Seema Malhotra Written Questions

Questions to Home Office tabled by Seema Malhotra


Date Title Questioner
31 Jul 2019, 3:25 p.m. Visas: Rugby (Sport) Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment he has made of the effect of the level of funding for women's rugby clubs in English women’s rugby championships and premierships on the ability of non-UK professional women rugby players to receive Tier 2 and Tier 5 migrant visas; and what other options are available for non-UK women rugby players to remain in the UK.

Answer (Seema Kennedy)

The funding of UK sports is a matter for the Department of Culture, Media and Sport.

Tiers 2 and 5 are our principle immigration routes for those wishing to play professional sport in the UK. Other visa options may be open to some migrants depending on their individual circumstances.

31 Jul 2019, 3:23 p.m. Visas: Rugby (Sport) Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many non-UK professional male rugby players sponsored by (a) the Rugby Football Union and (b) rugby clubs issued governing body endorsements to become a sponsor have received Tier 2 and Tier 5 migrant visas in each of the last 10 years.

Answer (Seema Kennedy)

The Home Office does not collate or publish the information requested.

31 Jul 2019, 3:05 p.m. Visas: Migrant Workers Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the requirements are for an organisation to qualify to sponsor Tier 2 and Tier 5 visas; and how many organisations meet those qualifications.

Answer (Seema Kennedy)

The requirements to become a sponsor and maintain this status are set out in the Tiers 2 and 5: guidance for sponsors. Currently, there are more than 30,000 organisations that are licenced sponsors.

24 Jul 2019, 4:38 p.m. Home Office: Ethnic Groups Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many BAME staff are employed at (a) grade 7, (b) grade 5 and (c) grade 3 in his Department.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

For the purposes of this answer, Senior Civil Service (SCS) Pay Band 1 has been treated as equivalent to Grade 5 and SCS Pay Band 2 and Director General have been treated as Grade 3.

At 30 June 2019, there are currently the following staff in the Home Office who have declared their ethnicity as BAME:

Grade

Number of BAME staff

Grade 7

309

Grade 5

15

Grade 3

2

Data Source: Adelphi – Home Office Human Resources Record System

Period covered: As at 30 June 2019

Employee coverage: The data is based on headcount of paid, permanent Civil Servants who were current as at 30 June 2019.

22 Jul 2019, 4:19 p.m. Visas: Migrant Workers Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate he has made of the number of applications received in each of the last twelve months for Leave to Remain extension application as a Tier 1 Highly Skilled general migrant; and how of those cases were concluded within eight weeks.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

The Tier 1 (General) route closed to Leave to Remain extension applications on 6 April 2015. Therefore, no Tier 1 General extension applications were received in the last twelve months.


The data regarding exceeding the eight-week service standards in current application routes can be found using the link https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/in-country-migration-data-may-2019


The statistics specific to service standards can be found on tab InC_02.

Historical data regarding service standards can be found via the following link:https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/migration-transparency-data#previous-data-releases

Complexity is identified on a case by case basis and will also vary depending on the application route. Therefore there is not an exhaustive list of the circumstances in which particular types of application might be deemed to be complex. Where an application is defined as non-straightforward, due to complexity, the customer will be written to within the normal processing time to explain why it will not be decided within the normal standard service, and to explain what will happen next.

22 Jul 2019, 4:19 p.m. Visas: Standards Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, for what reasons the processing of extension applications may exceed the eight-week agreed service standard; and with what frequency that standard has been exceeded in each of the last three years.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

The Tier 1 (General) route closed to Leave to Remain extension applications on 6 April 2015. Therefore, no Tier 1 General extension applications were received in the last twelve months.


The data regarding exceeding the eight-week service standards in current application routes can be found using the link https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/in-country-migration-data-may-2019


The statistics specific to service standards can be found on tab InC_02.

Historical data regarding service standards can be found via the following link:https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/migration-transparency-data#previous-data-releases

Complexity is identified on a case by case basis and will also vary depending on the application route. Therefore there is not an exhaustive list of the circumstances in which particular types of application might be deemed to be complex. Where an application is defined as non-straightforward, due to complexity, the customer will be written to within the normal processing time to explain why it will not be decided within the normal standard service, and to explain what will happen next.

