David Hanson Written Questions

Questions to Home Office tabled by David Hanson


Date Title Questioner
2 Jul 2019, 1:14 p.m. Airguns: Reviews David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 19 March 2019 to Written Question 230648, Airguns: Reviews, when his Department plans to publish its response to the review on the regulation of air weapons which was launched on 10 October 2017.

Answer (Mr Nick Hurd)

We intend to publish our conclusions to the review of air weapons regulation as soon as possible, alongside a consultation on firearms safety issues to which the Government committed during the passage of the Offensive Weapons Act 2019.

3 Apr 2019, 4:36 p.m. Knives: Crime David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the oral contribution of the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for the Home Department of 22 March 2019, Official Report, column 1404, how much of the £100 million in funding will be allocated to the police, by each police force.

Answer (Mr Nick Hurd)

On 13 March the Chancellor of the Exchequer announced an additional £100 million of funding for serious violence in 2019/20 to help the police’s immediate response to the rise in serious knife crime, and also to support investment in Violence Reduction Units. It is important that we recognise that greater law enforcement on its own will not reduce serious violence and that we must continue to focus on prevention.

The majority of the investment will go towards supporting police forces where violent crime is impacting the most, to take immediate action to suppress the violence we are seeing, to make our streets safer. We are engaging with partners including the National Police Chiefs’ Council and the Association of Police and Crime Commissioners and we are developing the criteria by which forces will receive this funding.

13 Mar 2019, 4:05 p.m. Crimes of Violence: Retail Trade David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the letter to the Rt. Hon. Member for Delyn, dated 21 January 2019 and deposited in the library, what the planned timescale is for the (a) completion of draft questions, (b) evidence gathering exercise, (c) closing date and (d) Government's response to the call for evidence on attacks against retail employees.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

We are committed to tackling violence and abuse toward shop workers; everyone has the right to feel safe at work.

On 21 January I announced that we will launch a call for evidence to strengthen our understanding of this issue. We will launch this shortly, before the Offensive Weapons Bill completes its passage through Parliament. We will ensure that interested parties have sufficient time to respond and that the analysis and subsequent Government response is taken forward promptly.

To support this, we are providing £50,000 for a sector-led communications campaign to raise awareness of this issue. We are finalising plans for this campaign and will announce further details shortly.

On 12 February I chaired a meeting of the National Retail Crime Steering Group (NRCSG) which focused exclusively on this issue. Agenda items included a discussion on the scope and direction of the call for evidence, and the NRCSG’s workplan on tackling violence and abuse, including in relation to the police response. My response to the Rt Hon member’s letter of 22 January was sent on 12th March 2019 and sets out plans for this work in more detail. A copy of this letter has been placed in the House library.

13 Mar 2019, 4:05 p.m. Crimes of Violence: Retail Trade David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the letter to the Rt. Hon. Member for Delyn, dated 21 January 2019 and deposited in the library, what steps his Department is planning to take to deliver the targeted communications activity to raise awareness of the existing legislation that covers assaults against an individual when working in a retail environment; and what the budget is for that communications activity.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

We are committed to tackling violence and abuse toward shop workers; everyone has the right to feel safe at work.

On 21 January I announced that we will launch a call for evidence to strengthen our understanding of this issue. We will launch this shortly, before the Offensive Weapons Bill completes its passage through Parliament. We will ensure that interested parties have sufficient time to respond and that the analysis and subsequent Government response is taken forward promptly.

To support this, we are providing £50,000 for a sector-led communications campaign to raise awareness of this issue. We are finalising plans for this campaign and will announce further details shortly.

On 12 February I chaired a meeting of the National Retail Crime Steering Group (NRCSG) which focused exclusively on this issue. Agenda items included a discussion on the scope and direction of the call for evidence, and the NRCSG’s workplan on tackling violence and abuse, including in relation to the police response. My response to the Rt Hon member’s letter of 22 January was sent on 12th March 2019 and sets out plans for this work in more detail. A copy of this letter has been placed in the House library.

13 Mar 2019, 4:05 p.m. Crimes of Violence: Retail Trade David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the letter to the Rt. Hon. Member for Delyn, dated 21 January 2019 and deposited in the library, when he plans to publish details on the outcomes of the retail group meeting held in February 2019.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

We are committed to tackling violence and abuse toward shop workers; everyone has the right to feel safe at work.

On 21 January I announced that we will launch a call for evidence to strengthen our understanding of this issue. We will launch this shortly, before the Offensive Weapons Bill completes its passage through Parliament. We will ensure that interested parties have sufficient time to respond and that the analysis and subsequent Government response is taken forward promptly.

To support this, we are providing £50,000 for a sector-led communications campaign to raise awareness of this issue. We are finalising plans for this campaign and will announce further details shortly.

On 12 February I chaired a meeting of the National Retail Crime Steering Group (NRCSG) which focused exclusively on this issue. Agenda items included a discussion on the scope and direction of the call for evidence, and the NRCSG’s workplan on tackling violence and abuse, including in relation to the police response. My response to the Rt Hon member’s letter of 22 January was sent on 12th March 2019 and sets out plans for this work in more detail. A copy of this letter has been placed in the House library.

13 Mar 2019, 4:05 p.m. Crimes of Violence: Retail Trade David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the letter to the Rt. Hon. Member for Delyn, dated 21 January 2019 and deposited in the Library, what the (a) outcomes were and (b) response was to the letter to the Commissioner of the City of London Police on retail crime and attacks on retail employees.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

We are committed to tackling violence and abuse toward shop workers; everyone has the right to feel safe at work.

On 21 January I announced that we will launch a call for evidence to strengthen our understanding of this issue. We will launch this shortly, before the Offensive Weapons Bill completes its passage through Parliament. We will ensure that interested parties have sufficient time to respond and that the analysis and subsequent Government response is taken forward promptly.

To support this, we are providing £50,000 for a sector-led communications campaign to raise awareness of this issue. We are finalising plans for this campaign and will announce further details shortly.

On 12 February I chaired a meeting of the National Retail Crime Steering Group (NRCSG) which focused exclusively on this issue. Agenda items included a discussion on the scope and direction of the call for evidence, and the NRCSG’s workplan on tackling violence and abuse, including in relation to the police response. My response to the Rt Hon member’s letter of 22 January was sent on 12th March 2019 and sets out plans for this work in more detail. A copy of this letter has been placed in the House library.

13 Mar 2019, 4:05 p.m. Members: Correspondence David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when he plans to respond to the letter from the Rt. Hon. Member for Delyn, dated 22 January 2019.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

We are committed to tackling violence and abuse toward shop workers; everyone has the right to feel safe at work.

On 21 January I announced that we will launch a call for evidence to strengthen our understanding of this issue. We will launch this shortly, before the Offensive Weapons Bill completes its passage through Parliament. We will ensure that interested parties have sufficient time to respond and that the analysis and subsequent Government response is taken forward promptly.

To support this, we are providing £50,000 for a sector-led communications campaign to raise awareness of this issue. We are finalising plans for this campaign and will announce further details shortly.

On 12 February I chaired a meeting of the National Retail Crime Steering Group (NRCSG) which focused exclusively on this issue. Agenda items included a discussion on the scope and direction of the call for evidence, and the NRCSG’s workplan on tackling violence and abuse, including in relation to the police response. My response to the Rt Hon member’s letter of 22 January was sent on 12th March 2019 and sets out plans for this work in more detail. A copy of this letter has been placed in the House library.

21 Feb 2019, 4:39 p.m. Immigration: Commonwealth David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many Commonwealth nationals who are members of the British Armed Forces have applied for their (a) partner and (b) children to settle in the UK; and how many of those applications were (i) accepted and (ii) rejected due to lack of income in each year since 2013.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

We do not publish this specific data. This information could only be obtained by a manual case by case review to collate the data which would be disproportionately expensive.

15 Jan 2019, 5:10 p.m. Police: Training David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, How many police officers have completed the training contained within the National Disclosure Plan by police force area.

Answer (Mr Nick Hurd)

Statistics published by the College of Policing on 20 December 2018 show the number of officers and staff that had completed new 'disclosure and relevancy – conducting fair investigations' training as at 30 November 2018. This includes a breakdown by police force area. These are available at https://www.college.police.uk/News/College-news/Documents/Disclosure_programme_completion_figures191218v3.pdf

11 Jan 2019, 12:49 p.m. Members: Correspondence David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when the Under-Secretary of State for Crime, Safeguarding and Vulnerability plans to respond to the Right hon. Member for Delyn on the rountable on retail crime held on 11 December 2018.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

I have considered the proposals raised at the roundtable on retail crime held on 11 December 2018 and am committed to providing the Rt. Hon Member for Delyn a response before the tabling deadline for Lords amendments to the Offensive Weapons Bill.

27 Jul 2018, 1:49 p.m. UK Border Force: London Airports David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many UK Border Force officers were employed at (a) Heathrow, (b) Gatwick, (c) Stansted and (d) Luton airports in each year since 2010.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

Border Force does not release location specific statistics on the deployment of its resources as doing so could compromise border security.
For information on Border Force staffing from 2010 I refer the Hon. Member to the answer given to the Hon. Member for Westmorland and Lonsdale on 7 February 2017, UIN 60627.

The latest published staffing figures for Border Force can be found in the Home Office Annual Report for 2016 – 17 on page 66 at:
/ https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/home-office-annual-report-and-accounts-2016-to-2017

Data for staffing levels in 2017/18 will be available when the Annual Report for 2017 – 18 is published

27 Jul 2018, 1:46 p.m. UK Border Force: London Airports David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many days were lost to sick leave by UK Border Force officers at (a) Heathrow, (b) Gatwick, (c) Stansted and (d) Luton airports in each year since 2010.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

Border Force does not release port-specific staffing numbers for national security reasons.

27 Jul 2018, 1:46 p.m. UK Border Force: London Airports David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many UK Border Force officers were (a) recruited, (b) dismissed and (c) retired at (i) Heathrow, (ii) Gatwick, (iii) Stansted and (iv) Luton airports in each year since 2010.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

Border Force does not release port-specific staffing numbers for national security reasons.

16 Jul 2018, 3:45 p.m. Shoplifting David Hanson

Question

What steps he is taking to reduce shop theft.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

I chair the National Retail Crime Steering Group with the British Retail Consortium. This brings retailers and the police together to ensure an effective response to crimes affecting retailers and includes work to reduce shop thefts.

2 Jul 2018, 1:24 p.m. Right of Abode David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many right of abode certificates have been (a) applied for and (b) granted to (i) males and (ii) females by country of origin following a change of name in each year since 2010; and how much has accrued to the public purse from those applications in each year since 2010.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

The Home Office does not record the information requested as this is not part of the application process. To provide the requested information would require manual examination of all applications for right of abode and exceed the dispropotionate cost limit.

2 Jul 2018, 9:28 a.m. British Citizenship: Young People David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the British Nationality Act 1981, how many young people have been refused British citizenship as a result of being found to not be of good character under each classification; and how many young people have faced restrictions in applying as a minor in each year since December 2012.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

The good character test for British citizenship applies to those aged 10 and over, in line with the age of criminal responsibility. There are no plans at present to review this. I recently wrote to the Joint Committee for Human Rights on several issues relating to British citizenship, including the good character test.
Figures relating to citizenship applications, including decisions to refuse where the applicant is found to not be of good character, are included in the latest Home Office quarterly migration statistics published on 24 May and available on Gov.uk.

