Catherine McKinnell Written Questions

92 Questions to Department for Education tabled by Catherine McKinnell


Date Title Questioner
7 Dec 2020, 4:16 p.m. Schools: Census Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when his Department plans to publish the data from the October 2020 school census.

Answer (Nick Gibb)

There are no plans to publish a comprehensive dataset from the October 2020 (Autumn) school census.

Data collected in the autumn census on exclusions relates to the 2019/20 academic year and is expected to be published in July 2021. No data was collected on pupil absence in the autumn census 2020.

The Department release annual National Statistics in the Schools, pupils and their characteristics publication, based on the Spring Census, collected in January. This includes data on pupil numbers by characteristics including gender, age, free school meals eligibility, language, and ethnicity, alongside data on class sizes and school numbers. The latest release is available here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/school-pupils-and-their-characteristics.

Further information on Special Educational Needs is also produced from the Spring Census and released in the ‘Special educational needs in England’ publication, available here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/special-educational-needs-in-england.

11 Nov 2020, 4:19 p.m. Respite Care: Children Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment his Department has made of the economic benefits of short breaks for respite for children who need palliative care.

Answer (Vicky Ford)

Palliative care can help children with life limiting or life ending conditions to have a good quality of life where they get treatment, care and support. Regular palliative care can enable parents to work and also can prevent escalation of needs later on.

While the government has not done any recent assessment of the economic benefits of short breaks for respite for children who need palliative care, local authorities have a statutory duty to assess the social care needs of disabled children and young people, and to provide respite care where necessary. Where it is appropriate, local authorities can fund respite care provided by hospices, either as a short-term stay or as a service provided to the child or young person in the family home by the hospice team. Local authorities and Clinical Commissioning Groups regularly liaise to plan and commission the most appropriate package of respite care for the children and young people with a life-limiting or life-threatening condition in their area.

3 Sep 2020, 6:07 p.m. Schools: Discrimination Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department is taking to tackle racism and Islamophobia in (a) schools and (b) among young people.

Answer (Nick Gibb)

The Department wants to support all young people to be happy, healthy and safe, and equip them for adult life and to make a positive contribution to society. That is why we have made Relationships Education compulsory for primary school age pupils, Relationships and Sex Education compulsory for secondary school age pupils and Health Education compulsory for pupils in all state funded schools.

The statutory duty to implement the new subjects has now come into force. However, considering the circumstances faced by our schools, the Department is reassuring schools that they have flexibility over when they discharge their duty within the first year of compulsory teaching.

The statutory guidance sets out that as part of Relationships Education, all primary aged pupils will be taught the importance of respecting others, even when they are very different from them, or make different choices or have different preferences or beliefs. Pupils will also be taught what a stereotype is, and how stereotypes can be unfair, negative or destructive.

Schools can also teach about racism and religion in personal, social, health and economic education and citizenship education where pupils can develop their understanding of the diverse national, regional, religious and ethnic identities in the UK and the need for mutual respect and understanding. All state funded schools are required by legislation or by their funding agreements to teach religious education to all registered pupils aged 5 to 18 years. Teaching religious education is also part of schools’ activity to meet their legal duty to promote young people’s spiritual, moral and cultural development.

Schools are required to actively promote fundamental British values, including democracy as well as the rule of law, individual liberty, mutual respect and tolerance of those of different faith and beliefs.

6 May 2020, 4:32 p.m. GCE A-level and GCSE: Coronavirus Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether (a) GCSE and (b) A-level exams sat by pupils in the Autumn term 2020 will be modified to reflect the break in teaching during the covid-19 outbreak.

Answer (Nick Gibb)

The Department is discussing arrangement for the autumn GCSE and A level examination series with Ofqual, the independent qualifications regulator. Ofqual will set out further proposals for consultation as soon as possible.

6 May 2020, 4:31 p.m. GCE A-level: Coronavirus Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the cancellation by the Government of A-levels in 2020 as a result of the covid-19 outbreak, if he will make it his policy to enable schools to consider pupils' raw GCSE scores when determining their centre assessment grades and rankings at A-level.

Answer (Nick Gibb)

This is a matter for Ofqual, the Office of Qualifications and Examinations Regulation. I have asked its Chief Regulator, Sally Collier, to write the hon. Member and a copy of her reply will be placed in the Libraries of both Houses.