22 Jul 2019, 4:19 p.m. Visas Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the reasons are that qualify an extension application as complex.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

The Tier 1 (General) route closed to Leave to Remain extension applications on 6 April 2015. Therefore, no Tier 1 General extension applications were received in the last twelve months.


The data regarding exceeding the eight-week service standards in current application routes can be found using the link https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/in-country-migration-data-may-2019


The statistics specific to service standards can be found on tab InC_02.

Historical data regarding service standards can be found via the following link:https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/migration-transparency-data#previous-data-releases

Complexity is identified on a case by case basis and will also vary depending on the application route. Therefore there is not an exhaustive list of the circumstances in which particular types of application might be deemed to be complex. Where an application is defined as non-straightforward, due to complexity, the customer will be written to within the normal processing time to explain why it will not be decided within the normal standard service, and to explain what will happen next.

19 Oct 2018, noon Home Office: Staff Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what change there has been in staffing levels in his Department since June 2016.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

Between June 2016 and June 2018 there has been an overall 9% increase in staffing levels.

June 2016

June 20181

% Variance

FTE

HC

FTE

HC

FTE

HC

26108

28060

28369

30620

9%

9%

1 Figures are reported using ONS Definitions. Since April 17 we have been using a new reporting system which has impacted on civil servant paid and unpaid figures; previously loans to FCO were captured as unpaid but are now recorded in the paid categoryas all costs are re-charged to the Home Office. The paid category only are reported in figures collected by Office for National Statistics (ONS) for the Quarterly Public Employment Survey (QPSES).

Data Source:

1) June 2016: Data View - Office for National Statistics compliant monthly snapshot corporate Human Resources data for Home Office.

2) June 2018: Adelphi - Home Office Human Resources Record System.

Period Covered:

1) As at 30/06/2016

2) As at 30/06/2018

Organisational Coverage: Home Office

Employee Coverage: Data is based on headcount (HC) and Full Time Equivalent (FTE) of paid Civil Servants who were current at the end of the period.

Note: Figues are in line with the Quarterly Public Sector Employment Survey (QPSES) collected by Office for National Statistics (ONS)

Key workforce changes in 2016-17 include:

1 Machinery of Government Change: 59.40 (FTE) Fire & Resilience staff moved to Home Office from the Department for Communities & Local Government

2 Machinery of Government Change: 80.46 (FTE) Civil Service Learning staff moved from Home Office to the Cabinet Office.

18 Oct 2018, 3:48 p.m. Home Office: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether he plans to publish his Department's preparations for no deal.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

We firmly believe it is in the interests of both the EU and the UK to strike a deal. That remains the goal on both sides and we are confident that this will be achieved. But it is the job of a responsible Government to prepare for all scenarios, so we have already carried out very significant ‘no deal’ preparations for the unlikely event that we reach March 2019 without agreeing a deal.

We have already published over 100 technical notices so that businesses and citizens have time to prepare in the event of a 'no deal' scenario. These are available on gov.uk in a centralised location that is easy for people to access and use.

17 Jul 2018, 11:57 a.m. Immigration: Carers Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate he has made of the number of people who have applied for the right to reside in the UK as carers under Ruiz-Zambrano case law since 2011; and of those people how many were successful.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

There are no published statistics specifically relating to carers who have made applications and been successful under the Ruiz-Zambrano case law, however information available on the issue and refusal of residence documentation to EEA nationals and their family members, broken down by the applicants’ nationality is published in the quarterly Immigration Statistics, European Economic Area volume table at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/immigration-statistics-year-ending-march-2018/list-of-tables#european-economic-area-eea

As European rights are automatic rights with no mandatory application required, the Home Office does not hold the information requested relating to the number of people resident in the UK who derive their right to reside from their status as primary carers under the Ruiz–Zambrano case law.

Statistics on the UK’s resident population is a matter for the Office for National Statistics.

17 Jul 2018, 11:57 a.m. Immigration: Carers Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if he will provide a breakdown by nationality of people who have (a) applied for and (b) been successful in their applications for the right to reside in the UK as carers under Ruiz-Zambrano case law since 2011.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

There are no published statistics specifically relating to carers who have made applications and been successful under the Ruiz-Zambrano case law, however information available on the issue and refusal of residence documentation to EEA nationals and their family members, broken down by the applicants’ nationality is published in the quarterly Immigration Statistics, European Economic Area volume table at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/immigration-statistics-year-ending-march-2018/list-of-tables#european-economic-area-eea

As European rights are automatic rights with no mandatory application required, the Home Office does not hold the information requested relating to the number of people resident in the UK who derive their right to reside from their status as primary carers under the Ruiz–Zambrano case law.

