023
(23,480 words contributed)
Finance Act 2024
(2,127 words contributed)
Flexible Working Bill 2021-22
(1,422 words contributed)
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View all Tulip Siddiq's debates

Hampstead and Kilburn Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petition Debates Contributed

Make it illegal for retailers and services to decline cash payments.

All businesses (excepting internet-based ones) and public services in which monetary transactions take place should be required by law to accept cash as a method of payment

The Government should not reduce the existing adult-child childcare ratios as has been suggested. There are surely better ways to reduce the cost of living – potentially endangering children in trusted care is not how it should be done.

Make specialist training mandatory for all police and other government agencies that support black women and girls affected by domestic abuse. Police and agencies should have culturally appropriate training to better understand the cultural needs of black women affected by domestic abuse.

Join other nations in providing a route to safety for refugees. Waive all visa requirements for Ukrainian passport holders arriving in the UK.

We have the second most expensive childcare system in the world. A full time place costs, on average, £14,000 per year, making it completely unaffordable for many families. Parents are forced to leave their jobs or work fewer hours, which has a negative impact on the economy and on child poverty.

We ask Parliament to repeal the High Speed Rail Bills, 2016 and 2019, as MPs voted on misleading environmental, financial and timetable information provided by the Dept of Transport and HS2 Ltd. It fails to address the conditions of the Paris Accord and costs have risen from £56bn to over £100bn.

Government should support vulnerable children & #endchildfoodpoverty by implementing 3 recommendations from the National Food Strategy to expand access to Free School Meals, provide meals & activities during holidays to stop holiday hunger & increase the value of and expand the Healthy Start scheme


Latest EDMs signed by Tulip Siddiq

26th October 2021
Tulip Siddiq signed this EDM as the primary signatory on Tuesday 26th October 2021

The service of Oliver Denton Lieberman

Tabled by: Tulip Siddiq (Labour - Hampstead and Kilburn)
That this House recognises Oliver Denton Lieberman’s dedication and public service as an office manager during many turbulent years in politics; appreciates that he has coordinated the campaign within Parliament to free Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe and supported her family; acknowledges the role he has played in running an efficient office and …
17 signatures
(Most recent: 29 Oct 2021)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 14
Independent: 2
Scottish National Party: 1
27th May 2021
Tulip Siddiq signed this EDM as a sponsor on Thursday 27th May 2021

Care Planning, Placement and Case Review (England) (Amendment) Regulations 2021 (S.I., 2021, No. 161) (No. 2)

Tabled by: Keir Starmer (Labour - Holborn and St Pancras)
That this House believes no child in care should be placed in unregulated accommodation; welcomes measures to ban unregulated accommodation for children aged 15 and under; and regrets the failure of the Care Planning, Placement and Case Review (England) (Amendment) Regulations 2021 (S.I., 2021, No. 161) to extend this ban …
13 signatures
(Most recent: 24 Jan 2022)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 10
Green Party: 1
Independent: 1
Liberal Democrat: 1
View All Tulip Siddiq's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Tulip Siddiq, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


1 Urgent Question tabled by Tulip Siddiq

Tulip Siddiq has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

2 Bills introduced by Tulip Siddiq


A Bill to give workers the right to flexible working from the first day of employment except in exceptional circumstances; to require employers to offer flexible working arrangements in employment contracts and advertise the available types of such flexibility in vacancy notices; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 40%

Last Event - 2nd Reading
Friday 6th May 2022

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to make provision for a maximum period of detention under the Immigration Act 1971 of 28 days; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 5th December 2018
(Read Debate)

Latest 50 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
2 Other Department Questions
24th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, whether her Department plans to change the penalties imposed on people who have not paid for their TV licence because they cannot afford to.

The BBC is responsible for the collection and enforcement of the licence fee, not the Government. The Government expects the BBC to collect the licence fee in an efficient and proportionate manner.

The requirement to hold a TV Licence is set out in the Communications Act 2003 and the Communications (Television Licensing) 2004. The current cost of a TV licence is £159 with the maximum penalty for TV licence evasion being a fine of £1,000. The sentencing court will determine the level of the fine. MOJ statistics indicate that the average fine is around £175.

