Seema Malhotra Written Questions

Questions to All Government Departments tabled by Seema Malhotra


Date Title Questioner
5 Nov 2019, 5:07 p.m. Ministry of Justice: Honours Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what proportion of staff in his Department in receipt of each category of Honour in (a) December 2018 and (b) June 2019 were (i) from ethnic minority backgrounds and (ii) female aged (A) under 30, (B) 31 to 40, (C) 41 to 50 and (D) aged over 50.

Answer (Chris Philp)

The Government is committed to ensuring that the honours system is fully representative of UK society. The proportion of women and people from ethnic minorities receiving recognition on each honours list is available on GOV.UK as is a breakdown of ethnicities of recipients is published on the Ethnicity Facts and Figures website at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/honours-recipients-by-ethnicity

Information on ages is not correlated with other diversity factors. We also publish the proportion of honours by independent committee on GOV.UK. The numbers of honours recipients in the Ministry of Justice are very small and vary from year to year. Releasing the requested data would identify the individuals and they have given permission for their data to be used for statistical purposes only.

5 Nov 2019, 4:57 p.m. Department for Exiting the European Union: Honours Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, what proportion of staff in his Department in receipt of each category of Honour in (a) December 2018 and (b) June 2019 were (i) from ethnic minority backgrounds and (ii) female aged (A) under 30, (B) 31 to 40, (C) 41 to 50 and (D) aged over 50.

Answer (James Duddridge)

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Dissolution.

5 Nov 2019, 4:53 p.m. Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy: Honours Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what proportion of staff in her Department in receipt of each category of Honour in (a) December 2018 and (b) June 2019 were (i) from ethnic minority backgrounds and (ii) female aged (A) under 30, (B) 31 to 40, (C) 41 to 50 and (D) aged over 50.

Answer (Nadhim Zahawi)

The Government is committed to ensuring that the honours system is fully representative of UK society. The proportion of women and people from ethnic minorities receiving recognition on each honours list is available on GOV.UK as is a breakdown of ethnicities of recipients, published on the Ethnicity Facts and Figures website.

Information on ages is not correlated with other diversity factors. We also publish the proportion of honours by independent committee on GOV.UK. The numbers of honours recipients in the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy are very small and vary from year to year. Releasing the requested data would identify the individuals and they have given permission for their data to be used for statistical purposes only.

5 Nov 2019, 4:51 p.m. Department for International Trade: Honours Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what proportion of staff in her Department in receipt of each category of Honour in (a) December 2018 and (b) June 2019 were (i) from ethnic minority backgrounds and (ii) female aged (A) under 30, (B) 31 to 40, (C) 41 to 50 and (D) aged over 50.

Answer (Conor Burns)

The Government is committed to ensuring that the honours system is fully representative of UK society. The proportion of women and people from ethnic minorities receiving recognition on each honours list is available on GOV.UK and a breakdown of ethnicities of recipients is published on the Ethnicity Facts and Figures website at https://www.ethnicity-facts-figures.service.gov.uk/culture-and-community/civic-participation/honours-recipients/latest Information on ages is not correlated with other diversity factors.

The numbers of honours recipients in the Department for International Trade are very small and vary from year to year. Releasing the requested data would identify the individuals when they have given permission for their data to be used for statistical purposes only.

5 Nov 2019, 4:45 p.m. Department for International Development: Honours Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what proportion of staff in his Department in receipt of each category of Honour in (a) December 2018 and (b) June 2019 were (i) from ethnic minority backgrounds and (ii) female aged (A) under 30, (B) 31 to 40, (C) 41 to 50 and (D) aged over 50.

Answer (Andrew Stephenson)

The Government is committed to ensuring that the honours system is fully representative of UK society. The proportion of women and people from ethnic minorities receiving recognition on each honours list is available on GOV.UK, as is a breakdown of ethnicities of recipients on the Ethnicity Facts and Figures website at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/honours-recipients-by-ethnicity.

Information on ages is not correlated with other diversity factors. We also publish the proportion of honours by independent committee on GOV.UK. The numbers of honours recipients in the Department for International Development are very small and vary from year to year. Releasing the requested data would identify the individuals and they have given permission for their data to be used for statistical purposes only.

5 Nov 2019, 4:39 p.m. Northern Ireland Office: Honours Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, what proportion of staff in his Department in receipt of each category of Honour in (a) December 2018 and (b) June 2019 were (i) from ethnic minority backgrounds and (ii) female aged (A) under 30, (B) 31 to 40, (C) 41 to 50 and (D) aged over 50.

Answer (Julian Smith)

The Government is committed to ensuring that the honours system is fully representative of UK society. The proportion of women and people from ethnic minorities receiving recognition on each honours list is available on GOV.UK as is a breakdown of ethnicities of recipients is published on the Ethnicity Facts and Figures website at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/honours-recipients-by-ethnicity

Information on ages is not correlated with other diversity factors. We also publish the proportion of honours by independent committee on GOV.UK. The numbers of honours recipients in the Northern Ireland Office are very small and vary from year to year. Releasing the requested data would identify the individuals and they have given permission for their data to be used for statistical purposes only.

5 Nov 2019, 4:29 p.m. Department for Work and Pensions: Honours Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what proportion of staff in his Department in receipt of each category of Honour in (a) December 2018 and (b) June 2019 were (i) from ethnic minority backgrounds and (ii) female aged (A) under 30, (B) 31 to 40, (C) 41 to 50 and (D) aged over 50.

Answer (Mims Davies)

The Government is committed to ensuring that the honours system is fully representative of UK society. The proportion of women and people from ethnic minorities receiving recognition on each honours list is available on GOV.UK, as is a breakdown of ethnicities of recipients, published on the Ethnicity Facts and Figures website at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/honours-recipients-by-ethnicity. Information on ages is not correlated with other diversity factors. We also publish the proportion of honours by independent committee on GOV.UK. The numbers of honours recipients in the Department for Work and Pensions are small and vary from year to year.

5 Nov 2019, 4:03 p.m. Foreign and Commonwealth Office: Honours Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what proportion of staff in his Department in receipt of each category of Honour in (a) December 2018 and (b) June 2019 were (i) from ethnic minority backgrounds and (ii) female aged (A) under 30, (B) 31 to 40, (C) 41 to 50 and (D) aged over 50.

Answer (Mrs Heather Wheeler)

​The Government is committed to ensuring that the honours system is fully representative of UK society. The proportion of women and people from ethnic minorities receiving recognition on each domestic honours list is available on GOV.UK as is a breakdown of ethnicities of recipients is published on the Ethnicity Facts and Figures website at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/honours-recipients-by-.

Information on ages is not correlated with other diversity factors. The Government also publishes the proportion of honours by independent committee on GOV.UK. The numbers of honours recipients in the Department are small and vary from year to year. Releasing the requested data would identify the individuals and they have given permission for their data to be used for statistical purposes only.

5 Nov 2019, 2:16 p.m. Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government: Housing Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what proportion of staff in his Department in receipt of each category of Honour in (a) December 2018 and (b) June 2019 were (i) from ethnic minority backgrounds and (ii) female aged (A) under 30, (B) 31 to 40, (C) 41 to 50 and (D) aged over 50.

Answer (Jake Berry)

The government is committed to ensuring that the honours system is fully representative of UK society. The proportion of women and people from ethnic minorities receiving recognition on each honours list is available on GOV.UK as is a breakdown of ethnicities of recipients is published on the Ethnicity Facts and Figures website at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/honours-recipients-by-ethnicity.

Information on ages is not correlated with other diversity factors. We also publish the proportion of honours by independent committee on GOV.UK. The numbers of honours recipients in the Department are very small and vary from year to year. Releasing the requested data would identify the individuals and they have given permission for their data to be used for statistical purposes only.

5 Nov 2019, 12:46 p.m. Scotland Office: Honours Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland, what proportion of staff in his Department in receipt of each category of Honour in (a) December 2018 and (b) June 2019 were (i) from ethnic minority backgrounds and (ii) female aged (A) under 30, (B) 31 to 40, (C) 41 to 50 and (D) aged over 50.

Answer (Mr Alister Jack)

The Government is committed to ensuring that the honours system is fully representative of UK society. The proportion of women and people from ethnic minorities receiving recognition on each honours list is available on GOV.UK as is a breakdown of ethnicities of recipients is published on the Ethnicity Facts and Figures website at:
https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/honours-recipients-by-ethnicity

Information on ages is not correlated with other diversity factors. We also publish the proportion of honours by independent committee on GOV.UK. The numbers of honours recipients in the Office of the Secretary of State for Scotland are very small and vary from year to year. Releasing the requested data would identify the individuals and they have given permission for their data to be used for statistical purposes only.

5 Nov 2019, 12:41 p.m. Department of Health and Social Care: Honours Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what proportion of staff in his Department in receipt of each category of Honour in (a) December 2018 and (b) June 2019 were (i) from ethnic minority backgrounds and (ii) female aged (A) under 30, (B) 31 to 40, (C) 41 to 50 and (D) aged over 50.

Answer (Caroline Dinenage)

As part of our commitment to achieving a workforce representative of the society we serve and providing equality of opportunity, we monitor representation of all protected characteristics across the Department.

In December 2018, two members of staff received honours and a further two members of staff received honours in June 2019. Where numbers of staff in a group are under five, we cannot disclose personally identifiable information, such as ethnicity.

5 Nov 2019, 12:20 p.m. Wales Office: Honours Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Wales, what proportion of staff in his Department in receipt of each category of Honour in (a) December 2018 and (b) June 2019 were (i) from ethnic minority backgrounds and (ii) female aged (A) under 30, (B) 31 to 40, (C) 41 to 50 and (D) aged over 50.

Answer (Kevin Foster)

The Government is committed to ensuring that the honours system is fully representative of UK society. The proportion of women and people from ethnic minorities receiving recognition on each honours list is available on GOV.UK as is a breakdown of ethnicities of recipients which is published on the Ethnicity Facts and Figures website at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/honours-recipients-by-ethnicity

Information on ages is not correlated with other diversity factors. The Government also publish the proportion of honours by independent committee on GOV.UK.

No staff in the Office of the Secretary of State for Wales received an Honour in December 2018 or June 2019.

5 Nov 2019, 12:01 p.m. Treasury: Honours Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what proportion of staff in his Department in receipt of each category of Honour in (a) December 2018 and (b) June 2019 were (i) from ethnic minority backgrounds and (ii) female aged (A) under 30, (B) 31 to 40, (C) 41 to 50 and (D) aged over 50.

Answer (Mr Simon Clarke)

The Government is committed to ensuring that the honours system is fully representative of UK society. The proportion of women and people from ethnic minorities receiving recognition on each honours list is available on GOV.UK as is a breakdown of ethnicities of recipients is published on the Ethnicity Facts and Figures website at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/honours-recipients-by-ethnicity.

Information on ages is not correlated with other diversity factors. We also publish the proportion of honours by independent committee on GOV.UK. The numbers of honours recipients in HM Treasury are very small and vary from year to year. Releasing the requested data would identify the individuals and they have given permission for their data to be used for statistical purposes only.

5 Nov 2019, 11:56 a.m. Department for Transport: Honours Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what proportion of staff in his Department in receipt of each category of Honour in (a) December 2018 and (b) June 2019 were (i) from ethnic minority backgrounds and (ii) female aged (A) under 30, (B) 31 to 40, (C) 41 to 50 and (D) aged over 50.

Answer (Chris Heaton-Harris)

The Government is committed to ensuring that the honours system is fully representative of UK society. The proportion of women and people from ethnic minorities receiving recognition on each honours list is available on GOV.UK. A breakdown of the ethnicities of recipients is published on the Ethnicity Facts and Figures website at https://www.ethnicity-facts-figures.service.gov.uk/culture-and-community/civic-participation/honours-recipients/latest.

Information on ages is not correlated with other diversity factors. We also publish the proportion of honours by independent committee on GOV.UK. The numbers of honours recipients in the Department for Transport are very small and vary from year to year. Releasing the requested data would identify the individuals and they have given permission for their data to be used for statistical purposes only.

5 Nov 2019, 11:55 a.m. Ministry of Defence: Honours Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what proportion of staff in his Department in receipt of each category of Honour in (a) December 2018 and (b) June 2019 were (i) from ethnic minority backgrounds and (ii) female aged (A) under 30, (B) 31 to 40, (C) 41 to 50 and (D) aged over 50.

Answer (Mark Lancaster)

The Government is committed to ensuring that the honours system is fully representative of UK society. The proportion of women and people from ethnic minorities receiving recognition on each honours list is available on GOV.UK, and a breakdown of ethnicities of recipients is published on the Ethnicity Facts and Figures website at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/honours-recipients-by-.

Information on ages is not correlated with other diversity factors. We also publish the proportion of honours by independent committee on GOV.UK. The numbers of honours recipients in the Ministry of Defence are very small and vary from year to year. Releasing the requested data would identify the individuals and they have given permission for their data to be used for statistical purposes only.

5 Nov 2019, 9:22 a.m. Cabinet Office: Honours Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what proportion of staff in his Department in receipt of each category of Honour in (a) December 2018 and (b) June 2019 were (i) from ethnic minority backgrounds and (ii) female aged (A) under 30, (B) 31 to 40, (C) 41 to 50 and (D) aged over 50.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

The Government is committed to ensuring that the honours system is fully representative of UK society. The proportion of women and people from ethnic minorities receiving recognition on each honours list is available on GOV.UK as is a breakdown of ethnicities of recipients is published on the Ethnicity Facts and Figures website at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/honours-recipients-by-ethnicity

Information on ages is not correlated with other diversity factors. We also publish the proportion of honours by independent committee on GOV.UK. The numbers of honours recipients in the Cabinet Office are very small and vary from year to year. Releasing the requested data would identify the individuals and they have given permission for their data to be used for statistical purposes only.

30 Sep 2019, 12:04 p.m. Maraviroc Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment he has had made of the effectiveness of Maraviroc in patients with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML).

Answer (Ms Nadine Dorries)

Maraviroc (brand name Celsentri) is currently authorised through the European centralised procedure for the treatment of patients who are infected with HIV type 1. It is used in combination other HIV medicines.

The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency which is responsible for the regulation of medicines in the United Kingdom is not aware of any application for maraviroc for use in patients with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) and cannot therefore comment on the efficacy of this drug in patients with PML.

3 Sep 2019, 9:49 a.m. Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport: Ethnic Groups Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many BAME staff are employed at (a) grade 7, (b) grade 5 and (c) grade 3 in his Department.

Answer (Nigel Adams)

The department’s declaration rate for ethnicity is currently at 69%, meaning that the figures in the table below are not an accurate reflection of the department’s true population.

Grade

DCMS equivalent

Percentage who have declared as BAME

Grade 7

Grade A

10.6%

Grade 5

SCS 1

*

Grade 3

SCS 2

*

*Percentage not provided where the figure relates to fewer than 5 individuals.

12 Aug 2019, 9:53 a.m. Foreign and Commonwealth Office: Ethnic Groups Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, how many BAME staff are employed at (a) grade 7, (b) grade 5 and (c) grade 3 in his Department.

Answer (Christopher Pincher)

​The percentage of United Kingdom-based ethnic minority staff employed at D6 (grade 7 equivalent) in the Foreign & Commonwealth Office (FCO) is 9 per cent. The percentage of United Kingdom-based ethnic minority staff employed in the FCO's senior management structure (SMS) is 7 per cent. Diversity statistics are published in the FCO's Annual Report and Accounts 2018-2019. They are given as percentages and are not broken down into separate SMS grades (SMS 1 (grade 5 equivalent), SMS 2 (grade 3 equivalent), SMS 3 and SMS 4) in order to protect individual staff anonymity.

The Civil Service-wide percentage for ethnic minority staff in SCS grades is 6.0 per cent (March 2019). The Civil Service-wide percentage for ethnic minority staff at grade 7 is 11.1 per cent.

2 Aug 2019, 10:36 a.m. Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs: Ethnic Groups Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many BAME staff are employed at (a) grade 7, (b) grade 5 and (c) grade 3 in his Department.

Answer (George Eustice)

As at 30 June, the number of BAME staff employed in the department for the grades requested is shown in the table below:

BAME Staff

SCS 2 (Grade 3)

Less than 5

SCS 1 (Grade 5)

13

Grade 7

72

As ethnic minority staff remain underrepresented at senior levels, the Civil Service set ambitious targets in June 2018 to increase the flow of ethnic minority civil servants into the SCS. Defra is committed to this activity.

Summary representation rates of ethnic minority SCS by department are published on the Civil Service diversity dashboard as at December 2018. At that time, Defra had 7.1% BAME SCS representation.

2 Aug 2019, 9:53 a.m. Renewable Energy: Feed-in Tariffs Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many applications were submitted to the Feed-In Tariff scheme in each of the last nine years in each region and nation of the UK.

Answer (Kwasi Kwarteng)

The Department does not hold data on applications submitted to the Feed-in Tariff scheme.

Data on cumulative installations confirmed on the Central Feed-in Tariff Register by region and nation within Great Britain is published quarterly and available from this link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/sub-regional-feed-in-tariffs-confirmed-on-the-cfr-statistics

2 Aug 2019, 9:49 a.m. Renewable Energy: Feed-in Tariffs Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the amount of money distributed in (a) generation and (b) export tariffs under the Feed-In Tariffs scheme in each of the last nine years in each nation and region of the UK.

Answer (Kwasi Kwarteng)

The Department does not hold FIT spend data disaggregated by region or nation of Great Britain.

Ofgem publish annual figures on total FIT generation payments made and total FIT export payments made, as part of the Feed-in Tariff Annual Report: https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/publications-and-updates/feed-tariff-fit-annual-report-2017-18

2 Aug 2019, 9:45 a.m. Microgeneration Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the effect of the (a) closure of the Feed-in Tariff scheme and (b) proposed introduction of the smart export guarantee scheme on the use of microgeneration technologies by residents.

Answer (Kwasi Kwarteng)

The Impact Assessments for both the closure of the Feed-in Tariff (FIT) and the introduction of the Smart Export Guarantee (SEG) included illustrative deployment scenarios for the technologies covered by FIT/SEG.

These can be accessed from the following links:

FIT closure Impact Assessment (p 10): https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/feed-in-tariffs-scheme

SEG Impact Assessment (p 8): https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/the-future-for-small-scale-low-carbon-generation

2 Aug 2019, 9:43 a.m. Renewable Heat Incentive Scheme Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans he has to maintain support for small-scale renewable heat generation beyond the termination of the Domestic Renewable Heat Initiative in March 2021.

Answer (Kwasi Kwarteng)

The budget for the Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI) has been set out to the end of March 2021. Decisions on the future funding for the RHI will be set out in the Spending Review.

The government is committed to phasing out installation of fossil fuel heating in buildings not connected to the gas grid during the 2020s. As announced by the Chancellor in the Spring Statement, Government also intends to introduce a Future Homes Standard by 2025, for new build homes to be future-proofed with low carbon heating and world-leading levels of energy efficiency.

2 Aug 2019, 9:40 a.m. Renewable Energy: Feed-in Tariffs Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the projected undistributed expenditure in relation to the Feed-In Tariff scheme as a result of the early closure of that scheme.

Answer (Kwasi Kwarteng)

The Feed-in Tariff closed as expected on March 31st 2019 having successfully brought forward over 6GW of small-scale low carbon generation capacity.

Financial limits were imposed on the scheme from 2016 Q2 to scheme closure, with the total annual payments to all installations during this period capped at £100m (2011/2012 prices). Based on Ofgem’s deployment reports, the scheme fell within this limit by £38m (2011/2012 prices).

2 Aug 2019, 9:35 a.m. Renewable Energy Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department has taken to support the (a) use and (b) production of renewable (i) energy and (ii) infrastructure in each nation and region of the UK.

Answer (Kwasi Kwarteng)

The Government has supported a number of measures and programmes to support the production and use of renewable energy and infrastructure. The Government has committed to making up to £557 million available for further Contracts for Difference auctions to bring forward large-scale renewable projects and introduced the Smart Export Guarantee in June, to ensure that generators are paid for excess energy they export back to the grid from 2020.

On 7 March, the Government announced the Offshore Wind Sector Deal, which will build on the UK’s global leadership in offshore wind and support the delivery of up to 30GW of offshore wind by 2030 in Great Britain; enhancing growth in the regions while continuing to reduce costs. We are also investing over £3 billion to support low-carbon innovation in the UK up to 2021, to ensure that the UK continues to reap the benefits from the transition to a low carbon economy. Previous schemes for renewable electricity include the Renewable Obligation and the Feed-in Tariff Scheme.

Energy policy is devolved matter in Northern Ireland.

The Government continues to support the production and use of renewable heat with the current Great Britain Renewable Heat Incentive. There is a separate Northern Ireland Renewable Heat Incentive scheme.The GB Renewable Heat Incentive supports the installation of renewable heat equipment in every region of Great Britain. To the end of June 2019, the RHI had supported 70,642 domestic, and 19,455 non-domestic installations.

The Government has also launched the Heat Networks Investment project (HNIP) - a major Government project which will invest up to £320m of capital funding in heat network projects in England and Wales. HNIP funds are specifically offered as ‘gap funding’ through a combination of grants and loans and the scheme will be open for applications for a period of up to three years.

Previous schemes for renewable heat include Clear Skies, the Low Carbon Building Programme, the Green Deal, and the Renewable Heat Premium Payment scheme.

31 Jul 2019, 3:25 p.m. Visas: Rugby (Sport) Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment he has made of the effect of the level of funding for women's rugby clubs in English women’s rugby championships and premierships on the ability of non-UK professional women rugby players to receive Tier 2 and Tier 5 migrant visas; and what other options are available for non-UK women rugby players to remain in the UK.

Answer (Seema Kennedy)

The funding of UK sports is a matter for the Department of Culture, Media and Sport.

Tiers 2 and 5 are our principle immigration routes for those wishing to play professional sport in the UK. Other visa options may be open to some migrants depending on their individual circumstances.

31 Jul 2019, 3:23 p.m. Visas: Rugby (Sport) Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many non-UK professional male rugby players sponsored by (a) the Rugby Football Union and (b) rugby clubs issued governing body endorsements to become a sponsor have received Tier 2 and Tier 5 migrant visas in each of the last 10 years.

Answer (Seema Kennedy)

The Home Office does not collate or publish the information requested.

31 Jul 2019, 3:20 p.m. Lighting: Housing Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make an estimate of the proportion of lightbulbs in use in households that are LED.

Answer (Kwasi Kwarteng)

Approximately 20% of the lightbulbs currently in use in households in the UK are LED.

31 Jul 2019, 3:05 p.m. Visas: Migrant Workers Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the requirements are for an organisation to qualify to sponsor Tier 2 and Tier 5 visas; and how many organisations meet those qualifications.

Answer (Seema Kennedy)

The requirements to become a sponsor and maintain this status are set out in the Tiers 2 and 5: guidance for sponsors. Currently, there are more than 30,000 organisations that are licenced sponsors.

30 Jul 2019, 5:35 p.m. Department for International Trade: Ethnic Groups Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how many BAME staff are employed at (a) grade 7, (b) grade 5 and (c) grade 3 in his Department.

Answer (Conor Burns)

The following table shows the number of staff in the Department for International Trade (DIT) (including UK Export Finance) who have self-reported as BAME on departmental systems, as at 30 June 2019.

Grade

Number of staff who have self-reported as BAME (30 June 2019)

Grade 7

81

Grade 5 (SCS1)

15

Grade 3 (SCS2)

Fewer than 5

As ethnic minority staff remain underrepresented at senior levels across the Civil Service, ambitious targets were set in June 2018 to increase the flow of ethnic minority civil servants into the SCS. By 2025, we aim for 13.2% of new SCS starters to be from an ethnic minority background across the Civil Service.

In DIT, 24% of new SCS starters since April 2017 are BAME.

30 Jul 2019, 4:31 p.m. Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy: Ethnic Groups Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many BAME staff are employed at (a) grade 7, (b) grade 5 and (c) grade 3 in his Department.

Answer (Nadhim Zahawi)

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy has 118 employees declared BAME at grade 7; 8 employees who have declared BAME at Grade 5 and; 2 employees who have declared BAME at Grade 3.

Note that personal characteristics are voluntary declarations and only 54% of BEIS employees have declared their ethnicity.

30 Jul 2019, 1:58 p.m. Lighting: Housing Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the average savings accrued to households of using LED instead of conventional lightbulbs.

Answer (Kwasi Kwarteng)

Each LED bulb will save a household around £55 over its 15 year lifetime. This consists of £43 in reduced energy consumption and £12 in reduced replacement costs (given LED bulbs last around 7.5 times longer than traditional halogen bulbs). Our analysis suggests that there are approximately 35 bulbs in an average household, so savings will be around £125 per year.

29 Jul 2019, 3:49 p.m. Ministry of Justice: Ethnic Groups Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many BAME staff are employed at (a) grade 7, (b) grade 5 and (c) grade 3 in his Department.

Answer (Edward Argar)

In the MoJ (including HMPPS) on 31 March 2019, excluding staff on unpaid leave:

There were 2,424 Grade 7 and Grade 6 staff, of whom 1,989 had declared their ethnicity; of these 224 were BAME. This means that 11.3% of Grade 7 and Grade 6 staff with known ethnicity were BAME.

There were 230 Grade 5 staff, of whom 200 had declared their ethnicity; of these 11 were BAME. This means that 5.5% of Grade 5 staff with known ethnicity were BAME.

There were 54 Grade 3 staff, of whom 46 had declared their ethnicity; the number of these who were BAME was less than three.

This is based on staff voluntarily recording their ethnicity data on the HR system (SOP).

29 Jul 2019, 12:08 p.m. Department for Work and Pensions: Ethnic Groups Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many BAME staff are employed at (a) grade 7, (b) grade 5 and (c) grade 3 in her Department.

Answer (Will Quince)

DWP encourages all of its employees to provide details of their personal diversity information, however this action is voluntary and therefore we do not hold a complete picture of our workforce representation.

As at 30th June 2019, 82% of DWP’s workforce have positively shared details of their ethnicity. Details of the grades requested are:

Grade

Number of employees who have indicated they are an ethnic minority

G7

90

G5

7

G3

~

~ In line with Office of National Statistics guidance data has been suppressed as count is less than 5 people

26 Jul 2019, 1:33 p.m. Department for Education: Ethnic Groups Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many BAME staff are employed at (a) grade 7, (b) grade 5 and (c) grade 3 in his Department.

Answer (Nick Gibb)

The number of Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) staff employed as at 30 June 2019 in Grade 7, Grade 5 (Deputy Director equivalent) and Grade 3 (Director equivalent) roles are summarised in the table below. Where the total number of BAME staff is fewer than 5, the actual number is suppressed to protect anonymity. The following agencies are included in these figures: Education & Skills Funding Agency, Standards & Testing Agency and Teaching Regulation Agency.

Grade

Number of BAME staff (headcount)

Grade 7

174

Grade 5 (Deputy Director)

12

Grade 3 (Director)

Fewer than 5

The department has an internal Diversity & Inclusion Strategy with a priority of increasing BAME representation at senior grades. We have introduced a range of interventions to attract and recruit more people from diverse backgrounds that include anonymised sifting and more diverse interview panels and we expect to see an improvement in these numbers over the next 2 to 5 years. We recently launched Project Race which aims to improve race equality and tackle disproportionate outcomes for BAME colleagues though outreach, support, and open honest discussion.

26 Jul 2019, 11:33 a.m. Scotland Office: Ethnic Groups Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland, how many BAME staff are employed at (a) grade 7, (b) grade 5 and (c) grade 3 in his Department.

Answer (Mr Alister Jack)

The Office of the Secretary of State for Scotland does not employ staff directly. All staff that join do so on an assignment, loan or secondment from other government bodies, principally the Ministry of Justice and the Scottish Government, who remain the employers.

Detailed information in relation to the ethnicity of staff is not held by the Office of the Secretary of State for Scotland; this information is held by the parent employers.

25 Jul 2019, 2:35 p.m. Department of Health and Social Care: Ethnic Groups Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many BAME staff are employed at (a) grade 7, (b) grade 5 and (c) grade 3 in his Department.

Answer (Caroline Dinenage)

As part of our commitment to achieving a workforce representative of the society we serve and providing equality of opportunity, we monitor representation of all protected characteristics across the Department.

Providing diversity information relies on employees voluntarily completing their diversity information on our electronic HR system and we continue to encourage staff to complete their self-declaration.

The declaration rate for ethnicity with the Department is 67% (data as at 30 September 2018) and therefore it should be noted that the information provided below regarding black, Asian and minority ethnic staff refers only to staff who have completed their self-declaration. This information refers only to Departmental staff and does not include staff from our executive agencies or arm’s length bodies.

Grade 7 – 38

Grade 5 (SCS1) – 7

Grade 3 (Director) – Nil

25 Jul 2019, 10:02 a.m. Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government: Ethnic Groups Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how many BAME staff are employed at (a) grade 7, (b) grade 5 and (c) grade 3 in his Department.