Statistics on the UK’s resident population is a matter for the Office for National Statistics.

17 Jul 2018, 11:57 a.m. Immigration: Carers Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate he has made of the number of people resident in the UK who derive their right to reside from their status as primary carers under Ruiz-Zambrano case law.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

There are no published statistics specifically relating to carers who have made applications and been successful under the Ruiz-Zambrano case law, however information available on the issue and refusal of residence documentation to EEA nationals and their family members, broken down by the applicants’ nationality is published in the quarterly Immigration Statistics, European Economic Area volume table at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/immigration-statistics-year-ending-march-2018/list-of-tables#european-economic-area-eea

As European rights are automatic rights with no mandatory application required, the Home Office does not hold the information requested relating to the number of people resident in the UK who derive their right to reside from their status as primary carers under the Ruiz–Zambrano case law.

Statistics on the UK’s resident population is a matter for the Office for National Statistics.

16 Jul 2018, 3:38 p.m. Immigration: Carers Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what plans he has to bring forward proposals on the status of Zambrano carers after the UK has left the EU.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

As set out in paragraph 6.12 of the Statement of Intent on the EU Settlement Scheme published on 21 June 2018, provision in the Immigration Rules will be made for a non-EU citizen who is the primary carer of a British citizen in the UK and who currently derives a right of residence from wider EU law (a Zambrano carer). Further details will be provided in due course on the new status which will be available to them.

4 Jun 2018, 3:40 p.m. Forensic Science Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the urgent review of 33 cases launched by the Metropolitan Police over suspected mishandling of evidence in the forensic laboratory, what information his Department holds on (a) number of boroughs affected and (b) number of cases involving on offender under 18 years old.

Answer (Mr Nick Hurd)

The Home Office does not hold information on either a) the number of boroughs affected and b) the number of cases involving an offender under 18 years.

16 Apr 2018, 9:22 a.m. Deportation Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment her Department has made of the potential (a) merits and (b) savings to the public purse of alternatives to the use of detention in monitoring people facing removal from the UK.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

The Home Office uses a number of tools to ensure that the vast majority of individuals who are liable to removal from the UK are managed in the community. These include reporting mechanisms, a new simplified immigration bail, and electronic monitoring for some foreign national offenders.

We regularly review our practices, taking account of external research into alternatives to detention. Following a recent meeting between officials and representatives of the UNHCR and from Canada and Sweden, to discuss best practice, opportunities for further work are being explored with a range of faith and community groups and other non-governmental organisations. The merits and associated costs will be an integral part of this ongoing work.

23 Mar 2018, 10:54 a.m. Community Policing: Hounslow Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate she has made of the number of community response police in Hounslow in each of the last five years.

Answer (Mr Nick Hurd)

The Home Office does not hold centrally the information requested.

The Home Office collects and publishes data annually on the number of police officers and Police Community Support Officers (PCSOs), including the primary role that these officers perform, by police force area. Data are not available at the borough level.

The latest data available on the number of police officers and PCSOs in the Metropolitan Police Service, and their primary role, as at 31 March 2017 can be found in the Tables F1 and F3 of the police workforce statistics published in July 2017: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/629865/police-workforce-tabs-jul17.ods

Data as at 31 March 2015 and 31 March 2016 can be found in the Tables F4 (for police officers) and Tables F3 and F6 (for PCSOs) of the police workforce statistics published in July 2016: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/544954/police-workforce-tabs-jul16.ods

Previous data were collected under a different framework, with different definitions, and are therefore not directly comparable with data as at 31 March 2015 or 2016. Data have been published since 2012, and can be found in the supplementary data tables of the relevant police workforce publications via the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/police-workforce-england-and-wales

Officers and PCSOs with multiple responsibilities or designations are recorded under their primary function. The data do not therefore provide a complete picture of all officers assigned to neighbourhood policing functions.