In February 2020, the Government launched a public consultation on decriminalising TV licence evasion. The responses highlighted the considerable stress and anxiety the criminal sanction can cause for individuals, including the most vulnerable in society.

The Government remains concerned that a criminal sanction for TV licence evasion is increasingly disproportionate and unfair in a modern public service broadcasting system. We will be looking at ways to ensure the BBC’s funding model is sustainable in the long-term, which will include asking whether a mandatory licence fee with criminal penalties for individual households is still appropriate.

The Government has also taken steps to support licence fee payers. This includes freezing the licence fee for two years, which aims to support households at a time when they need that support the most. The Government also introduced the Simple Payment Plan in April 2020, a flexible payment instalment scheme that allows customers to pay in fortnightly or monthly instalments throughout the year, and is available to certain customers who currently struggle to pay the TV licence fee. More information on the Simple Payment Plan and its eligibility criteria can be found here.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
16th Mar 2021
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what the Government’s policy is on membership clubs that exclude women.

Under Part 7 and Schedule 16 of the Equality Act 2010, associations, including private clubs, may lawfully restrict their membership to people who share a characteristic, such as sex. This provides scope for associations to restrict membership only to women, as well as those restricting membership only to men.

This is based on the understanding that, if a group of private individuals wish to form a club, then it is appropriate that they should be able to determine membership of the club.

It is however unlawful for a private club that restricts its membership to people who share a particular protected characteristic to discriminate against members, associates, or guests because of other protected characteristics.

Kemi Badenoch
President of the Board of Trade
21st Apr 2022
To ask the Attorney General, what is the status under UK law of Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe's (a) 2016 and (b) conviction by the Revolutionary Court in Iran.

A determination of the status in UK law of the findings of courts in foreign jurisdictions is a matter for the UK courts, as and when the need arises for such a determination in domestic proceedings.

The Government is delighted that after years of detention, Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe is safely home and has been reunited with her family and loved ones.

Alex Chalk
Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice
2nd Feb 2021
To ask the Attorney General, pursuant to the Answer of 28 January 2021 to Question 143029 on Taking of Hostages Act 1982: Prosecutions, how many proceedings referred to her Office under article 2 of the Taking of Hostages Act 1982 by the Crown Prosecution Service her Office has consented to prosecute in the last 10 years.

Our records indicate that the Law Officers have consented to prosecutions under the Taking of Hostages Act 1982 on four occasions in the last 10 years.

1st Feb 2021
To ask the Attorney General, how many and what proportion of the staff employed by her Department are apprentices.

The Attorney General’s Office currently have no apprentices. As staffing levels are below 250 the Department does not meet the criteria for the 2.3% target. However, plans are nevertheless in place to recruit 2 or 3 apprentices.

25th Jan 2021
To ask the Attorney General, how many proceedings for an offence under article 2 of the Taking of Hostages Act (1982) her office has instituted in the last 10 years.

The Law Officers do not institute proceedings under this legislation but must consent to any prosecution brought under it. The Crown Prosecution Service would ordinarily institute such proceedings.

The Law Officers apply the established principles of evidential sufficiency and public interest, which have their current expression in the Code for Crown Prosecutors, when considering an application for consent. We act quasi-judicially and independent of government. We do so in accordance with the Framework Agreement between the Law Officers and the Director of Public Prosecutions.

25th Jan 2021
To ask the Attorney General, on what basis she makes an assessment of the applications for instituting proceedings for an offence under article 2 of the Taking of Hostages Act 1982; and whether her Department has published guidance for preparing such applications.

The Law Officers do not institute proceedings under this legislation but must consent to any prosecution brought under it. The Crown Prosecution Service would ordinarily institute such proceedings.

The Law Officers apply the established principles of evidential sufficiency and public interest, which have their current expression in the Code for Crown Prosecutors, when considering an application for consent. We act quasi-judicially and independent of government. We do so in accordance with the Framework Agreement between the Law Officers and the Director of Public Prosecutions.