Answer (Mrs Heather Wheeler)

The table below shows the ethnicity recorded for the Department's staff as of 30 June 2019 at Grade 7, Grade 5 (Deputy Director) and at the Senior Civil Service level (SCS) which includes both Grade 5, and 3 (Director General). We can not provide a breakdown at Grade 3 as the number of ethnic minority SCS at the grade requested would be too small for us to release. It should also be noted that the overall ethnic minority population at MHCLG is 20.8 per cent, with 77.4 per cent of staff declaring their ethnicity on the Department's HR system

Ethnicity

Grade 7

Grade 5

SCS (Grade 5-2)

ethnic minority

56 (13.6%)

7 (10.0%)

10 (10.8%)

White

355 (86.4%)

63 (90.0%)

83 (89.2%)

Not known

134

5

13

MHCLG Total

545

77

106

24 Jul 2019, 4:38 p.m. Home Office: Ethnic Groups Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many BAME staff are employed at (a) grade 7, (b) grade 5 and (c) grade 3 in his Department.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

For the purposes of this answer, Senior Civil Service (SCS) Pay Band 1 has been treated as equivalent to Grade 5 and SCS Pay Band 2 and Director General have been treated as Grade 3.

At 30 June 2019, there are currently the following staff in the Home Office who have declared their ethnicity as BAME:

Grade

Number of BAME staff

Grade 7

309

Grade 5

15

Grade 3

2

Data Source: Adelphi – Home Office Human Resources Record System

Period covered: As at 30 June 2019

Employee coverage: The data is based on headcount of paid, permanent Civil Servants who were current as at 30 June 2019.

24 Jul 2019, 3:26 p.m. Department for Transport: Ethnic Groups Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many BAME staff are employed at (a) grade 7, (b) grade 5 and (c) grade 3 in his Department.

Answer (Michael Ellis)

As at June 30th, the numbers of BAME staff at the requested grades are as follows:

Grade

BAME Staff

Grade 3 (SCS Payband 3)

0

Grade 5 (SCS Payband 1)

6

Grade 7

101

It is worth noting numbers are not complete as these figures represent only those staff who have chosen to record their diversity information and self-identified as BAME on our HR records system. It is not mandatory to complete this information.

This figure represents the numbers across the Department and its Executive Agencies.

24 Jul 2019, 11:25 a.m. Pupils: Absenteeism Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he has taken to reduce rates of absence among pupils that are (a) eligible free school meals, (b) have special educational needs and (c) are of the Irish Heritage and Gypsy/Roma ethnic groups in each London Borough.

Answer (Nick Gibb)

All children of compulsory school age, regardless of their circumstances, are entitled to a full-time education which is suitable to their age, ability, aptitude and any special educational needs they may have. All parents have a legal duty to ensure that if their child is of compulsory school age that they receive a full time education, either by attendance at school or otherwise.

Schools should continually monitor pupils’ absence. If a child’s absence reaches a level of concern, the school should raise this with the parents and the local authority in the best interest of the child’s education. School and local authorities should consider the individual circumstances of each case and take the appropriate course of action to ensure the child receives consistent education. This can include the use a range of parental responsibility measures to provide support or sanctions to parents when their child’s attendance at school becomes a problem.

Schools also receive pupil premium funding to support pupils who have been registered for free school meals at any point in the last six years, and have the flexibility to use it to improve attendance if this is deemed a priority.

The Department wants all children and young people, regardless of special educational need or disability, to receive the right support to succeed in their education. and as they move into adult life. In 2014, the Department introduced significant reforms to enable schools to put the right support in place for those pupils so that they can attend school.

The Department has established a new Gypsy, Roma and Traveller (GRT) stakeholder group, chaired by the noble Baroness Whitaker. This group aims to ensure that any efforts to improve the school system take into account GRT pupils’ needs.

24 Jul 2019, 10:09 a.m. Department for Exiting the European Union: Ethnic Groups Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, how many BAME staff are employed at (a) grade 7, (b) grade 5 and (c) grade 3 in his Department.

Answer (Kwasi Kwarteng)

The Department for Exiting the European Union is committed to the creation of a diverse and inclusive working environment. Based on the self-declaration rates held on our system, the number of BAME staff employed in each grade group, and as a proportion of the staff in that grade who have made a declaration, is as follows:

Grade

Number (proportion)

Band A (Grade 7 equivalent)

20 (13.6%)

Band A+ (Grade 6 equivalent)

12 (19.6%)

SCS1 (Grade 5 equivalent)

fewer than 5

SCS2 (Grade 3 equivalent)

fewer than 5

The Department has had success in attracting a diverse workforce at delegated grades (AO-G6 equivalent), and in particular our representation of BAME staff is one of the highest in government. Our priority is now to ensure we are representative at the most senior levels of the department focusing on processes such as talent, development, attraction and recruitment, as well as continuing to build an inclusive culture that celebrates uniqueness. These figures are based entirely on people identifying themselves as BAME on the Department’s HR system.

23 Jul 2019, 3:15 p.m. Attorney General: Ethnic Groups Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Attorney General, how many BAME staff are employed at (a) grade 7, (b) grade 5 and (c) grade 3 in his Department.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

The recording of ethnicity is the responsibility of the individual to input via employee self-service. Due to small numbers of staff at each of the requested grades, we have grouped these together in our response below.

Including those on temporary promotion at the grades requested, there are 16 members of staff in scope. Of these, only five have input their ethnicity details onto the HR system. Of these, none have self-identified as being from an ethnic minority background.

AGO supports the Civil Service vision of being recognised as the UK’s most inclusive employer. AGO has two diversity champions and a Diversity & Inclusion Strategy in place that is reviewed by the Executive Board every six months.

AGO is an employer which promotes equality and aims to reflect the diversity of the society in which we live. It is committed to maximising the skills and potential of all its staff. It welcomes applications from all suitably qualified persons irrespective of disability, ethnic origin, gender, age, sexual orientation, marital status or religion/belief. It also implements blind recruitment to minimise the impact of unconscious bias.

23 Jul 2019, 2:53 p.m. Treasury: Ethnic Groups Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many BAME staff are employed at (a) grade 7, (b) grade 5 and (c) grade 3 in his Department.

Answer (Robert Jenrick)

The data for HM Treasury is based on Paid Staff as of 30th June 2019, and those who have chosen to declare their ethnicity.

BAME
Range E (Grade 7)64
Range SCS 1 (Grade 5)6
Range SCS 2 (Grade 3)Fewer than 5
23 Jul 2019, 2:17 p.m. Department for International Development: Ethnic Groups Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, how many BAME staff are employed at (a) grade 7, (b) grade 5 and (c) grade 3 in his Department.

Answer (Dr Andrew Murrison)

The below table shows the number of BAME staff, at Grade 7, Grade 5 and Grade 3, employed by DFID as at 30 June 2019.

Grade

No. of BAME Employees

Grade 7 (A2)

101

Grade 5 (SCS-G5)

5

Grade 3 (SCS-G3)

Less than 5

Grand Total

108

23 Jul 2019, 1:08 p.m. Ministry of Defence: Ethnic Groups Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many BAME staff are employed at (a) grade 7, (b) grade 5 and (c) grade 3 in her Department.

Answer (Mr Tobias Ellwood)

The number of civilian Full Time Equivalent BAME staff employed in the Ministry of Defence (MOD) as at 30 June 2019 is as follows:

Paid Grade/MOD Equivalent BAME Headcount

Grade 7/B2

65

Grade 5/SCS1

5

Grade 3/SCS3

~

In line with Departmental policy figures are rounded to the nearest 5 and tilde ('~') represents a number lower than five and greater than zero. Includes MOD Main Top Level Budgetary Areas (TLBs) only. Excludes Trading funds, Defence Equipment and Support Bespoke Trading Entity, Executive Agency, Royal Fleet Auxiliary and Locally engaged civilians (LECs).

Full details relating to the numbers of BAME staff employed in the MOD can be found in the Civilian personnel diversity publication on Gov.uk at the following link: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/mod-diversity-dashboard-2019

23 Jul 2019, 11:58 a.m. Wales Office: Ethnic Groups Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Wales, how many BAME staff are employed at (a) grade 7, (b) grade 5 and (c) grade 3 in his Department.

Answer (Kevin Foster)

The number of staff working in the Office of the Secretary of State for Wales and declaring themselves as BAME as at 30 June 2019 are shown below:

Grade

No. of staff reporting ethnicity

BAME

(a) grade 7/6

9

0

(b) grade 5

3

1

(c) grade 3

1

0

Total other staff grades

22

6

22 Jul 2019, 5:05 p.m. Adult Education: Qualifications Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate he has made of the proportion of adults without qualifications in (a) London and (b) Hounslow Borough.

Answer (Anne Milton)

The latest estimates of the proportion of adults without qualifications come from the Office for National Statistics Labour Force Survey data for the period January 2018 to December 2018. In Hounslow, 6.0% of adults aged between 16 and 64 had no qualifications, compared with 6.6% for London as a whole.

22 Jul 2019, 4:19 p.m. Visas: Migrant Workers Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate he has made of the number of applications received in each of the last twelve months for Leave to Remain extension application as a Tier 1 Highly Skilled general migrant; and how of those cases were concluded within eight weeks.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

The Tier 1 (General) route closed to Leave to Remain extension applications on 6 April 2015. Therefore, no Tier 1 General extension applications were received in the last twelve months.


The data regarding exceeding the eight-week service standards in current application routes can be found using the link https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/in-country-migration-data-may-2019


The statistics specific to service standards can be found on tab InC_02.

Historical data regarding service standards can be found via the following link:https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/migration-transparency-data#previous-data-releases

Complexity is identified on a case by case basis and will also vary depending on the application route. Therefore there is not an exhaustive list of the circumstances in which particular types of application might be deemed to be complex. Where an application is defined as non-straightforward, due to complexity, the customer will be written to within the normal processing time to explain why it will not be decided within the normal standard service, and to explain what will happen next.

22 Jul 2019, 4:19 p.m. Visas: Standards Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, for what reasons the processing of extension applications may exceed the eight-week agreed service standard; and with what frequency that standard has been exceeded in each of the last three years.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

The Tier 1 (General) route closed to Leave to Remain extension applications on 6 April 2015. Therefore, no Tier 1 General extension applications were received in the last twelve months.


The data regarding exceeding the eight-week service standards in current application routes can be found using the link https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/in-country-migration-data-may-2019


The statistics specific to service standards can be found on tab InC_02.

Historical data regarding service standards can be found via the following link:https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/migration-transparency-data#previous-data-releases

Complexity is identified on a case by case basis and will also vary depending on the application route. Therefore there is not an exhaustive list of the circumstances in which particular types of application might be deemed to be complex. Where an application is defined as non-straightforward, due to complexity, the customer will be written to within the normal processing time to explain why it will not be decided within the normal standard service, and to explain what will happen next.

22 Jul 2019, 4:19 p.m. Visas Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the reasons are that qualify an extension application as complex.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

The Tier 1 (General) route closed to Leave to Remain extension applications on 6 April 2015. Therefore, no Tier 1 General extension applications were received in the last twelve months.


The data regarding exceeding the eight-week service standards in current application routes can be found using the link https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/in-country-migration-data-may-2019


The statistics specific to service standards can be found on tab InC_02.

Historical data regarding service standards can be found via the following link:https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/migration-transparency-data#previous-data-releases

Complexity is identified on a case by case basis and will also vary depending on the application route. Therefore there is not an exhaustive list of the circumstances in which particular types of application might be deemed to be complex. Where an application is defined as non-straightforward, due to complexity, the customer will be written to within the normal processing time to explain why it will not be decided within the normal standard service, and to explain what will happen next.

22 Jul 2019, 3:49 p.m. Cabinet Office: Ethnic Groups Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many BAME staff are employed at (a) grade 7, (b) grade 5 and (c) grade 3 in his Department.

Answer (Kevin Foster)

Information about the ethnicity of staff working in the Cabinet Office (and other Government Departments) is published annually as part of the Annual Civil Service Employment Survey. The most recent statistics for March 2018 are published at https://www.nomisweb.co.uk/query/construct/summary.asp?mode=construct&version=0&dataset=129 . Statistics for March 2019 are scheduled for publication on 24th July 2019. Please note that in the Cabinet Office, Grade 7 is merged with Grade 6 in the Band A payband.

Summary representation rates of ethnic minority SCS by department are published on the Civil Service diversity dashboard as at December 2018. https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/civil-service-diversity-inclusion-dashboard/civil-service-diversity-and-inclusion-dashboard .

The table below provides more statistics on BAME staff in Cabinet Office:

Grade

No. of BAME

% Representation

% Declarations

Band A

197

17%

68%

SCS1

21

11%

70%

SCS2

5

10%

68%

All Grades

791

20%

59%

22 Jul 2019, 1:14 p.m. Aviation Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of the UK leaving the EU without a deal for the aviation industry on (a) the passage of flights across EU countries and the UK, (b) air services agreements, (c) aviation safety and security, (d) border management and (e) the environment.

Answer (Chris Grayling)

The contingency measures adopted by the EU and the reciprocal measures announced by the UK mean that flights will be able to continue as now in the period after we leave the EU, even in a “no deal” scenario. The same high safety and security standards will continue to apply to those flights, and passengers will see no changes at the border at UK airports. The UK will continue to work internationally to reduce the environmental impact of aviation.

22 Jul 2019, 12:45 p.m. Northern Ireland Office: Ethnic Groups Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, how many BAME staff are employed at (a) grade 7, (b) grade 5 and (c) grade 3 in her Department.

Answer (John Penrose)

I can confirm there are no BAME staff employed at Grade 3 within the Northern Ireland Office. Fewer than five staff have declared as BAME at both Grades 7 and 5 and in order to comply with Data Protection Act requirements, I am unable to disclose this number as a full answer would risk the identification of individuals.

22 Jul 2019, 10:40 a.m. Public Houses Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the contribution of pubs to (a) local economies, (b) local employment and (c) the Industrial Strategy.

Answer (Rebecca Pow)

Pubs are a major part of the tourism and hospitality offer for the UK, with the tourism sector worth over £68bn to the UK and employing over 1.5m people directly.

The Industrial Strategy is building long-term strategic partnerships with businesses through Sector Deals between Government and industry, and most recently agreed a Tourism Sector Deal. This Deal recognises the significant contribution of pubs to local economies and the tourism sector; for example, 42% of international visits include at least one visit to a pub. The Government considers pubs to be a crucial element in the employment ecosystem of the Tourism Sector workforce, and has announced that the British Beer and Pub Association will be partnering with UKHospitality to manage a new Hospitality and Tourism Skills Board (under the Tourism Industry Council), and will carry out an annual workforce survey.

The British Beer and Pub Association also put forward a consultation response to the Industrial Strategy Green Paper.

19 Jul 2019, 3:48 p.m. Housing: Microgeneration Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what steps his Department is taking to support the incorporation of infrastructure for microgeneration in housing developments throughout the UK.

Answer (Kit Malthouse)

National planning policy recognises that small-scale renewable energy and low carbon projects provide a valuable contribution to cutting greenhouse gas emissions and can be included as part of a planning application. In addition, for existing buildings, permitted development rights for micro-generation from renewable energy sources that include wind, solar and ground and air source heat pumps were introduced in 2015 and apply to both residential and non-residential development.

19 Jul 2019, 12:45 p.m. Electric Vehicles Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 8 July 2019 to Question 271500, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of the changes to electric vehicle plug-in grants announced in November 2018 on the uptake of electric vehicles after 2021.

Answer (Michael Ellis)

The plug-in car grant (PICG) was introduced in 2011 to support the early market for ultra low emission vehicles (ULEVs). Through the PICG we have supported the purchase of over 200,000 plug-in vehicles, including around 100,000 plug-in hybrid vehicles. Last year, in light of increased demand and decreasing prices, we reviewed the PICG to focus on the cleanest vehicles. While sales of plug-in hybrids have decreased since the grant was reviewed, sales of zero emission cars are up by more than 60% in 2019 so far than for the same period in 2018. Overall, sales of all alternatively fuelled cars have increased this year, compared to the same period last year. In our Road to Zero Strategy we set out ambitions for uptake of ULEVs in the UK, and stated that consumer incentives in some form will continue to play a role beyond 2020. In addition, to accelerate the shift to zero emission cars, all zero emission models will pay no company car tax in 2020-21, 1% in 2021-22 before returning to the planned 2% rate in 2022-23 – a significant tax saving for employees and employers.

19 Jul 2019, 8:18 a.m. Microgeneration Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential for microgeneration of electricity and heat to contribute to the goals of (a) decarbonisation and (b) net zero emissions by 2050.

Answer (Chris Skidmore)

The Government has supported the deployment over 6GW of small scale power generation, and we expect more to deploy now the Smart Export Guarantee has been announced.

a) This contributes to the over 33% of power that comes from renewables and over 50% that comes from low carbon sources. Our low carbon power generation could need to increase four-fold by 2050.

b) Decarbonising the power sector is crucial to achieving a net-zero economy – what’s more, small scale generation, as discussed in the Smart Systems and Flexibility plan is an important part of a more flexible and decentralised future system. (www.gov.uk/government/publications/upgrading-our-energy-system-smart-systems-and-flexibility-plan).

The generation of low carbon heat through technologies such as solar hot water, biomass, biomethane and heat pumps can all play an important role in decarbonising heat. These are all supported by the Renewable Heat Incentive. Through the Renewable Heat Incentive, the government is spending £2.8bn between 2018 and 2021 to incentivise the deployment of low carbon heating. (https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/rhi-mechanism-for-budget-management-estimated-commitments)

The Government made an assessment on the evidence on options to decarbonise heat in “Clean Growth – Transforming Heating” published in December 2018 (https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/heat-decarbonisation-overview-of-current-evidence-base). There is no clear consensus on the best approaches to decarbonising heat at scale. Given the diversity of heat demand, no one solution can provide the best option for everyone – a mix of technologies and customer options will need to be available. We need to continue exploring and testing different approaches to heat decarbonisation. The Government has committed to publishing a heat roadmap by summer 2020 which will set out further details on plans for decarbonising heat.

18 Jul 2019, 9:08 a.m. Buildings: Electricity and Heating Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the most popular models of (a) electricity and (b) heat microgeneration in buildings throughout the UK.

Answer (Chris Skidmore)

The Feed-in-Tariff (FIT) scheme supports solar, wind, hydro, anaerobic digestion and micro-combined heat and power technologies. On the basis of installations on Ofgem’s central FIT register, solar is the most popular method of electricity generation accounting for 99% of all installations (over 830,000) supported under the scheme.

The Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI) supports biomass only boilers and biomass pellet stoves, air source heat pumps, ground source heat pumps and solar thermal panels. The Domestic RHI has accredited over 69,000 applications for the residential microgeneration of heat. As of May 2019, air source heat pumps are the most popular method of heat microgeneration, making up 54% of total accredited applications. More deployment data can be found here.

It should be noted that there are some forms of microgeneration not covered by the RHI or FITs scheme.

17 Jul 2019, 8:27 a.m. Offshore Industry Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the financial contribution of the oil and gas sector to the economy of (a) each region of the UK and (b) the UK; and how many jobs the oil and gas sector supports in each region of UK.

Answer (Chris Skidmore)

The Department estimates that the oil and gas sector, defined as the combination of Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) codes 6 and 19, made a financial contribution of £23.9bn of Gross Value Added (GVA) to the UK economy in 2018[1]. The latest release of the UK Business Register and Employment Survey indicates that there were 20,700 direct jobs in the sector, with a further 124,100 roles supported in the immediate supply chain.[2] While it is not possible to estimate the economic contribution of the oil and gas sector to each region of the UK with sufficient granularity, the latest Oil and Gas UK Workforce Report estimates that Scotland, Greater London and the South East of England account for three-fifths of total employment supported by the offshore oil and gas industry.[3]

[1] ‘Extraction of crude petroleum and natural gas’ and ‘Manufacture of coke and refined petroleum products’ respectively. Note that as SIC code 19 includes coke oven products, this measure may lead to a slight overestimate. For context, the balance of GVA generated is £20.5bn and £3.4bn for SIC codes 6 and 19 respectively: GDP output approach – low-level aggregates, ONS - June 2019

[2]Industry (2, 3 and 5 - digit SIC) - Business Register and Employment Survey (BRES), ONS - September 2018

[3] Workforce Report, Oil & Gas UK - 2018

16 Jul 2019, 4:41 p.m. Climate Change Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the cost to the public purse of climate mitigation and natural disaster recovery throughout the regions of the country in the last ten years; and what funding he plans to allocate to those matters in the next ten years.

Answer (Chris Skidmore)

Climate change mitigation and natural disaster recovery are priorities for this government. Investment in reducing the UK’s contribution to climate change and managing its impacts can deliver benefits across the UK. This is why we have placed clean growth at the heart of our modern Industrial Strategy. Future funding decisions are a matter for the Spending Review.

16 Jul 2019, 3:09 p.m. Electric Vehicles: Charging Points Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many people in each region of the UK have received electric vehicle plug-in grants in each year since 2011.

Answer (Michael Ellis)

The attached table shows where new plug-in grant eligible vehicles were registered by region of the UK from 2011 to 2018. In October 2018 plug-in hybrids became ineligible for the plug-in car grant. Those registered after this date are not accounted for in the table.

16 Jul 2019, 2:58 p.m. Electric Vehicles Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent assessment his Department has made of which models of electric vehicle are most popular with consumers by region; and for which of those models are plug-in grants available.

Answer (Michael Ellis)

The attached tables show the top six most popular ultra low emission vehicle models with consumers by region between April 2018 and March 2019. Those vehicles eligible for plug-in grants are marked with a star. A number of different models are popular with consumers across the country. The number of models of ultra low emission vehicles available in the UK continues to increase. Nearly all major automakers have made significant commitments to start selling ULEVs.

16 Jul 2019, 8:42 a.m. Doctors: Private Sector Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 1 July 2019 to Question 271509, what his Department's definition is of serious or persistent failure in relation to doctors failing to follow guidance on disclosing their interests in organisations to which they refer patients; and how many incidents of that serious or persistent failure there have been in the last five years.

Answer (Stephen Hammond)

The Department does not define ‘serious or persistent failure’ in relation to doctors failing to follow guidance on disclosing their interests in organisations to which they refer patients. The Department also does not hold information on the number of incidents relating to failure to follow guidance on disclosing interests.

The General Medical Council (GMC) is the independent regulator of doctors in the United Kingdom. All UK registered doctors are expected to meet the professional standards set out in the GMC's guidance ‘Good Medical Practice’. Serious or persistent failure to follow this guidance will put their registration at risk.

12 Jul 2019, 11:23 a.m. Diabetes Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the prevalence of (a) Type 1 and (b) Type 2 diabetes in each local authority area in each of the last three years; what steps his Department is taking to tackle the prevalence of diabetes; and what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of his Department's policy on tackling diabetes.

Answer (Seema Kennedy)

Data on the prevalence of type 1 and type 2 diabetes is not available at local authority level.

The prevalence of both type one and type two diabetes, combined, is monitored and published via the Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF) and the National Diabetes Audit (NDA) provides information on the number with each condition separately at clinical commissioning group and general practice level. The QOF can be viewed at the following link:

https://qof.digital.nhs.uk/

The NDA can be viewed at the following link:

https://digital.nhs.uk/data-and-information/publications/statistical/national-diabetes-audit

Steps to reduce the increase in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes are being led via the Healthier You NHS Diabetes Prevention Programme. This programme can be viewed at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/diabetes/diabetes-prevention/

Significant funding and commitments to improving services for those with type 1 and type 2 diabetes have also been made in the NHS Long Term Plan. The NHS Long Term Plan can be viewed at the following link:

https://www.longtermplan.nhs.uk/

A first progress report covering early implementation of the Healthier You Diabetes Prevention Programme, including numbers of referrals and uptake in its first year, was published as a short report in Diabetic Medicine and can be accessed at the following link:

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/dme.13562

12 Jul 2019, 9:56 a.m. Fossil Fuels: Subsidies Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of the findings by the Overseas Development Institute in their 2018 G7 fossil fuel subsidy scorecard that the UK ranks 7th among G7 nations for transparency in its progress in ending Government support for fossil fuels; and if he will make a statement.

Answer (Robert Jenrick)

The VAT reduced rate for domestic fuel and power is aimed at reducing costs on household purchases of several supplies of energy, including electricity which is generated from renewable sources. This measure helps lower the cost of household bills for families.

The UK Government also places additional taxes on the extraction of oil and gas, with companies engaged in the production of oil and gas on the UK Continental Shelf subject to headline tax rates on their profits that are more than double those paid by other businesses. To date, the sector has paid over £330 billion in production taxes.

The UK is currently a net importer of both oil and gas and even under the most rapid energy transition scenarios, the UK is expected to remain a net importer for the foreseeable future. Managing the declining production from our relatively small domestic basin, while reducing our overall usage of fossil fuels, is therefore compatible with our climate change commitments.

Overall, the UK is fourth on the ODI’s 2018 G7 Fossil Fuel Subsidy Scorecard and is ranked first among G7 nations for pledges and commitments. Since the ODI published their report, the Government has signed a target of net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 in law, becoming the first G7 country to set such a goal. Among a range of other actions, we have also launched a comprehensive global review of the link between biodiversity and economic growth to be led by Professor Sir Partha Dasgupta.

12 Jul 2019, 9:56 a.m. Fuels: Tax Allowances Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the effect of reduced VAT for domestic fuels and tax reliefs for fossil fuel companies on the ability of the UK to phase out fossil fuel infrastructure in alignment with the goals of the Paris Agreement and to achieve net zero emissions by 2050.

Answer (Robert Jenrick)

The VAT reduced rate for domestic fuel and power is aimed at reducing costs on household purchases of several supplies of energy, including electricity which is generated from renewable sources. This measure helps lower the cost of household bills for families.

The UK Government also places additional taxes on the extraction of oil and gas, with companies engaged in the production of oil and gas on the UK Continental Shelf subject to headline tax rates on their profits that are more than double those paid by other businesses. To date, the sector has paid over £330 billion in production taxes.

The UK is currently a net importer of both oil and gas and even under the most rapid energy transition scenarios, the UK is expected to remain a net importer for the foreseeable future. Managing the declining production from our relatively small domestic basin, while reducing our overall usage of fossil fuels, is therefore compatible with our climate change commitments.

Overall, the UK is fourth on the ODI’s 2018 G7 Fossil Fuel Subsidy Scorecard and is ranked first among G7 nations for pledges and commitments. Since the ODI published their report, the Government has signed a target of net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 in law, becoming the first G7 country to set such a goal. Among a range of other actions, we have also launched a comprehensive global review of the link between biodiversity and economic growth to be led by Professor Sir Partha Dasgupta.

10 Jul 2019, 4:22 p.m. Maraviroc Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the (a) adequacy of NHS procurement options for and (b) the affordability of Maraviroc.

Answer (Seema Kennedy)

NHS England runs a competitive framework tender process to assess availability and cost of drugs used to treat HIV. Maraviroc is currently commissioned and procured for HIV nationally through a tender framework by NHS England and NHS Improvement. The affordability of Maraviroc is similar to comparable HIV treatments.

10 Jul 2019, 4:17 p.m. Maraviroc: Clinical Trials Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of the cost to the NHS of clinical trials of Maraviroc in each of the last three years.

Answer (Caroline Dinenage)

In the last three years, four investigator initiated non-commercial clinical trials have been supported by the National Institute for Health Research Clinical Research Network (NIHR CRN).

The cost to the National Health Service of these clinical trials is limited to:

- NHS Treatment Costs - the patient care costs, which would continue to be incurred if the patient care service in question continued to be provided after the research and development study had stopped.

- Excess Treatment Costs (ETCs) –that result from giving patients new treatments or changing the way that care is delivered, if applicable for non-commercial research and development studies.

We do not hold information on what, if any ETCs have been incurred historically by the NHS for individual clinical trials.

As is standard practice for non-commercial research studies, the NIHR CRN provided NHS Support Costs to cover additional patient care costs associated with the research. Research Costs for the clinical trials were met by the research funders.

10 Jul 2019, 4:06 p.m. Maraviroc: Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment NHS England has made of the availability of Maraviroc to patients with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy.

Answer (Seema Kennedy)

We are informed by NHS England and NHS Improvement that it does not commission Maraviroc for progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy as there is currently insufficient evidence to support its use in this condition.

NHS England and NHS Improvement have published do not commission policy for ‘Natalizumab-induced progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy in relation to immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in multiple sclerosis.’

Due to a lack of evidence and as it is considered experimental, it is not currently commissioned for this indication.

Further information is available at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/maraviroc-for-ms-urgent-policy-statement.pdf

10 Jul 2019, 1:55 p.m. Higher Education: Casual Workers Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the University and College Union report entitled, Counting the costs of casualisation in higher education, published June 2019, what assessment he has made of the (a) effect of job insecurity on mental and physical health and (b) level of financial stability of Cambridge teaching staff; and if he will make a statement.