2 Jul 2018, 9:28 a.m. British Citizenship: Young People David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many young people, as defined by the British Nationality Act 1981, have been (a) refused and (b) granted citizenship in each year since December 2012.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

The good character test for British citizenship applies to those aged 10 and over, in line with the age of criminal responsibility. There are no plans at present to review this. I recently wrote to the Joint Committee for Human Rights on several issues relating to British citizenship, including the good character test.
Figures relating to citizenship applications, including decisions to refuse where the applicant is found to not be of good character, are included in the latest Home Office quarterly migration statistics published on 24 May and available on Gov.uk.

2 Jul 2018, 9:28 a.m. British Citizenship: Young People David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, which reference to the British Nationality Act 1981, whether his Department has undertaken a review of the guidance it issues on good character for young persons; and what discussion his Department has had with stakeholders on the definitions used.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

The good character test for British citizenship applies to those aged 10 and over, in line with the age of criminal responsibility. There are no plans at present to review this. I recently wrote to the Joint Committee for Human Rights on several issues relating to British citizenship, including the good character test.
Figures relating to citizenship applications, including decisions to refuse where the applicant is found to not be of good character, are included in the latest Home Office quarterly migration statistics published on 24 May and available on Gov.uk.

9 May 2018, 5:06 p.m. Airguns David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when he plans to publish the outcome of the Government's review of air weapon regulation, announced on 12 December 2017.

Answer (Mr Nick Hurd)

The Government’s review of the regulation of air weapons received a large number of representations from interested parties and members of the public. We are considering these carefully and will publish our findings in due course.

5 Apr 2018, 12:26 p.m. Vetting David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people waited longer than (a) 14 days, (b) 18 days, (c) 25 days and (d) 60 days to receive their Disclosure and Barring Service reports; and what the number of applications for Disclosure and Barring Service reports was by police force in each year since 2010.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

The tables below set out the number of people who have waited longer than 14, 18, 25 and 60 days to receive their disclosure certificates*:

2010/11:

Type of check

> 14 days

> 18 days

> 25 days

> 60 days

Enhanced

1,880,214

1,578,142

1,243,836

453,391

Standard

9,222

4,926

2,784

674

Total

1,889,436

1,583,068

1,246,620

454,065

2011/12:

Type of check

> 14 days

> 18 days

> 25 days

> 60 days

Enhanced

688,549

519,641

368,941

104,773

Standard

4,456

2,960

1,794

487

Total

693,005

522,601

370,735

105,260

2012/13:

Type of check

> 14 days

> 18 days

> 25 days

> 60 days

Enhanced

790,299

613,596

380,402

42,520

Standard

3,917

2,935

1,961

319

Total

794,216

616,531

382,363

42,839

2013/14:

Type of check

> 14 days

> 18 days

> 25 days

> 60 days

Enhanced

834,288

751,147

593,457

405,014

Standard

3,221

3,063

2,151

946

Total

837,509

754,210

595,608

405,960

2014/15:

Type of check

> 14 days

> 18 days

> 25 days

> 60 days

Enhanced

1,038,411

736,329

490,198

181,338

Standard

15,125

4,420

1,473

216

Total

1,053,536

740,749

491,671

181,554

2015/16:

Type of check

> 14 days

> 18 days

> 25 days

> 60 days

Enhanced

917,972

675,921

446,212

209,613

Standard

3,688

1,646

897

217

Total

921,660

677,567

447,109

209,830

2016/17:

Type of check

> 14 days

> 18 days

> 25 days

> 60 days

Enhanced

948,522

725,014

516,048

204,482

Standard

2,579

998

617

124

Total

951,101

726,012

516,665

204,606

2017-Feb 2018:

Type of check

> 14 days

> 18 days

> 25 days

> 60 days

Enhanced

917,339

675,261

404,637

39,940

Standard

11,021

3,157

698

137

Total

928,360

678,418

405,335

40,077

*To include Standard and Enhanced checks.

Data relating to the number of applications for Disclosure and Barring checks carried out by each police force in each year since 2010 is available, but due to the volume of data, it is not in a reportable format. Officials will ensure a hard copy of this data is placed in the House library.

5 Apr 2018, 9:21 a.m. Solvents: Misuse David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps the Government is taking to reduce the number of deaths associated with solvent abuse.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

The Government has noted the key findings from the report of the Office of National Statistics on deaths related to volatile substances and helium in Great Britain.

We are committed to preventing deaths related to substance misuse. Our Drug Strategy, published in July 2017, brings together police, health, community and global partners to tackle the illicit drug trade, protect the most vulnerable and help those with drug dependency to recover and turn their lives around.

Drug control is kept under constant review and we work in consultation with the Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs to consider any new evidence of misuse or harms.

5 Apr 2018, 9:21 a.m. Solvents: Misuse David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment her Department has made of the implications for its policies of the Office for National Statistics report into solvent abuse, published on 26 March 2018.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

The Government has noted the key findings from the report of the Office of National Statistics on deaths related to volatile substances and helium in Great Britain.

We are committed to preventing deaths related to substance misuse. Our Drug Strategy, published in July 2017, brings together police, health, community and global partners to tackle the illicit drug trade, protect the most vulnerable and help those with drug dependency to recover and turn their lives around.

Drug control is kept under constant review and we work in consultation with the Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs to consider any new evidence of misuse or harms.

4 Apr 2018, 12:24 p.m. Nitrous Oxide: Misuse David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps the Government is taking to tackle the misuse of nitrous oxide.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

Psychoactive substances, such as nitrous oxide, have already cost far too many lives. That is why we changed the law in 2016 to make it illegal to supply substances that are capable of having a psychoactive effect.

The introduction of the Psychoactive Substances Act sent out a clear message – we will take whatever action is necessary to keep our families and communities safe.

Since the Act came into force, over 300 retailers across the United Kingdom have either closed down or are no longer selling psychoactive substances, police have arrested suppliers and action by the National Crime Agency has resulted in the removal of these drugs for sale on UK based websites.

4 Apr 2018, 10:11 a.m. Solvents: Misuse David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what funding the Government has committed to reduce deaths associated with solvent abuse via each (a) Department, (b) Agency, (c) Local authorities, and (d) voluntary organisation?

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

Funding decisions in relation to substance misuse services have been devolved to local authorities through the public health grant. It is for local authorities to commission the appropriate health services to address the use of volatile substances based on an assessment of local need.

Local areas need to consider how best to prevent and treat volatile substance use through age appropriate services. Local specialist services can support young people to address their substance misuse, and should operate as part of a wider network of services which aim to support young people with a range of issues and help them to build their resilience.

Adults who have problems with volatile substances can also access support from community drug and alcohol services, which should be able to provide appropriate psychosocial interventions to help them stop using these substances and medicines for symptomatic relief if needed.

3 Apr 2018, 12:40 p.m. Shops: Crimes of Violence David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department is taking to ensure that violence against shopworkers is recorded by police forces.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

Violence is unacceptable wherever it takes place, and violence or abuse against retail staff should not be tolerated. We encourage all victims, including shopworkers, to report these crimes to the police whenever they occur so that they can be recorded and investigated and the perpetrators brought to justice.

Through the National Retail Crime Steering Group, we are working with our partners across government, the police and in the retail sector to explore what more can be done to prevent and tackle violence and abuse against retail staff.

3 Apr 2018, 12:37 p.m. Shops: Crime David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the Local Shop Report 2017, published by the Association of Convenience Stores, what steps she is taking the reduce the level of convenience store crime.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

The Government takes retail crime very seriously. We recognise the damage and disruption that different crimes can have on businesses including smaller businesses and convenience stores.

Through the National Retail Crime Steering Group, which I co-chair with the British Retail Consortium, we bring together representatives from government departments, the police and the retail sector, including the Association of Convenience Stores, to focus on the crime issues that affect businesses of all sizes. This includes addressing the crimes that affect retail establishments and improving the safety of the staff who work in them.

16 Mar 2018, 2:38 p.m. Psychoactive Substances Act 2016 David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what is the expected (a) completion and (b) publication date of her Department’s review of the operation of the Psychoactive Substances Act 2016.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

The Home Office is committed to publishing the review 30 months after the introduction of the Psychoactive Substances Act 2016.

26 Feb 2018, 5:26 p.m. Police: Finance David Hanson

Question

What discussions she has had with Police and Crime Commissioners on the level of the police precept for 2018-19.

Answer (Mr Nick Hurd)

Before the police funding settlement, I spoke and received written submissions from leaders in police forces in England and Wales. Police leaders - especially in England where referendum limits apply - were clear that they wanted additional flexibility to increase funding through precept. I heard their messages and responded by allowing increases of an average £1 per month in England, enabling each PCC to maintain their funding in real terms next year.

20 Feb 2018, 5:01 p.m. Forensic Science David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department took to minimise risk in response to the National Audit Office report on The Home Office's oversight of forensic services, published in January 2015.

Answer (Mr Nick Hurd)

This was a briefing paper for the House of Commons Science and Technology Committee. The Home Office published its Forensic Science Strategy in March 2016 setting out how policing would deliver a national approach to forensic science delivery, supported by the Home Office.

14 Feb 2018, 11:34 a.m. Key Forensic Services: Insolvency David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, who will be responsible for the provision of forensic science services following the collapse of Key Forensic Services; and how much financial support will be given to establish that provider.

Answer (Mr Nick Hurd)

Key Forensic Services (KFS) appointed administrators on 30 January 2018. At the time there were around 2,000 pending cases, and around 30 police forces affected. The administrators have issued a statement that the company is continuing to trade.

I welcome the National Police Chiefs’ Council and Association of Police and Crime Commissioners’ swift action to minimise the impact on the criminal justice system and protect the evidence for live cases. With Home Office support they are working on a plan to ensure that the evidence KFS holds continues to be properly and professionally managed in accordance with the standards set by the Forensic Science Regulator. It is estimated that work to complete current cases will take around two months. Work is also underway to assess short-term, capacity within the forensic science market.

14 Feb 2018, 11:34 a.m. Key Forensic Services: Insolvency David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment her Department has made of the effect on police forces of the collapse of Key Forensic Services.

Answer (Mr Nick Hurd)

Key Forensic Services (KFS) appointed administrators on 30 January 2018. At the time there were around 2,000 pending cases, and around 30 police forces affected. The administrators have issued a statement that the company is continuing to trade.

I welcome the National Police Chiefs’ Council and Association of Police and Crime Commissioners’ swift action to minimise the impact on the criminal justice system and protect the evidence for live cases. With Home Office support they are working on a plan to ensure that the evidence KFS holds continues to be properly and professionally managed in accordance with the standards set by the Forensic Science Regulator. It is estimated that work to complete current cases will take around two months. Work is also underway to assess short-term, capacity within the forensic science market.

14 Feb 2018, 11:34 a.m. Key Forensic Services: Insolvency David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many pending cases Key Forensic Services was handling in each police force area prior to its collapse.

Answer (Mr Nick Hurd)

Key Forensic Services (KFS) appointed administrators on 30 January 2018. At the time there were around 2,000 pending cases, and around 30 police forces affected. The administrators have issued a statement that the company is continuing to trade.

I welcome the National Police Chiefs’ Council and Association of Police and Crime Commissioners’ swift action to minimise the impact on the criminal justice system and protect the evidence for live cases. With Home Office support they are working on a plan to ensure that the evidence KFS holds continues to be properly and professionally managed in accordance with the standards set by the Forensic Science Regulator. It is estimated that work to complete current cases will take around two months. Work is also underway to assess short-term, capacity within the forensic science market.