5th Feb 2024
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that Government data which is shared with third-party organisations is protected.

The Central Digital and Data Office, in the Cabinet Office, sets the policy and leads the cross-government approach to the safe, ethical, legal and secure sharing of government data. They work with the Government Security Group, who also lead on the topic of Supply Chain Security.

When sharing personal data with third party organisations, departments must make sure data is used fairly, lawfully and transparently, in compliance with the data protection principles set in UK GDPR and the Data Protection Act 2018. This includes having the requisite data protection controls and governance in place and working with vendors and partners to identify and remediate any risks. All government contracts with suppliers must consider the security of all information and set expectations for how it should be protected.

Departments are responsible for managing their security risks, including the risks to their information that is held and processed by authorised third-parties. The Government Security Standard, local security policies and assurance frameworks such as the Cyber Assessment Framework set out how they should do this. These frameworks and good practice have been collaboratively developed by the Cabinet Office, the National Cyber Security Centre and Departments themselves.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
29th Jun 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the cost to the public purse was of the Emergency alert test on 23 April 2023; and whether a value-for-money analysis was carried out.

The Government’s number one job is to keep people safe. Emergency Alerts are a critical new tool in the Government’s toolkit for warning and informing people where their lives are at risk.

The total cost to date of developing the technical architecture and systems that underpin the emergency alert system, in addition to the first three years of operational delivery, will be a maximum of £25.3 million.

All the contracts were established using the civil service public procurement policy. The tender process was therefore subject to a legal framework which encountered free and open competition and value for money, in line with internationally and nationally agreed obligations and regulations.

The capability is currently within a trial period, which will review its use in the live and exercise environment. Any assessments of value for money will be carried out on completion of this.

14th Jun 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether his Department plans to extend compensation payments to the children of people affected by the infected blood scandal who died before they were able to receive payment.

The recommendations of the Infected Blood Inquiry’s second interim report are still under consideration by the Government. I recognise this is a matter of great importance to many in this House, and I was grateful for the opportunity to update the House on this on 22 June.

14th Jun 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether his Department plans to extend infected blood compensation payments to the children of people affected who died before they were able to receive payment.

The recommendations of the Infected Blood Inquiry’s second interim report are still under consideration by the Government. I recognise this is a matter of great importance to many in this House, and I was grateful for the opportunity to update the House on this on 22 June.

14th Apr 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 30 March 2023 to Question 173042, whether the investigator has reported to the Prime Minister on the investigation into allegations of bullying made against the Rt hon. Member for Esher and Walton.

The findings of Adam Tolley KC have been published and are available on the gov.uk website. https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/investigation-report-to-the-prime-minister



24th Mar 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether the evidence gathering stage of the inquiry into allegations of bullying made against the Rt hon. Member for Esher and Walton has concluded.

It would not be appropriate to comment on an ongoing independent investigation.

As set out in the published Terms of Reference, the investigator will report to the Prime Minister on the investigation and the report of the investigation will be made public.



9th Feb 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many (a) phones were reported as stolen and (b) people were prosecuted for phone theft in each of the last five years.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority.

A response to the Hon. Member's Parliamentary Question of 9 February is attached.

15th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of extending financial compensation to bereaved parents and children of people given contaminated blood.

Sir Robert Francis QC has been appointed to carry out an independent study to provide Government with advice and recommendations about a potential framework for compensation to the infected and affected communities. The terms of reference of the study includes consideration of whether compensation should be extended to parents and children. These can be found on gov.uk: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/infected-blood-compensation-framework-study-terms-of-reference.

17th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the scientific basis is for the Government's decision to restrict marriage ceremonies to places of worship or public buildings.

Guidance for small marriages and civil partnerships was published on 22 March and can be found here - https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-guidance-for-small-marriages-and-civil-partnerships/covid-19-guidance-for-small-marriages-and-civil-partnerships#wedding-and-civil-partnership-ceremony-venues

We recognise that any restrictions on wedding venues may be disappointing for those planning such events, but we have to take necessary steps to limit transmission of COVID-19. This includes the closure of some settings and restrictions on social contact, including wedding and civil partnership ceremonies. By their very nature, weddings and civil partnership ceremonies are events that bring families and friends together, making them particularly vulnerable to the spread of COVID-19. We appreciate the sacrifices people have had to make across the COVID-19 pandemic and we do not wish to keep any restrictions in place longer than we need to.