Some forces are not able to make a clear distinction between ‘Neighbourhood Policing’ roles and ‘Incident (Response) Management’ roles, therefore those forces record the majority of, or all, employees under just one function. A more reliable measure is the number of officers employed in ‘Local policing’ roles, which includes both neighbourhood and response functions.

Any comparisons at force level should be made with care due to collaboration arrangements between forces for particular functions. Additionally, police functions data are often affected by re-structuring within police forces. Therefore comparisons over time for specific functions should be made with care.

Decisions on the size and composition of the police workforce are operational matters for Chief Officers working with their Police and Crime Commissioners and taking into account local priorities.

23 Jan 2018, 7:33 a.m. Welfare in Detention of Vulnerable Persons Review Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what progress has been made on implementing the recommendations from the Shaw Review into the Welfare in Detention of Vulnerable Persons, published in January 2016.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

The follow up to the independent review by Stephen Shaw CBE into the welfare in detention of vulnerable persons started on 4 September 2017. As part of this stocktake Mr Shaw will be assessing the implementation of all of his earlier review recommendations.

23 Jan 2018, 7:31 a.m. Immigrants: Detainees Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people aged 18 and under were held in immigration detention centres in each year from 2014 to date.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

Information on the number of minors entering and in detention in the UK from 2014, is available in tables dt_02_q and dt_13_q of the detention tables in the latest release of ‘Immigration Statistics, July to September 2017’, available from the Home Office website at: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/662536/detention-jul-sep-2017-tables.ods. Figures for Q4 2017 will be released on 22 February 2018.

22 Jan 2018, 5:43 p.m. Immigrants: Detainees Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment her Department has made of the effectiveness of safeguards to ensure that (a) vulnerable people diagnosed with a mental health condition and (b) victims of torture are not held in immigration removal centres.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

Detention is an important part of a firm but fair immigration system, helping to ensure that those with no right to remain in the UK are returned to their home country if they will not leave voluntarily. There is an underpinning presumption in immigration policy that a person will not be detained. Immigration detention is used sparingly and for the shortest period necessary.

When a vulnerable individual is considered for immigration detention, that consideration takes place in line with the adults at risk in immigration detention policy. The policy came into force in September 2016 and was part of the Government’s response to Stephen Shaw’s review of the welfare of vulnerable people in immigration detention. Victims of torture and individuals suffering from a mental health condition are amongst the groups of individuals who are protected by this policy.

Each case is decided on its own merits, on the basis of available evidence. Vulnerable individuals are detained only when immigration control factors – removability, public protection and compliance with immigration law – in their particular case outweigh the evidence of their vulnerability.

All detention decisions are subject to review by the Home Office Detention Gatekeeper, which is an internally independent function.

It is not possible for an individual to be detained having been assessed as unsuitable for detention by the Detention Gatekeeper, whether it be on grounds of mental health, as a victims of torture or a victim of modern slavery.

The Government considers that the adults at risk policy is an effective safeguard against the inappropriate detention of vulnerable people.

Once detained the Home Office has additional safeguards in place to ensure that vulnerable people do not remain in detention longer than is necessary or appropriate. Since February 2017 Case Progression Panels have been internally reviewing cases every three months to ensure case progression towards return.

From the 15 January 2018, the Secretary of State has a duty to refer individuals to the independent Immigration and Asylum Tribunal for consideration of bail four months from the point of detention of the last Tribunal consideration of bail and every four months thereafter. This duty does not extend to individuals detained for deportation or on national security grounds.

The follow up to the independent review by Stephen Shaw CBE into the welfare in detention of vulnerable persons started on 4 September 2017. As part of this stocktake Mr Shaw will be assessing the implementation of all of his earlier review recommendations.

22 Jan 2018, 5:42 p.m. Immigrants: Detainees Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent discussions she has had on introducing a clear limit on the length of time people can be held in immigration removal centres; and if she will make a statement.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

The Government has no plans to introduce a fixed time limit on immigration detention as this would only encourage detainees to refuse to cooperate with immigration and asylum processes until they reached the point at which they had to be released from detention and thus avoid their enforced removal from the UK. Published Home Office policy is clear, however, that detention is only used for the shortest period necessary, during which time any health and welfare needs detained persons may have are met through the provision of appropriate services