Answer (Chris Skidmore)

Mental health is a priority for the government, which is why my right hon. Friend, the Prime Minister recently announced measures (17 June 2019) which overhaul the government’s approach to preventing mental illness. These measures included providing £1 million to the Office of Students for a competition to find innovative new ways to support mental health at universities and colleges.

The Department for Education is working closely with Universities UK on embedding the Step Change programme. This calls on higher education (HE) leaders to adopt mental health as a strategic priority and take a whole-institution approach to embed a culture of good mental health practice.

The University Mental Health Charter, which was announced in June 2018, is also expected to drive up standards in promoting mental health and wellbeing, positive working environments and excellent support for both students and staff.

As independent and autonomous institutions, HE providers are responsible for decisions regarding the contracts they offer to academic staff. Like all employers, HE providers, including Cambridge University have a duty of care to their staff. The department expects them to take this very seriously. We also expect universities to give due consideration to their obligations under the Equality Act (2010) and the way their employment practices affect different sections of their communities and staff at different stages of their careers.

I gave a speech on 7 May 2019 that focused on early career researcher contracts. I am keen that early career academics do not get lost from policy debates, particularly around key issues such as mental health and wellbeing. The Independent Review of the Concordat to Support the Career Development of Researchers, led by Professor Julia Buckingham, has recognised issues of wellbeing and the challenges that arise from the use of short and fixed-term contracts. Recommendations are currently under review and a revised concordat is expected in September 2019.

10 Jul 2019, 12:42 p.m. Schools: Asbestos Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent assessment he has made of the proportion of school buildings that contain asbestos; and if he will make a statement.

Answer (Nick Gibb)

The Department takes the safety of pupils, staff and visitors to schools very seriously.

In 2016, the Department ran a voluntary survey to understand the proportion of school buildings that contain asbestos. 25% of schools responded and the findings showed that 83.1% had asbestos present.

In March 2018, the Department launched the Asbestos Management Assurance Process to develop a more comprehensive understanding of asbestos management in the school estate to strengthen our published guidance and support. 88.4% of schools responded to the latest survey and the Department intends to publish the report on the findings before summer recess.

10 Jul 2019, 12:18 p.m. Buildings: Asbestos Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what her Department's policy is on mandatory asbestos testing in public sector buildings.

Answer (Justin Tomlinson)

Regulation 4 of the Control of Asbestos Regulation 2012 requires duty holders (normally the owner or person responsible for maintenance of the building) in all public sector buildings to identify and record the presence and condition of asbestos-containing materials. In practice, this will require a survey of the building and, if necessary, the testing of any material suspected of containing asbestos.

10 Jul 2019, 11:08 a.m. Cancer: Greater London Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what comparative assessment his Department has made between the annual cancer mortality rate in (a) the London borough of Hounslow and (b) London in each of the last five years; and what steps his Department is taking to tackle cancer mortality in (i) the London borough of Hounslow and (ii) London.

Answer (Seema Kennedy)

The information is not available in the format requested.

9 Jul 2019, 3:19 p.m. Climate Change Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy, and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect of pursuing the target of net zero emissions by 2050 on historically economically marginalised communities; and what steps his Department has taken to ensure that policies to achieve the net zero target account for the needs of (a) workers in carbon-intensive industries and (b) historically economically marginalised communities.

Answer (Chris Skidmore)

The transition to a clean, low carbon economy can help give us towns and cities with cleaner air and warmer homes with lower bills, while growing our economy and supporting new jobs in growing low carbon industries – already there are almost 400,000 jobs in low carbon business and their supply chains. By one estimate this could grow to 2 million jobs in 2030.

But as our economy changes we must make sure that this growth is inclusive, benefits people right across the UK, supporting workers as industries change and ensuring the costs as well as the benefits are shared fairly, protecting consumers, workers and businesses. The Offshore Wind Sector Deal sets out that offshore wind could support 27,000 jobs across the UK by 2030. With the industry committed to sourcing 60% total lifetime UK content and increasing UK content in the capital expenditure phase, there will also be a need for highly skilled workers in manufacturing areas throughout the supply chain. The sector will also bolster regional clusters by working with local, regional, and devolved government and economic development agencies.

That is why we have announced that HM Treasury will be conducting a review into the costs of decarbonisation, including how to achieve this transition in a way that works for households, businesses and public finances, and the implications for UK competitiveness.

9 Jul 2019, 3:19 p.m. Climate Change Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department is taking to (a) end subsidies to the fossil fuel-based energy industry, (b) phase out fossil fuel-based energy infrastructure and (c) accelerate the transition to a clean energy economy within the 11-year timeframe set out in the IPCC report to limit temperature rise this century to 1.5 degrees Celsius published on 8 October 2018.

Answer (Chris Skidmore)

Climate change is one of the most urgent and pressing challenges we face today, and the UK is committed to tackling it. We have set a new net zero greenhouse gas emissions target for the UK, to be delivered by 2050. This world-leading target will bring to an end our contribution to climate change, and makes us the first major economy to legislate for net zero emissions.

We are taking steps to reduce dependence on fossil fuels. We project that oil and gas will play a smaller role in meeting the UK’s demand for energy over time, although there will continue to be a need for oil and gas as we transition to a low-carbon economy. We have committed to introducing legislation to phase out unabated coal-fired power generation in Great Britain from 1 October 2025 whilst supporting renewables. UK-wide coal consumption is now at its lowest recorded level since the start of the industrial revolution and over half of our electricity came from low carbon sources last year.

The UK uses a definition of fossil fuel subsidies developed with the EC and other G20 EU Member States to respond to the G20 commitment to phase out such subsidies. The definition, based on the approach of the International Energy Agency, is – “A fossil-fuel subsidy is any government measure or program with the objective or direct consequence of reducing below world-market prices, including all costs of transport, refining and distribution, the effective cost for fossil fuels paid by final consumers, or of reducing the costs or increasing the revenues of fossil-fuel producing companies.” The UK has no fossil fuel subsidies.

9 Jul 2019, 1:19 p.m. Civil Servants: Pensions Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what assessment he has made of the capacity of civil service pension funds to engage in shareholder advocacy with the companies in which they have holdings; and to what extent those funds have exercised that capacity to date.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

‘The Principal Civil Service Pension Scheme and Civil Servants and Others Pension Scheme’ are unfunded schemes and therefore do not engage in shareholder advocacy as they do not have any direct share holdings in companies.

9 Jul 2019, 1:19 p.m. Civil Service: Pension Funds Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what his policy is on adopting environmental, social, and governance criteria in relation to civil service pension funds.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

‘The Principal Civil Service Pension Scheme and Civil Servants and Others Pension Scheme’ is an unfunded scheme and therefore does not have any investments.

9 Jul 2019, 1:11 p.m. Liothyronine Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the value for money of prescribing Liothyronine (T3) on the NHS.

Answer (Seema Kennedy)

The Department has made no assessment. Clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) are responsible for the planning, commissioning and access to health care services for their local area.

NHS England and NHS Improvement are working closely with CCGs on the prescribing of liothyronine to support them with the implementation of guidance for CCGs on items which should not be routinely prescribed in primary care.

This guidance includes recommendations on the use of liothyronine in line with the British Thyroid Association, who advise that a small proportion of patients treated with levothyroxine continue to suffer with symptoms despite adequate biochemical correction. In these circumstances, where levothyroxine has failed and in line with this guidance, endocrinologists providing NHS services may recommend liothyronine for individual patients after a carefully audited trial of at least three months duration of the drug.

Further guidance on the prescribing of liothyronine has been published by the Regional Medicines Optimisation Committee. The aim of the guidance is to make best practice on the prescribing of liothyronine clearer. CCGs are expected to have regard to national guidance, and are responsible for developing their own local approaches to its implementation taking into account local priorities and needs.

9 Jul 2019, 1:11 p.m. Liothyronine Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to ensure access to Liothyronine on the NHS as an alternative to Levothyroxine.

Answer (Seema Kennedy)

The Department has made no assessment. Clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) are responsible for the planning, commissioning and access to health care services for their local area.

NHS England and NHS Improvement are working closely with CCGs on the prescribing of liothyronine to support them with the implementation of guidance for CCGs on items which should not be routinely prescribed in primary care.

This guidance includes recommendations on the use of liothyronine in line with the British Thyroid Association, who advise that a small proportion of patients treated with levothyroxine continue to suffer with symptoms despite adequate biochemical correction. In these circumstances, where levothyroxine has failed and in line with this guidance, endocrinologists providing NHS services may recommend liothyronine for individual patients after a carefully audited trial of at least three months duration of the drug.

Further guidance on the prescribing of liothyronine has been published by the Regional Medicines Optimisation Committee. The aim of the guidance is to make best practice on the prescribing of liothyronine clearer. CCGs are expected to have regard to national guidance, and are responsible for developing their own local approaches to its implementation taking into account local priorities and needs.

9 Jul 2019, 1:11 p.m. Liothyronine Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent steps he has taken to ensure access to Liothyronine on the NHS for people with hypothyroidism.

Answer (Seema Kennedy)

The Department has made no assessment. Clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) are responsible for the planning, commissioning and access to health care services for their local area.

NHS England and NHS Improvement are working closely with CCGs on the prescribing of liothyronine to support them with the implementation of guidance for CCGs on items which should not be routinely prescribed in primary care.

This guidance includes recommendations on the use of liothyronine in line with the British Thyroid Association, who advise that a small proportion of patients treated with levothyroxine continue to suffer with symptoms despite adequate biochemical correction. In these circumstances, where levothyroxine has failed and in line with this guidance, endocrinologists providing NHS services may recommend liothyronine for individual patients after a carefully audited trial of at least three months duration of the drug.

Further guidance on the prescribing of liothyronine has been published by the Regional Medicines Optimisation Committee. The aim of the guidance is to make best practice on the prescribing of liothyronine clearer. CCGs are expected to have regard to national guidance, and are responsible for developing their own local approaches to its implementation taking into account local priorities and needs.

9 Jul 2019, 1:02 p.m. Electric Vehicles Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps his Department has taken to support electric vehicles in (a) becoming competitive without financial incentives or subsidies for their purchase and (b) reaching price parity with non-electric vehicles.

Answer (Michael Ellis)

We are investing nearly £1.5bn‎ between April 2015 and March 2021, with grants available for plug in cars, vans, lorries, buses, taxis and motorcycles, and schemes to support chargepoint infrastructure at homes, workplaces and on residential streets. These subsidies are designed to support the early market and achieve a competitive, self-sustaining market.

The £400m public-private Charging Infrastructure Investment Fund will add thousands more public chargepoints. The Automated and Electric Vehicles Act gives Government new powers to regulate the chargepoint market and improve the experience for consumers. We have supported the installation of more than 20,000 public chargepoints, including over 2,000 rapid chargepoints. The UK’s network is already one of the largest networks in Europe and the Road to Zero strategy includes new commitments to massively expand electric and low emission vehicle infrastructure across the country. The Government has also put in place a favourable tax regime that rewards the cleanest, zero emission vehicles.

The Government has awarded over £300m in grants via Innovate UK into ultra low emission technologies. Part of this is the Faraday battery challenge, designed to ensure research and innovation takes centre stage in the Industrial Strategy and to reduce the cost of new technologies.

The Government has also put in place a favourable tax regime that rewards the cleanest, zero emission vehicles. Go Ultra Low is a joint Government-Industry funded campaign which aims to inform vehicle purchasers about the operational savings from driving electric vehicles and to dispel widespread myths.

We anticipate that electric vehicles will achieve price parity with their petrol and diesel counterparts in the mid-2020s. We will review progress by 2025. Against a rapidly evolving international context, we will seek to maintain the UK’s leadership position and meet our ambitions, and will consider what interventions are required if not enough progress is being made.

9 Jul 2019, 1:02 p.m. Electric Vehicles Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps his Department has taken to provide support for the purchase of electric vehicles to meet the targets set out in the Government's Net Zero Road Strategy.

Answer (Michael Ellis)

We are investing nearly £1.5bn‎ between April 2015 and March 2021, with grants available for plug in cars, vans, lorries, buses, taxis and motorcycles, and schemes to support chargepoint infrastructure at homes, workplaces and on residential streets. These subsidies are designed to support the early market and achieve a competitive, self-sustaining market.

The £400m public-private Charging Infrastructure Investment Fund will add thousands more public chargepoints. The Automated and Electric Vehicles Act gives Government new powers to regulate the chargepoint market and improve the experience for consumers. We have supported the installation of more than 20,000 public chargepoints, including over 2,000 rapid chargepoints. The UK’s network is already one of the largest networks in Europe and the Road to Zero strategy includes new commitments to massively expand electric and low emission vehicle infrastructure across the country. The Government has also put in place a favourable tax regime that rewards the cleanest, zero emission vehicles.

The Government has awarded over £300m in grants via Innovate UK into ultra low emission technologies. Part of this is the Faraday battery challenge, designed to ensure research and innovation takes centre stage in the Industrial Strategy and to reduce the cost of new technologies.

The Government has also put in place a favourable tax regime that rewards the cleanest, zero emission vehicles. Go Ultra Low is a joint Government-Industry funded campaign which aims to inform vehicle purchasers about the operational savings from driving electric vehicles and to dispel widespread myths.

We anticipate that electric vehicles will achieve price parity with their petrol and diesel counterparts in the mid-2020s. We will review progress by 2025. Against a rapidly evolving international context, we will seek to maintain the UK’s leadership position and meet our ambitions, and will consider what interventions are required if not enough progress is being made.

9 Jul 2019, 11:56 a.m. Summer Schools: Finance Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what (a) financial and (b) other support the Government (i) is providing in 2019 and (ii) has provided in each of the last five years to schools for summer school programmes.

Answer (Nick Gibb)

The Government’s Holiday Activities and Food programme has awarded money to organisations to deliver free holiday club provision for pupils eligible for free school meals over the 2018 and 2019 summer holidays. £2 million was awarded in 2018 and this has more than quadrupled to £9.1 million this summer. The clubs funded through this programme are required to provide free healthy food and enriching activities, including physical activities and elements of nutritional education.

The Department has invested £22 million for the academic years 2017-18 and 2018-19 to enable disadvantaged children and young people living in some of the most deprived parts of the country to participate in extra-curricular activities (including after school and holiday provision) which will enable them to develop essential life skills.

This Essential Life Skills programme is aimed at disadvantaged children and young people aged 5-18 across 12 Opportunity Areas. Within each Opportunity Area, local authorities are receiving grants to develop their own Essential Life Skills programme to meet the needs of pupils and young people in their communities. It is the responsibility of the local Partnership Board in each Opportunity Area to decide what programmes and activities best meet the needs of children and young people in the area.

9 Jul 2019, 10:43 a.m. Electric Vehicles Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent estimate he has made of the (a) number and (b) proportion of vehicles that are electric in each (i) region and (ii) nation of the UK.

Answer (Michael Ellis)

The following table contains the number and proportion of all licensed vehicles that are electric at the end of March 2019. This includes battery electric, plug-in hybrid electric and fuel cell electric vehicles.

Region/Country

Number

Proportion

North East

3,599

0.26%

North West

11,287

0.29%

Yorkshire and The Humber

14,174

0.47%

East Midlands

11,449

0.38%

West Midlands

28,400

0.75%

East

26,835

0.66%

London

26,253

0.85%

South East

42,482

0.67%

South West

22,871

0.56%

England

187,350

0.57%

Wales

4,290

0.22%

Scotland

12,397

0.41%

Northern Ireland

2,664

0.23%

United Kingdom TOTAL

210,415

0.53%

8 Jul 2019, 4:02 p.m. Soft Drinks: Taxation Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much funding (a) academies and (b) non-academy schools have received from the soft drinks industry levy.

Answer (Nadhim Zahawi)

The Budget 2016 announced funding for a number of programmes linked to the revenue from the Soft Drinks Industry Levy (SDIL). The Department for Education will receive £575 million during the current Spending Review period.

The funding has been used for the following projects:

  • Healthy Pupils Capital Fund (HPCF) - £100 million of revenue generated from the SDIL is being used for the HPCF. HPCF allocations for each local authority and multi-academy trust, who were eligible to receive a direct allocation, were published in March 2018 and are available at the following link: https://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20190212204720/https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/capital-allocations. Details of successful HPCF projects funded through the Condition Improvement Fund have been published here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/condition-improvement-fund-2018-to-2019-outcome.
  • Primary PE and Sport Premium - In September 2017, we announced that we had doubled the funding for the Primary PE and Sport Premium, with SDIL revenue contributing an additional £160 million a year to funding from the Department for Education and the Department for Health and Social Care. School-level allocations are available on gov.uk at: https://skillsfunding.service.gov.uk/pe-sport-premium/2018-2019/search-premium-allocation.
  • Essential Life Skills (ELS) - We have invested £22 million in an ELS programme to enable disadvantaged children and young people living in some of the most deprived parts of the country to participate in regular extra-curricular activities. The ELS programme is targeting disadvantaged children and young people aged 5-18 across 12 Opportunity Areas (OAs). We have distributed funding of £7.95 million in 2017-18 and £13.8 million in 2018-19 to the 12 OAs to deliver ELS activities. We do not have funding data broken down by academies and non-academies.
  • National Schools Breakfast Programme (NSBP) - We are investing up to £26 million into the NSBP. This money will kick start or improve breakfast clubs in over 1,700 academies and non-academies. The focus of these clubs has been to target the most disadvantaged areas of the country (including the Department for Education’s OAs) to help make sure every child gets the best start in life. Information from the programme is still being collected and data on funding at local authority level is not available at this stage.

8 Jul 2019, 3:40 p.m. Electric Vehicles Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps he is taking to incentivise the take-up of electric vehicles in areas with high levels of pollution.

Answer (Michael Ellis)

The UK Government takes its air quality obligations extremely seriously and is firmly committed to improving the UK’s air quality and cutting harmful emissions. In July 2017, we published the UK Plan for Tackling Roadside Nitrogen Dioxide Concentrations, setting out how we will achieve compliance in the shortest possible time. As a result of this, we are now working closely with 61 English local authorities, and have placed legal duties on them to tackle their nitrogen dioxide exceedances. This is underpinned by £495m in funding, including £220m Clean Air Fund to mitigate the impact of the plans on individuals and businesses. This funding can include, where appropriate, funding towards incentivising take up of electric vehicles.

To support the transition to zero emission vehicles, we are investing nearly £1.5bn‎ between April 2015 and March 2021, with grants available for plug in vehicles, and schemes to support charge point infrastructure at homes and workplaces and on residential streets. We have made real progress to date. 200,000 ultra-low emission vehicles are now registered in the UK, and we now have over 20,000 publicly accessible chargepoints. More than 2,000 are rapid devices – one of the largest networks in Europe.

In London, the Plug-in Car Grant (PIGC) paid out £45m in respect of vehicles registered in London.

4 Jul 2019, 3:48 p.m. Civil Servants: Pensions Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what assessment the Government has made of the (a) financial and (b) practical feasibility of divesting Civil Service Pension Funds from (i) fossil fuel and (ii) carbon-intensive industries.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

‘The Principal Civil Service Pension Scheme and Civil Servants and Others Pension Scheme’ is an unfunded scheme and therefore does not have any investments.

4 Jul 2019, 2:21 p.m. Financial Services Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what discussions he is having with fin tech providers on delivery of financial services to people and businesses affected by lack of access to cash.

Answer (John Glen)

The Government is committed to supporting digital payments, whilst safeguarding access to cash for those who need it. In light of changing payment trends, Government has created the Joint Authorities Cash Strategy Group. This Treasury-led Group, brings together the Bank of England, Payment Systems Regulator and Financial Conduct Authority to inform and co-ordinate members’ activities related to cash.

The Government has also invested over £2bn in the Post Office to maintain a stable network of branches where people can carry out their day-to-day banking.

The wider banking and finance industry has a key role to play and Government supports industry efforts to develop creative and innovative ways to maintain access to, and acceptance of, cash. The industry is committed to helping local communities identify and secure appropriate free access to cash for customers. Regarding specific discussions, Treasury Ministers and Officials have meetings with a wide variety of organisations in the public and private sectors as part of the process of policy development and delivery. Details of ministerial and permanent secretary meetings with external organisations on departmental business are published on a quarterly basis and are available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/hmt-ministers-meetings-hospitality-gifts-and-overseas-travel

4 Jul 2019, 2:21 p.m. Cash Dispensing Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps he is taking to increase access to cash in areas without ATMs.

Answer (John Glen)

The Government is committed to supporting digital payments, whilst safeguarding access to cash for those who need it. In light of changing payment trends, Government has created the Joint Authorities Cash Strategy Group. This Treasury-led Group, brings together the Bank of England, Payment Systems Regulator and Financial Conduct Authority to inform and co-ordinate members’ activities related to cash.

The Government has also invested over £2bn in the Post Office to maintain a stable network of branches where people can carry out their day-to-day banking.

The wider banking and finance industry has a key role to play and Government supports industry efforts to develop creative and innovative ways to maintain access to, and acceptance of, cash. The industry is committed to helping local communities identify and secure appropriate free access to cash for customers. Regarding specific discussions, Treasury Ministers and Officials have meetings with a wide variety of organisations in the public and private sectors as part of the process of policy development and delivery. Details of ministerial and permanent secretary meetings with external organisations on departmental business are published on a quarterly basis and are available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/hmt-ministers-meetings-hospitality-gifts-and-overseas-travel

4 Jul 2019, 2:14 p.m. Cash Dispensing Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether his Department has carried out an impact assessment of regional disparities in access to cash.

Answer (John Glen)

The Government has not conducted an impact assessment on the effect of reduced access to cash on small businesses, on vulnerable groups or on regional disparities in access to cash.

The Government initiated a discussion on payment methods at Spring Statement 2018 through a Call for Evidence on Cash & Digital Payments in the New Economy. This sought to gather evidence on how changing preferences for cash and digital payments impact on different sectors, regions and demographics.

In its recent response to this Call for Evidence, the Government set out its commitment to supporting digital payments whilst safeguarding access to cash for those who need it. It announced a Treasury-led Joint Authorities Cash Strategy (JACS) Group, bringing together the Bank of England, Financial Conduct Authority and Payments Systems Regulator to inform and co-ordinate members’ activities related to cash.

Additionally, the Government-established Payment Systems Regulator (PSR) is closely monitoring developments in ATM provision. The PSR regulates LINK, the scheme which runs the UK’s ATM network, and has used its powers to hold LINK to account over LINK’s commitments to preserve the broad geographic spread of the ATM network.

4 Jul 2019, 2:14 p.m. Cash Dispensing Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether his Department has carried out an impact assessment of the effect of reduced access to cash among vulnerable groups including (a) disabled people, (b) BAME people and (c) people on low incomes.

Answer (John Glen)

The Government has not conducted an impact assessment on the effect of reduced access to cash on small businesses, on vulnerable groups or on regional disparities in access to cash.

The Government initiated a discussion on payment methods at Spring Statement 2018 through a Call for Evidence on Cash & Digital Payments in the New Economy. This sought to gather evidence on how changing preferences for cash and digital payments impact on different sectors, regions and demographics.

In its recent response to this Call for Evidence, the Government set out its commitment to supporting digital payments whilst safeguarding access to cash for those who need it. It announced a Treasury-led Joint Authorities Cash Strategy (JACS) Group, bringing together the Bank of England, Financial Conduct Authority and Payments Systems Regulator to inform and co-ordinate members’ activities related to cash.

Additionally, the Government-established Payment Systems Regulator (PSR) is closely monitoring developments in ATM provision. The PSR regulates LINK, the scheme which runs the UK’s ATM network, and has used its powers to hold LINK to account over LINK’s commitments to preserve the broad geographic spread of the ATM network.

4 Jul 2019, 2:14 p.m. Cash Dispensing Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether his Department has conducted an impact assessment of the effect of reduced access to cash on small businesses.

Answer (John Glen)

The Government has not conducted an impact assessment on the effect of reduced access to cash on small businesses, on vulnerable groups or on regional disparities in access to cash.

The Government initiated a discussion on payment methods at Spring Statement 2018 through a Call for Evidence on Cash & Digital Payments in the New Economy. This sought to gather evidence on how changing preferences for cash and digital payments impact on different sectors, regions and demographics.

In its recent response to this Call for Evidence, the Government set out its commitment to supporting digital payments whilst safeguarding access to cash for those who need it. It announced a Treasury-led Joint Authorities Cash Strategy (JACS) Group, bringing together the Bank of England, Financial Conduct Authority and Payments Systems Regulator to inform and co-ordinate members’ activities related to cash.

Additionally, the Government-established Payment Systems Regulator (PSR) is closely monitoring developments in ATM provision. The PSR regulates LINK, the scheme which runs the UK’s ATM network, and has used its powers to hold LINK to account over LINK’s commitments to preserve the broad geographic spread of the ATM network.

4 Jul 2019, 11:25 a.m. Doctors: Private Sector Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to (a) identify and (b) mitigate against any conflict of interest by NHS consultants referring patients to private hospitals in which those consultants have an interest.

Answer (Stephen Hammond)

NHS England guidance makes clear that all National Health Service staff, including consultants should declare all private practice on appointment, and/or any new private practice when it arises. Where clinical private practice gives rise to a conflict of interest then the general management actions outlined in guidance should be considered and applied to mitigate risks


In addition, the General Medical Council is the independent regulator of doctors in the United Kingdom and sets the professional standards that all doctors must follow to practice in the UK. Doctors planning to refer a patient to an organisation in which they have a financial or commercial interest must tell the patient about that interest and make a note of this in the patient’s medical record. Doctors must be prepared to explain and justify their decisions and actions. Serious or persistent failure to follow this guidance will put their registration at risk





4 Jul 2019, 10:02 a.m. European Parliament: Elections Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether he has plans to commission and investigation into the the potential disenfranchisement of EU citizens resident in the UK in the 2019 European Parliament elections.

Answer (Kevin Foster)

In line with their statutory duty, the Electoral Commission will be publishing a report into the administration of the polls later this year, which the Government will consider in due course.

1 Jul 2019, 3:59 p.m. Parliamentary Contributory Pension Fund Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Leader of the House, what discussions he has had with the Parliamentary Contributory Pension Fund on the (a) financial and (b) practical feasibility of divesting its funds from (i) fossil fuel and (ii) carbon-intensive industries.

Answer (Mel Stride)

The Parliamentary Contributory Pension Fund (PCPF) is a separate entity with its own trustees. The Leader of the House has no role in the administration or investment management of the fund and I have therefore had no discussions with the PCPF’s trustees.

4 Jun 2019, 3:09 p.m. Higher Education: Finance Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when the Philip Augur report on funding and post-18 education is planned for publication.

Answer (Chris Skidmore)

The independent panel, chaired by Philip Augar, has published its independent advice to the government. The government will consider the panel’s recommendations carefully and will conclude the review at the spending review. The government has not yet taken decisions with regards to the recommendations put forward. The full report can be accessed via GOV.UK, and as a command paper here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/805127/Review_of_post_18_education_and_funding.pdf.

1 Apr 2019, 2:28 p.m. Mortgages: Interest Rates Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to correspondence from the Economic Secretary to the Treasury to the Chair of the Treasury Committee on 30 January 2019 on how the Standard Variable Rate will be set; what the identity is of the regulatory active lenders in the mechanism referred to on page 3; what the current level of Standard Variable Rate being charged by those lenders is; and what formula was used by UK Asset Resolution to link its Standard Variable Rate to the rate charged by those lenders.

Answer (John Glen)

NRAM Limited (NRAM) and Bradford & Bingley plc (B&B) set their Standard Variable Rates (SVR) by reference to the SVRs of the top fifteen UK mortgage providers. Currently these fifteen lenders collectively hold c.90% of the outstanding mortgage balances of members of UK Finance, the industry's trade body. This ensures that NRAM’s and B&B’s SVRs are in line with other variable rates available in the market.

The ranking of lenders by value of mortgages outstanding is available from UK Finance’s website at www.ukfinance.org.uk, and the SVRs currently offered by lenders are also publicly available on their respective websites.

1 Apr 2019, 2:27 p.m. Mortgages Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to Mortgage customers: proposed changes to responsible lending rules and guidance CP19/14 published by the Financial Conduct Authority on 26 March 2019, what estimate his Department has made of the number of mortgage customers currently unable to switch their mortgage product who will not be able to benefit from modified affordability assessment proposals.

Answer (John Glen)

HM Treasury welcome the FCA’s announcement that it intends to change its mortgage lending rules to move to a relative affordability assessment for customers seeking to switch to a cheaper mortgage without borrowing more. We have worked closely with the FCA in the lead up to the publication of their Consultation Paper.

The Economic Secretary and Andrew Bailey, the FCA’s Chief Executive, wrote to the Treasury Select Committee in response to questioning on who might be helped by the FCA’s proposed changes.