In the COVID-19 Response - Spring 2021, the Government has set out the gradual and cautious approach to reopening in England, guided by science and the data, including the staged return of weddings and civil partnerships, as well as sporting events.

In order to inform the pace and sequencing of the roadmap, the Government commissioned advice and modelling from SAGE and its sub-groups. Scientific evidence supporting the government response to coronavirus is regularly published here - https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/scientific-evidence-supporting-the-government-response-to-coronavirus-covid-19.

Penny Mordaunt
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
1st Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many and what proportion of the staff employed by No 10 Downing Street are apprentices.

As has been the case under successive administrations, the Prime Minister’s Office and the Government in Parliament are an integral part of the Cabinet Office.

As of 31 January 2021, apprentices make up 2.13% of the department’s workforce.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
13th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what scientific evidence his Department is using to base its decision to restrict marriage ceremonies to only couples with exceptional circumstances under the January 2021 covid-19 lockdown restrictions.

On 4 January, the Prime Minister announced a National Lockdown for all of England, in accordance with growing evidence of virus prevalence. Under these new restrictions, weddings and civil partnership ceremonies should only take place in exceptional circumstances. Up to six people can attend (including the couple). Anyone working is not included in that limit.

We recognise the restrictions may be disappointing for those planning such events. By their nature, weddings and civil partnership ceremonies are events that bring families and friends together, including from across the country and sometimes across the world, making them particularly vulnerable to the spread of COVID-19. We do not wish to keep restrictions in place for any longer than we have to, and restrictions will be kept under review in line with the changing situation. For further information, please refer to the guidance for small weddings and civil partnerships https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-guidance-for-small-marriages-and-civil-partnerships/covid-19-guidance-for-small-marriages-and-civil-partnerships. There is different advice for Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

The government continues to regularly make available scientific evidence supporting its COVID-19 response, including at https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/scientific-evidence-supporting-the-government-response-to-coronavirus-covid-19.

On 22 February, the Prime Minister will set out the plan for reopening schools, and gradually reopening the economy and society, in a sustainable way in England.

For further information, please refer to the Coronavirus (COVID‑19) page on gov.uk, which will publish further information regarding the roadmap on 22 February, https://www.gov.uk/coronavirus.

Penny Mordaunt
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
17th Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to his Answer of 3 November 2020 to Question 108274 on Cabinet Office: Audit and with reference to the joint ventures listed on page 26 of the Cabinet Office 2019-20 annual report, if he could set out (a) who audits the accounts and (b) whether the accounts are laid before Parliament of (i) Behavioural Insights Team (BIT), (ii) Axelos, (iii) Shared Services Connected Limited (SSCL), (iv) Integrated Debt Services (Indesser) and (v) Crown Hosting Data Centres.

Auditors are named in each company’s annual accounts, copies of which are available from the Companies House website.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
17th Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to his Answer of 2 November 2020 to Question 107705 on Government Departments: Email, what cross-government controls exist to ensure that Ministers' and Special Advisors' emails or other communication records are retained in accordance with record keeping policy.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
12th Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what assessment his Department has made of the financial effect on widowed people of the civil service pension rules on remarriage and cohabitation.

The Government Actuary’s Department completed the quadrennial actuarial valuation as at 31 March 2016 and showed that the average annual pension for surviving adult dependants in the Civil Service pension arrangements was around £2,100 for male dependants and around £4,700 for female dependants. The pensions of widows, widowers and surviving civil partner pensions, under the Classic section of the Principal Civil Service Pension Scheme, cease if they remarry or cohabit. An average of around 120 pensions cease on remarriage or cohabitation per year for the period 2008 to 2019.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
23rd Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many companies or entities his Department (a) controls or (b) has significant influence over whose accounts are not audited by the National Audit Office.