14 Feb 2018, 11:34 a.m. Key Forensic Services: Insolvency David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many police forces have ongoing case work with Key Forensic Services.

Answer (Mr Nick Hurd)

Key Forensic Services (KFS) appointed administrators on 30 January 2018. At the time there were around 2,000 pending cases, and around 30 police forces affected. The administrators have issued a statement that the company is continuing to trade.

I welcome the National Police Chiefs’ Council and Association of Police and Crime Commissioners’ swift action to minimise the impact on the criminal justice system and protect the evidence for live cases. With Home Office support they are working on a plan to ensure that the evidence KFS holds continues to be properly and professionally managed in accordance with the standards set by the Forensic Science Regulator. It is estimated that work to complete current cases will take around two months. Work is also underway to assess short-term, capacity within the forensic science market.

14 Feb 2018, 11:34 a.m. Key Forensic Services: Insolvency David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate her Department has made of the cost to the public purse of the collapse of Key Forensic Services.

Answer (Mr Nick Hurd)

Key Forensic Services (KFS) appointed administrators on 30 January 2018. At the time there were around 2,000 pending cases, and around 30 police forces affected. The administrators have issued a statement that the company is continuing to trade.

I welcome the National Police Chiefs’ Council and Association of Police and Crime Commissioners’ swift action to minimise the impact on the criminal justice system and protect the evidence for live cases. With Home Office support they are working on a plan to ensure that the evidence KFS holds continues to be properly and professionally managed in accordance with the standards set by the Forensic Science Regulator. It is estimated that work to complete current cases will take around two months. Work is also underway to assess short-term, capacity within the forensic science market.

5 Feb 2018, 5:27 p.m. Slavery David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether her Department plans to collect information on outcomes for victims once they leave support for people rescued from modern slavery.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

The Home Office does not routinely collect data on victims after they have left the National Referral Mechanism. In October 2017, the Government announced a package of reforms to the National Referral Mechanism including the development of a digitised casework system. It is anticipated that the digital system will improve our ability to collate and report on the progress of victims through the National Referral Mechanism.

The reform package additionally includes an extended period of move on support for confirmed victims. This will enable a more robust transition for victims leaving government funded support. In addition, the provision of a 6 month drop-in service will present the opportunity for continued engagement between support providers and confirmed adult victims.

5 Feb 2018, 5:25 p.m. Slavery David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, on what date her Department will introduce an all-encompassing cross-Government governance structure for tackling modern slavery.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

Modern slavery is a barbaric crime that destroys the lives of victims across the globe.

The Government has a co-ordinated policy and operational response, with a Modern Slavery Taskforce chaired by the Prime Minister.

We have noted the recommendations from the National Audit Office - including in this area - and have already responded publicly to a number of them. The report will be further considered by the Prime Minister's Modern Slavery Taskforce.

5 Feb 2018, 5:24 p.m. Slavery David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if her Department will undertake a review of the funding allocated across Government to tackle modern slavery and how effective that expenditure is.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

Modern slavery is a barbaric crime that destroys the lives of victims across the globe.

The Home Office works collaboratively with other government departments and agencies to tackle modern slavery and we monitor the Department’s direct spend on tackling modern slavery. This includes measures such as £8.5 million grant funding from the Police Transformation Fund to transform the police response to modern slavery, and the Modern Slavery Fund of £33.5 million official development assistance managed by the Home Office, to tackle modern slavery across the globe.

We have noted the recommendations from the National Audit Office - including in this area - and have already responded publicly to a number of them. The report will be further considered by the Prime Minister's Modern Slavery Taskforce.

5 Feb 2018, 5:21 p.m. Slavery David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when her Department plans to implement framework options for monitoring performance and progress in reducing modern slavery, as recommended by the National Audit Office.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

Modern slavery is a barbaric crime that destroys the lives of victims across the globe.

The UK Government has had an ambitious Modern Slavery Strategy in place since 2014 and the world-leading Modern Slavery Act was introduced in 2015. Significant progress has been made in implementing the Strategy which have been monitored through performance indicators relating to individual parts of the Strategy. The Home Office will continue to develop its performance framework as necessary, in cooperation with other government departments and agencies.

We have noted the recommendations from the National Audit Office - including in this area - and have already responded publicly to a number of them. The report will be further considered by the Prime Minister's Modern Slavery Taskforce.

31 Jan 2018, 12:42 p.m. Slavery David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many National Referral Mechanism forms were (a) not completed properly by first responders and (b) missing information in each year since the implementation of the Modern Slavery Act 2015.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

The recently announced reform of the National Referral Mechanism (NRM), includes measures aimed at improving the identification of potential victims and, decision-making timescales. The digitisation of the NRM and a review of the role of First Responders will address the quality of the initial referrals received by the Competent Authority and better support their decision-making.

30 Jan 2018, 4:20 p.m. Slavery David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many police forces have a dedicated modern slavery taskforce.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

This information is not held centrally by the Home Office. Decisions about the size and composition of the police workforce are an operational matter for chief officers, in line with the local priorities set by their Police and Crime Commissioner.

30 Jan 2018, 4:19 p.m. Slavery David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many and what proportion of subcontractors of the modern slavery victim care contract use the Human Trafficking Foundation Care Standards.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

As part of the recently announced package of reforms to the National Referral Mechanism (NRM), Government committed to adopting the Trafficking Survivor Care Standards, drafted by the Human Trafficking Foundation with contributions from a range of non-governmental organisations, including a number of subcontractors of the Victims Care Contact.

We are currently working with a group of key stakeholders, including subcontractors of the Victim Care Contract, to update the standards and design a compliance regime. The standards will then be incorporated into future care contracts for adult victims of modern slavery. In the meantime, we will work with all subcontractors to ensure they are meeting the minimum standards.

30 Jan 2018, 4:17 p.m. Slavery David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what information her Department holds on the average waiting time for victims of modern slavery and human trafficking to access English courses provided by the Salvation Army as part of the victim care contract.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

The Victim Care Contract for adult victims of modern slavery, delivered for the Government by The Salvation Army does not include the provision of English courses and therefore the Home Office does not have data on average waiting times for victims to access classes. Through the Victim Care Contract, victims of modern slavery receive accommodation, subsistence, access to mental, physical and dental health services, and signposting to legal support.

Recently announced reforms to the National Referral Mechanism (NRM) will mean that confirmed victims have access to this support for a minimum of 90 days, and when victims leave central-government funded support they will have access to drop-in services for a further 6 months

30 Jan 2018, 4:11 p.m. Business: Procurement David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department is taking to ensure that businesses who are required to provide statements on their supply chains (a) provide such a statement and (b) complete their statements to a sufficient standard; and what steps her Department is taking to monitor the performance of businesses in providing those statements.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

As a result of the world-leading provisions in the Modern Slavery Act 2015, we have seen thousands of transparency statements published and businesses are now more focused on this issue than ever before. The legislation was designed to harness pressure from civil society, consumers and investors rather than set up a burdensome system of Government monitoring. We are pleased that civil society organisations are using company statements to hold businesses to account, including contacting businesses that have not yet published statements.

The Government has strengthened guidance for businesses and recently wrote to over 10,000 businesses that may be required to publish statements reminding them of their obligations and providing useful resources. We expect this activity will further increase the number and quality of statements published.

In October the Government also launched a new ‘Business Against Slavery Forum’ which will establish a new partnership between Government and business to accelerate progress in tackling modern slavery. It will focus on sharing best practice and building new initiatives to tackle modern slavery, including improving business engagement with the Modern Slavery Act 2015.

30 Jan 2018, 4:08 p.m. Slavery David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the timetable is for her Department to implement improvements to the National Referral Mechanism.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

Improvements to the National Referral Mechanism were announced in October 2017. The reforms cover 16 work streams some of which will be implemented more quickly than others. A number of reform measures are subject to commercial tender for provision of services. The detailed implementation plans for each work stream are being developed, which will identify the likely timescales.

30 Jan 2018, 4:06 p.m. Slavery David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many referrals have been made under the National Referral Mechanism by police forces in England and Wales by police force in each month since the implementation of the Modern Slavery Act 2015.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

This information is not held centrally by the Home Office. However, the October 2017 report from the police inspectorate (HMICRFS) on the police response to modern slavery includes data on NRM referrals made by police forces by year.

This report can be accessed at the following link:

www.justiceinspectorates.gov.uk/hmicfrs/wp-content/uploads/stolen-freedom-the-policing-response-to-modern-slavery-and-human-trafficking.pdf

The National Crime Agency also regularly publishes statistics relating to the number of potential victims of modern slavery referred to the National Referral Mechanism, broken down by police force area. These can be found here: www.nationalcrimeagency.gov.uk/publications/national-referral-mechanism-statistics

30 Jan 2018, 4:03 p.m. Slavery David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department is taking to put in place data sharing arrangements between all parties involved in tackling modern slavery.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

The Home Office has a number of agreements with partner agencies to enable data to be shared for the purposes of tackling modern slavery. We are considering the impact of the proposed Data Protection Bill in relation to these agreements. We are exploring options to put in place improved data sharing arrangements with international partners to tackle modern slavery up stream.

30 Jan 2018, 4:01 p.m. Slavery David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether her Department will set a target for the time taken for cases of modern slavery to be processed under the National Referral Mechanism.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

The time taken to process National Referral Mechanism (NRM) cases varies by complexity. As part of the ongoing reform of the NRM, changes will be made to ensure a quicker, more certain decision making process, that victims have confidence in.

29 Jan 2018, 3:59 p.m. Slavery David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many outstanding decisions UK Visas and Immigration has on victims of modern slavery who have been referred under the National Referral Mechanism.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

Data on the National Referral Mechanism (NRM) are published regularly by the National Crime Agency and in the UK Annual Report on Modern Slavery. These reports are available via the following links:
http://www.nationalcrimeagency.gov.uk/publications/national-referral-mechanism-statistics
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/2017-uk-annual-report-on-modern-slavery

29 Jan 2018, 3:34 p.m. Asylum David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people seeking asylum are being considered under the National Referral Mechanism.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

Data on the National Referral Mechanism (NRM) are published regularly by the National Crime Agency and in the UK Annual Report on Modern Slavery. These reports are available via the following links:
http://www.nationalcrimeagency.gov.uk/publications/national-referral-mechanism-statistics
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/2017-uk-annual-report-on-modern-slavery

13 Dec 2017, 6:02 p.m. HM Passport Office: Compensation David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much compensation Her Majesty's Passport Office has paid out in each year since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

Since 2014/15 compensation payments for HM Passport Office are included within overall HM Passport Office costs disclosed in the Department’s Annual Report and Accounts.

Prior to 2014/15 HM Passport Office produced its own Annual Reports and Accounts which disclosed all HM Passport Office income and expenditure, including compensation payments to customers.

6 Dec 2017, 5:30 p.m. HM Passport Office: Overtime David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much HM Passport Office spent on overtime in each month of 2017.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

Overtime costs for Her Majesty’s Passport Office are included within overall staffing costs published in the Department’s Annual Report and Accounts. Staffing costs for January to March 2017 are included in the published 2016/17 financial year report. Staffing costs for April to June 2017 will be included in the Department’s Annual Report and Accounts for financial year 2017/18.

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/home-office-annual-report-and-accounts-2016-to-2017

29 Nov 2017, 4:59 p.m. Offenders: Foreign Nationals David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many foreign national offenders, who had been issued with removal directions, have (a) made asylum claims (b) lodged judicial review applications and (c) made further representations in each year since 2010?

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

Providing the information requested could only be done at disproportionate cost.