Copies of these letters can be found here:

https://www.parliament.uk/documents/commons-committees/treasury/Correspondence/2017-19/EST-to-Chair-re-mortgage-prisoners-300119.pdf

https://www.parliament.uk/documents/commons-committees/treasury/Correspondence/2017-19/Chief-Exec-of-FCA-to-Chair-re-mortgage-prisoners-150219.pdf

1 Apr 2019, 2:27 p.m. Mortgages Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what discussions he has had with the Financial Conduct Authority on the development of the cost benefit analysis used to assess the potential impact of the its proposals in Mortgage customers: proposed changes to responsible lending rules and guidance CP19/14 published on 26 March 2019.

Answer (John Glen)

HM Treasury welcome the FCA’s announcement that it intends to change its mortgage lending rules to move to a relative affordability assessment for customers seeking to switch to a cheaper mortgage without borrowing more. We have worked closely with the FCA in the lead up to the publication of their Consultation Paper.

The Economic Secretary and Andrew Bailey, the FCA’s Chief Executive, wrote to the Treasury Select Committee in response to questioning on who might be helped by the FCA’s proposed changes.

Copies of these letters can be found here:

https://www.parliament.uk/documents/commons-committees/treasury/Correspondence/2017-19/EST-to-Chair-re-mortgage-prisoners-300119.pdf

https://www.parliament.uk/documents/commons-committees/treasury/Correspondence/2017-19/Chief-Exec-of-FCA-to-Chair-re-mortgage-prisoners-150219.pdf

26 Feb 2019, 5:04 p.m. Young Offenders: Rehabilitation Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many young people are subject to a Youth Rehabilitation Order in (a) the Feltham and Heston constituency and (b) England and Wales.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The most recent published data shows that in 2017/18, there were 6,794 Youth Rehabilitation Orders issued in England and Wales

The Ministry of Justice does not hold data for Feltham and Heston Constituency specifically, but within Hounslow Youth Offending Service, of which Feltham and Heston is a part, there were 43 Youth Rehabilitation Orders issued to children and young people in 2017/18.

26 Feb 2019, 4:55 p.m. Feltham Young Offender Institution Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what progress has been made in implementing the Secure STAIRS framework at HM Young Offenders Institute Feltham; and what assessment he has made on the potential effect of that framework on the levels of (a) violence and (b) disruptive behaviour at that institution.

Answer (Edward Argar)

A staggered roll out of the SECURE STAIRS framework has commenced at HMYOI Feltham with HMYOI Feltham’s Enhanced Support Unit (ESU) currently working to the Framework. Roll out will continue over the coming year. It is too early in the project to draw any conclusions on the impact on violence or disruptive behaviour at HMYOI Feltham.

The Custody Support Plan (CuSP) has been implemented in the ESU and the ESU CuSP Officers are engaging in their allocated young person’s case formulation meetings as per the joint HMPPS YCS and NHS England Behaviour Management Strategy. Full implementation is planned for the end of March 2020.

26 Feb 2019, 4:55 p.m. Feltham Young Offender Institution Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether a custody support plan that provides each young offender with a weekly review by a nominated officer is in place at HM Young Offenders Institute Feltham.

Answer (Edward Argar)

A staggered roll out of the SECURE STAIRS framework has commenced at HMYOI Feltham with HMYOI Feltham’s Enhanced Support Unit (ESU) currently working to the Framework. Roll out will continue over the coming year. It is too early in the project to draw any conclusions on the impact on violence or disruptive behaviour at HMYOI Feltham.

The Custody Support Plan (CuSP) has been implemented in the ESU and the ESU CuSP Officers are engaging in their allocated young person’s case formulation meetings as per the joint HMPPS YCS and NHS England Behaviour Management Strategy. Full implementation is planned for the end of March 2020.

26 Feb 2019, 4:31 p.m. Pupils: Disadvantaged Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to tackle the disparity in attainment between white British pupils of key stage 4 age who (a) are and (b) are not eligible for free school meals.

Answer (Nick Gibb)

The Government is committed to creating a truly meritocratic country, where everyone has a fair chance to go as far as their hard work will take them, regardless of background. To raise standards for all pupils, the Department has already reformed the secondary curriculum, assessment and accountability arrangements. The Department’s GCSE reforms mean that there is a rigorous suite of new qualifications, in line with the standards expected in countries with high performing education systems. The Department has also introduced new progress measures so that schools are accountable for the progress pupils make as well as their attainment.

The Department is aware that the most significant factor affecting pupil attainment, across all ethnicities including white British children, is economic disadvantage. To tackle this, the Department has provided a total of £13.75 billion from April 2011 to March 2018 through the pupil premium to help schools improve the progress and attainment of pupils from disadvantaged backgrounds. The Department continues to provide this additional funding, which is £2.4 billion this year alone. Pupils recorded as eligible for free school meals now, or at any point in the last 6 years, are eligible for the pupil premium.

26 Feb 2019, 4:27 p.m. Unemployment: Ethnic Groups Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps she is taking to tackle the comparatively high rates of unemployment among adults from (a) Black and (b) Pakistani and Bangladeshi ethnic groups in each (i) region and (ii) nation of the UK.

Answer (Alok Sharma)

In 2015 the Government made a commitment to increase the level of ethnic minority employment by 20% by 2020. Since then, 556,000 more people from ethnic minority backgrounds are in employment, a 17% increase. The Black/African/Caribbean unemployment rate of 8.4% is the lowest it has been since this series began in 2001 as is the Pakistani and Bangladeshi unemployment rate of 7.7%.

We know there is more to do following the Race Disparity Audit in 2017 which revealed a gap in employment rates between ethnic minority groups and the overall population. The Department has been addressing this by maximising the effectiveness of our jobcentres and influencing the behaviour of employers in supporting ethnic minority jobseekers into employment.

For example, the Department identified 20 challenge areas across Great Britain to work with that have a large gap between ethnic minority and white employment rates. We have delivered mentoring circles in all 20 challenge areas which involve national employers offering specialised support to unemployed, ethnic minority jobseekers to help build their confidence and raise their aspirations. In January 2019, I announced that these mentoring circles will now be rolled out nationally from April 2019.

We also know from the Race Disparity Audit that gender matters, even more so for the Pakistani and Bangladeshi group, where employment rates for females is less than half of White groups. To help overcome this barrier, in September we started trialling a programme with Pakistani and Bangladeshi women in Birmingham. The women participated in workshops to explore the benefits of becoming work ready and the financial incentives for their families in taking up paid employment. We will use this learning to help determine how we can deliver similar programmes across the Jobcentre network in 2019.

[Figures are all based on averages from January 2018 – December 2018 (Labour Force Survey, ONS) for the UK.]

21 Feb 2019, 3:53 p.m. Children and Young People: Visual Impairment Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he plans to take to ensure that there is a sufficient capacity in education and habilitation vision impairment specialists to allow for the assessment of all young people and children with vision impairment; and what steps he plans to take to regularly review that capacity.

Answer (Nadhim Zahawi)

Local authorities, in consultation with schools and other services, should consider carefully how best to meet the needs of children and young people in their area, including those with vision impairment. This may include working closely with neighbouring authorities to provide joint services to meet low incidence needs.

To support local authorities, we have announced an additional £250 million high needs funding, over this year and the next. This will bring the total allocated for high needs next year to £6.3 billion. We recognise that authorities’ high needs budgets face significant pressures and this additional investment will help them manage those pressures.

In addition, we are providing £3.4 million for 2018-2020 to equip the school workforce to deliver high quality teaching across all types of special educational need and disabilities (SEND), including vision impairment. The SEND schools’ workforce contract, which will be delivered by the Whole School SEND consortium, will help schools to identify and meet SEND training needs and build the specialist workforce. We are also reviewing the learning outcomes of specialist SEND qualifications, including the mandatory qualifications for teachers of classes with visual impairment, to ensure they reflect the changing needs of the education system.

20 Feb 2019, 5:15 p.m. Pupils: Visual Impairment Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate he has made of the number of Qualified Teachers of the Visually Impaired in each local authority in England and Wales; and what assessment he has made of whether those numbers are sufficient to meet demand.

Answer (Nick Gibb)

Information on the number of teachers who are Qualified Teachers of the Visually Impaired is not held centrally.

Under the Children and Families Act 2014 local authorities have a statutory duty to ensure the sufficiency of provision in their areas for children and young people with special educational needs and disabilities and their families, by reviewing it regularly in consultation with the local population. This would include provision for children and young people who have a visual impairment.

20 Feb 2019, 5:07 p.m. Pupils: Visual Impairment Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to ensure that each young person with vision impairment has received appropriately adapted (a) national tests and exam papers and (b) past papers without charge.

Answer (Nick Gibb)

The Standards and Testing Agency (STA) develops modified versions of National Curriculum tests in enlarged print (Key Stage 2 only), modified large print and braille (Key Stages 1 and 2). They are primarily designed for pupils with visual impairments, although they may be suitable for pupils with other needs. Schools can request permission from STA to open Key Stage 2 tests up to 5 days early if they need to make further adaptations to the test materials to meet a pupil’s specific needs. Schools are not charged for any version of the tests. Past versions of the modified tests are available free of charge so that schools can help pupils prepare and to ensure the materials meet their needs.

Ofqual is the regulator of qualifications, examinations and assessments in England. As well as requiring regulated awarding organisations to comply with equalities legislation, Ofqual’s General Conditions of Recognition require awarding organisations to monitor their qualifications for any feature which could disadvantage a group of students who share a particular protected characteristic, including those who have a disability due to visual impairment. Under the Equality Act 2010, awarding organisations are required to make reasonable adjustments to assessments for disabled students. Awarding organisations can, and do, make a wide range of adjustments to their assessments, including modifying exam papers (e.g. producing large-print or braille versions).

Ofqual does not impose any specific requirements regarding past papers, either in standard format or in any modified format. However, the total number and proportion of modified exam papers produced for the annual summer exam series is increasing over time. Awarding organisations and schools and colleges are therefore increasingly likely to have modified papers available to be subsequently used as past papers.

The awarding organisations that offer GCSEs, AS and A level qualifications do not charge for modified exam papers and where past exam papers have been modified, these are usually made available to schools and colleges free of charge.

20 Feb 2019, 4:54 p.m. Third Sector Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, with reference to the Civil Society Strategy, what progress his Department has made on establishing a regular forum for social enterprises to coordinate relations with government; and whether he has made an assessment of the potential merits of strengthening the legal framework for co-operatives.

Answer (Mims Davies)

The Civil Society Strategy is long term, setting out our vision for government’s work with and for civil society over the next 10 years and beyond. As we said in the Strategy, we recognise the strong demand from the social enterprise sector for a simpler relationship with Government and the proposal to establish a forum for social enterprises remains an important recommendation. Our resources are currently focused on other priorities from the Civil Society Strategy and on preparing for EU exit. In the meantime we continue to engage closely with representatives from the social enterprise sector on matters of mutual interest, including specific recommendations from the Civil Society Strategy. To inform the scope and remit of the forum for social enterprises, we will convene a meeting chaired by the Voluntary, Community and Social Enterprise Crown Representative in due course. The legal framework for co-operatives and community benefit societies is one of the issues we expect the group will wish to place on its agenda.

20 Feb 2019, 2:51 p.m. Pupils: Visual Impairment Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to ensure that teachers are able to identify young children who require visual impairment support in early years education.

Answer (Nadhim Zahawi)

Early Years Teacher Status is awarded to graduates who have met all of the Teachers’ Standards (Early Years) which are available at: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/211646/Early_Years_Teachers__Standards.pdf. These standards set out the minimum knowledge, understanding and skills that an Early Years Teacher must demonstrate. Early Years Teachers are required to:

  • Have a secure understanding of how a range of factors can inhibit children’s learning and development and how best to address these.
  • Demonstrate an awareness of the physical, emotional, social, intellectual development and communication needs of babies and children, and know how to adapt education and care to support children at different stages of development.
  • Demonstrate a clear understanding of the needs of all children, including those with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND), and be able to use and evaluate distinctive approaches to engage and support them.
  • Know when a child is in need of additional support and how this can be accessed, working in partnership with parents and/or carers and other professionals.

The Early Years Foundation Stage framework requires providers to have arrangements in place to support children with special educational needs (SEN) or disabilities and to identify a member of staff to act as SEN Co-ordinator. This framework can be found here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/596629/EYFS_STATUTORY_FRAMEWORK_2017.pdf.

Where it is identified that a child may have SEN, the setting should adopt the graduated approach that is outlined in the SEND Code of Practice – assessing the child’s needs, planning suitable support, implementing that support and reviewing it regularly to ensure it remains appropriate to the child’s needs. This document can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/send-code-of-practice-0-to-25.

20 Feb 2019, 11:48 a.m. Breast Cancer: Screening Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department plans to take to train, recruit and resource the breast cancer staff needed to fulfil the commitment in the NHS Long Term Plan to increase breast screening uptake.

Answer (Steve Brine)

My Rt. hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care has commissioned Baroness Dido Harding, working closely with Sir David Behan, to lead a number of programmes to engage with key National Health Service interests to develop a detailed workforce implementation plan. These programmes will consider detailed proposals to grow the workforce rapidly, including staff working on breast cancer screening, consider additional staff and skills required, build a supportive working culture in the NHS and ensure first rate leadership for NHS staff.

Following the publication of Health Education England's (HEE) first ever Cancer Workforce Plan in December 2017, there has been significant interest in training in radiographer reporting. HEE planned to invest in 300 more radiographers to start image interpretation and reporting courses by 2021. 150 radiographers commenced training in 2018/19 and 150 are expected to commence in 2019/20.

13 Feb 2019, 4:14 p.m. Heathrow Airport: Railways Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 18 January 2019 to Written Question 207579 on Heathrow Airport: Railways, what plans the Government has for undertaking a Grip 1-2 study of a Southern Rail Access to Heathrow.

Answer (Andrew Jones)

The Government remains committed to significant involvement by the market in designing and constructing a Southern Rail link to Heathrow. The Market Sounding Findings Report published in December 2018 recommended that Government now needs to further clarify the outcomes we want to be delivered from this project and consider appropriate commercial models for the market to take forward the development of potential solutions. This work is being done as quickly as possible following which we intend to set out further engagement opportunities to all interested parties.

13 Feb 2019, 4:08 p.m. Heathrow Airport: Railways Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 18 January 2019 to Written Question 207580 on Heathrow Airport: Railways, how much funding has been allocated for the next stage of development for a Southern Rail Access to Heathrow.

Answer (Andrew Jones)

In line with the recommendations of the recently published Market Sounding Report on Southern Rail Link to Heathrow, Government is now working to further develop and clarify the outcomes we want to be delivered from this project and consider appropriate commercial models. This work is being done as quickly as possible, following which we intend to set out further engagement opportunities to all interested parties. This work is being funded from within current Departmental resource budgets.

4 Feb 2019, 9:59 a.m. Beverage Containers: Recycling Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps he is taking to include community groups in the planned consultation on a deposit return scheme; and if he will make a statement.

Answer (Dr Thérèse Coffey)

The consultation on introducing a deposit return scheme (DRS), which will be published shortly, will look at how such a scheme would operate. We are aware that any DRS would need to be accessible for all, and will continue to engage with a wide range of stakeholders and ensure everyone has a chance to have their say.

30 Jan 2019, 5:14 p.m. Alcoholic Drinks: Misuse Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when the Government plans to begin work on a new alcohol strategy.

Answer (Steve Brine)

The Department of Health and Social Care and Home Office officials are continuing to hold discussions on the proposals for a new joint alcohol strategy and further announcements will be made in due course.

29 Jan 2019, 1:27 p.m. Beverage Containers: Recycling Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will make an assessment of the potential effect on the level of recycling of the (a) cans and bottles return system using ReturPack in Sweden; (b) deposit charge for drinks bottles in Norway and (c) return vending machines in Denmark.

Answer (Dr Thérèse Coffey)

As the Minister responsible for this policy area, I visited Norway, Sweden and Denmark at the end of 2017, to find out more about the DRS in those countries.

We are drawing upon experience of how DRS systems operate in a range of countries to help shape our proposals for a scheme in England. We have not made specific assessments regarding individual schemes.

28 Jan 2019, 5:10 p.m. Alcoholic Drinks: Misuse Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what discussions he plans to hold with BAME communities on the development of a new alcohol strategy.

Answer (Steve Brine)

The Government continues to hold regular discussions on the options for future alcohol policy development. Officials across Government will continue to engage with a variety of groups and communities in the development of alcohol policy to help understand where we are falling short and what more we can do.

28 Jan 2019, 8:13 a.m. Beverage Containers: Recycling Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what progress he has made on the consultation for a deposit return scheme as announced by his Department on 28 March 2018.

Answer (Dr Thérèse Coffey)

Proposals are currently being developed for the model, scope and scale of a deposit return scheme (DRS), and the consultation will be published shortly.

23 Jan 2019, 2:48 p.m. Young Offenders: Solitary Confinement Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many young offenders have been kept in solitary confinement for 22 hours a day in each Young Offenders Institution in the last month for which figures are available.

Answer (Edward Argar)

Our response to PQ 141024 provided a breakdown of the total number of hours young people spent in segregation in each Young Offender Institution, where data is available, over the last 5 years. HMPPS are in the process of reviewing how this data is collected across each establishment in the Youth Estate.

The safety and welfare of young people in our care is the core priority of the Youth Custody Service and children are never subject to solitary confinement. There are some occasions when it is necessary to remove children from association. On those occasions they will, as far as possible, have access to a regime that is comparable to the normal regime; including entitlements to social and legal visits, religious services, access to the phone, education, showers and exercise in the open air and, where possible, in association with other removed children.

21 Jan 2019, 5:14 p.m. Young Offender Institutions: Visits Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what proportion of young offenders in each Young Offenders Institution were allowed (a) weekly visits, (b) a visit every two weeks and (c) more than one visit a week in the last calendar month for which figures are available.

Answer (Edward Argar)

The information requested could only be obtained at disproportionate cost as it is not held centrally.

18 Jan 2019, 2:58 p.m. Heathrow Airport: Railways Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what discussions he has had with the Chancellor of the Exchequer on funding for the next stage of development of the Southern Rail Link to Heathrow.

Answer (Andrew Jones)

A new Southern rail link to Heathrow forms part of our long term aspiration to make getting to the airport quicker and easier for millions of air travellers across south of England and is an exciting opportunity to harness new and innovative ideas from the private sector. The project is in the early stages of development and funding for the next stage is being provided by the Department. The Secretary of State has not had any discussions with the Chancellor in relation to funding this next stage of work.

18 Jan 2019, 2:14 p.m. Heathrow Airport: Railways Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to the report entitled, Southern Rail Link to Heathrow Market Sounding, published by his Department in December 2018, what progress his Department has made on the publication of a (a) process and (b) timeframe in relation to the (i) development and (ii) completion of a Southern Rail Link to Heathrow.

Answer (Andrew Jones)

The Market Sounding Findings Report, published by the Department in December 2018, indicated significant interest for development and financing of the Southern Rail Link to Heathrow. This interest from the market aligns with my intention for future private sector involvement and we remain keen to advance this project in order to deliver quicker and easier journeys for millions of holidaymakers and business travellers across the south of England. The report concluded that Government now needs to further clarify the outcomes we want to be delivered from this project. We are committed to doing this as quickly as possible following which we intend to set out further opportunities for market involvement.

16 Jan 2019, 3:34 p.m. Electric Vehicles: Finance Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what grants the Government has made available for supporting the transition to electric vehicles; and what the take up of those grants has been to date.

Answer (Richard Harrington)

The measures outlined in the Road to Zero Strategy amount to nearly £1.5 billion of investment and represent one of the world’s most comprehensive packages of support for zero-emission vehicles. This includes grants for plug in vehicles and schemes to support chargepoint infrastructure.

Since 2011, the Government has provided £700 million funding for plug-in vehicle grants which have supported the purchase of over 170,000 vehicles.

More than 2,000 organisations have applied for the Workplace Charging Scheme; 28 local authorities have applied for funding under the On-street Residential Chargepoint Scheme; and almost 60,000 domestic chargers have been installed under the Electric Vehicle Homecharge Scheme.

16 Jan 2019, 3:34 p.m. Electric Vehicles Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government on the transition to electric vehicles in local communities.

Answer (Richard Harrington)

Ministers have regular discussions with their counterparts in the Ministry for Housing, Communities and Local Government (MHCLG). Cities and local authorities have a crucial role to play during the transition to zero emission vehicles and addressing local air quality issues – which is why we are providing £20m of support for local authorities to deliver Ultra Low Emission taxi charging Infrastructure; £48m for Ultra-Low Emission Buses and infrastructure; and £40m to establish Go Ultra Low cities in becoming global exemplars of ultra low emission vehicle uptake. The UK now has over 15,500 public chargepoints. More than 1,500 are rapid devices, one of the largest networks in Europe. We are working with MHCLG to further support the take up of electric vehicles in local communities.

16 Jan 2019, 3:34 p.m. Electric Vehicles Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he has (a) convened and (b) any plans to convene a Cabinet sub-committee on supporting the development and take up of electric vehicles.

Answer (Richard Harrington)

There are no plans to convene a Cabinet sub-committee on supporting the development and uptake of electric vehicles. The Economic and Industrial Strategy (Economic Affairs) sub-Committee is the relevant committee for securing cross-Government agreement on electric vehicle strategy and policy. In 2018 the sub-Committee agreed to the Government’s Road to Zero strategy on the transition to zero emission vehicles. The measures outlined in the Strategy amount to nearly £1.5 billion of investment and represent one of the world’s most comprehensive packages of support for zero-emission vehicles. Since 2011, the Government has supported the purchase of over 170,000 ultra low emission vehicles.

16 Jan 2019, 3:07 p.m. Cancer: Medical Treatments Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of the number of patients who have (a) used Immunotherapy treatments under the NHS and (b) had Immunotherapy treatments ended after two years in each of the last five years.

Answer (Steve Brine)

This information is not held centrally.

15 Jan 2019, 2:57 p.m. Energy: Housing Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he he has made of the level of demand for (a) home electricity generation and (b) a domestic energy storage unit.

Answer (Claire Perry)

As of September 2018, the Feed-In Tariff scheme had delivered 749,327 household installations with a total generation capacity of 2.8GW. The impact assessment accompanying the consultation and response to the Feed-In Tariff closure provides an assessment of future small-scale low-carbon installations across different capacity sizes, including the 0-10kW band which most household generation falls under.

The Impact Assessment is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/feed-in-tariffs-scheme.

As domestic energy storage is a relatively new technology Government does not yet have an assessment of the level of consumer demand. Government will continue to engage with industry bodies and stakeholders to understand how this market is likely to develop.

14 Jan 2019, 10:51 a.m. Electric Vehicles: Tax Allowances Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what tax incentives are in place to support the development and take-up of electric vehicles.

Answer (Robert Jenrick)

The government uses the tax system to encourage the development and take-up of cars with low carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions to meet our legally binding CO2 targets and our ambition for the majority of all new cars and vans sold to be 100% zero emission by 2040.

Zero emission cars attract favourable rates of both Vehicle Excise Duty (VED) and company car tax. For example, on first registration, a zero-emission car is not liable to pay any VED, whilst the most polluting models attract a VED rate of over £2,000.

The government has also recently responded to the consultation on reforming the VED system for vans. This confirmed that from April 2021 zero and ultra low emission vans will receive a significant VED discount compared to conventionally fuelled alternatives.

25 Oct 2018, 12:41 p.m. Department for International Trade: Staff Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what change there has been in staffing levels in his Department since June 2016.

Answer (Sir George Hollingbery)

When the Department for International Trade (DIT) was formed in July 2016, the number of staff was 2,504. The number of staff working for the Department for International Trade as at 30 September 2018 is 3,882.


The figures above include all people engaged in DIT and UK Export Finance (UKEF) business activities. This includes employees, contractors and those on loan from other government departments or seconded from organisations external to the Civil Service.

19 Oct 2018, 2 p.m. Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government: Staff Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what change there has been in staffing levels in his Department since June 2016.

Answer (Jake Berry)

The Department’s workforce statistics are published on a quarterly basis by the Office for National Statistics as part of its Quarterly Public Sector Employment estimates. Data for the two quarters in question, June 2016 and June 2018 (latest available quarterly release) can be viewed and obtained via the following link: https://www.ons.gov.uk/employmentandlabourmarket/peopleinwork/publicsectorpersonnel/datasets/publicsectoremploymentreferencetable (table 9) in the attached xlsx files for the dates in question.

At the end of June 2016 the Department employed a reported 1420 full-time equivalent staff in comparison with 1760 full-time equivalent staff at the end of June 2018. Please note that these figures are roundest to the nearest ten at the point of release and do not include the Department’s Executive Agencies or NDPBs. The difference between the two reported numbers represents a 24 per cent increase in staffing levels during the period in question. It is important to note that In March 2010 there were 2109 full-time equivalent staff working in the Department.

Please note that the numbers reported to ONS are based on directly employed officials where the Department bears at least 50 per cent of salary costs through its payroll. Staff employed directly by the Department who are on an unpaid leave of absence or paid on a reimbursed basis are not included in management information published on GOV.UK and supplied to ONS.

19 Oct 2018, 12:11 p.m. Ministry of Defence: Staff Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what change there has been in staffing levels in his Department since June 2016.

Answer (Mark Lancaster)

Details of changes to Armed Forces staffing levels since June 2016 can be found via the links below:

Armed Forces Personnel

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/uk-armed-forces-monthly-service-personnel-statistics-2016

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/uk-armed-forces-monthly-service-personnel-statistics-2017*

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/quarterly-service-personnel-statistics-2018

*The publication of Armed Forces staffing levels changed from monthly to quarterly following the release of the 1 October 2017 edition.

Civilian Personnel

Details of MOD civilian staffing levels are published within the Biannual Civilian Personnel Report (BCPR). A link to the BCPR can be found below:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/mod-biannual-civilian-personnel-statisticsindex

Prior to the biannual change on 1 April 2018, civilian personnel statistics were published quarterly in the Quarterly Civilian Personnel Report; a link to these historic reports can be found below:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/mod-civilian-personnel-quarterly-statistics-index

19 Oct 2018, noon Home Office: Staff Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what change there has been in staffing levels in his Department since June 2016.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

Between June 2016 and June 2018 there has been an overall 9% increase in staffing levels.

June 2016

June 20181

% Variance

FTE

HC

FTE

HC

FTE

HC

26108

28060

28369

30620

9%

9%

1 Figures are reported using ONS Definitions. Since April 17 we have been using a new reporting system which has impacted on civil servant paid and unpaid figures; previously loans to FCO were captured as unpaid but are now recorded in the paid categoryas all costs are re-charged to the Home Office. The paid category only are reported in figures collected by Office for National Statistics (ONS) for the Quarterly Public Employment Survey (QPSES).

Data Source:

1) June 2016: Data View - Office for National Statistics compliant monthly snapshot corporate Human Resources data for Home Office.

2) June 2018: Adelphi - Home Office Human Resources Record System.

Period Covered:

1) As at 30/06/2016

2) As at 30/06/2018

Organisational Coverage: Home Office

Employee Coverage: Data is based on headcount (HC) and Full Time Equivalent (FTE) of paid Civil Servants who were current at the end of the period.

Note: Figues are in line with the Quarterly Public Sector Employment Survey (QPSES) collected by Office for National Statistics (ONS)

Key workforce changes in 2016-17 include:

1 Machinery of Government Change: 59.40 (FTE) Fire & Resilience staff moved to Home Office from the Department for Communities & Local Government

2 Machinery of Government Change: 80.46 (FTE) Civil Service Learning staff moved from Home Office to the Cabinet Office.

19 Oct 2018, 11:36 a.m. Northern Ireland Office: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, whether she plans to publish her Department's preparations for no deal.

Answer (Mr Shailesh Vara)

We firmly believe it is in the interests of both the EU and the UK to strike a deal. That remains the goal on both sides and we are confident that this will be achieved. But it is the job of a responsible Government to prepare for all scenarios, so we have already carried out very significant ‘no deal’ preparations for the unlikely event that we reach March 2019 without agreeing a deal.

We have already published over 100 technical notices so that businesses and citizens have time to prepare in the event of a 'no deal' scenario. These are available on Gov.uk in a centralised location that is easy for people to access and use.

19 Oct 2018, 11:25 a.m. Department for Education: Staff Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what change there has been in staffing levels in his Department since June 2016.

Answer (Anne Milton)

The table below shows the change in the department’s staffing levels since June 2016.

Date

Headcount

Full Time Equivalent

June 2016

3531

3395.6

August 2018

6194

5956.7

19 Oct 2018, 11:19 a.m. Department for Education: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether he plans to publish his Department's preparations for no deal.

Answer (Anne Milton)

It is in the interests of both the EU and the UK to strike a deal and this remains the goal on both sides. We are confident that this will be achieved.

It is the job of a responsible government to prepare for all scenarios. We have already carried out very significant ‘no deal’ preparations for the unlikely event that we reach March 2019 without agreeing a deal.

