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Written Question
Asylum: Rwanda
Tuesday 24th May 2022

Asked by: Lord Archbishop of Canterbury (Bishops - Bishops)

Question to the Home Office:

To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of whether (1) women, (2) girls, and (3) LGBT+ people, who are relocated to Rwanda will be afforded the same safety as in the UK.

Answered by Baroness Williams of Trafford

Rwanda is a safe and secure country with respect for the rule of law. We have carried out a robust report that demonstrates our commitment to fully evaluating whether Rwanda would be suitable for each potentially eligible person to be relocated.

We would only ever work with countries that we know are safe and will treat asylum seekers in accordance with relevant international human rights laws. Furthermore, Rwanda’s constitution includes a broad prohibition on discrimination.


Written Question
Asylum: Rwanda
Tuesday 24th May 2022

Asked by: Lord Archbishop of Canterbury (Bishops - Bishops)

Question to the Home Office:

To ask Her Majesty's Government whether families will be split up through the new Asylum Partnership Arrangement with Rwanda; and if not, what evidence they have that the policy will not lead to increased trafficking of women and children.

Answered by Baroness Williams of Trafford

Other than unaccompanied asylum-seeking children, anyone arriving in the UK whose claim is inadmissible and who has undertaken a dangerous journey to the UK on or after 1 January 2022 may be considered for relocation to Rwanda.

Everyone considered for relocation will be screened and have access to legal advice. Decisions will be taken on a case-by-case basis and nobody will be removed if it is unsafe or inappropriate for them.

We comply fully with the UK’s legal obligations, including under Article 8 of the Human Rights Act. For those with family links in the UK, who want to be considered for entry to the UK, they should seek to do so via legal and safe routes. Nobody should put their lives into the hands of criminal people smuggling gangs by making dangerous and irregular journeys.


Written Question
Asylum: Rwanda
Tuesday 24th May 2022

Asked by: Lord Archbishop of Canterbury (Bishops - Bishops)

Question to the Home Office:

To ask Her Majesty's Government what criteria they will use to determine whether someone arriving in the UK, outside of the authorised channels, is eligible for being relocated to Rwanda.

Answered by Baroness Williams of Trafford

Other than unaccompanied asylum-seeking children, anyone arriving in the UK whose claim is inadmissible and who has undertaken a dangerous journey to the UK on or after 1 January 2022 may be considered for relocation to Rwanda.

Everyone considered for relocation will be screened and have access to legal advice. Decisions will be taken on a case-by-case basis and nobody will be removed if it is unsafe or inappropriate for them.

We comply fully with the UK’s legal obligations, including under Article 8 of the Human Rights Act. For those with family links in the UK, who want to be considered for entry to the UK, they should seek to do so via legal and safe routes. Nobody should put their lives into the hands of criminal people smuggling gangs by making dangerous and irregular journeys.


Written Question
Asylum: Rwanda
Thursday 28th April 2022

Asked by: Lord Archbishop of Canterbury (Bishops - Bishops)

Question to the Home Office:

To ask Her Majesty's Government whether families will be split up through the new Asylum Partnership Arrangement with Rwanda; and if not, what evidence they have that the new policy will not lead to increased trafficking of women and children.

Answered by Baroness Williams of Trafford

It has not proved possible to respond to this question in the time available before Prorogation. Ministers will correspond directly with the Member


Written Question
Asylum: Rwanda
Thursday 28th April 2022

Asked by: Lord Archbishop of Canterbury (Bishops - Bishops)

Question to the Home Office:

To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of whether any (1) women, (2) girls, and (3) LGBT+ people, who are relocated to Rwanda, will be afforded the same safety as in the UK.

Answered by Baroness Williams of Trafford

It has not proved possible to respond to this question in the time available before Prorogation. Ministers will correspond directly with the Member


Written Question
Asylum: Rwanda
Thursday 28th April 2022

Asked by: Lord Archbishop of Canterbury (Bishops - Bishops)

Question to the Home Office:

To ask Her Majesty's Government what criteria they will use to determine whether someone arriving in the UK other than by authorised channels is eligible for being relocated to Rwanda.