All Cabinet Office arms length bodies are audited by the National Audit Office.

Details of Cabinet Office Joint Ventures are published in the annual report.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
23rd Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what review he has made of (a) his Department’s and (c) cross-Government audit arrangements for Government contracts in the last 12 months; and what changes he has made to those arrangements to ensure (i) their adequacy and (ii) manage risk in relation to the extraordinary procurements undertaken during the covid-19 outbreak.

As has been the case under successive administrations, departments are responsible for their commercial decisions, including the award and monitoring of contracts. Departmental Accounting Officers are responsible for managing risk and agreeing annual audit plans. The Cabinet Office has internal and external audits related to its contractual arrangements. Further audits are planned this financial year.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
22nd Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what guidance his Department has issued cross-government on how long emails should be retained by Departments for (a) civil servants, (b) special advisors and (c) Ministers.

Departments are responsible for their own record keeping. Record management requirements do not differ between civil servants (including special advisers) and Ministers. The Cabinet Office has not issued cross-government guidance on how long emails should be retained.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
25th Jun 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what controls his Department requires from Government departments to identify and disclose the award of Government contracts to entities owned or controlled by Government ministers and senior civil servants from their own or other departments.

Ministers and Civil Servants are bound respectively by the requirements of the Ministerial Code, the Civil Service Code and the Civil Service Management Code, which include provisions for the management of potential conflicts of interest.

25th Jun 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what controls his Department requires from Government departments to identify and disclose the award of Government contracts to entities owned or controlled by major political party donors.

Ministers and Civil Servants are bound respectively by the requirements of the Ministerial Code, the Civil Service Code and the Civil Service Management Code, which include provisions for the management of potential conflicts of interest.

6th Feb 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what information his Department holds on the use of offshore accounts by government decision makers; and whether additional risk controls or mitigations are put in place where the use of offshore accounts by those individuals is identified.

I refer the Hon. member to the response which I gave to PQ 12393 on Monday 10 February.

All public office holders are expected to comply with the law as it applies to offshore banking activity.

Oliver Dowden
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
4th Feb 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, when his Department last undertook a review of the adequacy of controls on the use of offshore bank accounts by Ministers and senior civil servants.

I refer the Hon. Member to the answer which I gave to PQ 8404 on Monday 3 February 2020.

Oliver Dowden
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
27th Jan 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the requirements are for (a) senior officials and (b) Ministers of his Department to disclose their ownership and use of offshore banking arrangements.

All public office holders are expected to comply with the law as it applies to offshore banking activity.

Ministers and Civil Servants must also uphold the standards of conduct as set out in the Ministerial and Civil Service Code respectively, as well as the seven principles of public life.

Oliver Dowden
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
8th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, what steps her Department is taking to prevent companies being set up using other people's personal information without their consent.

The Economic Crime and Corporate Transparency Act 2023 amends the Companies Act 2006 to introduce a range of measures aimed at preventing the abuse of personal information. Once commenced, these will mean that (amongst other things) those incorporating and running companies will be required to verify their identities, and that the registrar of companies will have enhanced powers to ensure that people’s personal addresses are not misused.

Kevin Hollinrake
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
8th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, whether her Department has made an assessment of the potential merits of introducing the compulsory labelling of products to indicate whether they were British-made or imported.

Aside from certain specified products such as food there is no requirement for goods to be labelled with their country of origin. The Government does not have plans to introduce such a requirement on behalf of consumers.

Under the Consumer Protection from Unfair Trading Regulations 2008, traders are banned from using misleading statements about the geographical or commercial origin of products including in response to requests for information by consumers.

Kevin Hollinrake
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
19th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, when she plans to bring forward legislative proposals to implement the Sustainability Disclosure Standards.

The Green Finance Strategy (March 2023) set out the Government’s plans for endorsement of the International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) Foundation’s recently published sustainability disclosure standards. This document explained that the Government is establishing an endorsement process that will assess the suitability of the standards for use for UK companies, with the aim of publishing a UK-endorsed version of the standards that could be used by UK companies. This version of the standards will form the basis of any regulatory or legal changes that Government or the Financial Conduct Authority may wish to make at a later stage.