Home Office publish data on the number of FNOs that have been removed from the UK. This information can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/immigration-statistics-april-to-june-2017-data-tables

The Home Office also publish the total number of FNOs living in the community. This information can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/immigration-enforcement-data-august-2017

29 Nov 2017, 4:59 p.m. Offenders: Foreign Nationals David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many non-detained foreign national offenders who have completed their custodial sentences have been removed in each year since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

Providing the information requested could only be done at disproportionate cost.

Home Office publish data on the number of FNOs that have been removed from the UK. This information can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/immigration-statistics-april-to-june-2017-data-tables

The Home Office also publish the total number of FNOs living in the community. This information can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/immigration-enforcement-data-august-2017

29 Nov 2017, 4:59 p.m. Offenders: Foreign Nationals David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate she has made of the number of foreign national offenders that have missed a reporting event, and how many have subsequently (i) had contact re-established and (ii) not had contact re-established in each year since 2010?

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

Providing the information requested could only be done at disproportionate cost.

Home Office publish data on the number of FNOs that have been removed from the UK. This information can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/immigration-statistics-april-to-june-2017-data-tables

The Home Office also publish the total number of FNOs living in the community. This information can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/immigration-enforcement-data-august-2017

29 Nov 2017, 4:59 p.m. Offenders: Foreign Nationals David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent estimate he has made of the number of foreign national offenders broken down by offence and region.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

Providing the information requested could only be done at disproportionate cost.

Home Office publish data on the number of FNOs that have been removed from the UK. This information can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/immigration-statistics-april-to-june-2017-data-tables

The Home Office also publish the total number of FNOs living in the community. This information can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/immigration-enforcement-data-august-2017

23 Nov 2017, 1:24 p.m. Proscribed Organisations: Internet David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many websites for (a) Scottish Dawn, (b) NS131 and (c) National Action have been removed since those organisations were proscribed.

Answer (Mr Ben Wallace)

The Police Counter-Terrorism Internet Referral Unit (CTIRU) refers content that they assess as contravening UK terrorism legislation and companies terms and conditions to Communications Service Providers (CSPs). This includes content of proscribed UK organisations such as National Action and its aliases.

If CSPs agree that it breaches their terms and conditions they remove it voluntarily. Following the proscription of National Action in December 2016, HMG requested CSPs to remove and restrict access to National Action content.

23 Nov 2017, 1:24 p.m. Proscribed Organisations: Internet David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, for how long websites for (a) Scottish Dawn, (b) NS131 and (c) National Action remained live after those organisations were proscribed.

Answer (Mr Ben Wallace)

The Police Counter-Terrorism Internet Referral Unit (CTIRU) refers content that they assess as contravening UK terrorism legislation and companies terms and conditions to Communications Service Providers (CSPs). This includes content of proscribed UK organisations such as National Action and its aliases.

If CSPs agree that it breaches their terms and conditions they remove it voluntarily. Following the proscription of National Action in December 2016, HMG requested CSPs to remove and restrict access to National Action content.

2 Nov 2017, 5:18 p.m. Scrap Metal Dealers Act 2013 David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the Answer of 2 December 2016 to Question 54519, what the timetable is for the publication of the Government's review of the Scrap Metal Dealers Act 2013.

Answer (Sarah Newton)

The Government has conducted a review of the Scrap Metal Dealers Act 2013 to assess whether it has met its intended objectives and whether it should be retained or repealed. A report of the findings of this review will be published later this year.

5 Sep 2017, 8:05 a.m. Psychoactive Substances Act 2016: Reviews David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when her Department plans to publish its framework for the review of the Psychoactive Substances Act 2016 as set out in section 58 of that Act.

Answer (Sarah Newton)

On 14 July the Home Office published The Psychoactive Substances Act Review Framework which set out the Government’s plans to measure as far as possible any change in activity before and after the implementation of the Psychoactive Substances Act.

8 Aug 2017, 1:53 p.m. UK Border Force: Staff David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many full-time equivalent staff were operational at the Border Force (a) Intelligence South East and Europe (Folkestone), (b) Intelligence Hub (Dover), (c) Receipt, Evaluation and Development (Sheffield), (d) Receipt, Evaluation and Development (Croydon), (e) Receipt, Evaluation and Development (Solihull) and (f) Receipt, Evaluation and Development (Glasgow) in each year since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

The Immigration Intelligence Receipt, Evaluation and Development (RED) teams were created in 2015 and are a national command. Staff in post in RED teams as of March 2016 and March 2017 (FTE) was 56 and 63 split across four locations.

For Border Force capabilities, this Government has ensured that sufficient resources are available to ensure the security of the border is not compromised. Security of the border cannot be simply measured by numbers of staff. Border Force uses a sophisticated combination of experienced officers, intelligence, data, technology and partnership working. Border Force resources are reviewed on a regular basis as part of the wider Border Force business planning process which is led by the Director General of Border Force.

8 Aug 2017, 1:53 p.m. UK Border Force: Staff David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many intelligence personnel were employed by Border Force in each year since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

The Immigration Intelligence Receipt, Evaluation and Development (RED) teams were created in 2015 and are a national command. Staff in post in RED teams as of March 2016 and March 2017 (FTE) was 56 and 63 split across four locations.

For Border Force capabilities, this Government has ensured that sufficient resources are available to ensure the security of the border is not compromised. Security of the border cannot be simply measured by numbers of staff. Border Force uses a sophisticated combination of experienced officers, intelligence, data, technology and partnership working. Border Force resources are reviewed on a regular basis as part of the wider Border Force business planning process which is led by the Director General of Border Force.

4 Aug 2017, 12:49 p.m. Europol David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many files the UK has sent to the Europol Malware Analysis Solution in each of the last three years.

Answer (Mr Nick Hurd)

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

The 2015 National Security Strategy (NSS) confirmed that cybercrime is a top threat to the UK’s economic and national security. The UK’s future security and prosperity depends on our ability to safeguard the digital information, data and networks at home and abroad. The cyber threats we face continue to grow in scale and sophistication. The Government will continue to invest in law enforcement capabilities to ensure delivery agencies have the capacity to deal with the increasing volume and sophistication of cyber crime.

The Government values the role of Europol and that is why the UK opted-in to the new Europol Regulation, which came into force on 1 May 2017, enabling us to maintain our current access to the agency and benefit from its cooperation and operational advantages until we leave the EU.

Intelligence exchange between UK law enforcement and Europol is well-established and takes place on a daily and routine basis on a wide range of criminal activity, including cybercrime. The National Crime Agency (NCA) also support Europol with seconded staff, including within the European Cybercrime Centre (EC3). This cooperation continues to assist UK efforts to tackle cybercrime impacting on the UK.

Since its launch, the UK has submitted 414,776 malware files to the Europol Malware Analysis Solution.

The data requested on how many occasions the UK has received support from the European Cybercrime Centre is not held centrally and can only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

4 Aug 2017, 12:49 p.m. European Cybercrime Centre David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, on how many occasions the UK has received support from the European Cybercrime Centre in each year since that centre's creation.

Answer (Mr Nick Hurd)

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

The 2015 National Security Strategy (NSS) confirmed that cybercrime is a top threat to the UK’s economic and national security. The UK’s future security and prosperity depends on our ability to safeguard the digital information, data and networks at home and abroad. The cyber threats we face continue to grow in scale and sophistication. The Government will continue to invest in law enforcement capabilities to ensure delivery agencies have the capacity to deal with the increasing volume and sophistication of cyber crime.

The Government values the role of Europol and that is why the UK opted-in to the new Europol Regulation, which came into force on 1 May 2017, enabling us to maintain our current access to the agency and benefit from its cooperation and operational advantages until we leave the EU.

Intelligence exchange between UK law enforcement and Europol is well-established and takes place on a daily and routine basis on a wide range of criminal activity, including cybercrime. The National Crime Agency (NCA) also support Europol with seconded staff, including within the European Cybercrime Centre (EC3). This cooperation continues to assist UK efforts to tackle cybercrime impacting on the UK.

Since its launch, the UK has submitted 414,776 malware files to the Europol Malware Analysis Solution.

The data requested on how many occasions the UK has received support from the European Cybercrime Centre is not held centrally and can only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

3 Aug 2017, 2:32 p.m. Passports David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many applications for (a) passport renewal and (b) a first passport were classified as in progress in each month since January 2017.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

The table below contains information on applications that are classed as work in progress. These are applications where Her Majesty’s Passport office is not waiting for a response from the customer.

Applications in Progress

Renewals

First Times

Jan-17

29,695

26,884

Feb-17

41,920

31,695

Mar-17

49,873

38,773

Apr-17

53,389

37,051

May-17

36,495

36,609

Jun-17

65,399

44,561

3 Aug 2017, 2:18 p.m. Drugs: Counterfeit Manufacturing David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many (a) websites have been shut down, (b) goods have been seized, (c) arrests have been made and (d) medicine units have been seized in the UK under Operational Pangea in each year since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

The Home Office does not hold this information. INTERPOL releases information annually detailing the total results of Operational Pangea from all participating countries.

1 Aug 2017, 9:40 a.m. Passports David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many passport applications processed by the Passport Office missed the three week target for processing in each month between 1 January and 30 June 2017.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

Between 1 January 2017 and 30 June 2017, 1,352 UK passport applications not requiring further information took longer than three weeks to process.

This represents 0.06% of the 2.4 million UK applications issued in this period.

31 Jul 2017, 12:25 p.m. UK Border Force: Dogs David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many detector dogs Border Force had in each (a) airport, (b) port and (c) train terminal in each year since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

Border Force works at the Border with a range of law enforcement partners including the police and the Ministry of Defence, including the use of detector dogs.

Border Force detector dogs are a national resource and the current number available for deployment nationally to detect illegal goods and clandestines is 108.

65 of these dogs are wholly owned by Border Force and 43 are provided by a UK based contractor.

Since 2010, the numbers have been (Border Force owned dogs only):

2010: 75

2011: 73

2012: 70

2013: 69

2014: 70

2015: 64

2016: 67

25 Jul 2017, 3:18 p.m. Passports David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the number of overseas applications for passports has been in each month since March 2014.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

Her Majesty’s Passport Office received a total of 1,258,726 overseas passport applications from March 2014 to December 2016. A monthly breakdown of the total is provided in the table below.

Table

Overseas passport applications received March 2014 to December 2016.

Mar-14

40,874

Apr-14

37,836

May-14

43,092

Jun-14

34,926

Jul-14

32,064

Aug-14

29,327

Sep-14

33,670

Oct-14

32,998

Nov-14

28,110

Dec-14

25,919

Jan-15

39,276

Feb-15

41,273

Mar-15

47,400

Apr-15

42,913

May-15

40,364

Jun-15

40,769

Jul-15

36,041

Aug-15

31,636

Sep-15

38,995

Oct-15

37,174

Nov-15

32,893

Dec-15

25,929

Jan-16

43,902

Feb-16

47,771

Mar-16

49,548

Apr-16

45,894

May-16

42,248

Jun-16

40,485

Jul-16

36,333

Aug-16

33,651

Sep-16

34,559

Oct-16

32,620

Nov-16

34,034

Dec-16

24,202

25 Jul 2017, 2:57 p.m. HM Passport Office: Staff David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many passport examining officers HM Passport Office employed in each year since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

The table below shows the number of Her Majesty's Passport Office full-time equivalents working within operational directorates for passport production, which includes passport examining officers and other front line roles, on the 31 March of each year.