We have already published over 100 technical notices so that businesses and citizens have time to prepare in the event of a 'no deal' scenario. These are available on GOV.UK in a centralised location that is easy for people to access and use.

19 Oct 2018, 11:10 a.m. Department for International Trade: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether he plans to publish his Department's preparations for no deal.

Answer (Sir George Hollingbery)

We firmly believe it is in the interests of both the EU and the UK to strike a deal. That remains the goal on both sides and we are confident that this will be achieved. But it is the job of a responsible Government to prepare for all scenarios, so we have already carried out very significant ‘no deal’ preparations for the unlikely event that we reach March 2019 without agreeing a deal.

The Government has already published over 100 technical notices so that businesses and citizens have time to prepare in the event of a ‘no deal’ scenario. These are available on gov.uk in a centralised location that is easy for people to access and use.

19 Oct 2018, 10:52 a.m. Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether he plans to publish his Department's preparations for no deal.

Answer (Margot James)

We firmly believe it is in the interests of both the EU and the UK to strike a deal. That remains the goal on both sides and we are confident that this will be achieved. However it is the job of a responsible Government to prepare for all scenarios, so we have already carried out very significant ‘no deal’ preparations for the unlikely event that we reach March 2019 without agreeing a deal


We have already published over 100 technical notices so that businesses and citizens have time to prepare in the event of a 'no deal' scenario. These are available on gov.uk in a centralised location that is easy for people to access and use.

19 Oct 2018, 10:50 a.m. Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport: Staff Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what change there has been in staffing levels in his Department since June 2016.

Answer (Margot James)

The DCMS headcount for June 2016 and the following two years was:

Date

Headcount

30 June 2016

530

30 June 2017

669

30 June 2018

979

These figures relate to Civil Servants on DCMS’ payroll. This includes permanent staff, those on fixed-term contracts, those on paid loan/secondment in/out of DCMS and those on paid maternity leave.

This information is published by DCMS on an annual basis. The information for 2016/17 can be found here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/dcms-workforce-management-data-financial-year-2016-to-2017

19 Oct 2018, 10:27 a.m. Treasury: Staff Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what change there has been in staffing levels in his Department since June 2016.

Answer (Robert Jenrick)

Between June 2016 and June 2018, the headcount at HM Treasury increased by 140. The headcount is published quarterly by the ONS via this link: https://www.ons.gov.uk/employmentandlabourmarket/peopleinwork/publicsectorpersonnel/datasets/publicsectoremploymentreferencetable

19 Oct 2018, 7:52 a.m. Wales Office: Staff Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Wales, what change there has been in staffing levels in his Department since June 2016.

Answer (Mims Davies)

In the Office of the Secretary of State for Wales the staffing levels increased by six staff between June 2016 and September 2018.

18 Oct 2018, 4:22 p.m. Department of Health and Social Care: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he plans to publish his Department's preparation for no deal.

Answer (Steve Barclay)

We have already published a series of 77 technical notices so that businesses and citizens have time to prepare in the event of a 'no deal' scenario. These are available on gov.uk in a centralised location that is easy for people to access and use.

18 Oct 2018, 4:18 p.m. Department for Work and Pensions: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether she plans to publish her Department's preparations for no deal.

Answer (Alok Sharma)

The Department for Work and Pensions continues to plan for all EU exit scenarios, as is prudent for such a significant issue, including working closely with the Department for Exiting the European Union to ensure consistency of plans across government.

The Government has published a series of technical notices so that businesses and citizens have time to prepare for March 2019 in the event of a ‘no deal’ scenario.

Further details and information can be found on gov.uk:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/uk-governments-preparations-for-a-no-deal-scenario

18 Oct 2018, 4:03 p.m. Ministry of Defence: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether he plans to publish his Department's preparations for no deal.

Answer (Mark Lancaster)

Ministry of Defence officials are working closely with colleagues from across Government to manage the consequences of exiting the EU under a 'no deal' scenario. We firmly believe it is in the interests of both the EU and the UK to strike a deal.

That remains the goal on both sides and we are confident that this will be achieved. But it is the job of a responsible Government to prepare for all scenarios, so we have already carried out very significant 'no deal' preparations for the unlikely event that we reach March 2019 without agreeing a deal.

The Government have already published over 100 technical notices so that businesses and citizens have time to prepare in the event of a 'no deal' scenario. These are available on gov.uk in a centralised location that is easy for people to access and use.

18 Oct 2018, 3:48 p.m. Home Office: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether he plans to publish his Department's preparations for no deal.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

We firmly believe it is in the interests of both the EU and the UK to strike a deal. That remains the goal on both sides and we are confident that this will be achieved. But it is the job of a responsible Government to prepare for all scenarios, so we have already carried out very significant ‘no deal’ preparations for the unlikely event that we reach March 2019 without agreeing a deal.

We have already published over 100 technical notices so that businesses and citizens have time to prepare in the event of a 'no deal' scenario. These are available on gov.uk in a centralised location that is easy for people to access and use.

18 Oct 2018, 1:25 p.m. Department for Work and Pensions: Staff Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what change there has been in staffing levels in her Department since June 2016.

Answer (Justin Tomlinson)

Figures on employment levels in all Civil Service organisations are collected each quarter by ONS as part of the Quarterly Public Sector Employment Survey (QPSES). These figures are published quarterly in arrears as part of ONS’ Public Sector Employment statistics – a National Statistic. The figures in the table below show staffing for the Department for Work and Pensions, excluding is Executive Agencies from quarter ending 30 June 2016.

Quarter Ending

Total Headcount

30-Jun-16

84,230

30-Sep-16

83,660

31-Dec-16

83,330

31-Mar-17

84,050

30-Jun-17

84,120

30-Sep-17

83,170

31-Dec-17

83,160

31-Mar-18

83,420

30-Jun-18

82,820

The latest QPSES data was published on 11 September 2018 and can be found at the following link

https://www.ons.gov.uk/employmentandlabourmarket/peopleinwork/publicsectorpersonnel/bulletins/publicsectoremployment/june2018

The Department also publishes its workforce management information each month. These details can be found at the following link.

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/dwp-workforce-management-information#2010-to-march-2014-

18 Oct 2018, 1:09 p.m. Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs: Staff Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what change there has been in staffing levels in his Department since June 2016.

Answer (George Eustice)

The changes in staffing levels for Defra between 30 June 2016 and 30 June 2018 are shown in the table below:

June 2016

June 2018

Change

Headcount

1700

3,810

+2,110

Source: Office of National Statistics – Quarterly Public Sector Employment Survey (June 2016 and June 2018)

18 Oct 2018, 1:03 p.m. Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, whether he plans to publish his Department's preparations for no deal.

Answer (Jake Berry)

We believe it is in the interests of both the EU and the UK to strike a deal. That remains the goal on both sides and we are confident that this will be achieved. It is the job of a responsible Government to prepare for all scenarios, so we have already carried out very significant ‘no deal’ preparations for the unlikely event that we reach March 2019 without agreeing a deal.

The Government has already published over 100 technical notices so that businesses and citizens have time to prepare in the event of a 'no deal' scenario. These are available on Gov.UK.

18 Oct 2018, 11:21 a.m. Department of Health and Social Care: Staff Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what change there has been in staffing levels in his Department since June 2016.

Answer (Caroline Dinenage)

The Department’s staffing levels have decreased by 474 people since June 2016.

The Department’s headcount is publicly available up until March 2018 at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/dh-monthly-workforce-information

The total headcounts for March-August 2018 are:

Date

Grand Total
(workforce numbers)

Headcount

Full Time Equivalent

March 2018

1,637

1574.47

April 2018

1,633

1571.19

May 2018

1,629

1567.02

June 2018

1,629

1567.02

July 2018

1,736

1668.92

August 2018

1,594

1538.49

18 Oct 2018, 10:16 a.m. Ministry of Justice: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether he plans to publish his Department's preparations for no deal.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

We firmly believe it is in the interests of both the EU and the UK to strike a deal. That remains the goal on both sides and we are confident that this will be achieved.

But it is the job of a responsible Government to prepare for all scenarios, so we have already carried out very significant ‘no deal’ preparations for the unlikely event that we reach March 2019 without agreeing a deal.

We have already published over 100 technical notices so that businesses and citizens have time to prepare in the event of a 'no deal' scenario. These are available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/how-to-prepare-if-the-uk-leaves-the-eu-with-no-deal

18 Oct 2018, 8:59 a.m. Cabinet Office: Staff Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what change there has been in staffing levels in his Department since June 2016.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

As part of this Government’s commitment to transparency, my Department publishes workforce statistics each month. Information about staffing levels since June 2016 are available at

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/payroll-costs-and-non-consolidated-pay-data

17 Oct 2018, 3:33 p.m. Department for Exiting the European Union: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, whether he plans to publish his Department's preparations for no deal.

Answer (Suella Braverman)

The Government has been clear on the outcome it wants to achieve, which is to secure a mutually advantageous deal with the EU. However, we have already carried out very significant ‘no deal’ preparations for the unlikely event that we reach March 2019 without agreeing a deal. We have successfully passed critical legislation, signed international agreements, recruited additional staff and guaranteed certain EU funding in a ‘no deal’ scenario.

We have already published a series of over 100 technical notices so that businesses and citizens have time to prepare in the event of a 'no deal' scenario. These are available on gov.uk in a centralised location that is easy for people to access and use.

17 Oct 2018, 3:29 p.m. Department for Exiting the European Union: Staff Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, what change there has been in staffing levels in his Department since June 2016.

Answer (Suella Braverman)

The Department continues to recruit the brightest and the best from across the civil service, the wider public sector and the private sector. The Department for Exiting the European Union was established in July 2016 and has now grown to over 650 staff.

17 Oct 2018, 3:13 p.m. Scotland Office: Staff Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland, what change there has been in staffing levels in his Department since June 2016.

Answer (David Mundell)

Staffing levels at the Office of the Secretary of State for Scotland have increased by seven staff members between June 2016 and June 2018.

Date

Headcount

June 2016

69

June 2018

76

Difference

+7

17 Oct 2018, 3:12 p.m. Scotland Office: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland, whether he plans to publish his Department's preparations for no deal.

Answer (David Mundell)

We firmly believe it is in the interests of both the EU and the UK to strike a deal. That remains the goal on both sides and we are confident that this will be achieved. But it is the job of a responsible Government to prepare for all scenarios, so we have already carried out very significant ‘no deal’ preparations for the unlikely event that we reach March 2019 without agreeing a deal.

We have already published over 100 technical notices so that businesses and citizens have time to prepare in the event of a 'no deal' scenario. These are available on gov.uk in a centralised location that is easy for people to access and use.

17 Oct 2018, 3:07 p.m. Department for International Development: Staff Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what change there has been in staffing levels in her Department since June 2016.

Answer (Harriett Baldwin)

Figures on employment levels in all Civil Service organisations are collected each quarter by ONS as part of its Quarterly Public Sector Employment Survey (QPSES).

Please see below table providing DFID’s staff numbers since June 2016. September figures will be published 2 November.

2016

Numbers

2017

Numbers

2018

Numbers

June

2022

January

2120

January

2495

July

2022

February

2158

February

2513

August

2046

March

2181

March

2526

September

2062

April

2190

April

2545

October

2071

May

2217

May

2551

November

2090

June

2256

June

2569

December

2099

July

2299

July

2605

August

2329

August

2632

September

2351

October

2389

November

2443

December

2459

17 Oct 2018, 3:05 p.m. Department for International Development: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, whether she plans to publish her Department's preparations for no deal.

Answer (Harriett Baldwin)

DFID published guidance on 23 August for UK organisations delivering EU humanitarian aid programmes if there is no Brexit deal so that they can make informed plans and preparations for that unlikely scenario. The guidance set out our offer of financial assurance for UK organisations to allow them to continue bidding for funding from the core budget of European Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid Operations (ECHO) without undertaking unmanageable financial and programmatic risk.

17 Oct 2018, 12:19 p.m. Wales Office: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Wales, whether he plans to publish his Department's preparations for no deal.

Answer (Alun Cairns)

We firmly believe it is in the interests of both the EU and the UK to strike a deal. That remains the goal on both sides and we are confident that this will be achieved. But it is the job of a responsible Government to prepare for all scenarios, so we have already carried out very significant ‘no deal’ preparations for the unlikely event that we reach March 2019 without agreeing a deal.

We have already published over 100 technical notices so that businesses and citizens have time to prepare in the event of a 'no deal' scenario. These are available on gov.uk in a centralised location that is easy for people to access and use.

17 Oct 2018, 8:40 a.m. Cabinet Office: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether he plans to publish his Department's preparations for no deal.

Answer (Sir David Lidington)

We firmly believe it is in the interests of both the EU and the UK to strike a deal. That remains the goal on both sides and we are confident that this will be achieved. But it is the job of a responsible Government to prepare for all scenarios, so we have already carried out very significant ‘no deal’ preparations for the unlikely event that we reach March 2019 without agreeing a deal. The Government has already published over 100 technical notices so that businesses and citizens have time to prepare in the event of a 'no deal' scenario. These are available on gov.uk in a centralised location that is easy for people to access and use.

15 Oct 2018, 4:40 p.m. Treasury: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether he plans to publish his Department's preparations for no deal.

Answer (John Glen)

We firmly believe it is in the interests of both the EU and the UK to strike a deal. That remains the goal on both sides and we are confident that this will be achieved. But it is the job of a responsible Government to prepare for all scenarios, so we have already carried out very significant ‘no deal’ preparations for the unlikely event that we reach March 2019 without agreeing a deal.

We have already published over 100 technical notices so that businesses and citizens have time to prepare in the event of a 'no deal' scenario. These include notices outlining HMT and HMRC’s preparations on:

  • Banking, insurance and other financial services

  • VAT for businesses

  • The Government’s guarantee for EU-funded programmes

  • Trading with the EU

  • Classifying your goods in the UK Trade Tariff

    These are available on gov.uk in a centralised location that is easy for people to access and use.

15 Oct 2018, 4:15 p.m. Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he plans to publish his Department's preparations for no deal.

Answer (Kelly Tolhurst)

We firmly believe it is in the interests of both the EU and the UK to strike a deal. That remains the goal on both sides and we are confident that this will be achieved. But it is the job of responsible Government to prepare for all scenarios, so we have already carried out very significant ‘no deal’ preparations for the unlikely event that we reach March 2019 without agreeing a deal.

We have already published over 100 technical notices so that businesses and citizens have time to prepare in the event of a ‘no deal’ scenario. These are available on gov.uk in a centralised location that is easy for people to access and use.

15 Oct 2018, 4:14 p.m. Department for Transport: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether he plans to publish his Department's preparations for no deal.

Answer (Chris Grayling)

The government has now published 106 specific technical notices to help businesses, citizens and consumers to prepare for March 2019 in the event of a no-deal scenario, this includes 14 DfT notices. These are available on the gov.uk website.

15 Oct 2018, 4:09 p.m. Electric Vehicles: Sales Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he he made of the number of electric vehicles that were sold in the UK in each of the last three years; and what estimate he has made of the proportion of cars sold in the UK in each of the last three years that were electric vehicles.

Answer (Richard Harrington)

The following table contains data on the number of vehicles registered for the first time in the UK, covering the last three years from 2015 – 2017. These figures are taken from the DVLA database.

2015

2016

2017

Number of electric vehicles

11,759

12,383

15,928

Proportion of cars that were electric cars

0.4%

0.4%

0.5%

15 Oct 2018, 4 p.m. Foreign and Commonwealth Office: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, whether he plans to publish his Department's preparations for no deal.

Answer (Sir Alan Duncan)

We firmly believe it is in the interests of both the EU and the UK to strike a deal. That remains the goal on both sides and we are confident that this will be achieved. But it is the job of a responsible Government to prepare for all scenarios, so we have already carried out very significant ‘no deal’ preparations for the unlikely event that we reach March 2019 without agreeing a deal. The Government has already published over 100 technical notices so that businesses and citizens have time to prepare in the event of a 'no deal' scenario. These are available on gov.uk in a centralised location that is easy for people to access and use.

15 Oct 2018, 3:53 p.m. Ministry of Justice: Staff Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what change there has been in staffing levels in his Department since June 2016.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

The information you have requested is published on the monthly cabinet office data for MoJ website which shows the number of payroll staff and agency/contractors in the department each month going back to 2011.

Please see the link to this below

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/workforce-management-information-moj

15 Oct 2018, 3:41 p.m. Shareholders Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what estimate he has made of the proportion of the population who own shares in (a) the UK and (b) Feltham and Heston constituency.

Answer (Chloe Smith)

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the Authority to reply.

15 Oct 2018, 3:20 p.m. Credit: Interest Rates Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimates he has made of the number of people that took out a high-cost loan in each of the last three years in (a) the UK and (b) Feltham and Heston constituency.

Answer (John Glen)

On 1 April 2014, regulation of the consumer credit market, including high-cost lenders, was transferred to the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA).

We have passed the Honourable Lady’s questions on to the FCA, who will reply directly by letter. A copy of the letter will be placed in the Library of the House.

15 Oct 2018, 3:19 p.m. Bank Services Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the number of people that do not have a bank account in each of the last three years in (a) the UK and (b) Feltham and Heston constituency.

Answer (John Glen)

The Treasury does not make assessments of the number of people who do not have a bank account.

However, in 2017, the Financial Conduct Authority published the results of the Financial Lives Survey which found that 1.3 million UK adults were unbanked, i.e. have no current account or alternative e-money account.

The Financial Lives Survey report (https://www.fca.org.uk/publications/research/understanding-financial-lives-uk-adults) contains further information on the characteristics of the unbanked and their preferences to have a bank account. The report analyses survey results across the four nations of the UK, the nine regions of England, and by rural and urban areas. The FCA intend to repeat the Financial Lives Survey on a regular basis in future.

15 Oct 2018, 2:55 p.m. Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether he plans to publish his Department's preparations for no deal.

Answer (David Rutley)

We do not want or expect a no-deal Brexit, but a responsible Government should prepare for all potential outcomes, including the unlikely scenario in which no mutually satisfactory agreement can be reached. To help businesses and the public prepare for March 2019 in the event of a no deal scenario, Defra has published 30 Technical Notices covering areas such as standards for animals, plants, food, chemicals, and timber. Defra will continue to plan and work with its stakeholders and partners to ensure they are prepared for all possible scenarios.

15 Oct 2018, 12:09 p.m. Northern Ireland Office: Staff Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, what change there has been in staffing levels in his Department since June 2016.

Answer (Mr Shailesh Vara)

The headcount in the Northern Ireland Office is currently 152 with 44 vacancies. In 2016, the headcount was 110 with 16 vacancies.

25 Jul 2018, 3:11 p.m. Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, pursuant to his oral contribution of 12 July 2018, on EU: Future Relationship White Paper Column 1158, Official Report, column 1158, what the timetable is for the publication of the (a) withdrawal agreement and (b) implementation bill.

Answer (Suella Braverman)

As we set out in the future relationship White Paper the UK and the EU have a shared ambition to agree both the Withdrawal Agreement and the Future Framework by October in order to given sufficient time for the respective our Parliaments to give their approval before the UK leaves the EU on 29 March 2019.

Once the UK and the EU have reached agreement on the Withdrawal Agreement and Future Framework, under the terms of the European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018, there will be a debate in both Houses of Parliament. If the House of Commons supports a resolution to approve the Withdrawal Agreement and Future Framework, the Government will bring forward the implementing legislation - the European Union (Withdrawal Agreement) Bill.

A draft of the Withdrawal Agreement was published on 19 March 2018.

24 Jul 2018, 3:52 p.m. Business and Families Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, pursuant to the oral evidence of the Prime Minister of 18 July 2018 to the Liaison Committee, if he will publish the titles of the 70 technical notices for businesses and families setting out how to prepare for a no-deal scenario for the UK leaving the EU.

Answer (Chris Heaton-Harris)

As set out in Parliament on July 18 the Government will be publishing around 70 technical notices over the coming months to help businesses and citizens prepare for March 2019 in the unlikely event of a ‘no deal’ scenario.

These will be published throughout August and September and will be available on gov.uk in a centralised location that is easy for people to access and use. There will be further detail on the content of these notices in due course.

24 Jul 2018, 3:50 p.m. Business and Families Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, pursuant to the oral evidence of the Prime Minister of 18 July 2018 to the Liaison Committee, when the Government plans to publish 70 technical notices for businesses and families setting out how to prepare for a no-deal scenario for the UK leaving the EU; and how many of those notes have been completed.

Answer (Chris Heaton-Harris)

Securing a deal with our EU partners remains our top priority and we are confident in doing so, but we have a duty to plan for alternatives.

We will therefore be providing further information on our plans for a range of exit scenarios in order to guide businesses and the public on how they can best prepare for our exit from the EU. To this end, the Government will be publishing around 70 technical notices throughout August and September.

18 Jul 2018, 10:02 a.m. Public Bodies: Disability Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what assessment he has made of the compatibility of the draft Public Bodies (Websites and Mobile Applications) Accessibility Regulations 2018 with the Equality Act 2010 so that all Schedule 19 public authorities are defined as public bodies for the purposes of the regulations; and if he will make a statement.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

The main obligations on public sector bodies in the Public Sector Bodies (Websites and Mobile Applications) Accessibility Regulations 2018 (“the Regulations”) are to comply with the accessibility requirement, provided it does not impose a disproportionate burden on that body. This is aligned with the reasonable adjustment duties in the Equality Act 2010, which require a public authority or service-provider to make reasonable adjustments for persons with particular protected characteristics, including disability.

The authorities subject to the Regulations set out in the Web Accessibility Directive are narrower than those subject to the Equality Act 2010, including the list of public authorities in Schedule 19. In particular, the duty to make reasonable adjustments in the Equality Act 2010 also applies to service-providers and those exercising public functions.

The Regulations do not supersede any of the duties in the Equality Act 2010. Bodies who are subject to both the Regulations and the Equality Act will be required to meet their obligations under both. Government will be publishing guidance to support the implementation of the directive which will make clear that even if organisations or content are not subject to the Regulations, there may still be a duty to make reasonable adjustments for disabled people under the Equality Act 2010 or the Disability Discrimination Act 1995.

Government Digital Service (GDS) have produced a first iteration of guidance that can be accessed here : https://www.gov.uk/guidance/accessibility-requirements-for-public-sector-websites-and-apps. GDS are continuing to develop this guidance over the summer, working with end users and accessibility specialists.

17 Jul 2018, 11:57 a.m. Immigration: Carers Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate he has made of the number of people who have applied for the right to reside in the UK as carers under Ruiz-Zambrano case law since 2011; and of those people how many were successful.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

There are no published statistics specifically relating to carers who have made applications and been successful under the Ruiz-Zambrano case law, however information available on the issue and refusal of residence documentation to EEA nationals and their family members, broken down by the applicants’ nationality is published in the quarterly Immigration Statistics, European Economic Area volume table at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/immigration-statistics-year-ending-march-2018/list-of-tables#european-economic-area-eea

As European rights are automatic rights with no mandatory application required, the Home Office does not hold the information requested relating to the number of people resident in the UK who derive their right to reside from their status as primary carers under the Ruiz–Zambrano case law.

Statistics on the UK’s resident population is a matter for the Office for National Statistics.

17 Jul 2018, 11:57 a.m. Immigration: Carers Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if he will provide a breakdown by nationality of people who have (a) applied for and (b) been successful in their applications for the right to reside in the UK as carers under Ruiz-Zambrano case law since 2011.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

There are no published statistics specifically relating to carers who have made applications and been successful under the Ruiz-Zambrano case law, however information available on the issue and refusal of residence documentation to EEA nationals and their family members, broken down by the applicants’ nationality is published in the quarterly Immigration Statistics, European Economic Area volume table at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/immigration-statistics-year-ending-march-2018/list-of-tables#european-economic-area-eea

As European rights are automatic rights with no mandatory application required, the Home Office does not hold the information requested relating to the number of people resident in the UK who derive their right to reside from their status as primary carers under the Ruiz–Zambrano case law.

Statistics on the UK’s resident population is a matter for the Office for National Statistics.

17 Jul 2018, 11:57 a.m. Immigration: Carers Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate he has made of the number of people resident in the UK who derive their right to reside from their status as primary carers under Ruiz-Zambrano case law.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

There are no published statistics specifically relating to carers who have made applications and been successful under the Ruiz-Zambrano case law, however information available on the issue and refusal of residence documentation to EEA nationals and their family members, broken down by the applicants’ nationality is published in the quarterly Immigration Statistics, European Economic Area volume table at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/immigration-statistics-year-ending-march-2018/list-of-tables#european-economic-area-eea

As European rights are automatic rights with no mandatory application required, the Home Office does not hold the information requested relating to the number of people resident in the UK who derive their right to reside from their status as primary carers under the Ruiz–Zambrano case law.

Statistics on the UK’s resident population is a matter for the Office for National Statistics.

16 Jul 2018, 3:38 p.m. Immigration: Carers Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what plans he has to bring forward proposals on the status of Zambrano carers after the UK has left the EU.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

As set out in paragraph 6.12 of the Statement of Intent on the EU Settlement Scheme published on 21 June 2018, provision in the Immigration Rules will be made for a non-EU citizen who is the primary carer of a British citizen in the UK and who currently derives a right of residence from wider EU law (a Zambrano carer). Further details will be provided in due course on the new status which will be available to them.

12 Jul 2018, 11:20 a.m. Prison Officers: Labour Turnover Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps he is taking to improve the retention rate of experienced prison officers.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

We commend our hard-working prison officers who do a vital job in protecting the public every day, often in very challenging, difficult and dangerous circumstances.

We want prison officers to stay and progress their careers. We’ve improved induction processes to ease transition into the job, provide care and support for our staff and offer additional training. These measures are part of the work we are doing directly with Governors to address local issues and ensure experienced staff and new recruits remain in the service.

The Prison Officer Recruitment and Retention Programme has been established to meet the target of 2,500 net increase in prison officers by December 2018, announced in the Prison Safety and Reform White Paper.

In order to safeguard the White Paper investment and maintain the experience of existing staff, we are focusing on ways to reduce attrition levels. The Retention Framework, Toolkit and Action Plan was launched in August 2017, designed to support prisons in identifying drivers of attrition and put in place targeted local interventions. This approach was piloted at a number of establishments across the estate and the results are currently being evaluated. The findings, including additional guidance on best practice, will shortly be shared with Senior Managers and HR professional across HMPPS.

10 Jul 2018, 2:43 p.m. Public Bodies: Disability Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps he has taken to consult with representatives of disabled people's organisations on the digital accessibility implications of the draft Public Bodies (Websites and Mobile Applications) Accessibility Regulations 2018.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

A public consultation on the draft Public Bodies (Websites and Mobile Applications) Accessibility Regulations 2018 and the Government’s plans for implementation ran for four weeks from 30 April to 29 May 2018. A number of disabled people's organisations responded to the consultation and the Government will be publishing its response shortly.

Since November 2017, one-to-one meetings have been held with delegates from Leonard Cheshire, Mencap and Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB).

A roundtable consultation discussion was held on 17 May 2018 with representatives from major disability charities in the UK. 17 delegates attended this meeting from Mencap, Thomas Pocklington Trust, British Deaf Association, RNIB, Sense, Scope and the Voluntary Organisations Disability Group. Seven representatives from disability charities (Thomas Pocklington Trust, RNIB, Sense, Scope) also attended a follow-up roundtable on 21 June on the subject of how we work together to create useful guidance to help the public sector deliver accessible websites, mobile apps and services.

10 Jul 2018, 2:43 p.m. Public Bodies: Disability Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, which disabled people's organisations have taken part in face-to-face stakeholder meetings convened with regard to the digital accessibility implications of the Public Bodies (Websites and Mobile Applications) Accessibility Regulations 2018.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

A public consultation on the draft Public Bodies (Websites and Mobile Applications) Accessibility Regulations 2018 and the Government’s plans for implementation ran for four weeks from 30 April to 29 May 2018. A number of disabled people's organisations responded to the consultation and the Government will be publishing its response shortly.

Since November 2017, one-to-one meetings have been held with delegates from Leonard Cheshire, Mencap and Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB).

A roundtable consultation discussion was held on 17 May 2018 with representatives from major disability charities in the UK. 17 delegates attended this meeting from Mencap, Thomas Pocklington Trust, British Deaf Association, RNIB, Sense, Scope and the Voluntary Organisations Disability Group. Seven representatives from disability charities (Thomas Pocklington Trust, RNIB, Sense, Scope) also attended a follow-up roundtable on 21 June on the subject of how we work together to create useful guidance to help the public sector deliver accessible websites, mobile apps and services.

10 Jul 2018, 2:43 p.m. Public Bodies: Disability Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, which disabled people's organisations are represented in the stakeholder group he is consulting as the Government prepares guidance for public sector bodies on the draft Public Bodies (Websites and Mobile Applications) Accessibility Regulations 2018.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

A public consultation on the draft Public Bodies (Websites and Mobile Applications) Accessibility Regulations 2018 and the Government’s plans for implementation ran for four weeks from 30 April to 29 May 2018. A number of disabled people's organisations responded to the consultation and the Government will be publishing its response shortly.