Kevin Hollinrake
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
13th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, if her Department will make an assessment of the potential merits of introducing a minimum time period after which gift cards can expire.

Whilst there is no legal minimum term for the validity of gift cards, the Government has worked with the UK Gift Card & Voucher Association (GCVA) to encourage businesses to use expiry dates of at least two years and has made it clear that retailers should be transparent about the terms and conditions offered to consumers including card expiry dates.

We asked the Law Commission to consider the issue of gift card and voucher expiry terms and they concluded that there was not a need to introduce additional measures in this area.

Kevin Hollinrake
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
19th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, what steps her Department is taking to reduce the ethnicity pay gap.

This Government remains committed to tackling all areas of disparities in this country, including in employment. It is crucial that everyone is treated fairly in the workplace, so that they can thrive and reach their full potential and we want to ensure that everyone has access to the same employment opportunities.

Ethnicity pay gap reporting is just one type of tool to assist employers in doing this and it may not always be the most appropriate mechanism for some types of organisation. Therefore, as set out in the “Inclusive Britain” report published in March 2022, the Government will not be legislating to make ethnicity pay reporting mandatory at this stage. Instead we have produced guidance to support those who wish to report voluntarily.  This was published earlier this month.

Kevin Hollinrake
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
29th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, what non-educational funding is available to support small businesses that wish to (a) exhibit and (b) export trade overseas.

The Department for Business and Trade (DBT) is planning to spend over £200 million, over the Spending Review period, to support Small and Medium-sized Enterprises (SMEs). Financial assistance for businesses is available through the British Business Bank and UK Export Finance.

Furthermore, local authorities have been given £2.6 billion over the Spending Review period, through the Shared Prosperity Fund, to provide support – including export help – to businesses in their areas.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
9th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, what assessment she has made of the adequacy of funding available for smaller companies to exhibit their trade overseas; and whether she has made an assessment of how that support compares to that offered by other countries in the World Trade Organisation.

Since launching on 30 November 2021, the UK Tradeshow Programme has had 419 applications seeking support to exhibit at (258), or attend (161*), trade shows overseas.

The programme is currently running as a 16-month feasibility study, ending on 31 March 2023, and research to evaluate the programme is ongoing.

As outlined in our 2021 Export Strategy “Made in the UK, sold to the World”, the Department is committed to improving exporting opportunities for businesses and monitoring our performance in this area to ensure continuous improvement.

*Pursuant to my replies to the hon. Member for Torfaen on 9 February 2023, UIN 126730 and 126731, which stated 164 attendee applications had been received, three applications have since been resolved as incomplete.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
9th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, how many small businesses received support via the UK Trade Programme in 2022; and what assessment she has made of the adequacy of the availability of that support.

Since launching on 30 November 2021, the UK Tradeshow Programme has had 419 applications seeking support to exhibit at (258), or attend (161*), trade shows overseas.

The programme is currently running as a 16-month feasibility study, ending on 31 March 2023, and research to evaluate the programme is ongoing.

As outlined in our 2021 Export Strategy “Made in the UK, sold to the World”, the Department is committed to improving exporting opportunities for businesses and monitoring our performance in this area to ensure continuous improvement.

*Pursuant to my replies to the hon. Member for Torfaen on 9 February 2023, UIN 126730 and 126731, which stated 164 attendee applications had been received, three applications have since been resolved as incomplete.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
26th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what steps she is taking to ensure that the Government meets its heat pump installation targets.

The Government is committed to growing the market to 600,000 heat pump installations a year by 2028. We are supporting installations through schemes like the Boiler Upgrade Scheme, Social Housing Decarbonisation Scheme and Energy Company Obligation. From 2025, we expect the Future Homes Standard and the Clean Heat Market Mechanism to support further market growth.