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/offender-management

22 Jan 2018, 5:42 p.m. Immigrants: Detainees Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment her Department has made of the effect of indefinite detention in an immigration detention removal centre on the health and wellbeing of such detainees.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

The Government has no plans to introduce a fixed time limit on immigration detention as this would only encourage detainees to refuse to cooperate with immigration and asylum processes until they reached the point at which they had to be released from detention and thus avoid their enforced removal from the UK. Published Home Office policy is clear, however, that detention is only used for the shortest period necessary, during which time any health and welfare needs detained persons may have are met through the provision of appropriate services

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/offender-management

4 Dec 2017, 5:42 p.m. Home Office: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate she has made of the (a) number of officials to be employed by her Department and (b) her Department's payroll in (i) 2018, (ii) 2019, (iii) 2020, (iv) 2021 and (v) 2022 as a result of the UK leaving EU.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

The Home Office constantly monitors the capabilities it needs to deliver the Government’s agenda. With EU exit negotiations underway, we continue to assess how this, alongside our other priorities, will impact on the workforce and capabilities required. Any resulting changes to resource requirements will be factored into strategic planning.

21 Nov 2017, 5:33 p.m. Domestic Abuse Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate she has made of the number of domestic violence related incidents that were (a) reported to the police, (b) detected and (c) prosecuted in each (i) London Borough and (ii) region or nation of the UK in each of the three full years for which figures are available.

Answer (Mr Nick Hurd)

The Office for National Statistics publishes a cross-governmental report on domestic abuse statistics in England and Wales. This report includes the number of domestic abuse incidents and crimes recorded by the police by police force area level. Data are not available at the London Borough level or for nations other than England and Wales.

The first of these publications, ‘Domestic abuse in England and Wales’ year ending March 2016’, was published in December 2016 and can be found here:

https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/crimeandjustice/bulletins/domesticabuseinenglandandwales/yearendingmarch2016

15 Nov 2017, 5:04 p.m. Visas: Skilled Workers Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what proportion of Tier 2 (General) visa applications made in each month since January 2016 had a decision made on them within three weeks.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

The published quarterly transparency data does not separate out Tier 2 General applications from the wider Tier 2 route. We have therefore provided the published data for all Tier 2 subcategories which includes General, Intra Company Transfers, Minister of Religion and Sportspeople.

Link to the latest published data:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/migration-transparency-data#uk-visas-and-immigration

15 Nov 2017, 5 p.m. Visas: Skilled Workers Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many Tier 2 (General) visa applications her Department has received in each month since January 2016; how many of those applications were (a) applications from outside the UK, (b) extensions within the UK, (c) switches within the UK, (d) extensions within the UK (Premium service) and (e) switches within the UK (Premium service); how much was received in fees to her Department for each of those categories; and what the average waiting time to decision was for each of those categories in each month of that period.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

We are unable to provide all of the specific data requested. In line with published quarterly transparency data we have provided for:

a) The number of Tier 2 applications made out of country

b) and c) The number of Tier 2 and 5 applications made in country

d) and e) The number of Tier 2 and 5 same day premium applications made in country

Link to the latest published data:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/migration-transparency-data#uk-visas-and-immigration

7 Nov 2017, 4:16 p.m. Home Office: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether her Department was consulted by the Department for Exiting the European Union on the economic impact assessments conducted for the UK leaving the EU.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

The Government is carrying out an ongoing programme of comprehensive analytical work that will inform our negotiating position with the EU, to define our deep and special partnership with the EU and inform our understanding of how EU exit will affect the UK’s domestic policies and frameworks.

My Department is working with officials across government, in close coordination with the Department for Exiting the European Union, to ensure the delivery of a holistic programme of analysis across government.

30 Oct 2017, 5:05 p.m. Domestic Abuse: Children Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate she has made of the number of children growing up in homes which are experiencing domestic violence in each region and nation of the UK.

Answer (Sarah Newton)

We know from various studies that around 1 in 5 children in the UK will have been exposed to domestic abuse. In addition, data published by the Office for National Statistics on childhood experience of abuse shows that children who witness domestic abuse are more likely to experience domestic abuse as an adult.

The Queen’s Speech set out that we would bring forward legislation to protect victims of domestic abuse, and committed to ensuring that if abusive behaviour involves a child, then the court can hand down a sentence that reflects the devastating life-long impact that abuse has on the child.