Answered by Baroness Williams of Trafford

It has not proved possible to respond to this question in the time available before Prorogation. Ministers will correspond directly with the Member


Written Question
Affordable Housing: Construction
Wednesday 10th February 2021

Asked by: Lord Archbishop of Canterbury (Bishops - Bishops)

Question to the Department for Levelling Up, Housing & Communities:

To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of whether their target for the number of affordable homes that they want to see built is sufficient to meet the demand for such homes.

Answered by Lord Greenhalgh

The National Planning Policy Framework is clear that it is for local authorities to identify the size, type and tenure of housing needed for different groups in the community, including those who require affordable housing, and reflect this in planning policies.

The Government is committed to increasing the supply of affordable housing and is investing over £12 billion in affordable housing over 5 years, the largest investment in affordable housing in a decade. This includes the new £11.5 billion Affordable Homes Programme, which will leverage £38 billion of private finance and provide up to 180,000 new homes across the country, should economic conditions allow.


Written Question
Affordable Housing
Tuesday 9th February 2021

Asked by: Lord Archbishop of Canterbury (Bishops - Bishops)

Question to the Department for Levelling Up, Housing & Communities:

To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the answer by Lord Greenhalgh on 26 January (HL Deb, col 1500), what assessment they have made of the level of household income that would be needed to afford a home defined as "affordable".

Answered by Lord Greenhalgh

The Government does not a prescribe a definition of affordability, but we recognise that the fundamental purpose of social housing is to provide affordable, safe and secure homes to those who cannot afford to rent or buy through the open market. This purpose is reflected in the definition of affordable housing in the National Planning Policy Framework and in our approach to setting maximum rent levels in social housing. The vast majority of rented social housing in England is let at Social Rent using a formula that takes account of relative county earnings (among several other factors). In the case of Affordable Rent, the initial rent is capped at up to 80 per cent of the equivalent market rent (except in London where both Social Rent and Affordable Rent levels tend to be lower).

The Government continues to invest to deliver different types of rented social housing to meet the needs of a wide range of households including those at risk of homelessness in areas of the country where affordability is most pressured.

For those who cannot afford their rent, Housing Benefit or Universal Credit is available to provide support with housing costs.


Written Question
Immigration Controls: Dover Port
Tuesday 2nd February 2021

Asked by: Lord Archbishop of Canterbury (Bishops - Bishops)

Question to the Cabinet Office:

To ask Her Majesty's Government why they did not approve the application by the Port of Dover for funding to double the capacity for passport checks by the government of France at that port.

Answered by Lord True - Shadow Leader of the House of Lords

Allocations from the Port Infrastructure Fund (PIF) have been published at gov.uk. (https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/port-infrastructure-fund-allocations/port-infrastructure-fund-successful-applicants).

The criteria for awarding grants were set out in the PIF Prospectus. The scope of the PIF concentrated on infrastructure necessary to support GB-EU trade and the Border Operating Model, rather than the movement of people.


Written Question
Dover Port
Wednesday 27th January 2021

Asked by: Lord Archbishop of Canterbury (Bishops - Bishops)

Question to the Department for Transport:

To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to increase the (1) capacity, and (2) resilience, of the Port of Dover.

Answered by Baroness Vere of Norbiton

The Port of Dover has well-established procedures for handling freight/passenger traffic, including in-built resilience contingencies.

Government is supporting the Port of Dover to meet capacity and resilience challenges in many ways including phasing-in the new Border Operating Model; Kent Access Permits; free COVID testing for hauliers at many sites including Sevington and Manston and a concerted, extensive campaign to brief hauliers on new arrangements and legal requirements. The Government is also taking powers to make it a requirement to have a negative test before entering Kent.

Additionally, Port of Dover is relieved (as is Eurotunnel) of the difficult and expensive prospect of providing border checks facilities on-site. This is due to HMG providing fully-funded inland facilities.