The Government is supporting the supply chain, through Heat Pump Investment Accelerator Competition for manufacturers and the Heat Training Grant. We are also consulting on changes to Permitted Development Rights to make it easier for people who want a heat pump to install one.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
25th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what recent assessment he has made of the impact of the increases in the cost of living on affordability of communal heating charges.

The Government has recognised that increases in the cost of living have impacted the bills paid by heat network consumers. The Government has therefore introduced the Energy Bills Discount Scheme, and previously the Energy Bill Relief Scheme, which support heat networks. Bills will vary depending on consumption levels, network efficiency, and other variables. The table below estimates the variable gas cost element of a bill for a customer consuming 7,000 kWh of heat on a gas heat network. It includes the impact of gas prices and government support schemes. Costs such as maintenance and standing charges have not been included.

Time period

Estimated annualised heat network heat bill (7,000 kWh of heat, fuel cost only)

April 2023 - June 2023 Energy Bill Discount Scheme supporting heat networks.

£861

October 2022 – March 2023 Energy Bill Relief Scheme supporting heat networks.

£1,037

March 2022 – September 2022 No government support scheme in place for heat networks.

£968

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
25th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what steps the Government is taking to support Gypsy, Roma and Traveller people with the impact of rises in the cost of living; and whether those groups are eligible for support under (a) the Energy Bills Support Scheme-Alternative Funding and (b) the Alternative Fuels Payment.

As part of the application process for these schemes, the Government require applicants to show proof of address, such as a tenancy agreement or a utility bill, to protect public funds against fraud. The Government understand that some Gypsy and Traveller households may not be able provide this evidence, which means they won’t currently be able to receive the EBSS AF or the AFP AF. Officials are working to establish whether there is a robust method for them to provide proof of eligibility, whilst protecting public funds, so they can receive support.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
9th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, whether her Department has made an assessment of the potential merits of including measures to help tackle fake online reviews in the Online Safety Bill.

Online fake reviews are not within scope of the Online Safety Bill but are being addressed through separate legislation. The new Digital Markets and Consumers Competition Bill, which was introduced to Parliament on 25 April, includes a delegated power to amend the ‘blacklist’ of automatically unfair practices set out in the Bill.

The first intended use of this power is to add practices related to fake and misleading reviews following consultation during Bill passage. This will give greater clarity to business and consumers and, where fake reviews are posted, allow enforcers to take effective action quickly.

9th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, whether the Government has made an assessment of the potential merits of reforming the recording regulations in the Data Protection Act 1998 to ensure that consent is obtained from all parties before the processing of data can take place.

The UK’s data protection legislation is now set out in the Data Protection Act 2018 and UK General Data Protection Regulation. Like the previous legislation, consent is not the only lawful ground on which processing of personal data can occur. For example, it might be necessary for organisations to process data for public interest reasons, such as crime prevention or safeguarding, without seeking the consent of the individual first. Similarly, there may be some non-intrusive commercial activities that customers may reasonably expect organisations to take without seeking their specific consent.

We are taking steps in the Data Protection and Digital Information (No. 2) Bill to reform aspects of the current legislation. Where processing of personal data is based on a person’s consent, the Bill will not make any changes to the rules which require consent to be freely given, specific and informed. The Bill will make some changes to existing record-keeping requirements which can place unnecessary burdens on small businesses in particular. In the future, organisations will only have to keep records of their processing activities if their processing activities are likely to pose high risks to the rights and freedoms of individuals. This will help to make sure that organisations are not spending disproportionate amounts of time and resources on unnecessary paperwork.

24th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, what recent assessment her Department has made of the effectiveness of Tech Nation.

The Department's assessment of Tech Nation is focused on the effectiveness of activities that were paid for with government grant funding, rather than on the organisation as a whole. To this end, robust monitoring and evaluation processes were in place throughout the grant-funded period to ensure taxpayers’ money was spent properly and responsibly.

In addition to monthly and quarterly monitoring, we undertook independent evaluations of our grant to Tech Nation, as per Government requirements. The most recent published assessment of Tech Nation’s activities funded by the Department was published in October 2020.