Since November 2017, one-to-one meetings have been held with delegates from Leonard Cheshire, Mencap and Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB).

A roundtable consultation discussion was held on 17 May 2018 with representatives from major disability charities in the UK. 17 delegates attended this meeting from Mencap, Thomas Pocklington Trust, British Deaf Association, RNIB, Sense, Scope and the Voluntary Organisations Disability Group. Seven representatives from disability charities (Thomas Pocklington Trust, RNIB, Sense, Scope) also attended a follow-up roundtable on 21 June on the subject of how we work together to create useful guidance to help the public sector deliver accessible websites, mobile apps and services.

9 Jul 2018, 4:42 p.m. Government Departments: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, pursuant to the Answer of 29 March 2018 to Question 134319 on Departments: Brexit, what arrangements have been established in his Department to coordinate departments’ exit planning and delivery; and what the size is of that coordinating team.

Answer (Mr Robin Walker)

Philip Rycroft, through the Department for Exiting the European Union, has responsibility for the overall coordination and strategy for exit. This includes coordination of other government departments’ planning and delivery work - where of course there are hundreds of officials working to deliver a successful Exit from the EU.

In particular, the Policy & Delivery Coordination directorate has been established to lead DExEU’s work to coordinate the domestic policy implications of exit across government departments. There are over 100 people working in PDC.

However all staff in the Department are dedicated to planning, delivering or supporting the work on EU exit. DExEU has over 650 staff based in the UK plus the expertise of over 120 officials in Brussels, and regular resource reviews have taken place in order to ensure that the Department’s structure remains suitable.

9 Jul 2018, 10:51 a.m. Building Connections Fund Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether the funding from the Building Connections Fund will be allocated in tranches between July 2018 and December 2020; and whether there is a closing date for applications for that funding in the first tranche.

Answer (Tracey Crouch)

The £11m Building Connections Fund will launch later this month. Details on how to apply and the closing date for applications will be advertised on Gov.uk.

Information on the announcement of the fund can be found on the Gov.Uk website via https://www.gov.uk/government/news/20-million-investment-to-help-tackle-loneliness

5 Jul 2018, 4:21 p.m. Infrastructure and Projects Authority: Managers Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many project and programme managers have been recruited by the Infrastructure and Projects Authority to work on projects relating to the UK leaving the EU; and how many of those managers' contracts are of a duration that is (a) permanent, (b) less than 12 months and (c) greater than 12 months.

Answer (Oliver Dowden)

The Infrastructure and Projects Authority supports departments by running centralised recruitment campaigns for project delivery professionals. We are unable to provide details of how many of these individuals have been matched to roles linked to EU Exit, or to specify details of individual contracts.

5 Jul 2018, 9:50 a.m. Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, how many meetings the Exit Programme Directors' Group has held since November 2017; and what the dates were of those meetings.

Answer (Mr Steve Baker)

The Exit Programme Directors' Group provides a forum for exit programme directors across government to share good practice, information and feedback. The group meets monthly.

4 Jun 2018, 3:59 p.m. Better Care Fund Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, which initiatives by English region receive funding from the Better Care fund; and how much funding each such initiative has received.

Answer (Caroline Dinenage)

The Better Care Fund (BCF) is a universal policy for local authorities and clinical commissioning groups to pool budgets for the purposes of integrated care. Local areas develop BCF plans according to their local needs (including mental health), as outlined in the Integration and Better Care Fund Planning Requirements for 2017-19*. Plans are agreed locally by Health and Wellbeing Boards. Data is not collected centrally on how much BCF funding is used to address mental health needs. A Quality and Outcomes of Person-centred Care Policy Research Unit system-level evaluation of the BCF is underway, with the final report planned for this summer and this will contain detail on different categories of BCF spend.

Note:

The document can be found at the following link:

*https://www.england.nhs.uk/publication/integration-and-better-care-fund-planning-requirements-for-2017-19/

4 Jun 2018, 3:59 p.m. Better Care Fund: Mental Health Services Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, which initiatives by English region which are funded from the Better Care fund are dedicated to address mental health needs.

Answer (Caroline Dinenage)

The Better Care Fund (BCF) is a universal policy for local authorities and clinical commissioning groups to pool budgets for the purposes of integrated care. Local areas develop BCF plans according to their local needs (including mental health), as outlined in the Integration and Better Care Fund Planning Requirements for 2017-19*. Plans are agreed locally by Health and Wellbeing Boards. Data is not collected centrally on how much BCF funding is used to address mental health needs. A Quality and Outcomes of Person-centred Care Policy Research Unit system-level evaluation of the BCF is underway, with the final report planned for this summer and this will contain detail on different categories of BCF spend.

Note:

The document can be found at the following link:

*https://www.england.nhs.uk/publication/integration-and-better-care-fund-planning-requirements-for-2017-19/

4 Jun 2018, 3:40 p.m. Forensic Science Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the urgent review of 33 cases launched by the Metropolitan Police over suspected mishandling of evidence in the forensic laboratory, what information his Department holds on (a) number of boroughs affected and (b) number of cases involving on offender under 18 years old.

Answer (Mr Nick Hurd)

The Home Office does not hold information on either a) the number of boroughs affected and b) the number of cases involving an offender under 18 years.

4 Jun 2018, 2:01 p.m. Public Health Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what information he holds on the (a) number of staff employed in and (b) size of budget for public health teams in each local authority in England in each of the last three years.

Answer (Steve Brine)

Information on the number of staff employed in and size of budgets for public health teams in each local authority in England is not held centrally.

Public health allocations for 2018/19 for each local authority in England are available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/public-health-grants-to-local-authorities-2018-to-2019

It is for each individual authority to decide what proportion of this is spent on staff.

4 Jun 2018, 1:41 p.m. Terrorism: Greater London Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what support the Government provides to survivors of the Harrods bombing in 1983.

Answer (Dr Phillip Lee)

The Government is committed to ensuring that victims of historical as well as recent terrorist attacks receive the help and support they need.

Under the Code of Practice for Victims of Crime in England and Wales, victims of terrorism have enhanced entitlements to support as victims of the most serious crime.

The Ministry of Justice fund a range of organisations for the provision of specialist, emotional and practical support to family members bereaved by crime including terrorist attacks, and fund the Peace Foundation which provides specialist support specifically for victims of terrorism.

Since 2015, the majority of funding and support provision for victims of crime in England and Wales has been devolved to Police and Crime Commissioners. This support provision encompasses a range of specialist, practical and emotional support based on the needs of the individual.

In 1983, the Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme was administered by the Criminal Injuries Compensation Board (CICB). CICB annual reports show that between 1983 and 1986, 190 applications for compensation were received that related to the Harrods bombing, but do not contain details of how many of those applications resulted in an award being made. As the Scheme has a number of eligibility criteria, no estimate can be made of the number of survivors who might be entitled to receive compensation.

4 Jun 2018, 6:49 a.m. Pupils: Travellers Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to improve the attainment of pupils from (a) gypsy and roma and (b) Irish Traveller backgrounds.

Answer (Nick Gibb)

Through the Pupil Premium the Government continues to provide additional funding, nearly £2.5 billion this year, to help schools improve the progress and attainment of disadvantaged pupils; high proportions of Gypsy, Roma and Traveller pupils will benefit from this support.

In January 2018 the Department established the Gypsy, Roma and Traveller stakeholder group to inform policy to raise the attainment of Gypsy, Roma and Traveller pupils. In March 2018, a review of exclusions was launched, led by Edward Timpson, who will be supported by an expert reference group providing expertise on the school system and perspectives of pupils more likely to be excluded. The group includes an advisor with extensive experience working with Gypsy, Roma and Traveller communities. The Department continues to work with the Ministry for Housing, Communities and Local Government on their 2018/19 pilot programme to improve the social integration of Gypsy, Roma and Traveller communities. In addition, as part of the Careers Strategy, the Department will include Gypsy, Roma and Traveller youth as a target group for a pilot, testing ways of providing careers guidance to vulnerable groups.

16 May 2018, 3:50 p.m. Segregation of Prisoners Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many requests to authorise a removal from association as specified in Paragraph 2(B) of Rule 49 of the Prisons and Young Offender Institution Offender Rules he received from Prison Governors in 2017; and how many of those requests for removal from association were granted.

Answer (Dr Phillip Lee)

Prison and Young Offender Institution (YOI) Rule 49 (Removal From Association - RFA) permits a Governor to segregate a young person from others (either generally or for particular purposes). Segregation under this rule must be desirable either for the maintenance of good order or discipline, or for the young person’s own interests.

Although Rule 49 (2b) provides that the governor must obtain leave from the Secretary of State in writing to authorise continuing segregation beyond 42 days, Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service’s policy on segregation mandates that young people cannot be segregated beyond 21 days without this leave being obtained.

The safety and welfare of all young people held in custody is one of our highest priorities. When young people in custody are putting themselves or others at risk, segregation can be used as a last resort for limited periods of time when no other form of intervention is suitable. This is closely monitored by specialist staff and accompanied by a strategy of intervention.

The table below provides the number of applications received for authorisation of continued RFA after 21 days and 42 days as well as the number of applications that were approved during 2017.

RFA beyond 21 days

RFA beyond 42 days

No of applications received

73

27

No of applications approved

73

27

NB : All applications received were approved

The numbers above represent occurrences and not individual young people

16 May 2018, 3:50 p.m. Segregation of Prisoners Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many requests to authorise a removal from association under paragraph 2(C) of Rule 49 of the Prisons and Young Offender Institution Offender Rules 2000 he received from governors in 2017; and many of those requests were granted.

Answer (Dr Phillip Lee)

Prison and Young Offender Institution (YOI) Rule 49 (Removal From Association - RFA) permits a Governor to segregate a young person from others (either generally or for particular purposes). Segregation under this rule must be desirable either for the maintenance of good order or discipline, or for the young person’s own interests.

Although Rule 49 (2b) provides that the governor must obtain leave from the Secretary of State in writing to authorise continuing segregation beyond 42 days, Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service’s policy on segregation mandates that young people cannot be segregated beyond 21 days without this leave being obtained.

The safety and welfare of all young people held in custody is one of our highest priorities. When young people in custody are putting themselves or others at risk, segregation can be used as a last resort for limited periods of time when no other form of intervention is suitable. This is closely monitored by specialist staff and accompanied by a strategy of intervention.

The table below provides the number of applications received for authorisation of continued RFA after 21 days and 42 days as well as the number of applications that were approved during 2017.

RFA beyond 21 days

RFA beyond 42 days

No of applications received

73

27

No of applications approved

73

27

NB : All applications received were approved

The numbers above represent occurrences and not individual young people

3 May 2018, 3:56 p.m. Electric Vehicles: Charging Points Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what support is available for local authorities to develop electric vehicle charging infrastructure.

Answer (Jesse Norman)

The Government has put in place a range of grant schemes to support the installation of domestic and workplace charging infrastructure, across the UK. For areas without off-street parking, funding is made available to Local Authorities to install charging infrastructure, through Government’s On Street Residential Charging Scheme. In addition, under the Government’s Go Ultra Low City Scheme, £22.9m has been allocated to support the installation of infrastructure – this is currently being procured and installed in eight UK cities. Following open competitions, 10 Local authorities have also benefited from £14m of Government funding to install taxi chargepoints.

At the Autumn Budget in 2017, the Chancellor announced a new £400m electric vehicle Charging Infrastructure Investment Fund. This funding will support the efforts of local authorities across the UK to establish recharging infrastructure. More detail on how the Fund will be administered will be published in due course. We are also taking powers through the Automated and Electric Vehicle Bill to ensure the roll-out of electric vehicle infrastructure at key locations such as motorway service areas and large fuel stations.

3 May 2018, 3:54 p.m. Electric Vehicles Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of current incentives to encourage the uptake of electric vehicles.

Answer (Jesse Norman)

Since 2011, more than 140,000 ultra low emission battery electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles have been registered in the UK. In 2017, sales of ultra-low emission vehicles were 1.8% of all new cars, and the UK was the second largest market for ultra low emission vehicles in the EU. We remain on track to meet the 2013 projection for sales of ULEVs to make up between 3-7% of all new sales by 2020. We are supporting the design, manufacture and use of ultra low emission vehicles with a £1.5 billion package of policy support out to 2020.

2 May 2018, 4:15 p.m. Feltham Young Offender Institution Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps his Department is taking to reduce incidences of violence in HM Feltham Young Offenders Institution.

Answer (Dr Phillip Lee)

Keeping all children and young people in custody safe is a key priority for the Youth Custody Service. We are taking active steps to address and reduce the levels of violence for all those who live and work within the Youth Estate, including Feltham.

A number of initiatives have recently been implemented to tackle violence and drive performance improvements within the Youth Estate. A holistic style approach to managing behaviour within the youth estate has led to the implementation of Minimising and Managing Physical Restraint (MMPR) in all under-18 Young Offender Institutions (YOI) and Secure Training Centres. In public sector Young Offender Institutions, local psychological teams have been put in place to carry out assessments of young people involved in multiple perpetrator/serious assaults. A new structured approach to the delivery of interventions for young people has been introduced to ensure that interventions delivered are either accredited or formally approved. Restorative justice practises have also been rolled out.

At Feltham specifically, we have around 100 new officers currently in training - with the first officers on the landings in April - helping to get to the root causes of violence and improve safety.

In addition, the first Enhanced Support Unit within the Youth Estate opened at Feltham in November 2017 to support and manage young people who are deemed to have exceptionally complex needs and high-risk behaviours.

2 May 2018, 4:14 p.m. Feltham Young Offender Institution Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment he has made of trends in the number of hours spent in education, purposeful activity and association by inmates of HM Feltham Young Offenders Institution since 2010.

Answer (Dr Phillip Lee)

I am committed to improving the education offer and tailoring it to the individual needs of young people. This will include ensuring that there is sufficient time in the day for access to vocational activities, sports, and health and behavioural interventions as well as academic education. We are working with education providers and YOI sites to improve flexibility of provision within the 30 hour week, to drive delivery of a wide range of activities alongside traditional classroom based learning.

Across both sites at Feltham, there are more than 100 prison officers currently in training – with the first new officers beginning to arrive on the landings this month. This will help to provide better access to education and get young people engaged in meaningful activities which will help them to turn away from crime.

2 May 2018, 4:03 p.m. Young Offenders: Solitary Confinement Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what information his Department holds on the (a) number of instances of, (b) average length of time and (c) average number of hours per day people aged 18 were held in solitary confinement in the youth secure estate in (i) England and (ii) Wales since 2010.

Answer (Dr Phillip Lee)

The safety and welfare of young people held in custody is one of our highest priorities and is fundamental to the proper functioning of our justice system. We are committed to reforming youth custody so that it is safer for both young people and staff and better equipped to help young people turn their lives around.

There are some occasions, when young people in custody are putting themselves or others at risk, during which segregation can be used as a last resort for limited periods of time when no other form of intervention is suitable.

Any decision to remove a young person from association is subject to regular review and a range of safeguarding measures are in place to ensure appropriate oversight of their care. There are careful limits placed on the length of time for which young people can be removed from association without review of the decision to remove.

2 May 2018, 4:02 p.m. Feltham Young Offender Institution Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what estimate he has made of the number of incidents where Minimising and Managing Physical Restraint techniques were deployed in response to (a) prisoner on staff, (b) prisoner on prisoner and (c) multi-perpetrator fights at HM Feltham Young Offenders Institution since 2010.

Answer (Dr Phillip Lee)

The safety and welfare of young people held in custody is one of the highest priorities for the Youth Custody Service (YCS). The YCS has rolled out the Minimising and Managing Physical Restraint (MMPR) technique for staff to use on young people in all Young Offender Institutes and Secure Training Centres – including Her Majesty’s Young Offender Institute (HMYOI) Feltham. MMPR has been specifically designed to reduce the use of physical restraint on young people by focusing on de-escalation techniques. It is only to be used as a last resort when there are no other suitable interventions available.

See the data below relating to the use if the (MMPR) technique for HMYOI Feltham.

Oct-16

Nov-16

Dec-16

Jan-17

Feb-17

Mar-17

Total use of MMPR incidents

83

103

62

51

66

77

- Preventing damage to property

2

0

2

0

2

4

- Preventing an escape/abscond

0

0

0

0

0

0

- Good Order and Security

4

5

1

3

1

1

- Preventing harm to self

10

12

7

6

13

17

- Prevent harm to third party

67

85

51

42

50

55

- Incitement

0

1

1

0

0

0

Notes:

  • HMYOI Feltham only started using the technique of Minimising and Managing Physical Restraint (MMPR) in October 2016, so the data below only relates to data available from this until March 2017. This period is the most up to date published data available;
  • the data collected by HMYOI Feltham is not classified in terms of ‘who the disputes were between’ – but the reason for why the MMPR was use;
  • this data is taken from monthly case level returns on the use of MMPR submitted to the Youth Justice Board (YJB) by HMYOI Feltham;
  • this data includes some 18 year olds who remain in the under 18 secure estate.
  • data received from HMYOI Feltham through monthly returns is validated before publication by an annual reconciliation process;
  • these figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems, which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing and can be subject to change over time.
2 May 2018, 2:55 p.m. UK Trade with EU Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether he has modelled the effect on the UK economy of the Government's planned trading partnership with the EU.

Answer (John Glen)

The Government is undertaking a wide range of analysis and preparatory work to support our EU exit negotiations and preparations. However, it is not standard practice to provide an ongoing commentary on internal analysis.

Ministers have a specific responsibility, which Parliament has endorsed, not to release information that would undermine our negotiating position.

We have committed to providing Parliament with appropriate analysis ahead of the final vote on the deal. That will be the right time to present the work. It will allow Parliament to scrutinise an appropriate analysis of the options, based on the most accurate assessment we can make.

2 May 2018, 11:02 a.m. Equal pay: Feltham and Heston Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, how many companies in the Feltham and Heston constituency employ over 250 employees; and of those companies (a) what the average gender pay gap is and (b) how many failed to report their gender pay gap statistics by the 4 April 2018 deadline.

Answer (Victoria Atkins)

Under new regulations, large employers were required to publish gender pay gap data by the deadlines of 30 March for the public sector, and 4 April for the private and voluntary sector.

All of the data published by organisations for the first year of gender pay gap reporting is available on the government reporting website:

https://gender-pay-gap.service.gov.uk/

The data can be filtered by postcode, however, organisations are identified by the address they are registered at according to their Companies House record. As a result, there may be companies that employ more than 250 people in the constituency, but are registered at another address.

The Office for National Statistics publishes gender pay gaps by home parliamentary constituency. The median gap for Feltham and Heston is 16.1%.

20 Apr 2018, 10:57 a.m. Heathrow Airport: Southern Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the potential effect on regeneration of the proposal for Southern Rail access to Heathrow.

Answer (Joseph Johnson)

New connectivity to Heathrow Airport from the south could provide a real boost to the economy, creating new journey opportunities and encouraging modal shift. As part of the national ‘Call for Ideas’ for Market Led Proposals (announced 20 March), registrations of interest that support Government’s aspiration for a Southern Rail Link were welcomed. This will inform the further work required before any decisions on whether to and, if so, how this scheme will be progressed and funded.

20 Apr 2018, 10:52 a.m. Heathrow Airport: Railways Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether he plans to undertake a Stage 3 GRIP analysis to establish the options for new rail capacity south of Heathrow.

Answer (Joseph Johnson)

The Government recently published the Rail Network Enhancements Pipeline (RNEP) which provides a clear framework for how we will continue to enhance our railway. This sets out a rolling programme of investment with clear options and decision points for railway enhancements as they develop.

Options for new rail capacity south of Heathrow will be taken forward in accordance with the RNEP approach. This does not directly align with the Governance for Railway Investment Projects (GRIP) stages used by Network Rail, although investment decisions may be supported by, or use elements of GRIP stages.

20 Apr 2018, 10:49 a.m. Diesel Vehicles: Sales Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will introduce a ban on the sale of new diesel vehicles in 2030.

Answer (Jesse Norman)

The Government’s ambition is for almost every car and van to be zero emission by 2050. In order to achieve this, we have said we will end the sale of new conventional petrol and diesel cars and vans by 2040. The UK was the first major economy in the world to set out such a challenging ambition for new vehicle sales.

Our ambition is supported by one of the most comprehensive packages of support in the world for ultra low emission vehicles, which is why we have one of the biggest markets for these vehicles in Europe. Meeting the 2040 commitment should be industry-led, with Government monitoring developments closely, and we will consider intervening if not enough progress is being made.

18 Apr 2018, 1:55 p.m. Electric Vehicles: Tax Allowances Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of introducing tax incentives to support the take-up of electric vehicles.

Answer (Robert Jenrick)

The government uses the tax system to encourage the purchase of cars with low carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. The Vehicle Excise Duty (VED) system works in a technology-neutral manner to encourage uptake of fuel efficient, low CO2 emitting models irrespective of whether they are fuelled by petrol, diesel or battery power. This means the very cleanest zero-emission cars – that also produce no air quality pollutants – pay nothing in the first year of registration.

HM Treasury keeps transport taxes under review, as it does with all taxes, and if the Chancellor decides to make changes, he will announce them at fiscal events.

16 Apr 2018, 3:19 p.m. Theatre: Pupils Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what information his Department holds on the number and proportion of school children in England under the age of 16 who have been to the theatre in the twelve months.

Answer (Michael Ellis)

The Department for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport publishes the Taking Part Survey every year which provides reliable national estimates of engagement with the arts, heritage, museums and libraries.

The latest Taking Part: Annual Child Report (2016/17) survey shows that 27.5% of 5-10 year olds engaged with the theatre and drama activities, while 63.5% of 11-15 year olds engaged.

16 Apr 2018, 1:23 p.m. Child Arrangement Orders Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many parents wait (a) less than one month, (b) more than one month and (c) more than three months to see their children at a child contact centre.

Answer (Dr Phillip Lee)

The Government does not hold such information because we do not operate any central referral system for child contact sessions.

16 Apr 2018, 9:22 a.m. Deportation Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment her Department has made of the potential (a) merits and (b) savings to the public purse of alternatives to the use of detention in monitoring people facing removal from the UK.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

The Home Office uses a number of tools to ensure that the vast majority of individuals who are liable to removal from the UK are managed in the community. These include reporting mechanisms, a new simplified immigration bail, and electronic monitoring for some foreign national offenders.

We regularly review our practices, taking account of external research into alternatives to detention. Following a recent meeting between officials and representatives of the UNHCR and from Canada and Sweden, to discuss best practice, opportunities for further work are being explored with a range of faith and community groups and other non-governmental organisations. The merits and associated costs will be an integral part of this ongoing work.

28 Mar 2018, 4:35 p.m. Child Contact Centres Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what funding his Department has allocated to support the establishment and operation of child contact centres in England in each of the last five years.

Answer (Lucy Frazer)

The Government has no overall responsibility for funding child contact centre provision. However, the Children and Family Court Advisory and Support Service (Cafcass) procures contact sessions at supervised child contact centres for families involved in family proceedings. The level of funding is dependent on demand but has remained broadly stable since 2014/15. Cafcass also provides small value grants of up to £3,000 per annum to assist child contact centres run by the voluntary sector (supported centres), where such organisations seek financial assistance. The value of these grants decreased in 2013/14 due to additional top-up funding for these centres provided in 2012/13 before increasing in 2014/15. Funding since 2015/16 has remained broadly stable.

The Ministry of Justice, and previously the Department for Education, has provided core grant funding to the National Association of Child Contact Centres (NACCC) to help it set standards and run an accreditation scheme for child contact centres in England, supported by training. The value of this grant has increased in each of the last three years.

Funding for the financial years 2013/14 to 2017/18 are shown in the table below. Unit cost efficiencies, changes in demand volume and changes to the ways suppliers are paid mean that figures are not directly comparable across all financial years.

Core grant funding of child contact centres: financial years 2013/14 to 2017/18

2013/14 £

2014/15 £

2015/16 £

2016/17 £

2017/18 (provisional) £

Supervised child contact centres

2,443,305

1,579,351

1,368,605

1,546,065

1,599,074

Supported child contact centres

160,585

385,544

446,223

447,787

434,800

NACCC core grant

128,6051

128.9581

130,0002

170,000

192,000

Notes: 1 Department for Education. 2 Transitional year with a grant of £65,000 each from Ministry of Justice and Department for Education.

27 Mar 2018, 4:12 p.m. Hospitals Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of the number (a) hospitals in each region and (b) the number of hospitals in each region which have hospital-based independent domestic violence advisors.

Answer (Jackie Doyle-Price)

The Department does not hold data centrally on the number of hospitals by region.

Independent Domestic Violence advisers (IDVAs) support the safety of victims and survivors of domestic violence at high risk of harm to secure their safety and the safety of their children. Data on IDVA services is collected by the charity SafeLives. In 2017, the percentage of IDVA services based in health settings was 15%. This data is from SafeLives’ 2017 Survey of domestic abuse practitioners in England and Wales, available from:

http://safelives.org.uk/sites/default/files/resources/SafeLives%202017%20survey%20of%20domestic%20abuse%20practitioners-web_0.pdf

Data is not available on the number of IDVAs based in hospital settings regionally.

26 Mar 2018, 4:46 p.m. Teachers: Vacancies Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate he has made of the number of teacher vacancies in (a) maths, (b) music and (c) science in secondary schools in each English region.

Answer (Nick Gibb)

The following table provides the number of full-time classroom teacher vacancies and temporarily filled posts[1] for maths, music and science subjects in state funded secondary schools in each region in England, as at November 2016. November 2017 figures will be available in the summer.

Maths

Music

Science

North East

10

-

10

North West

40

-

30

Yorkshire and the Humber

30

-

30

East Midlands

30

-

30

West Midlands

30

-

50

East of England

40

-

50

Inner London

20

-

30

Outer London

30

-

60

South East

40

-

70

South West

10

-

20

Total England

280

20

380

Source: School Workforce Census

Figures have been rounded to nearest 10.

’-‘ nil or negligible.

[1] Includes advertised vacancies for full-time permanent appointments (or appointments of at least one term’s duration) plus vacancies filled on a temporary basis by a teacher on a contract of less than one year.

26 Mar 2018, 4:25 p.m. Pupils: Mental Health Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to support mindfulness for pupils in (a) primary schools and (b) secondary schools in England.

Answer (Nadhim Zahawi)

We believe that it is for schools to decide what pastoral support to offer their pupils as they know them best. The department carried out a survey of school mental health provision (https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/supporting-mental-health-in-schools-and-colleges) which found that 73% of schools offer sessions covering topics such as coping skills, problem-solving or mindfulness.

The survey also indicated that schools need more information about evidence-based approaches to supporting mental wellbeing that work in a school setting. In January 2017, my Rt hon. Friend, the Prime Minister announced a programme of randomised control trials of school-based interventions to support children and young people’s mental health and wellbeing.

One of the trials, which commenced in August 2017, will involve approaches to promoting wellbeing in primary and secondary schools, including exercises, routines, and mindfulness. We will consider how best to provide schools with the outcomes of these projects and a range of other piloting and trial activity.

26 Mar 2018, 3:43 p.m. Education Welfare Officers Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what support the Government is providing for welfare officers in schools.

Answer (Nick Gibb)

Education Welfare Officers (or School Attendance Officers) are employed by local authorities or schools. The local authority or school will prescribe the responsibilities of the role. Any support required for the individual to fulfil that role will be provided by the school or local authority.

23 Mar 2018, 10:54 a.m. Community Policing: Hounslow Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate she has made of the number of community response police in Hounslow in each of the last five years.

Answer (Mr Nick Hurd)

The Home Office does not hold centrally the information requested.

The Home Office collects and publishes data annually on the number of police officers and Police Community Support Officers (PCSOs), including the primary role that these officers perform, by police force area. Data are not available at the borough level.

The latest data available on the number of police officers and PCSOs in the Metropolitan Police Service, and their primary role, as at 31 March 2017 can be found in the Tables F1 and F3 of the police workforce statistics published in July 2017: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/629865/police-workforce-tabs-jul17.ods

Data as at 31 March 2015 and 31 March 2016 can be found in the Tables F4 (for police officers) and Tables F3 and F6 (for PCSOs) of the police workforce statistics published in July 2016: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/544954/police-workforce-tabs-jul16.ods

Previous data were collected under a different framework, with different definitions, and are therefore not directly comparable with data as at 31 March 2015 or 2016. Data have been published since 2012, and can be found in the supplementary data tables of the relevant police workforce publications via the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/police-workforce-england-and-wales

Officers and PCSOs with multiple responsibilities or designations are recorded under their primary function. The data do not therefore provide a complete picture of all officers assigned to neighbourhood policing functions.