Number (FTE)

2011

2,586

2012

2,216

2013

2,389

2014

2,593

2015

3,594

2016

3,412

2017

3,219

25 Jul 2017, 2:55 p.m. HM Passport Office: Standards David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the Passport Agency's average process time was for (a) straightforward and (b) non-straightforward applications in each month since June 2014.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

The tables below show the average processing time in days for a) straightforward and (b) non-straightforward applications in each month since June 2014 for UK and International applications. From April 2017 the median average times were used instead of the mean average previously reported, due to enhanced reporting available through a new system.

Table 1

UK average processing times for straightforward (SFPC) & non-straightforward passport applications (NSFPC)

Date

UK SFPC

UK NSFPC

Jan-14

4.2

8.1

Feb-14

6.8

10.3

Mar-14

7.7

11.9

Apr-14

9.3

13.9

May-14

10.9

15.6

Jun-14

14.0

18.5

Jul-14

16.2

21.3

Aug-14

12.0

19.3

Sep-14

3.8

12.5

Oct-14

2.4

9.7

Nov-14

2.1

9.1

Dec-14

2.0

9.4

Jan-15

2.4

7.2

Feb-15

3.1

7.6

Mar-15

3.4

8.3

Apr-15

2.7

8.0

May-15

2.5

7.7

Jun-15

2.5

8.0

Jul-15

2.0

8.2

Aug-15

1.8

8.0

Sep-15

2.2

8.1

Oct-15

2.8

8.7

Nov-15

2.6

8.4

Dec-15

1.7

8.4

Jan-16

2.0

6.2

Feb-16

2.4

6.6

Mar-16

2.3

7.0

Apr-16

3.0

7.5

May-16

3.3

7.8

Jun-16

4.4

8.7

Jul-16

5.4

9.4

Aug-16

5.6

9.5

Sep-16

3.6

8.3

Oct-16

1.8

6.9

Nov-16

1.8

6.2

Dec-16

1.8

6.5

Jan-17

1.8

6.2

Feb-17

2.1

6.4

Mar-17

2.6

7.2

Apr-17

3.1

7.9

May-17

3.7

8.1

Jun-17

3.8

8.3

Table 2

International average processing times for straightforward & non-straightforward passport applications

Date

Int SFPC

Int NSFPC

Jan-14

9.0

16.4

Feb-14

11.4

16.3

Mar-14

15.5

20.9

Apr-14

26.0

29.8

May-14

24.8

34.3

Jun-14

27.3

34.4

Jul-14

30.2

36.2

Aug-14

27.5

34.6

Sep-14

16.0

29.5

Oct-14

10.4

25.5

Nov-14

5.4

21.6

Dec-14

3.9

21.8

Jan-15

4.7

19.7

Feb-15

5.2

16.4

Mar-15

4.4

15.1

Apr-15

3.4

12.1

May-15

4.0

12.9

Jun-15

4.2

12.9

Jul-15

3.7

13.2

Aug-15

2.6

12.3

Sep-15

3.7

12.0

Oct-15

2.6

11.2

Nov-15

2.5

11.3

Dec-15

2.1

12.0

Jan-16

2.7

9.5

Feb-16

3.7

9.8

Mar-16

2.9

10.0

Apr-16

3.2

10.2

May-16

3.0

10.5

Jun-16

3.1

11.3

Jul-16

4.1

12.7

Aug-16

5.8

13.9

Sep-16

3.9

10.3

Oct-16

2.1

11.8

Nov-16

2.0

11.2

Dec-16

1.9

12.2

Jan-17

1.9

11.8

Feb-17

3.1

11.2

Mar-17

2.9

11.3

Apr-17

2.8

9.7

May-17

3.0

11.2

Jun-17

2.6

11.7

25 Jul 2017, 2:40 p.m. Immigration Controls: Enforcement David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the cost was of the Deloitte review of intelligence for the Border Force and Immigration Enforcement, commissioned in 2014.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

The cost of the Deloitte Review of intelligence for Immigration Enforcement and Border Force was £340,704.

24 Jul 2017, 1:25 p.m. Immigration Controls: Undocumented Migrants David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people absconded from ports of entry after being stopped by Border Force officers in each year since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

Due to the way in which absconder data is recorded, it is not currently feasible to make an informed estimate of the number of people who have absconded from ports of entry after being stopped by Border Force, or who were subsequently recovered.

To establish this information would incur disproportionate cost.

24 Jul 2017, 1:23 p.m. Immigration Controls David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people who absconded from ports of entry after being stopped by Border Force officers were subsequently recovered in each year since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

Due to the way in which absconder data is recorded, it is not currently feasible to make an informed estimate of the number of people who have absconded from ports of entry after being stopped by Border Force, or who were subsequently recovered.

To establish this information would incur disproportionate cost.

20 Jul 2017, 11:45 a.m. UK Border Force: Computer Software David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether her Department has undertaken an assessment of the effect of switching off the ATHENA border force software at the end of May 2016 on the Border Force.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

Athena was replaced by the Single Intelligence Platform (SIP) at the beginning of May 2016. The single intelligence platform was designed specifically for intelligence across the Border Force, Immigration Enforcement and HM Passport Office. It is better suited to the operational needs of Home Office intelligence, is simpler to use, has greater functionality than Athena and has delivered significant efficiencies. SIP has enabled wider access including HM Passport Office.

It has been built and developed by Home Office Digital Data and Technology. Improvements and new functionality are added on a weekly basis. The user research conducted every week provides a wealth of empirical evidence confirming the positive effect on the user experience.

Information from the decommissioned Athena database remains available and accessible to intelligence staff in Immigration Enforcement and Border Force.

20 Jul 2017, 11:43 a.m. Immigration Controls: Enforcement David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what progress the Border Force and Immigration Enforcement have made on the implementation of the Deloitte review of intelligence commissioned in 2014.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

Since publication of the Deloitte Review, Immigration Enforcement (IE) and Border Force (BF) have made a number of changes in direct response to its recommendations. This includes strengthening tasking and prioritisation processes, organisational restructures and developing a culture where the value of intelligence is understood across the organisation.

We consider that all of the Deloitte recommendations have now been addressed or are incorporated as part of our Transformation programme, and therefore the review is now closed.

20 Jul 2017, 11:42 a.m. Immigration Controls David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many Border Force category (a) A, (b) B and (c) C alerts were (i) issued and (ii) produced a successful outcome for maritime and air freight for each year since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

This information is exempt from disclosure under sections 31(1) (a) & (e) of the Freedom of Information Act due to the potential to compromise National border security.

20 Jul 2017, 11:39 a.m. UK Border Force: Freight David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many (a) airports, (b) ports and (c) train terminals had a dedicated Border Force customs team to deal with freight in each year since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

This Government has ensured that sufficient resources are available to ensure the security of the border is not compromised. Border Force uses a sophisticated combination of experienced officers, intelligence, data, technology and partnership working. All airports, ports and train terminals have Border Force Customs to deal with freight.

20 Jul 2017, 11:38 a.m. UK Border Force: Handbooks David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many Border Force staff have accessed the Professional Practice Manual on her Department's intranet since it was introduced.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

Border Force does not have access to the level of information that is required in response to the PQ.

20 Jul 2017, 11:30 a.m. Home Office: Databases David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department has taken in response to the findings in the report from the Independent Chief Inspector of Borders and Immigration of 21 July 2016 on intelligence functions of Border Force and Immigration Enforcement regarding making best use of the Intelligence Management System.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

Border Force and Immigration Enforcement are continually making improvements to the Intelligence Management System as part of the system’s development to meet business needs specific to each organisation.

For example, the link between the Intelligence Management System and the Single Intelligence Platform enables Intelligence Management System records and information to be automatically uploaded into Single Intelligence Platform. This has been completed and went live in autumn 2016. This was a significant improvement ensuring the system is used to its full potential.

Border Force is working on delivering a border specific user interface in IMS. This will enable Border Force to improve and increase the recording of information received within IMS.

20 Jul 2017, 11:12 a.m. Home Office: Databases David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when the most recent (a) guidance and (b) training was issued for UK Visas and Immigration caseworkers on using the Intelligence Management System.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

UKVI issued detailed training guidance to temporary migration caseworkers in June 2016. This included detailed instruction on how to complete the online referral form.

Immigration Enforcement deliver training on request to UKVI caseworkers as part of their intelligence cycle transformation work.

Intelligence requirements are regularly circulated to all staff as set out in the quarterly threat assessment. These provide clear indications of what information is needed to fulfil those intelligence gaps and complete the intelligence picture.

20 Jul 2017, 10:53 a.m. Home Office: Databases David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department is taking to ensure Border Force regions use the Intelligence Management System instead of local spreadsheets.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

Border Force Intelligence Directorate is in the process of procuring, designing and delivering a bespoke workflow tool integrated with the Intelligence Management System. This will enable us to discontinue the use of spreadsheets to record intelligence.

Guidance has been provided to all operational Border Force staff on the use of the Intelligence Management System. This guidance was communicated in the form of an interim operational instruction in August 2016.

20 Jul 2017, 10:53 a.m. Home Office: Databases David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what guidance her Department has issued to Border Force teams on the use of the Intelligence Management System instead of local spreadsheets to log intelligence data.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

Border Force Intelligence Directorate is in the process of procuring, designing and delivering a bespoke workflow tool integrated with the Intelligence Management System. This will enable us to discontinue the use of spreadsheets to record intelligence.

Guidance has been provided to all operational Border Force staff on the use of the Intelligence Management System. This guidance was communicated in the form of an interim operational instruction in August 2016.

20 Jul 2017, 10:48 a.m. UK Border Force: Handbooks David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether her Department has a hard copy of the Professional Practice Manual to each Border Force operation site since it was introduced.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

The Professional Practice Manual (PPM) is an Immigration Enforcement product. Border Force staff refer to their own guidance and, in addition, have access to PPM via the Home Office Intranet.

10 Jul 2017, 4:52 p.m. Counter-terrorism David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, on how many occasions her Department has used the EU Terrorist Finance Tracking Programme since its creation.

Answer (Mr Ben Wallace)

The Terrorist Finance Tracking Programme (TFTP) allows UK law enforcement access, in specific circumstances, to information on international financial transactions on the SWIFT messaging network. The Joint Report from the EU Commission and US Treasury Department highlighted the valuable role data from TFTP had played in supporting counter-terrorism investigations. Due to reasons of national security it is not in the public interest to disclose the specific details of the UK’s use of the TFTP.

Joint Report from the European Union Commission and the U.S. Treasury Department regarding the value of TFTP Provided Data – 27 November 2013

10 Jul 2017, 3:20 p.m. Europol David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many times the UK has accessed Europol's counter-terrorism and emergency response teams in each year since their creation.

Answer (Mr Ben Wallace)

The UK has never accessed EUROPOL's counter-terrorism and emergency response teams since their creation.

10 Jul 2017, 3:19 p.m. Europol David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much information the UK has shared with Europol's information system on foreign terrorist fighters in each year since 2010.

Answer (Mr Ben Wallace)

The UK has been a strong driver in improving data sharing across EU systems to ensure that law enforcement authorities across the EU are able to develop the best possible analysis and intelligence picture.

Intelligence exchange between UK law enforcement and Europol is well-established and takes place on a daily and routine basis on a wide range of criminal activity. The National Crime Agency (NCA) also support Europol with seconded staff. This cooperation continues to assist UK efforts to tackle cross-border crime impacting on the UK.

We cannot comment specifically on sharing data with Europol systems as we do not comment on intelligence-sharing arrangements with international law enforcement organisations. However, the UK is a leading contributor to Europol databases and a leading user of the Secure Information Exchange Network Application service (SIENA).