In November 2022, we commissioned an economic consultancy to undertake a second independent evaluation of our grant funding to Tech Nation. This evaluation will cover the 20/21-22/23 funding period and will assess the impact of the grant, in addition to capturing lessons learned from the Tech Nation programmes. The report's findings will be published in due course.

We thank Tech Nation for their valuable work over the years and their lasting impact on the UK tech sector.

9th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, what assessment her Department has made of the safety of human-level machine learning systems; and what steps she is taking to support AI safety research.

To address the potential risks and opportunities presented by AI technology, the Office for AI is working at pace to develop a White Paper setting out our position on regulating AI.

Our starting point is that the best way to realise the full economic and societal potential of AI is through a context-based approach to regulation, leveraging the sector expertise of our world-class regulators and focusing on real risks arising from the use of AI rather than the technology itself. This approach will establish a framework based on a set of cross-cutting principles to inform how regulators should tackle risks.

As indicated by our policy statement in July 2022, we will ensure our approach to AI regulation is risk based, proportionate, and adaptable. Our approach will also look for ways to ensure effective horizon scanning, to monitor both immediate and long term AI risks. We will also make sure we deploy the full range of non-regulatory tools to support effective governance – including technical standards and assurance.

In October 2022, we launched the AI Standards Hub, led by the Alan Turing Institute, to amplify the UK’s voice in the development of global technical standards for responsible AI. The Centre for Data Ethics and Innovation have also set out their AI Assurance roadmap which aims to build an ecosystem for AI assurance.

Alongside this, the Government provides funding via UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) for academic research, and last year, the Arts and Humanities Research Council announced £8.5m funding for research towards safe and ethical AI.

Together, Government funding will ensure that the UK remains at the forefront of AI research globally – with research from the UK the third most cited globally, behind only the US and China.

23rd Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he has plans to make (a) swimming pools and (b) leisure centres eligible for support under the Energy Intensive Industries Exemption Scheme.

There are currently no plans to review the list of Energy and Trade Intensive Industries eligible for support under the Energy Bill Discount Scheme. The Government has taken a consistent approach to identifying the most energy and trade intensive sectors, with all sectors that meet agreed thresholds for energy and trade intensity eligible for Energy and Trade Intensive Industries support. These thresholds have been set at sectors falling above the 80th percentile for energy intensity and 60th percentile for trade intensity, plus any sectors eligible for the existing energy compensation and exemption schemes.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
20th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the BEIS consultation entitled Making Flexible Working the Default published in September 2021, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of mandating publishing of parental leave policies as part of gender pay gap reporting.

The Government consulted on whether employers should be required to publish and report on their family-related leave and pay policies in 2019. Having reviewed consultation responses from a range of stakeholders and taken account of the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic, the Government decided that such a requirement should be considered as part of the process of considering how successful the Gender Pay Gap Reporting Regulations have been, and how Gender Pay Gap Reporting may be taken forward.

A fully considered review of Gender Pay Gap Reporting will be published in due course.

Kevin Hollinrake
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
20th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of introducing a day one right to request flexible working from job offer rather than first day of employment.

The Government consulted on whether all employees should be given a ‘day one’ right to request flexible working in 2021. Having reviewed consultation responses from a range of stakeholders, the Government decided to proceed with plans to extend the right to all employees from their first day of employment.

This conclusion was set out in our response to the consultation “Making Flexible Working the Default”, which was published in September 2022.

Kevin Hollinrake
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
20th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department is taking to help protect industry from potential risks posed by future pandemics; and if he will increase research and development science spending to help reduce those risks.

The UK is at the forefront of pandemic preparedness research, including the development of advanced vaccines, building on the success of the Oxford AstraZeneca Vaccine. This includes allocating £354 million to life sciences manufacturing through the Global Britain Investment Fund to strengthen UK vaccine manufacturing resilience.

BEIS stands ready to support businesses through any future pandemic, tailored to the circumstances at the time. We are increasing public R&D spending to £20 billion per annum by 2024-25, reaffirming BEIS’ record £39.8 billion allocation to 2024-25. This includes £25.1 billion for UK Research and Innovation, which provides significant funding for pandemic preparedness.