Some forces are not able to make a clear distinction between ‘Neighbourhood Policing’ roles and ‘Incident (Response) Management’ roles, therefore those forces record the majority of, or all, employees under just one function. A more reliable measure is the number of officers employed in ‘Local policing’ roles, which includes both neighbourhood and response functions.

Any comparisons at force level should be made with care due to collaboration arrangements between forces for particular functions. Additionally, police functions data are often affected by re-structuring within police forces. Therefore comparisons over time for specific functions should be made with care.

Decisions on the size and composition of the police workforce are operational matters for Chief Officers working with their Police and Crime Commissioners and taking into account local priorities.

21 Mar 2018, 3:19 p.m. Universal Credit: Feltham and Heston Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what information her Department holds on the number of people in Feltham and Heston constituency transferred onto universal credit who are in rent arrears.

Answer (Alok Sharma)

The information requested is not currently available.

In our published research available at https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/481865/universal-credit-extended-gateway-evaluation.pdf, the proportion of Universal Credit claimants who were in arrears at the start of their claim fell by a third after four months. To note, the relevant section is Page 33, Table 3.5. This report is from 2015.

Additionally, research carried out by the National Federation of ALMOs shows over three quarters of their tenants come onto Universal Credit with pre-existing rent arrears. This research can be accessed at http://www.almos.org.uk/include/getDoc.php?did=7944&fid=9326. To note, the relevant section is page 10, section 3.

We are currently carrying out further analysis of this issue with a number of housing providers, to investigate and understand the true level of rent arrears for their tenants, what is causing them and any impacts Universal Credit may be having. It will be published when completed.

21 Mar 2018, 3:10 p.m. Children: Poverty Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps her Department is taking to help end child poverty.

Answer (Kit Malthouse)

This Government is committed to action that improves long-term outcomes for children and families by focusing on tackling the root causes of poverty and disadvantage. This is why we introduced statutory measures to drive action on parental worklessness and children’s educational attainment – the areas that can make the biggest difference.

Improving Lives: Helping Workless Families, published in April 2017 set out the framework for a continued focus on improving outcomes for disadvantaged families and their children both now and in the future. This included an additional seven non-statutory national indicators to track progress over time.

We are also undertaking the most ambitious reform to the welfare system in decades - so that it supports people to find and to stay in work. We believe that work offers families the best opportunity to get out of poverty and become self-reliant. Children living in households where all adults work are five times less likely to be in poverty than those in workless households.

21 Mar 2018, 2:54 p.m. BBC Children in Need Appeal and National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what meetings he has had with (a) NSPCC and (b) Children in Need in the last 12 months.

Answer (Kit Malthouse)

No meetings have taken place in the last 12 months between the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, the NSPCC and Children in Need .

25 Jan 2018, 6:43 p.m. Prisoners: Solitary Confinement Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment his Department has made of the effect on people's mental health of being held in solitary confinement in prison or other penal institutions.

Answer (Dr Phillip Lee)

Segregation is the removal of prisoners from normal association under Prison Rules and in accordance with a process prescribed in policy. Prisoners are segregated for the shortest time necessary to manage and address the reasons for their segregation and whilst segregated must have access to as normal a regime as possible. MoJ is aware of International evidence and learning about the potentially adverse effects on mental health that can result from solitary confinement. Whilst HMPPS does not hold prisoners in solitary confinement, this learning has been utilised in the development of safeguards in policy to protect the mental health and wellbeing of segregated prisoners. These safeguards include; completion by a doctor or registered nurse of an initial segregation health screen within two hours of a prisoner being segregated, daily visits by a member of healthcare and doctor visits at least every three days. In addition, a prisoner’s segregation must be reviewed at least every 14 days by a multi-disciplinary Segregation Review Board, chaired by an operational manager and with input from Healthcare, Psychology and mental health in-reach teams as necessary.

25 Jan 2018, 6:40 p.m. Prisoners: Solitary Confinement Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what information his Department holds on the number of instances of a person with a diagnosed mental health condition has been held in solitary confinement within the secure estate in the last 12 months.

Answer (Dr Phillip Lee)

Segregation is the removal from normal association under Prison Rules and in accordance with a process prescribed in policy. HMPPS does not hold prisoners in solitary confinement. Prisoners with a mental health condition may be segregated where this is assessed as being the most appropriate course of action. A prisoner whose mental health puts them at risk of self-harm may be segregated in exceptional circumstances only. Segregation policy sets out a range of safeguards to monitor and support the prisoner’s well-being including daily visits by a member of healthcare, visits from a doctor at least every three days and from mental health in-reach teams as necessary. Additional monitoring of the prisoner is determined in accordance with an assessment of individual need and the need for continued segregation is reviewed at least every 14 days. Information about segregated prisoners is held locally and regional offices receive quarterly reports from their prisons that identify any segregated prisoners who may have been segregated contrary to Healthcare advice relating to the prisoners mental health and wellbeing; this will not necessarily include information about prisoners with a diagnosis of a mental health condition where no healthcare objection to segregation was raised.

23 Jan 2018, 5:22 p.m. Prisoners: Solitary Confinement Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what recent assessment his Department has made of the effect on mental health of prisoners of being held in solitary confinement.

Answer (Dr Phillip Lee)

The MoJ has not carried out any independent recent assessment of the effect on mental health of prisoners being held in solitary confinement and does not hold prisoners in solitary confinement. MoJ is aware of International evidence and learning on the subject and has utilised this in development of the policy and process applying to the segregation of prisoners under Prison Rules. This includes a range of safeguards to protect mental health and wellbeing including: completion by a doctor or registered nurse of an initial segregation health screen within two hours of a prisoner being segregated, daily visits by a member of healthcare and doctor visits at least every three days. In addition, a prisoner’s segregation must be reviewed at least every 14 days by a multi disciplinary Segregation Review Board, chaired by an operational manager and with input from Healthcare and psychology and mental health in-reach teams as necessary.

23 Jan 2018, 4:22 p.m. Young Offenders: Solitary Confinement Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what information his Department holds on the number of instances of a people aged 18 or under being held in solitary confinement in the youth secure estate in the last 12 months.

Answer (Dr Phillip Lee)

Young people in the youth secure estate are some of the most vulnerable people in society and their safety and welfare is our highest priority.

We do not use solitary confinement. Young people can be removed from association under careful control where they will not be permitted to associate with other young people.

Any decision to remove a young person from association is subject to regular review and a range of safeguarding measures are in place to ensure appropriate oversight of their care. There are careful limits placed on the length of time for which young people can be removed from association without review of the decision to remove. Young offenders cannot be removed from association as a punishment.

23 Jan 2018, 4:22 p.m. Young Offenders: Solitary Confinement Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what his Department's policy is on the use of solitary confinement within the youth secure estate.

Answer (Dr Phillip Lee)

Young people in the youth secure estate are some of the most vulnerable people in society and their safety and welfare is our highest priority.

We do not use solitary confinement. Young people can be removed from association under careful control where they will not be permitted to associate with other young people.

Any decision to remove a young person from association is subject to regular review and a range of safeguarding measures are in place to ensure appropriate oversight of their care. There are careful limits placed on the length of time for which young people can be removed from association without review of the decision to remove. Young offenders cannot be removed from association as a punishment.

23 Jan 2018, 7:33 a.m. Welfare in Detention of Vulnerable Persons Review Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what progress has been made on implementing the recommendations from the Shaw Review into the Welfare in Detention of Vulnerable Persons, published in January 2016.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

The follow up to the independent review by Stephen Shaw CBE into the welfare in detention of vulnerable persons started on 4 September 2017. As part of this stocktake Mr Shaw will be assessing the implementation of all of his earlier review recommendations.

23 Jan 2018, 7:31 a.m. Immigrants: Detainees Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people aged 18 and under were held in immigration detention centres in each year from 2014 to date.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

Information on the number of minors entering and in detention in the UK from 2014, is available in tables dt_02_q and dt_13_q of the detention tables in the latest release of ‘Immigration Statistics, July to September 2017’, available from the Home Office website at: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/662536/detention-jul-sep-2017-tables.ods. Figures for Q4 2017 will be released on 22 February 2018.

22 Jan 2018, 5:43 p.m. Immigrants: Detainees Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment her Department has made of the effectiveness of safeguards to ensure that (a) vulnerable people diagnosed with a mental health condition and (b) victims of torture are not held in immigration removal centres.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

Detention is an important part of a firm but fair immigration system, helping to ensure that those with no right to remain in the UK are returned to their home country if they will not leave voluntarily. There is an underpinning presumption in immigration policy that a person will not be detained. Immigration detention is used sparingly and for the shortest period necessary.

When a vulnerable individual is considered for immigration detention, that consideration takes place in line with the adults at risk in immigration detention policy. The policy came into force in September 2016 and was part of the Government’s response to Stephen Shaw’s review of the welfare of vulnerable people in immigration detention. Victims of torture and individuals suffering from a mental health condition are amongst the groups of individuals who are protected by this policy.

Each case is decided on its own merits, on the basis of available evidence. Vulnerable individuals are detained only when immigration control factors – removability, public protection and compliance with immigration law – in their particular case outweigh the evidence of their vulnerability.

All detention decisions are subject to review by the Home Office Detention Gatekeeper, which is an internally independent function.

It is not possible for an individual to be detained having been assessed as unsuitable for detention by the Detention Gatekeeper, whether it be on grounds of mental health, as a victims of torture or a victim of modern slavery.

The Government considers that the adults at risk policy is an effective safeguard against the inappropriate detention of vulnerable people.

Once detained the Home Office has additional safeguards in place to ensure that vulnerable people do not remain in detention longer than is necessary or appropriate. Since February 2017 Case Progression Panels have been internally reviewing cases every three months to ensure case progression towards return.

From the 15 January 2018, the Secretary of State has a duty to refer individuals to the independent Immigration and Asylum Tribunal for consideration of bail four months from the point of detention of the last Tribunal consideration of bail and every four months thereafter. This duty does not extend to individuals detained for deportation or on national security grounds.

The follow up to the independent review by Stephen Shaw CBE into the welfare in detention of vulnerable persons started on 4 September 2017. As part of this stocktake Mr Shaw will be assessing the implementation of all of his earlier review recommendations.

22 Jan 2018, 5:42 p.m. Immigrants: Detainees Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent discussions she has had on introducing a clear limit on the length of time people can be held in immigration removal centres; and if she will make a statement.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

The Government has no plans to introduce a fixed time limit on immigration detention as this would only encourage detainees to refuse to cooperate with immigration and asylum processes until they reached the point at which they had to be released from detention and thus avoid their enforced removal from the UK. Published Home Office policy is clear, however, that detention is only used for the shortest period necessary, during which time any health and welfare needs detained persons may have are met through the provision of appropriate services

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/offender-management

22 Jan 2018, 5:42 p.m. Immigrants: Detainees Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment her Department has made of the effect of indefinite detention in an immigration detention removal centre on the health and wellbeing of such detainees.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

The Government has no plans to introduce a fixed time limit on immigration detention as this would only encourage detainees to refuse to cooperate with immigration and asylum processes until they reached the point at which they had to be released from detention and thus avoid their enforced removal from the UK. Published Home Office policy is clear, however, that detention is only used for the shortest period necessary, during which time any health and welfare needs detained persons may have are met through the provision of appropriate services

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/offender-management

12 Jan 2018, 1:30 p.m. Aviation: South East Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what the timetable is the publication of proposed flight paths for a new runway in the South East.

Answer (Ms Nusrat Ghani)

It is for Heathrow Airport Limited to determine the timing for publishing proposed new flightpaths for formal consultation while following the steps required by the Civil Aviation Authority’s airspace change process.

Heathrow Airport Limited have recently announced plans to hold a public consultation on the expansion of the airport, including on principles for airspace design, and this will run from 17 January to 28 March 2018.

21 Dec 2017, 1:57 p.m. Prime Minister: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what estimate he has made of the (a) number of officials to be employed by 10 Downing Street and (b) that office's payroll in (i) 2018, (ii) 2019, (iii) 2020, (iv) 2021 and (v) 2022 as a result of the UK leaving EU.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

I refer the hon. Member to the reply given to the hon. Member for Tottenham on 24th October 2017, Official Report, C.106568.

14 Dec 2017, 3:03 p.m. Attorney General: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Attorney General, what estimate he has made of the (a) number of officials to be employed by his Department and (b) his Department's payroll in (i) 2018, (ii) 2019, (iii) 2020, (iv) 2021 and (v) 2022 as a result of the UK leaving EU.

Answer (Jeremy Wright)

Exit is an all-of-government operation. The Department for Exiting the European Union is doing detailed work with departments to prepare for the upcoming negotiations by understanding the risks and opportunities of leaving the EU and coordinating planning.

Members of staff across the Law Officers’ Departments provide advice and analysis on EU Exit issues as required. Given the interactions between EU exit work and the Departments’ other priorities, it would not be possible to give an accurate figure.

8 Dec 2017, 12:17 p.m. Ministry of Defence: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what estimate he has made of the (a) number of officials to be employed by his Department and (b) his Department's payroll in (i) 2018, (ii) 2019, (iii) 2020, (iv) 2021 and (v) 2022 as a result of the UK leaving EU.

Answer (Mr Tobias Ellwood)

The Ministry of Defence has a small team who have been appointed to deal with Defence issues relating to the UK's decision to leave the EU. This team draws on a wide range of colleagues from across the Ministry of Defence (MOD) who support EU exit related work, in addition to their normal duties.

Given the interactions between EU exit work and the MOD's other priorities, it would not be possible to give an accurate future estimate.

7 Dec 2017, 5:58 p.m. Department for Communities and Local Government: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what estimate he has made of the (a) number of officials to be employed by his Department and (b) his Department's payroll in (i) 2018, (ii) 2019, (iii) 2020, (iv) 2021 and (v) 2022 as a result of the UK leaving EU.

Answer (Mr Marcus Jones)

Exit is an all-of-government operation. The Department for Exiting the European Union is doing detailed work with departments to prepare for the upcoming negotiations by understanding the risks and opportunities of leaving the EU and coordinating planning.

Staff within the EU exit team lead on providing advice to Ministers on EU Exit and exit-related issues. Members of staff across the Department also provide advice and analysis on EU Exit issues as required. Given the interactions between EU exit work and the Department’s other priorities, it would not be possible to give an accurate figure.

7 Dec 2017, 5:44 p.m. Government Equalities Office: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what estimate she has made of the (a) number of officials to be employed by her Department and (b) her Department's payroll in (i) 2018, (ii) 2019, (iii) 2020, (iv) 2021 and (v) 2022 as a result of the UK leaving EU.

Answer (Mr Robert Goodwill)

Exit is an all-of-government operation. The Department for Exiting the European Union is doing detailed work with departments to understand the risks and opportunities of leaving the EU and to coordinate planning. A team within the Government Equalities Office (GEO) leads on providing advice to ministers on EU Exit and exit-related issues. Members of GEO staff provide advice and analysis on EU Exit issues across a range of policy areas affecting women and equalities, as required.

Given the interactions between EU exit work and GEO’s other priorities, it is not possible to give an accurate figure specifically for work on EU exit.

7 Dec 2017, 5:32 p.m. Department for Education: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate she has made of the (a) number of officials to be employed by her Department and (b) her Department's payroll in (i) 2018, (ii) 2019, (iii) 2020, (iv) 2021 and (v) 2022 as a result of the UK leaving EU.

Answer (Mr Robert Goodwill)

Exit is an all-of-government operation. The Department for Exiting the European Union is doing detailed work with departments to understand the risks and opportunities of leaving the EU and to coordinate planning. A team within the International Education Division leads on providing advice to ministers on EU Exit and exit-related issues. Members of staff across the Department for Education (DfE) provide advice and analysis on EU Exit issues across a range of DfE policy areas as required.

Given the interactions between EU exit work and the department’s other priorities, it is not possible to give an accurate figure specifically for work on EU exit.

7 Dec 2017, 5:08 p.m. Foreign and Commonwealth Office: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what estimate he has made of the (a) number of officials to be employed by his Department and (b) his Department's payroll in (i) 2018, (ii) 2019, (iii) 2020, (iv) 2021 and (v) 2022 as a result of the UK leaving EU.

Answer (Sir Alan Duncan)

The Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) keeps its staff numbers under regular review in response to Ministerial priorities. Furthermore, the FCO works closely with the Department for Exiting the European Union and other Government Departments to prepare for EU Exit. Staff within the FCO's Europe Directorate lead on providing advice to Ministers on EU Exit and exit-related issues. However, staff across the Department leading on other issues also provide advice and analysis as required. It is therefore not possible to give an accurate figure for the number of officials working on issues related to the UK leaving the EU, given the interactions between EU Exit work and the FCO's other priorities.

7 Dec 2017, 4:50 p.m. Department for Exiting the European Union: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, what estimate he has made of the (a) number of officials to be employed by his Department and (b) his Department's payroll in (i) 2018, (ii) 2019, (iii) 2020, (iv) 2021 and (v) 2022 as a result of the UK leaving EU.

Answer (Mr Steve Baker)

All departments are equipping themselves with the resources they need to get the best deal for the UK. The Department for Exiting the European Union now has over 600 staff based in the UK plus the expertise of over 120 officials in Brussels. We regularly review headcount to ensure that we are appropriately staffed to deal with all aspects of the negotiations.

The Department is responsible for overseeing EU exit negotiations, as well as establishing the future relationship between the UK and EU. As such, all staff in the Department are dedicated to planning or supporting our work on EU exit.

7 Dec 2017, 3:55 p.m. Department for Work and Pensions: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what estimate he has made of the (a) number of officials to be employed by his Department and (b) his Department's payroll in (i) 2018, (ii) 2019, (iii) 2020, (iv) 2021 and (v) 2022 as a result of the UK leaving EU.

Answer (Caroline Dinenage)

The Department for Exiting the European Union is doing detailed work with departments to prepare for the upcoming negotiations by understanding the risks and opportunities of leaving the EU and coordinating planning. Staff within the EU and International Affairs Division lead on providing advice to Ministers on EU Exit and exit-related issues. Members of staff across the Department also provide advice and analysis on EU Exit issues as required. Given the interactions between EU exit work and the Department’s other priorities, it would not be possible to give an accurate figure for the information you have requested.

7 Dec 2017, 3:40 p.m. Treasury: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the (a) number of officials to be employed by his Department and (b) his Department's payroll in (i) 2018, (ii) 2019, (iii) 2020, (iv) 2021 and (v) 2022 as a result of the UK leaving EU.

Answer (Andrew Jones)

A significant proportion of the Treasury’s work is in some way related to exiting the European Union and this fluctuates over time as it interacts with Treasury’s other priorities.

Many staff will work both on EU Exit and other priorities so it is not possible to accurately estimate the number of Treasury officials who will be engaged on EU Exit work at any one time.

7 Dec 2017, 3:29 p.m. Department for Transport: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what estimate he has made of the (a) number of officials to be employed by his Department and (b) his Department's payroll in (i) 2018, (ii) 2019, (iii) 2020, (iv) 2021 and (v) 2022 as a result of the UK leaving EU.

Answer (Sir John Hayes)

Exit is an all-of-government operation. The Department for Exiting the European Union is doing detailed work with departments to prepare for the upcoming negotiations by understanding the risks and opportunities of leaving the EU and coordinating planning. Staff within the Department for Transport’s International and Regulatory Directorate lead on providing advice to Ministers on EU Exit and exit-related issues. Members of staff across the Department for Transport also provide advice and analysis on EU Exit issues as required. Given the interactions between EU exit work and the Department’s other priorities, it would not be possible to give an accurate figure.

7 Dec 2017, 2:27 p.m. Department for International Trade: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what estimate he has made of the (a) number of officials to be employed by his Department and (b) his Department's payroll in (i) 2018, (ii) 2019, (iii) 2020, (iv) 2021 and (v) 2022 as a result of the UK leaving EU.

Answer (Greg Hands)

Leaving the European Union is an all-of-government operation. The Department for Exiting the European Union is doing detailed work with departments to prepare for the upcoming negotiations by understanding the risks and opportunities of leaving the EU and coordinating planning.

The Department for International Trade was established to secure UK and global prosperity by promoting and financing international trade and investment and championing free trade.

Given the interactions between EU exit work and the Department’s other priorities, it would not be possible to give a specific figure.

7 Dec 2017, 2:26 p.m. Department of Health: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what estimate he has made of the (a) number of officials to be employed by his Department and (b) his Department's payroll in (i) 2018, (ii) 2019, (iii) 2020, (iv) 2021 and (v) 2022 as a result of the UK leaving EU.

Answer (Philip Dunne)

Leaving the European Union is an all-of-Government operation. The Department for Exiting the European Union is doing detailed work with departments to prepare for the upcoming negotiations by understanding the risks and opportunities of leaving the EU and coordinating planning.

Staff within the Global and Public Health Directorate of this Department lead on providing advice to Ministers on EU Exit and exit-related issues.

Members of staff across the Department also provide advice and analysis on EU Exit issues as required.

Given the interactions between EU exit work and the Department’s other priorities, it would not be possible to give an accurate figure.

7 Dec 2017, 11:12 a.m. Cabinet Office: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what estimate he has made of the (a) number of officials to be employed by his Department and (b) his Department's payroll in (i) 2018, (ii) 2019, (iii) 2020, (iv) 2021 and (v) 2022 as a result of the UK leaving EU.

Answer (Caroline Nokes)

I refer the hon. Member to the reply given to the hon. Member for Tottenham on 24th October 2017, Official Report, C.106568.

7 Dec 2017, 10:34 a.m. Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what estimate she has made of the (a) number of officials to be employed by her Department and (b) her Department's payroll in (i) 2018, (ii) 2019, (iii) 2020, (iv) 2021 and (v) 2022 as a result of the UK leaving EU.

Answer (Matt Hancock)

The whole of Government is preparing for the UK to make an orderly and successful exit from the European union. Exit is an all-of-government operation. The Department for Exiting the European Union is doing detailed work with departments to prepare for the upcoming negotiations by understanding the risks and opportunities of leaving the EU and coordinating planning. Staff within the DCMS EU Team lead on providing advice to Ministers on EU Exit and exit-related issues. Members of staff across the Department also provide advice and analyses on EU Exit issues as required. Given the interactions between EU exit work and the Department's other priorities, it would not be possible to give an accurate figure.

6 Dec 2017, 12:46 p.m. Ministry of Justice: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what estimate he has made of the (a) number of officials to be employed by his Department and (b) his Department's payroll in (i) 2018, (ii) 2019, (iii) 2020, (iv) 2021 and (v) 2022 as a result of the UK leaving EU.

Answer (Dominic Raab)

As with all government departments, members of staff across the MoJ provide advice and analysis on EU Exit issues as required. Given the interactions between EU Exit work and the MoJ’s other priorities, it is not possible to provide an estimate of the number of officials to be employed for these financial years

6 Dec 2017, 12:22 p.m. Department for International Development Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what estimate she has made of the (a) number of officials to be employed by her Department and (b) her Department's payroll in (i) 2018, (ii) 2019, (iii) 2020, (iv) 2021 and (v) 2022 as a result of the UK leaving EU.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

EU Exit is an all-of-government operation. The Department for International Development is doing detailed work with departments to prepare for the upcoming negotiations by understanding the risks and opportunities of leaving the EU and coordinating planning.

Staff within the Europe and Trade for Development teams lead on providing advice to Ministers on EU Exit and exit-related issues. Members of staff across the Department also provide advice and analysis on EU Exit issues as required.

Given the interactions between EU exit work and the Department’s other priorities, it would not be possible to give an accurate figure.

6 Dec 2017, 11:58 a.m. Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what estimate he has made of the (a) number of officials to be employed by his Department and (b) his Department's payroll in (i) 2018, (ii) 2019, (iii) 2020, (iv) 2021 and (v) 2022 as a result of the UK leaving EU.

Answer (George Eustice)

Over 80% of Defra’s agenda is affected by the UK’s departure from the European Union. We continue to keep our resourcing plans under review, focusing both on recruitment and increasing the capability of new and existing staff.

Since June 2016, Defra has recruited over 550 additional staff to support our preparations for leaving the EU. The majority of these new staff are employed in the central department where they are working on a range of projects identified to enable a successful withdrawal from the EU.

5 Dec 2017, 5:44 p.m. Northern Ireland Office: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, what estimate he has made of the (a) number of officials to be employed by his Department and (b) his Department's payroll in (i) 2018, (ii) 2019, (iii) 2020, (iv) 2021 and (v) 2022 as a result of the UK leaving EU.

Answer (Chloe Smith)

EU exit affects a number of work areas across my Department and will therefore encompass a proportion of workload for many staff, the amount of which will vary over time.

The number of officials employed by my department is kept under regular review to ensure we have the appropriate resources to manage the departure from the EU.

Given the interactions between EU exit work and the Department’s other priorities, it would not be possible to give a year by year figure.

5 Dec 2017, 11:22 a.m. Wales Office: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Wales, what estimate he has made of the (a) number of officials to be employed by his Department and (b) his Department's payroll in (i) 2018, (ii) 2019, (iii) 2020, (iv) 2021 and (v) 2022 as a result of the UK leaving EU.

Answer (Guto Bebb)

EU Exit is an all-of-government operation. The Department for Exiting the European Union is doing detailed work with departments to prepare for the upcoming negotiations by understanding the risks and opportunities of leaving the EU and coordinating planning.

Staff in the Office’s constitution and policy teams lead on providing advice to Ministers on EU Exit and exit-related issues. Members of staff across the department also provide advice and analysis on EU Exit issues as required.

Given the interactions between EU exit work and the Office’s other priorities, it would not be possible to give an accurate figure.

5 Dec 2017, 11:11 a.m. Scotland Office: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland, what estimate he has made of the (a) number of officials to be employed by his Department and (b) his Department's payroll in (i) 2018, (ii) 2019, (iii) 2020, (iv) 2021 and (v) 2022 as a result of the UK leaving EU.

Answer (David Mundell)

Exiting the European Union is an all-of-government operation for which the Department for Exiting the European Union is doing detailed work with departments to prepare for the upcoming negotiations by understanding the risks and opportunities of leaving the EU and coordinating planning.

Members of staff across the Department provide advice and analysis on EU Exit issues as required. Given the interactions between EU exit work and the Department’s other priorities, it would not be possible to give an accurate figure.

4 Dec 2017, 5:42 p.m. Home Office: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate she has made of the (a) number of officials to be employed by her Department and (b) her Department's payroll in (i) 2018, (ii) 2019, (iii) 2020, (iv) 2021 and (v) 2022 as a result of the UK leaving EU.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

The Home Office constantly monitors the capabilities it needs to deliver the Government’s agenda. With EU exit negotiations underway, we continue to assess how this, alongside our other priorities, will impact on the workforce and capabilities required. Any resulting changes to resource requirements will be factored into strategic planning.

4 Dec 2017, 2:56 p.m. Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the (a) number of officials to be employed by his Department and (b) his Department's payroll in (i) 2018, (ii) 2019, (iii) 2020, (iv) 2021 and (v) 2022 as a result of the UK leaving EU.

Answer (Margot James)

Teams across the Department are working on delivering a successful EU exit. We have estimated an additional 450 staff requirement for officials over 2017-18 and are reviewing future resource needs.

30 Nov 2017, 1:28 p.m. Airports Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the potential effect on the 10 largest airports in the UK by passenger volume of there being no deal between the UK and the EU.

Answer (Sir John Hayes)

The Government is considering carefully all the potential implications arising from the UK’s exit from the EU, and plans to negotiate the best possible relationship between the UK and EU in the field of aviation. This includes the implications for airports and passengers.

We will continue to work closely with the international aviation community to ensure that this global industry continues to be a major success story for the UK economy.

We do not want or expect a no deal outcome, but we have a duty to plan for the alternative. Both the EU and the UK have a common interest in getting the best outcome.

28 Nov 2017, 2:37 p.m. Agricultural Products: Exports Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the potential effect on agricultural exports of there being no deal between the UK and the EU.

Answer (George Eustice)

In 2016, UK food, feed and drink exports to the EU were worth £12 billion and EU food, feed and drink exports to the UK were worth £30 billion. It is in the interests of both parties to conclude a comprehensive customs agreement. We are conducting rigorous analysis on various trade scenarios for the future to inform Government policy.

27 Nov 2017, 4:46 p.m. Drugs: Manufacturing Industries Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment he has made of the potential effect on the pharmaceutical industry of there being no deal between the UK and the EU.

Answer (Steve Brine)

We are confident that a future partnership between the United Kingdom and European Union, and one that minimising disruption for patients and business, is in the interests of both sides, so we approach these negotiations anticipating success.

However, since June 2016, every Government department has been working at pace to build a detailed understanding of how withdrawing from the EU will affect its existing policies and services in a wide range of outcomes. This will ensure that we are prepared both for a negotiated settlement but also for the unlikely scenario in which no mutually satisfactory agreement can be reached.