Further information on SIENA and the Europol Information System can be found at: https://www.europol.europa.eu/activities-services/services-support/information-exchange

10 Jul 2017, 3:19 p.m. Europol David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much information has been exchanged by the UK to other EU member states via Europol's Secure Information Exchange Network Application service in each year since 2010.

Answer (Mr Ben Wallace)

The UK has been a strong driver in improving data sharing across EU systems to ensure that law enforcement authorities across the EU are able to develop the best possible analysis and intelligence picture.

Intelligence exchange between UK law enforcement and Europol is well-established and takes place on a daily and routine basis on a wide range of criminal activity. The National Crime Agency (NCA) also support Europol with seconded staff. This cooperation continues to assist UK efforts to tackle cross-border crime impacting on the UK.

We cannot comment specifically on sharing data with Europol systems as we do not comment on intelligence-sharing arrangements with international law enforcement organisations. However, the UK is a leading contributor to Europol databases and a leading user of the Secure Information Exchange Network Application service (SIENA).

Further information on SIENA and the Europol Information System can be found at: https://www.europol.europa.eu/activities-services/services-support/information-exchange

10 Jul 2017, 12:51 p.m. Europol David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the effect of the potential loss of Europol assistance in tackling missing trader intra-community fraud on the UK's ability to tackle value added tax fraud.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

We recognise the challenges in negotiating a new relationship, but it is in the clear interest of both the UK and European partners that we find a way to continue to cooperate in this space. We remain committed to the safety of citizens across Europe, but it would be wrong to set out unilateral positions on specific measures in advance of negotiations.

10 Jul 2017, 12:51 p.m. Europol David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the effect of the potential loss of access to Europol's Early Warning System on the UK's ability to tackle new psychoactive substances.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

We recognise the challenges in negotiating a new relationship, but it is in the clear interest of both the UK and European partners that we find a way to continue to cooperate in this space. We remain committed to the safety of citizens across Europe, but it would be wrong to set out unilateral positions on specific measures in advance of negotiations.

10 Jul 2017, 12:51 p.m. Europol David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the potential loss of access to Europol's information system on the UK's ability to tackle crime.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

We recognise the challenges in negotiating a new relationship, but it is in the clear interest of both the UK and European partners that we find a way to continue to cooperate in this space. We remain committed to the safety of citizens across Europe, but it would be wrong to set out unilateral positions on specific measures in advance of negotiations.

10 Jul 2017, 12:51 p.m. Europol David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the effect of the potential loss of access to Europol's Terrorism Situation and Trend Report system on the UK's ability to tackle terrorism.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

We recognise the challenges in negotiating a new relationship, but it is in the clear interest of both the UK and European partners that we find a way to continue to cooperate in this space. We remain committed to the safety of citizens across Europe, but it would be wrong to set out unilateral positions on specific measures in advance of negotiations.

10 Jul 2017, 12:51 p.m. Europol David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the effect of the potential loss of access to Europol on the UK's ability to work across borders with the US.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

We recognise the challenges in negotiating a new relationship, but it is in the clear interest of both the UK and European partners that we find a way to continue to cooperate in this space. We remain committed to the safety of citizens across Europe, but it would be wrong to set out unilateral positions on specific measures in advance of negotiations.

10 Jul 2017, 10:49 a.m. Europol David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what (a) financial, (b) intelligence, (c) personnel and (d) other assistance Europol's European Migrant Smuggling Centre has given to the UK in each year since February 2016.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

Cooperation between UK law enforcement and Europol’s European Migrant Smuggling Centre on organised immigration crime is well-established and routine. This cooperation has and continues to assist UK efforts to tackle organised immigration crime impacting on the UK through enhanced intelligence exchange.

However, the specific data requested is not held centrally and can only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

10 Jul 2017, 10:39 a.m. European Arrest Warrants David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the effect of the potential loss of access to the European Arrest Warrant on the UK's ability to easily extradite those who have committed crimes.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

The UK continues to work closely with Member States to execute European Arrest Warrants.

The Government will look to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

The details of our new relationship will be subject to negotiations and it is too early to speculate at this stage what it may look like.

10 Jul 2017, 10:39 a.m. European Arrest Warrants David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what plans she has on replacement for the SIRENE Bureaux if the UK leaves the European Arrest Warrant agreement.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

The UK continues to work closely with Member States to execute European Arrest Warrants.

The Government will look to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

The details of our new relationship will be subject to negotiations and it is too early to speculate at this stage what it may look like.

10 Jul 2017, 10:35 a.m. European Arrest Warrants David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many European Arrest Warrant requests made by (a) the UK to each other EU state and (b) each other EU member state to the UK have been rejected as not valid in each year since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

Between 21 July 2014 and 31 March 2017 the National Crime Agency refused to certify 508 European Arrest Warrants on the grounds of disproportionality or dual criminality.

The NCA does not hold figures prior to the 2014 reforms made to the European Arrest Warrant, which came into effect on 21 July 2014.

The NCA does not hold equivalent figures for EU member states.

7 Jul 2017, 9:09 a.m. Radicalism: Internet David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, on how many occasions the UK accessed Europol's EU internet referral unit in each year since 1 July 2015.

Answer (Mr Ben Wallace)

The internet is a powerful tool which terrorists and extremists exploit to radicalise, recruit, inspire and incite. This Government takes seriously the issue of online terrorist and extremist content. We work in partnership with major technology firms across the spectrum of online harms, identifying ways to tackle threats.

The UK has been at the forefront of the online battle against online extremist and terrorist material. In the UK our dedicated police Counter Terrorism Internet Referral Unit (CTIRU) refers content that they assess as contravening UK terrorism legislation to industry. If industry agree that it breaches their terms and conditions, they remove it voluntarily. Following referrals from the police Counter Terrorism Internet Referral Unit (CTIRU), social media providers have removed over 270,000 pieces of terrorist-related material since its inception in February 2010. In 2016, CTIRU secured the removal of over 8,000 pieces of terrorist content a month.

This successful model has been replicated at EU level to deal as a response to the international nature of the online threat. The UK was instrumental in the formation of the European Union Internet Referral Unit (EU IRU) which went live in July 2015, following the Charlie Hebdo attacks. The EU IRU has referred over 30,000 pieces of content and successfully secured the removal of over 80% of this content since its inception in 2015.

We continue to work with the EU and other international partners to push industry to take a more proactive approach to terrorist and extremist content on their platforms

CTIRU have a permanent officer seconded to the EU internet referral unit so they can have access, and work closely together, continually.

7 Jul 2017, 9:09 a.m. Europol David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the total number of referrals to the EU Internet Referral Unit was; and how many of those referrals led to the deletion of internet content in each year since 2015.

Answer (Mr Ben Wallace)

The internet is a powerful tool which terrorists and extremists exploit to radicalise, recruit, inspire and incite. This Government takes seriously the issue of online terrorist and extremist content. We work in partnership with major technology firms across the spectrum of online harms, identifying ways to tackle threats.

The UK has been at the forefront of the online battle against online extremist and terrorist material. In the UK our dedicated police Counter Terrorism Internet Referral Unit (CTIRU) refers content that they assess as contravening UK terrorism legislation to industry. If industry agree that it breaches their terms and conditions, they remove it voluntarily. Following referrals from the police Counter Terrorism Internet Referral Unit (CTIRU), social media providers have removed over 270,000 pieces of terrorist-related material since its inception in February 2010. In 2016, CTIRU secured the removal of over 8,000 pieces of terrorist content a month.

This successful model has been replicated at EU level to deal as a response to the international nature of the online threat. The UK was instrumental in the formation of the European Union Internet Referral Unit (EU IRU) which went live in July 2015, following the Charlie Hebdo attacks. The EU IRU has referred over 30,000 pieces of content and successfully secured the removal of over 80% of this content since its inception in 2015.

We continue to work with the EU and other international partners to push industry to take a more proactive approach to terrorist and extremist content on their platforms

CTIRU have a permanent officer seconded to the EU internet referral unit so they can have access, and work closely together, continually.

7 Jul 2017, 9:03 a.m. European Cybercrime Centre David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the potential effect of losing access to the (a) European Cybercrime Centre and (b) Internet Organised Crime Threat Assessment on tackling cybercrime after the UK leaves the EU.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

The 2015 National Security Strategy (NSS) confirmed that cybercrime is a top threat to the UK’s economic and national security. The UK’s future security and prosperity depends on our ability to safeguard the digital information, data and networks at home and abroad. The cyber threats we face continue to grow in scale and sophistication. The Government will continue to invest in law enforcement capabilities to ensure delivery agencies have the capacity to deal with the increasing volume and sophistication of cyber crime.

The Government values the role of Europol and that is why the UK opted-in to the new Europol Regulation, which came into force on 1 May 2017, enabling us to maintain our current access to the agency and benefit from its cooperation and operational advantages until we leave the EU.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

7 Jul 2017, 8:54 a.m. Europol David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many (a) arrests and (b) prosecutions have taken place in the UK after Europol investigations into missing trader intra-community fraud in each year since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

The Government values the role of Europol and that is why the UK opted-in to the new Europol Regulation, which came into force on 1 May 2017, enabling us to maintain our current access to the agency and benefit from its cooperation and operational advantages until we leave the EU.

Intelligence exchange between UK law enforcement and Europol is well-established and takes place on a daily and routine basis on a wide range of criminal activity. The National Crime Agency (NCA) also support Europol with seconded staff. This cooperation continues to assist UK efforts to tackle cross-border crime impacting on the UK.

The specific data requested on how Europol operations and investigations have contributed to seizures, arrests and prosecutions in the UK is not held centrally and could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

7 Jul 2017, 8:54 a.m. Europol David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many kilograms of (a) drugs, (b) new psychoactive substances and (c) endangered species goods have been seized in the UK as a result of Europol operations in each year since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

The Government values the role of Europol and that is why the UK opted-in to the new Europol Regulation, which came into force on 1 May 2017, enabling us to maintain our current access to the agency and benefit from its cooperation and operational advantages until we leave the EU.

Intelligence exchange between UK law enforcement and Europol is well-established and takes place on a daily and routine basis on a wide range of criminal activity. The National Crime Agency (NCA) also support Europol with seconded staff. This cooperation continues to assist UK efforts to tackle cross-border crime impacting on the UK.

The specific data requested on how Europol operations and investigations have contributed to seizures, arrests and prosecutions in the UK is not held centrally and could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

7 Jul 2017, 8:54 a.m. Europol David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many weapons have been seized in the UK as a result of Europol operations in each year since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

The Government values the role of Europol and that is why the UK opted-in to the new Europol Regulation, which came into force on 1 May 2017, enabling us to maintain our current access to the agency and benefit from its cooperation and operational advantages until we leave the EU.

Intelligence exchange between UK law enforcement and Europol is well-established and takes place on a daily and routine basis on a wide range of criminal activity. The National Crime Agency (NCA) also support Europol with seconded staff. This cooperation continues to assist UK efforts to tackle cross-border crime impacting on the UK.

The specific data requested on how Europol operations and investigations have contributed to seizures, arrests and prosecutions in the UK is not held centrally and could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

7 Jul 2017, 8:51 a.m. Europol David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the effect on the UK's ability to fight cybercrime of the UK's potential loss of access to Europol's Joint Cybercrime action taskforce after the UK leaves the EU.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

The 2015 National Security Strategy (NSS) confirmed that cybercrime is a top threat to the UK’s economic and national security. The UK’s future security and prosperity depends on our ability to safeguard the digital information, data and networks at home and abroad. The cyber threats we face continue to grow in scale and sophistication. The Government will continue to invest in law enforcement capabilities to ensure delivery agencies have the capacity to deal with the increasing volume and sophistication of cyber crime.