The Government is engaging with businesses across the economy in order to understand the challenges and opportunities that may impact them in the coming months and years. We understand the need to reduce uncertainty wherever we can, and are working to get the right deal for industry and ensure the UK remains the best possible place to do business. As part of this dialogue, we will be working closely to understand how the Government can support businesses in making the transition outside of the European Union.

27 Nov 2017, 2:16 p.m. Motor Vehicles: Manufacturing Industries Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of there being no deal between the UK and the EU on car manufacturing in the UK; and if he will make a statement.

Answer (Claire Perry)

The Department works closely with the UK automotive industry to understand the impacts and opportunities of leaving the EU. The UK’s automotive industry is world leading and the Government will continue its longstanding programme of support to maintain the international competitiveness of the industry. We want our deep and special partnership with the EU to include automotive, ensuring trade is as free and frictionless as possible with as little disruption as possible to the industry. The Government is focused on securing the best possible deal for the United Kingdom as we leave the European Union.

27 Nov 2017, 2:15 p.m. Arts Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment she has made of the potential effect on the creative industries of there being no deal between the UK and the EU; and if she will make a statement.

Answer (Matt Hancock)

The Creative Industries are one of the UK’s greatest success stories, contributing over £87 billion to the economy. We have been working closely with the Creative Industries to understand the impacts and opportunities presented by our decision to leave the EU.

Following the referendum in June 2016, DCMS continues to make rigorous preparations for a range of possible outcomes from the UK's negotiations with the EU.

24 Nov 2017, 9:41 a.m. Bank Services Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the number of adults without a bank account in each region of the UK; and if he will make a statement.

Answer (Steve Barclay)

The Treasury has made no such estimate. However, independent estimates, such as those reported in the University of Birmingham’s Financial Inclusion Annual Monitoring Report 2017, indicate that approximately 1.52 million adults in the UK do not have access to a bank account in their own name.

The Government is committed to improving access to financial services. Access to a transactional bank account is key to enabling people to manage their money on a day-to-day basis effectively, securely and confidently.

Since September 2016, the nine largest personal current account providers in the UK are legally required to offer basic bank accounts to customers who do not have a bank account or who are ineligible for a bank’s standard current account.

21 Nov 2017, 5:33 p.m. Domestic Abuse Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate she has made of the number of domestic violence related incidents that were (a) reported to the police, (b) detected and (c) prosecuted in each (i) London Borough and (ii) region or nation of the UK in each of the three full years for which figures are available.

Answer (Mr Nick Hurd)

The Office for National Statistics publishes a cross-governmental report on domestic abuse statistics in England and Wales. This report includes the number of domestic abuse incidents and crimes recorded by the police by police force area level. Data are not available at the London Borough level or for nations other than England and Wales.

The first of these publications, ‘Domestic abuse in England and Wales’ year ending March 2016’, was published in December 2016 and can be found here:

https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/crimeandjustice/bulletins/domesticabuseinenglandandwales/yearendingmarch2016

21 Nov 2017, 1:38 p.m. Personal Independence Payment: Feltham and Heston Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many initially unsuccessful Personal Independent Payment (PIP) claimants from Feltham and Heston are now eligible for PIP under the updated PIP guidelines.

Answer (Sarah Newton)

I refer the Hon. Member to the answer I gave on 13 November 2017 to Question UIN111728.

The department is not able to reliably estimate the number of past disallowances who would benefit from this change. Therefore it is not possible to estimate how many initially unsuccessful claimants from Feltham and Heston are now eligible

17 Nov 2017, 1:31 p.m. Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Prime Minister, when she was shown the summaries of the sectoral analyses collated by the Department for Exiting the European Union; and if she will make a statement.

Answer (Mrs Theresa May)

The Department for Exiting the European Union has produced a range of quantitative and qualitative analysis since the referendum. This analysis is regularly updated and I and Ministers across Government are kept informed.

15 Nov 2017, 5:04 p.m. Visas: Skilled Workers Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what proportion of Tier 2 (General) visa applications made in each month since January 2016 had a decision made on them within three weeks.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

The published quarterly transparency data does not separate out Tier 2 General applications from the wider Tier 2 route. We have therefore provided the published data for all Tier 2 subcategories which includes General, Intra Company Transfers, Minister of Religion and Sportspeople.

Link to the latest published data:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/migration-transparency-data#uk-visas-and-immigration

15 Nov 2017, 5 p.m. Visas: Skilled Workers Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many Tier 2 (General) visa applications her Department has received in each month since January 2016; how many of those applications were (a) applications from outside the UK, (b) extensions within the UK, (c) switches within the UK, (d) extensions within the UK (Premium service) and (e) switches within the UK (Premium service); how much was received in fees to her Department for each of those categories; and what the average waiting time to decision was for each of those categories in each month of that period.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

We are unable to provide all of the specific data requested. In line with published quarterly transparency data we have provided for:

a) The number of Tier 2 applications made out of country

b) and c) The number of Tier 2 and 5 applications made in country

d) and e) The number of Tier 2 and 5 same day premium applications made in country

Link to the latest published data:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/migration-transparency-data#uk-visas-and-immigration

14 Nov 2017, 2:17 p.m. Department for Exiting the European Union: Freedom of Information Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, with reference to his Department's Freedom of information response DEX000585 of 29 September 2017, on sector studies, on which date each of the studies in the initial exercise was completed.

Answer (Mr Robin Walker)

The Department has been carrying out sectoral analysis since the referendum. This has resulted in a wide mix of qualitative and quantitative analysis which is contained in a range of documents developed at different times since the referendum. The analysis examines the nature of activity in the sectors and is constantly evolving and being updated both by our department and in other departments.

14 Nov 2017, 10:34 a.m. Cabinet Office: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether his Department was consulted by the Department for Exiting the European Union on the economic impact assessments conducted for the UK leaving the EU.

Answer (Damian Green)

The Government is carrying out an ongoing programme of comprehensive analytical work that will inform our negotiating position with the EU, to define our deep and special partnership with the EU and inform our understanding of how EU exit will affect the UK’s domestic policies and frameworks


Cabinet Office is working with officials across government, in close coordination with the Department for Exiting the European Union, to ensure the delivery of a holistic programme of analysis across government.

7 Nov 2017, 5:46 p.m. Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether his Department was consulted by the Department for Exiting the European Union on the economic impact assessments conducted for the UK leaving the EU.

Answer (George Eustice)

The Government is carrying out an ongoing programme of comprehensive analytical work that will inform our negotiating position with the EU, to define our deep and special partnership with the EU and inform our understanding of how EU exit will affect the UK’s domestic policies and frameworks


Defra is working with officials across government, in close coordination with the Department for Exiting the European Union, to ensure the delivery of a holistic programme of analysis across government.

7 Nov 2017, 4:16 p.m. Home Office: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether her Department was consulted by the Department for Exiting the European Union on the economic impact assessments conducted for the UK leaving the EU.

Answer (Brandon Lewis)

The Government is carrying out an ongoing programme of comprehensive analytical work that will inform our negotiating position with the EU, to define our deep and special partnership with the EU and inform our understanding of how EU exit will affect the UK’s domestic policies and frameworks.

My Department is working with officials across government, in close coordination with the Department for Exiting the European Union, to ensure the delivery of a holistic programme of analysis across government.

6 Nov 2017, 11:38 a.m. Leader of the House of Commons: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Leader of the House, whether her Office was consulted by the Department for Exiting the European Union on the economic impact assessments conducted for the UK leaving the EU.

Answer (Andrea Leadsom)

The Government is carrying out an ongoing programme of comprehensive analytical work that will inform our negotiating position with the EU, to define our deep and special partnership with the EU and inform our understanding of how EU exit will affect the UK's domestic policies and frameworks.

The Office of the Leader of the House of Commons is working with officials across government, in close coordination with the Department for Exiting the European Union, to ensure the delivery of a holistic programme of analysis across government.

3 Nov 2017, 2:50 p.m. Ministry of Justice: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether his Department was consulted by the Department for Exiting the European Union on the economic impact assessments conducted for the UK leaving the EU.

Answer (Dominic Raab)

The Government is carrying out an ongoing programme of comprehensive analytical work that will inform our negotiating position with the EU, to define our deep and special partnership with the EU and inform our understanding of how EU exit will affect the UK’s domestic policies and frameworks.

The Ministry of Justice is working with officials across government, in close coordination with the Department for Exiting the European Union, to ensure the delivery of a holistic programme of analysis across government.

3 Nov 2017, 1:42 p.m. Government Equalities Office: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, whether the Government Equalities Office was consulted by the Department for Exiting the European Union on the economic impact assessments conducted for the UK leaving the EU.

Answer (Mr Robert Goodwill)

The government is carrying out an ongoing programme of comprehensive analytical work that will inform our negotiating position with the EU, to define our deep and special partnership with the EU and inform our understanding of how EU exit will affect the UK’s domestic policies and frameworks.

The Government Equalities Office is working with officials across government, in close coordination with the Department for Exiting the European Union, to ensure the delivery of a holistic programme of analysis across government.

3 Nov 2017, 1:41 p.m. Department for Education: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether her Department was consulted by the Department for Exiting the European Union on the economic impact assessments conducted for the UK leaving the EU.

Answer (Mr Robert Goodwill)

The government is carrying out an ongoing programme of comprehensive analytical work that will inform our negotiating position with the EU, to define our deep and special partnership with the EU and inform our understanding of how EU exit will affect the UK’s domestic policies and frameworks.

The Department for Education is working with officials across government, in close coordination with the Department for Exiting the European Union, to ensure the delivery of a holistic programme of analysis across government.

3 Nov 2017, 1:13 p.m. Department for Transport: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether his Department was consulted by the Department for Exiting the European Union on the economic impact assessments conducted for the UK leaving the EU.

Answer (Jesse Norman)

The Government is carrying out a programme of comprehensive analytical work to inform our negotiating position with the EU; to define the UK’s future relationship with the EU, and inform our understanding of how EU exit will affect the UK’s domestic policies and frameworks. This work is a collaborative effort across government, and any analysis relating to transport has been prepared in full consultation between departments.

2 Nov 2017, 5 p.m. Young Offenders: Speech and Language Disorders Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what estimate he has made of how many and what proportion of young offenders in young offenders institutes have speech, language and communications difficulties; what proportion of such offenders are receiving support services; and what proportion of those not receiving such support services are in a waiting list to receive them.

Answer (Dr Phillip Lee)

There are high numbers of young people with special educational needs including speech, language and communication needs in youth custody.

Data collected to inform the custody placement decision for young people shows that 32% were recorded as having ‘learning disability or difficulty concerns’ between April 2014 and March 2016.

Both health and education partners fulfil key roles in meeting the needs of young people with speech language and communication needs but we do not collect assessment data centrally.

NHS England screen and assess every child and young person that enters the secure estate using the Comprehensive Health Assessment Tool (CHAT) that assesses any neurodisabilities. Following this assessment individual care plans for all children and young people are put in place.

Education providers are also required to assess the educational needs of young people and their contracts require them to provide support services for young people with special educational needs or disabilities.

We are committed to strengthening health services and special needs support as part of youth justice reforms. Reforms include implementing the NHS-led Secure Stairs project, an integrated framework of care for the Secure Estate for Children and Young People and investing in Enhanced Support Units, smaller units to provide specialist interventions, mental health and psychological support, in under-18 YOIs.

2 Nov 2017, 4:32 p.m. Foreign and Commonwealth Office: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, whether his Department was consulted by the Department for Exiting the European Union on the economic impact assessments conducted for the UK leaving the EU.

Answer (Sir Alan Duncan)

The Foreign and Commonwealth Office is working with officials across Government on Brexit issues, in close coordination with the Department for Exiting the European Union.

2 Nov 2017, 4:19 p.m. Vaccination: Finance Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what plans he has to change levels of funding for vaccination programmes; and which vaccines will be so affected.

Answer (Steve Brine)

Funding for vaccination programmes (both the cost of vaccines and administering those vaccines) were estimated up to 2020/21 as part of the Department’s 2015 Spending Review process. These estimates are updated on an ongoing basis to take account of expert advice as well as changes in demand and pricing.

2 Nov 2017, 4:14 p.m. Ministry of Defence: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether his Department was consulted by the Department for Exiting the European Union on the economic impact assessments conducted for the UK leaving the EU.

Answer (Mark Lancaster)

The Government is carrying out an ongoing programme of comprehensive analytical work that will inform our negotiating position with the EU, to define our deep and special partnership with the EU and inform our understanding of how EU exit will affect the UK's domestic policies and frameworks. The Ministry of Defence is working with officials across Government, in close coordination with the Department for Exiting the European Union, to ensure the delivery of a holistic programme of analysis.

2 Nov 2017, 3:34 p.m. Department for Communities and Local Government: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, whether his Department was consulted by the Department for Exiting the European Union on the economic impact assessments conducted for the UK leaving the EU.

Answer (Mr Marcus Jones)

The Government is carrying out an ongoing programme of comprehensive analytical work that will inform our negotiating position with the EU, to define our deep and special partnership with the EU and inform our understanding of how EU exit will affect the UK’s domestic policies and frameworks.

My Department is working with officials across government, in close coordination with the Department for Exiting the European Union, to ensure the delivery of a holistic programme of analysis across government.

2 Nov 2017, 12:13 p.m. Scotland Office: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland, whether his Department was consulted by the Department for Exiting the European Union on the economic impact assessments conducted for the UK leaving the EU.

Answer (David Mundell)

The UK Government is carrying out an ongoing programme of comprehensive analytical work that will inform our negotiating position with the EU, to define our deep and special partnership with the EU and inform our understanding of how EU exit will affect the UK’s domestic policies and frameworks.


The Scotland Office is working with officials across government, in close coordination with the Department for Exiting the European Union, to ensure the delivery of a holistic programme of analysis across government.

1 Nov 2017, 5:39 p.m. Department for International Development: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, whether her Department was consulted by the Department for Exiting the European Union on the economic impact assessments conducted for the UK leaving the EU.

Answer (Rory Stewart)

The Government is carrying out an ongoing programme of comprehensive analytical work that will inform our negotiating position with the EU, to define our deep and special partnership with the EU, and inform our understanding of how EU exit will affect the UK’s domestic policies and frameworks.

The Department for International Development is working with officials across government, in close coordination with the Department for Exiting the European Union, to ensure the delivery of a holistic programme of analysis across government.

1 Nov 2017, 3:58 p.m. Department for Work and Pensions: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether his Department was consulted by the Department for Exiting the European Union on the economic impact assessments conducted for the UK leaving the EU.

Answer (Damian Hinds)

The Government is carrying out an ongoing programme of comprehensive analytical work that will inform our negotiating position with the EU, to define our deep and special partnership with the EU and inform our understanding of how EU exit will affect the UK’s domestic policies and frameworks.

The Department for Work and Pensions is working with officials across government, in close coordination with the Department for Exiting the European Union (DExEU), to ensure the delivery of a holistic programme of analysis across government.

1 Nov 2017, 2:08 p.m. Attorney General: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Attorney General, whether the Law Officers' Departments were consulted by the Department for Exiting the European Union on the economic impact assessments conducted for the UK leaving the EU.

Answer (Robert Buckland)

The Government is carrying out an ongoing programme of comprehensive analytical work that will inform our negotiating position with the EU, to define our deep and special partnership with the EU and inform our understanding of how EU exit will affect the UK’s domestic policies and frameworks.

The Law Officers’ Departments are working with officials across government, in close coordination with the Department for Exiting the European Union, to ensure the delivery of a co-ordinated programme of analysis across government.

1 Nov 2017, 1:30 p.m. Northern Ireland Office: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, whether his Department was consulted by the Department for Exiting the European Union on the economic impact assessments conducted for the UK leaving the EU.

Answer (Chloe Smith)

The Government is carrying out an ongoing programme of comprehensive analytical work that will inform our negotiating position with the EU, to define our deep and special partnership with the EU and inform our understanding of how Brexit will affect the UK’s domestic policies and frameworks.

My officials are working with officials across government, in close coordination with the Department for Exiting the European Union, to ensure the delivery of a holistic programme of analysis across government.


30 Oct 2017, 5:22 p.m. Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department was consulted by the Department for Exiting the European Union on the economic impact assessments conducted for the UK leaving the EU.

Answer (Margot James)

The Government is carrying out an ongoing programme of comprehensive analytical work that will inform our negotiating position with the EU, to define our deep and special partnership with the EU and inform our understanding of how EU exit will affect the UK’s domestic policies and frameworks. The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy is working with officials across government, in close coordination with the Department for Exiting the European Union, to ensure the delivery of a holistic programme of analysis across government.

30 Oct 2017, 5:06 p.m. Treasury: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether his Department was consulted by the Department for Exiting the European Union on the economic impact assessments conducted for the UK leaving the EU.

Answer (Steve Barclay)

The Government is carrying out an ongoing programme of comprehensive analytical work that will inform our negotiating position with the EU, to define our deep and special partnership with the EU and inform our understanding of how EU exit will affect the UK’s domestic policies and frameworks.

HM Treasury is working with officials across government, in close coordination with the Department for Exiting the European Union, to ensure the delivery of a holistic programme of analysis across government.

30 Oct 2017, 5:05 p.m. Domestic Abuse: Children Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate she has made of the number of children growing up in homes which are experiencing domestic violence in each region and nation of the UK.

Answer (Sarah Newton)

We know from various studies that around 1 in 5 children in the UK will have been exposed to domestic abuse. In addition, data published by the Office for National Statistics on childhood experience of abuse shows that children who witness domestic abuse are more likely to experience domestic abuse as an adult.

The Queen’s Speech set out that we would bring forward legislation to protect victims of domestic abuse, and committed to ensuring that if abusive behaviour involves a child, then the court can hand down a sentence that reflects the devastating life-long impact that abuse has on the child.

30 Oct 2017, 4:59 p.m. Department for International Trade: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether his Department was consulted by the Department for Exiting the European Union on the economic impact assessments conducted for the UK leaving the EU.

Answer (Greg Hands)

The Government is carrying out an ongoing programme of comprehensive analytical work that will inform our negotiating position with the EU, to define our deep and special partnership with the EU and inform our understanding of how EU exit will affect the UK’s domestic policies and frameworks.

The Department for International Trade is working with officials across government, in close coordination with the Department for Exiting the European Union, to ensure the delivery of a holistic programme of analysis across government.

30 Oct 2017, 4:40 p.m. Mental Health Services: Children Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what estimate he has made of the number of children on the waiting list for mental health support services in (a) Hounslow, (b) London and (c) England who have witnessed domestic abuse.

Answer (Jackie Doyle-Price)

The Department does not hold this information.

30 Oct 2017, 4:38 p.m. Mental Health Services: Children Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what estimate he has made of the number of children waiting for mental health support services in (a) Hounslow, (b) London and (c) England.

Answer (Jackie Doyle-Price)

The information is not held in the format requested. Data on waiting times for children referred to mental health support services is not held. Data on the count of people under 18, who have a referral recorded that started on or after 1 January 2016 is reported by NHS Digital and can be viewed via the following link:

http://content.digital.nhs.uk/mhldsreports

30 Oct 2017, 4:36 p.m. Department of Health: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health, whether his Department was consulted by the Department for Exiting the European Union on the economic impact assessments conducted for the UK leaving the EU.

Answer (Philip Dunne)

The Government is carrying out an ongoing programme of comprehensive analytical work that will inform our negotiating position with the European Union, to define our deep and special partnership with the EU and inform our understanding of how EU exit will affect the United Kingdom’s domestic policies and frameworks.

The Department of Health has been working, and continues to work with officials across government, in close coordination with the Department for Exiting the European Union, to ensure the delivery of a comprehensive programme of analysis across government.

30 Oct 2017, 4:21 p.m. Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether her Department was consulted by the Department for Exiting the European Union on the economic impact assessments conducted for the UK leaving the EU.

Answer (Matt Hancock)

The Government is carrying out an ongoing programme of comprehensive analytical work that will inform our negotiating position with the EU, to define our deep and special partnership with the EU and inform our understanding of how EU exit will affect the UK’s domestic policies and frameworks.

DCMS is working with officials across government, in close coordination with the Department for Exiting the European Union, to ensure the delivery of a holistic programme of analysis across government.

30 Oct 2017, 1:12 p.m. Wales Office: Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Wales, whether his Department was consulted by the Department for Exiting the European Union on the economic impact assessments conducted for the UK leaving the EU.

Answer (Alun Cairns)

The Department for Exiting the European Union, working with officials across Government, including the Office of the Secretary of State for Wales, is undertaking a wide range of analysis covering the entirety of the UK economy in order to support negotiations. We are looking at over 50 sectors as well as cross-cutting regulatory issues.

While the Department for Exiting the European Union has responsibility for overseeing preparations for the withdrawal of the UK from the EU and conducting these withdrawal negotiations in support of the Prime Minister, the Office of the Secretary of State for Wales work closely with them and other Government departments on all issues relating to EU Exit.

12 Oct 2017, 4:11 p.m. Economic Situation Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, pursuant to the Answer of 13 September 2017 to Question 8561, what the evidential basis is for his statement that Parliament has agreed that the Government need not publish anything that would undermine its ability to negotiate the best deal for the UK.

Answer (Mr Steve Baker)

On 12 October 2016 the House of Commons agreed to an amended Opposition motion which stated that the parliamentary scrutiny process should be undertaken in such a way that does not undermine the negotiating position of the Government as negotiations are entered into.

On 7 December 2016 the House of Commons also voted in favour of an amended Opposition motion which stated that there should be no disclosure of material that could be reasonably judged to damage the UK in any negotiations to withdraw from the European Union after Article 50 has been triggered.



9 Oct 2017, 4:55 p.m. Brexit Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, pursuant to the Answer of 13 September 2017 to Question 8561, what the criteria is for deciding what information, if published, would undermine the ability of the Government to negotiate the best deal for the UK; and which Minister is responsible for making that decision.

Answer (Mr Robin Walker)

As is usual practice, the Government considers the implications of publishing its analysis, including, where appropriate, looking at a range of relevant factors to decide whether it would harm the Government’s negotiating position. The Government respects the role of Parliament in this process and has committed to keeping both Houses informed throughout. However, the Government also takes seriously its commitment not to publish anything that would undermine its negotiating position. Government publications are based on the principle of collective agreement, and therefore the decision to publish Government material is a collective one.

19 Sep 2017, 8:56 a.m. New Businesses and Small Businesses: Government Assistance Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what (a) grants and (b) other financial support his Department provides to (i) small and (ii) start-up businesses.

Answer (Margot James)

British Business Bank Programmes are supporting almost £3.5bn of finance to over 56,000 smaller businesses, and participating in a further £5.5bn to 81 mid-cap businesses (as at December 2016).

These figures are published in this Department’s annual report[1] and in the British Business Bank’s annual report[2].

I am pleased to note that since 2012 in the hon. Member’s constituency of Feltham and Heston, 67 start-up loans have been drawn down to a value of £497,547.

[1] https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/641623/beis-annual-report-accounts-2016-17-update-2-web.pdf

[2] https://annualreport2017.british-business-bank.co.uk/

5 Sep 2017, 4:57 p.m. Animal Welfare: Crime Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many crimes relating to animal cruelty have been reported in each of he last three years.

Answer (George Eustice)

The number of offenders found guilty and sentenced for offences under Sections 4 to 8 of the Animal Welfare Act 2006 in England and Wales from 2014 to 2016 is shown in the table. It should be noted that these figures pre-date the latest Sentencing Council’s guidelines which were introduced in May and, in the case of animal cruelty offences, allow magistrates more flexibility with regard to imposing penalties towards the upper end of the scale.

Offenders found guilty and sentenced at all courts of animal cruelty offences (1), England and Wales, 2014 to 2016 (2)(3)(4)

Outcome

2014

2015

2016

Found guilty

814

622

585

Sentenced

815

624

585

of which

Fine

146

97

116

Immediate custody

82

58

63

of which

under six months

81

55

60

(1) Defined as being SS4-8 Animal Welfare Act 2006; (2) figures relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the one selected is that for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe; (3) every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, this data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces, so care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when the data is used; (4) the number of offenders sentenced can differ from those found guilty, as a defendant found guilty in a particular year, and committed for sentence at the Crown Court, may be sentenced in the following year.

Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services - Ministry of Justice

5 Sep 2017, 4:57 p.m. Animal Welfare: Sentencing Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many people have received (a) a fine and (b) a custodial sentence of less than six months for animal cruelty offences.

Answer (George Eustice)

The number of offenders found guilty and sentenced for offences under Sections 4 to 8 of the Animal Welfare Act 2006 in England and Wales from 2014 to 2016 is shown in the table. It should be noted that these figures pre-date the latest Sentencing Council’s guidelines which were introduced in May and, in the case of animal cruelty offences, allow magistrates more flexibility with regard to imposing penalties towards the upper end of the scale.

Offenders found guilty and sentenced at all courts of animal cruelty offences (1), England and Wales, 2014 to 2016 (2)(3)(4)

Outcome

2014

2015

2016

Found guilty

814

622

585

Sentenced

815

624

585

of which

Fine

146

97

116

Immediate custody

82

58

63

of which

under six months

81

55

60

(1) Defined as being SS4-8 Animal Welfare Act 2006; (2) figures relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the one selected is that for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe; (3) every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, this data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces, so care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when the data is used; (4) the number of offenders sentenced can differ from those found guilty, as a defendant found guilty in a particular year, and committed for sentence at the Crown Court, may be sentenced in the following year.

Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services - Ministry of Justice

13 Jul 2017, 4 p.m. Feltham Young Offender Institution: Expenditure Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, if he will publish the (a) direct resource expenditure and (b) overall resource expenditure for Feltham Young Offenders Institution between 2011 and 2017.

Answer (Dr Phillip Lee)

Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) routinely publishes direct and overall resource expenditure for each private and public sector prison in England and Wales on an annual basis after the end of each financial year. The information requested can be accessed at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/prison-performance-statistics-2015-to-2016. The figures for Feltham YOI are reported under the ‘Male closed YOI’ establishment category.

The data for the last financial year 2016-17 has not yet been finalised, and is expected to be published in autumn 2017.

13 Jul 2017, 3:23 p.m. Feltham Young Offender Institution: Staff Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many staff and officers were employed at Feltham Young Offenders Institution between 2011 and 2017.

Answer (Dr Phillip Lee)

Information on the number of staff employed in Feltham YOI from 2013 and 2017 can be found in the workforce statistics bulletins at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/national-offender-management-service-workforce-statistics

Information on the number of staff employed in Feltham YOI in 2011 and 2012 are contained in the table 1 below.

Table 1: Staff numbers (Full-Time Equivalent) in Feltham YOI, as at 31 March 2011 and 31 March 2012

Band 3-5 Officers

All other staff

31/03/2011

400

291

31/03/2012

369

285

To note: band 3 officers refers to Prison officers

band 4 officers refers to Specialist officers

band 5 officers refers Custodial Managers

13 Jul 2017, 2:56 p.m. Feltham Young Offender Institution Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment he has made of the report by HM Chief Inspector of Prisons published on 30 June 2017 following an unannounced inspection of Feltham Young Offenders Institution; and if he will make a statement.

Answer (Dr Phillip Lee)

Her Majesty's Chief Inspector of Prisons' inspection of Feltham took place from 23 January to 3 February 2017. Safety in prisons and young offender institutions is fundamental to the proper functioning of our justice system and addressing safety concerns is at the heart of our reform plans. The findings from the report highlighted serious concern over safety and levels of violence and we are already taking action to address this and other issues identified. We are currently working on an action plan based on the inspectorate’s recommendation to address the concerns raised in the report.

6 Jul 2017, 3:36 p.m. Universal Credit: Self-employed Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, of those who are self-employed more than 12 months and in receipt of universal credit, what estimate he has made of those who were previously on working tax credits before being moved on to universal credit.

Answer (Mel Stride)

HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) stops claims for tax credits when a person claims Universal Credit with the Department for Work and Pensions. HMRC do not hold data on a person’s employment status when they are in receipt of Universal Credit and are therefore unable to provide the requested information.

5 Jul 2017, 2:47 p.m. Universal Credit: Self-employed Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what estimate he has made of the number of people who have been self-employed for more than 12 months and in receipt of universal credit who are exempt from the minimum income floor.

Answer (Damian Hinds)

The requested information is currently not available. It is too early to say, as the number of self-employed claimants on UC remains low. We intend to carry out research and evaluation on self-employment in UC going forward, as the number of self-employed claimants increases. The UC Evaluation Framework, published in July 2016, sets out our plans. The UC Evaluation Framework can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/universal-credit-evaluation-framework-2016

4 Jul 2017, 4:31 p.m. NHS: Pay Seema Malhotra

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment he has made of the effect of the public sector pay cap on staffing levels in the NHS.

Answer (Philip Dunne)

National Health Service staff do a fantastic job and the government is committed to ensuring they can continue to deliver world-class patient care. Pay restraint has helped the NHS to recruit an additional 33,800 (6.4%) professionally qualified clinical staff since May 2010.