The Government values the role of Europol and that is why the UK opted-in to the new Europol Regulation, which came into force on 1 May 2017, enabling us to maintain our current access to the agency and benefit from its cooperation and operational advantages until we leave the EU.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

7 Jul 2017, 8:51 a.m. Europol David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the effect on the UK's ability to protect citizens, businesses and the state from malware attacks of the potential loss of access to the Europol Malware Analysis Solution after the UK leaves the EU.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

The 2015 National Security Strategy (NSS) confirmed that cybercrime is a top threat to the UK’s economic and national security. The UK’s future security and prosperity depends on our ability to safeguard the digital information, data and networks at home and abroad. The cyber threats we face continue to grow in scale and sophistication. The Government will continue to invest in law enforcement capabilities to ensure delivery agencies have the capacity to deal with the increasing volume and sophistication of cyber crime.

The Government values the role of Europol and that is why the UK opted-in to the new Europol Regulation, which came into force on 1 May 2017, enabling us to maintain our current access to the agency and benefit from its cooperation and operational advantages until we leave the EU.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

7 Jul 2017, 8:51 a.m. Europol David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the effect of the potential loss of access to Europol's Joint Operational Team Mare on tackling illegal migration to the UK after the UK leaves the EU.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

The 2015 National Security Strategy (NSS) confirmed that cybercrime is a top threat to the UK’s economic and national security. The UK’s future security and prosperity depends on our ability to safeguard the digital information, data and networks at home and abroad. The cyber threats we face continue to grow in scale and sophistication. The Government will continue to invest in law enforcement capabilities to ensure delivery agencies have the capacity to deal with the increasing volume and sophistication of cyber crime.

The Government values the role of Europol and that is why the UK opted-in to the new Europol Regulation, which came into force on 1 May 2017, enabling us to maintain our current access to the agency and benefit from its cooperation and operational advantages until we leave the EU.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

7 Jul 2017, 8:51 a.m. Human Trafficking David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the effect of the potential loss of access to Europol's European Migrant Smuggling Centre on tackling human trafficking to the UK after the UK leaves the EU.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

The 2015 National Security Strategy (NSS) confirmed that cybercrime is a top threat to the UK’s economic and national security. The UK’s future security and prosperity depends on our ability to safeguard the digital information, data and networks at home and abroad. The cyber threats we face continue to grow in scale and sophistication. The Government will continue to invest in law enforcement capabilities to ensure delivery agencies have the capacity to deal with the increasing volume and sophistication of cyber crime.

The Government values the role of Europol and that is why the UK opted-in to the new Europol Regulation, which came into force on 1 May 2017, enabling us to maintain our current access to the agency and benefit from its cooperation and operational advantages until we leave the EU.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

7 Jul 2017, 8:49 a.m. Crime: Databases David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the potential loss of access to the Schengen Information System on tackling crime after the UK leaves the EU.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation on measures such as SIS II once the UK has left the EU but it is too early to speculate at this stage what future arrangements may look like.

7 Jul 2017, 8:45 a.m. European Arrest Warrants David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many European Arrest Warrant (a) arrests, (b) requests and (c) surrenders have been made in each year since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

Each year the National Crime Agency publishes statistics on the European Arrest Warrants (EAW), these figures include: -

  • The number of EAWs made or received
  • The number of arrests
  • The number of surrenders

The figures since 2010 are published at: -

http://www.nationalcrimeagency.gov.uk/publications/european-arrest-warrant-statistics

7 Jul 2017, 8:45 a.m. European Arrest Warrants David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many European Arrest Warrants have been requested by each police force since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

Each year the National Crime Agency publishes statistics on the European Arrest Warrants (EAW), these figures include: -

  • The number of EAWs made or received
  • The number of arrests
  • The number of surrenders

The figures since 2010 are published at: -

http://www.nationalcrimeagency.gov.uk/publications/european-arrest-warrant-statistics

7 Jul 2017, 8:45 a.m. European Arrest Warrants David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many European Arrest Warrants have (a) been issued by the UK, (b) resulted in an extradition back to the UK and (c) resulted in an extradition back to the country requesting the warrant in each year since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

Each year the National Crime Agency publishes statistics on the European Arrest Warrants (EAW), these figures include: -

  • The number of EAWs made or received
  • The number of arrests
  • The number of surrenders

The figures since 2010 are published at: -

http://www.nationalcrimeagency.gov.uk/publications/european-arrest-warrant-statistics

7 Jul 2017, 8:38 a.m. European Arrest Warrants David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the effect on the Crown Prosecution Service of the potential loss of access to the European Arrest Warrant.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

The Government will look to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with the Crown Prosecution Service on the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

5 Jul 2017, 3:13 p.m. Human Trafficking David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, on how many occasions the UK accessed information from Europol's European Migrant Smuggling Centre in each year since that centre's creation.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

Intelligence exchange between UK law enforcement and Europol is well-established and routine, including on organised immigration crime. The National Crime Agency and Immigration Enforcement also support Europol with seconded staff, including within the European Migrant Smuggling Centre (EMSC), which incorporates JOT Mare. This cooperation has and continues to assist UK efforts to tackle organised immigration crime impacting on the UK.

However, the data requested is not held centrally and can only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

5 Jul 2017, 3:13 p.m. Europol David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many cases have been shared through Europol's Joint Operational Team Mare programme by (a) the UK, (b) other EU member states, (c) states with operational agreements with Europol and (d) states with strategic agreements with Europol in each year since that programme's creation in March 2015.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

Intelligence exchange between UK law enforcement and Europol is well-established and routine, including on organised immigration crime. The National Crime Agency and Immigration Enforcement also support Europol with seconded staff, including within the European Migrant Smuggling Centre (EMSC), which incorporates JOT Mare. This cooperation has and continues to assist UK efforts to tackle organised immigration crime impacting on the UK.

However, the data requested is not held centrally and can only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

5 Jul 2017, 3:13 p.m. Europol David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what contributions Europol's Joint Operational Team Mare has made to UK border control operations at (a) Calais and (b) other locations in each year since March 2015.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

Intelligence exchange between UK law enforcement and Europol is well-established and routine, including on organised immigration crime. The National Crime Agency and Immigration Enforcement also support Europol with seconded staff, including within the European Migrant Smuggling Centre (EMSC), which incorporates JOT Mare. This cooperation has and continues to assist UK efforts to tackle organised immigration crime impacting on the UK.

However, the data requested is not held centrally and can only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

5 Jul 2017, 3:13 p.m. Human Trafficking David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many suspects have been arrested in the UK after the use of Europol's European Migrant Smuggling Centre since February 2016.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

Intelligence exchange between UK law enforcement and Europol is well-established and routine, including on organised immigration crime. The National Crime Agency and Immigration Enforcement also support Europol with seconded staff, including within the European Migrant Smuggling Centre (EMSC), which incorporates JOT Mare. This cooperation has and continues to assist UK efforts to tackle organised immigration crime impacting on the UK.

However, the data requested is not held centrally and can only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

4 Jul 2017, 9:17 a.m. Eurojust David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the potential effect of loss of access to Eurojust after the UK leaves the EU on tackling human trafficking.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

Eurojust can lead to improved criminal justice outcomes by ensuring that investigators and prosecutors share information and evidence, agree strategies and co-ordinate activity in order to tackle cross-border criminality in a more efficient and effective manner.

The Government values the role of Eurojust and that is why Eurojust was one of the measures we rejoined in December 2014 as part of the decision under Protocol (No. 36) to the EU Treaties to opt out of all pre-Lisbon JHA legislation and opt back into 35 key measures.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Statistics on Eurojust’s work are publicly available online at the below link:

http://www.eurojust.europa.eu/doclibrary/corporate/Pages/annual-reports.aspx

4 Jul 2017, 9:17 a.m. Eurojust David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many drug VAT fraud cases that Eurojust has supported the Government in investigating were (a) in the UK, (b) against UK citizens abroad and (c) against UK interests in each year since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

Eurojust can lead to improved criminal justice outcomes by ensuring that investigators and prosecutors share information and evidence, agree strategies and co-ordinate activity in order to tackle cross-border criminality in a more efficient and effective manner.

The Government values the role of Eurojust and that is why Eurojust was one of the measures we rejoined in December 2014 as part of the decision under Protocol (No. 36) to the EU Treaties to opt out of all pre-Lisbon JHA legislation and opt back into 35 key measures.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Statistics on Eurojust’s work are publicly available online at the below link:

http://www.eurojust.europa.eu/doclibrary/corporate/Pages/annual-reports.aspx

4 Jul 2017, 9:17 a.m. Eurojust David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many drug trafficking cases that Eurojust has supported the UK in investigating were (a) in the UK, (b) against UK citizens abroad and (c) against UK interests in each year since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

Eurojust can lead to improved criminal justice outcomes by ensuring that investigators and prosecutors share information and evidence, agree strategies and co-ordinate activity in order to tackle cross-border criminality in a more efficient and effective manner.

The Government values the role of Eurojust and that is why Eurojust was one of the measures we rejoined in December 2014 as part of the decision under Protocol (No. 36) to the EU Treaties to opt out of all pre-Lisbon JHA legislation and opt back into 35 key measures.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Statistics on Eurojust’s work are publicly available online at the below link:

http://www.eurojust.europa.eu/doclibrary/corporate/Pages/annual-reports.aspx

4 Jul 2017, 9:17 a.m. Eurojust David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many terrorism cases Eurojust has supported the UK in investigating in each year since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

Eurojust can lead to improved criminal justice outcomes by ensuring that investigators and prosecutors share information and evidence, agree strategies and co-ordinate activity in order to tackle cross-border criminality in a more efficient and effective manner.

The Government values the role of Eurojust and that is why Eurojust was one of the measures we rejoined in December 2014 as part of the decision under Protocol (No. 36) to the EU Treaties to opt out of all pre-Lisbon JHA legislation and opt back into 35 key measures.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Statistics on Eurojust’s work are publicly available online at the below link:

http://www.eurojust.europa.eu/doclibrary/corporate/Pages/annual-reports.aspx

4 Jul 2017, 9:17 a.m. Eurojust David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many times the Government has placed an urgent request for judicial cooperation with Eurojust on terrorism-related cases in each year since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

Eurojust can lead to improved criminal justice outcomes by ensuring that investigators and prosecutors share information and evidence, agree strategies and co-ordinate activity in order to tackle cross-border criminality in a more efficient and effective manner.

The Government values the role of Eurojust and that is why Eurojust was one of the measures we rejoined in December 2014 as part of the decision under Protocol (No. 36) to the EU Treaties to opt out of all pre-Lisbon JHA legislation and opt back into 35 key measures.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Statistics on Eurojust’s work are publicly available online at the below link:

http://www.eurojust.europa.eu/doclibrary/corporate/Pages/annual-reports.aspx

4 Jul 2017, 9:17 a.m. European Judicial Cybercrime Network David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment has she made of the potential effect of loss of access to the European Judicial Cybercrime Network after the UK has left the EU.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

Eurojust can lead to improved criminal justice outcomes by ensuring that investigators and prosecutors share information and evidence, agree strategies and co-ordinate activity in order to tackle cross-border criminality in a more efficient and effective manner.

The Government values the role of Eurojust and that is why Eurojust was one of the measures we rejoined in December 2014 as part of the decision under Protocol (No. 36) to the EU Treaties to opt out of all pre-Lisbon JHA legislation and opt back into 35 key measures.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Statistics on Eurojust’s work are publicly available online at the below link:

http://www.eurojust.europa.eu/doclibrary/corporate/Pages/annual-reports.aspx

4 Jul 2017, 9:15 a.m. Eurojust David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the potential loss of access to Eurojust after the UK leaves the EU on the Government's ability to tackle VAT fraud.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

Eurojust can lead to improved criminal justice outcomes by ensuring that investigators and prosecutors share information and evidence, agree strategies and co-ordinate activity in order to tackle cross-border criminality in a more efficient and effective manner.

The Government values the role of Eurojust and that is why Eurojust was one of the measures we rejoined in December 2014 as part of the decision under Protocol (No. 36) to the EU Treaties to opt out of all pre-Lisbon JHA legislation and opt back into 35 key measures.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Statistics on Eurojust’s work are publicly available online at the below link:

http://www.eurojust.europa.eu/doclibrary/corporate/Pages/annual-reports.aspx

4 Jul 2017, 9:15 a.m. Eurojust David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the potential effect of loss of access to Eurojust after the UK leaves the EU on the Government's ability to tackle drug trafficking.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

Eurojust can lead to improved criminal justice outcomes by ensuring that investigators and prosecutors share information and evidence, agree strategies and co-ordinate activity in order to tackle cross-border criminality in a more efficient and effective manner.

The Government values the role of Eurojust and that is why Eurojust was one of the measures we rejoined in December 2014 as part of the decision under Protocol (No. 36) to the EU Treaties to opt out of all pre-Lisbon JHA legislation and opt back into 35 key measures.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Statistics on Eurojust’s work are publicly available online at the below link:

http://www.eurojust.europa.eu/doclibrary/corporate/Pages/annual-reports.aspx

4 Jul 2017, 9:15 a.m. Eurojust David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the potential effect of loss of access to Eurojust after the UK leaves the EU on private and non-profit sectors who use that organisation's services.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

Eurojust can lead to improved criminal justice outcomes by ensuring that investigators and prosecutors share information and evidence, agree strategies and co-ordinate activity in order to tackle cross-border criminality in a more efficient and effective manner.

The Government values the role of Eurojust and that is why Eurojust was one of the measures we rejoined in December 2014 as part of the decision under Protocol (No. 36) to the EU Treaties to opt out of all pre-Lisbon JHA legislation and opt back into 35 key measures.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Statistics on Eurojust’s work are publicly available online at the below link:

http://www.eurojust.europa.eu/doclibrary/corporate/Pages/annual-reports.aspx

4 Jul 2017, 9:15 a.m. Eurojust David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many organised property crime cases committed by mobile organised crime groups Eurojust has supported the Government in investigating in each year since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

Eurojust can lead to improved criminal justice outcomes by ensuring that investigators and prosecutors share information and evidence, agree strategies and co-ordinate activity in order to tackle cross-border criminality in a more efficient and effective manner.

The Government values the role of Eurojust and that is why Eurojust was one of the measures we rejoined in December 2014 as part of the decision under Protocol (No. 36) to the EU Treaties to opt out of all pre-Lisbon JHA legislation and opt back into 35 key measures.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Statistics on Eurojust’s work are publicly available online at the below link:

http://www.eurojust.europa.eu/doclibrary/corporate/Pages/annual-reports.aspx

4 Jul 2017, 9:15 a.m. Eurojust David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many terrorism cases Eurojust has supported the Government in investigating were (a) in the UK, (b) against UK citizens abroad and (c) against UK interests in each year since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

Eurojust can lead to improved criminal justice outcomes by ensuring that investigators and prosecutors share information and evidence, agree strategies and co-ordinate activity in order to tackle cross-border criminality in a more efficient and effective manner.

The Government values the role of Eurojust and that is why Eurojust was one of the measures we rejoined in December 2014 as part of the decision under Protocol (No. 36) to the EU Treaties to opt out of all pre-Lisbon JHA legislation and opt back into 35 key measures.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Statistics on Eurojust’s work are publicly available online at the below link:

http://www.eurojust.europa.eu/doclibrary/corporate/Pages/annual-reports.aspx

4 Jul 2017, 9:15 a.m. Eurojust David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many organised property crime cases committed by mobile organised crime groups that Eurojust has supported the Government in investigating were (a) in the UK, (b) against UK citizens abroad and (c) against UK interests in each year since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

Eurojust can lead to improved criminal justice outcomes by ensuring that investigators and prosecutors share information and evidence, agree strategies and co-ordinate activity in order to tackle cross-border criminality in a more efficient and effective manner.

The Government values the role of Eurojust and that is why Eurojust was one of the measures we rejoined in December 2014 as part of the decision under Protocol (No. 36) to the EU Treaties to opt out of all pre-Lisbon JHA legislation and opt back into 35 key measures.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Statistics on Eurojust’s work are publicly available online at the below link:

http://www.eurojust.europa.eu/doclibrary/corporate/Pages/annual-reports.aspx

4 Jul 2017, 9:15 a.m. Eurojust David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many cybercrime cases Eurojust supported the Government in investigating were (a) in the UK, (b) against UK citizens abroad and (c) against UK interests in each year since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

Eurojust can lead to improved criminal justice outcomes by ensuring that investigators and prosecutors share information and evidence, agree strategies and co-ordinate activity in order to tackle cross-border criminality in a more efficient and effective manner.

The Government values the role of Eurojust and that is why Eurojust was one of the measures we rejoined in December 2014 as part of the decision under Protocol (No. 36) to the EU Treaties to opt out of all pre-Lisbon JHA legislation and opt back into 35 key measures.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Statistics on Eurojust’s work are publicly available online at the below link:

http://www.eurojust.europa.eu/doclibrary/corporate/Pages/annual-reports.aspx

4 Jul 2017, 9:15 a.m. Eurojust David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many human trafficking cases Eurojust supported the Government in investigating were (a) in and (b) outside the UK in each year since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

Eurojust can lead to improved criminal justice outcomes by ensuring that investigators and prosecutors share information and evidence, agree strategies and co-ordinate activity in order to tackle cross-border criminality in a more efficient and effective manner.

The Government values the role of Eurojust and that is why Eurojust was one of the measures we rejoined in December 2014 as part of the decision under Protocol (No. 36) to the EU Treaties to opt out of all pre-Lisbon JHA legislation and opt back into 35 key measures.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Statistics on Eurojust’s work are publicly available online at the below link:

http://www.eurojust.europa.eu/doclibrary/corporate/Pages/annual-reports.aspx

4 Jul 2017, 9:15 a.m. Eurojust David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many fraud cases Eurojust has supported the Government in investigating were (a) in the UK, (b) against UK citizens abroad and (c) against UK interests in each year since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

Eurojust can lead to improved criminal justice outcomes by ensuring that investigators and prosecutors share information and evidence, agree strategies and co-ordinate activity in order to tackle cross-border criminality in a more efficient and effective manner.

The Government values the role of Eurojust and that is why Eurojust was one of the measures we rejoined in December 2014 as part of the decision under Protocol (No. 36) to the EU Treaties to opt out of all pre-Lisbon JHA legislation and opt back into 35 key measures.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Statistics on Eurojust’s work are publicly available online at the below link:

http://www.eurojust.europa.eu/doclibrary/corporate/Pages/annual-reports.aspx

4 Jul 2017, 9:15 a.m. Eurojust David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many VAT fraud cases Eurojust has supported the Government in investigating in each year since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

Eurojust can lead to improved criminal justice outcomes by ensuring that investigators and prosecutors share information and evidence, agree strategies and co-ordinate activity in order to tackle cross-border criminality in a more efficient and effective manner.

The Government values the role of Eurojust and that is why Eurojust was one of the measures we rejoined in December 2014 as part of the decision under Protocol (No. 36) to the EU Treaties to opt out of all pre-Lisbon JHA legislation and opt back into 35 key measures.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Statistics on Eurojust’s work are publicly available online at the below link:

http://www.eurojust.europa.eu/doclibrary/corporate/Pages/annual-reports.aspx

4 Jul 2017, 9:15 a.m. Eurojust David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many fraud cases Eurojust has supported the Government in investigating in each year since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

Eurojust can lead to improved criminal justice outcomes by ensuring that investigators and prosecutors share information and evidence, agree strategies and co-ordinate activity in order to tackle cross-border criminality in a more efficient and effective manner.

The Government values the role of Eurojust and that is why Eurojust was one of the measures we rejoined in December 2014 as part of the decision under Protocol (No. 36) to the EU Treaties to opt out of all pre-Lisbon JHA legislation and opt back into 35 key measures.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Statistics on Eurojust’s work are publicly available online at the below link:

http://www.eurojust.europa.eu/doclibrary/corporate/Pages/annual-reports.aspx

4 Jul 2017, 9:15 a.m. Eurojust David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many cybercrime cases Eurojust has supported the Government in investigating in each year since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

Eurojust can lead to improved criminal justice outcomes by ensuring that investigators and prosecutors share information and evidence, agree strategies and co-ordinate activity in order to tackle cross-border criminality in a more efficient and effective manner.

The Government values the role of Eurojust and that is why Eurojust was one of the measures we rejoined in December 2014 as part of the decision under Protocol (No. 36) to the EU Treaties to opt out of all pre-Lisbon JHA legislation and opt back into 35 key measures.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Statistics on Eurojust’s work are publicly available online at the below link:

http://www.eurojust.europa.eu/doclibrary/corporate/Pages/annual-reports.aspx

4 Jul 2017, 9:15 a.m. Eurojust David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many cases of human trafficking Eurojust has supported the Government in investigating in each year since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

Eurojust can lead to improved criminal justice outcomes by ensuring that investigators and prosecutors share information and evidence, agree strategies and co-ordinate activity in order to tackle cross-border criminality in a more efficient and effective manner.

The Government values the role of Eurojust and that is why Eurojust was one of the measures we rejoined in December 2014 as part of the decision under Protocol (No. 36) to the EU Treaties to opt out of all pre-Lisbon JHA legislation and opt back into 35 key measures.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Statistics on Eurojust’s work are publicly available online at the below link:

http://www.eurojust.europa.eu/doclibrary/corporate/Pages/annual-reports.aspx

4 Jul 2017, 9:15 a.m. Eurojust David Hanson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many drug trafficking cases Eurojust has supported the Government in investigating in each year since 2010.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

In a modern, interconnected world, crime is increasingly international and does not respect borders. The Government is clear that effective cooperation with EU Member States on security, justice and policing in order to tackle serious organised crime will continue to be a top UK priority.

Eurojust can lead to improved criminal justice outcomes by ensuring that investigators and prosecutors share information and evidence, agree strategies and co-ordinate activity in order to tackle cross-border criminality in a more efficient and effective manner.

The Government values the role of Eurojust and that is why Eurojust was one of the measures we rejoined in December 2014 as part of the decision under Protocol (No. 36) to the EU Treaties to opt out of all pre-Lisbon JHA legislation and opt back into 35 key measures.

The Prime Minister has made clear that one of the twelve objectives for the negotiations ahead will be to establish a new relationship with the European Union that includes practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement cooperation to tackle cross-border crime and to keep our people safe.

We continue to work closely with EU partners and we are examining the options for future cooperation once the UK has left the EU.

Statistics on Eurojust’s work are publicly available online at the below link:

http://www.eurojust.europa.eu/doclibrary/corporate/Pages/annual-reports.aspx