6 May 2020, 4:31 p.m. GCE A-level and GCSE: Coronavirus Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether schools may request (a) non-exam assessments and (b) coursework not yet submitted by pupils to help determine (i) GCSE and (ii) A-level grades and rankings for the 2020 cohorts.

Answer (Nick Gibb)

This is a matter for Ofqual, the Office of Qualifications and Examinations Regulation. I have asked its Chief Regulator, Sally Collier, to write the hon. Member and a copy of her reply will be placed in the Libraries of both Houses.

21 Apr 2020, 10:51 a.m. Home Education: Coronavirus Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the covid-19 outbreak, what steps he is taking to ensure home-schooled pupils can obtain Key Stage 4 qualifications.

Answer (Nick Gibb)

As my right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education, announced to the House on 18 March, the Government has taken the difficult decision to cancel all examinations due to take place in schools and colleges in England this summer, as part of the fight to prevent the spread of coronavirus.

The Department’s priority is to ensure that students can move on as planned to the next stage of their lives, including starting university, college or sixth form courses, an apprenticeship or a job. For students at Key Stage 4 taking GCSEs and technical awards, we will ensure they are awarded a grade which reflects their work. Our intention is that a grade will be awarded this summer based on the best available evidence, including any non-examination assessment that students have completed. This will apply to home-schooled pupils and to other private candidates where the head of the examination centre is confident that they and their staff have seen sufficient evidence of students’ achievements to make objective judgements. If they wish to do so, home-schooled students and others will have the option to sit an examination as soon as is reasonably possible after the beginning of the academic year.

Ofqual is urgently exploring whether there are alternative options for those students who do not have an existing relationship with an examination centre and who need results this summer for progression purposes. Ofqual published a consultation on the treatment of private candidates and other issues on 15 April.

8 Apr 2020, 5:42 p.m. Schools: Coronavirus Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the covid-19 outbreak, if he will issue guidance on precautions that pregnant school and college staff should take.

Answer (Nick Gibb)

Our school and college leaders are central to the country’s response to this current crisis.

School and college staff who are pregnant should follow the central guidance from Public Health England (PHE). The guidance states that anyone who is pregnant should be particularly stringent in following social distancing measures. The Government would expect all employers to support any staff who are pregnant and at risk. The guidance from PHE is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-guidance-on-social-distancing-and-for-vulnerable-people.

Social distancing guidance for educational settings has been published, and states that staff at an increased risk of serious illness as a result of COVID-19, such as those that are pregnant, should work from home where possible, and education and childcare settings should endeavour to support this. This additional guidance is available here:
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-implementing-social-distancing-in-education-and-childcare-settings/coronavirus-covid-19-implementing-social-distancing-in-education-and-childcare-settings.

27 Mar 2020, 2:54 p.m. Assessments: Coronavirus Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the covid-19 outbreak, if he will take steps to support exam boards that experience increases in requests for special consideration.

Answer (Nick Gibb)

On 16 March, the Government announced that all exams due to take place in schools and colleges in England this summer would be cancelled as part of the fight to prevent the spread of coronavirus.

The Department’s priority is to ensure that students can move on as planned to the next stage of their lives, including starting university, college or sixth form courses or apprenticeships in the autumn. For GCSE, A and AS level students, we will make sure they are awarded a grade which reflects their work. Our intention is that a grade will be awarded this summer based on the best available evidence, including any non-exam assessment that students have already completed. The qualifications regulator Ofqual is working urgently with the exam boards to set out proposals for how this process will work and more information will be provided as soon as possible. Given that exams will not be taking place, the normal special consideration arrangements will not apply to the awarding of grades this summer.

We recognise that some students may nevertheless feel disappointed that they haven’t been able to sit their exams. If they do not believe the correct process has been followed in their case, they will be able to appeal on that basis. In addition, if they do not feel their calculated grade reflects their performance, they will have the opportunity to sit an exam, once schools and colleges are open again. The existing special consideration arrangements will apply to any students who experience exceptional circumstances when sitting those exams: as we expect that many fewer students will be sitting the exams than in a normal exam series we are confident that the exam boards’ existing systems will be able to cope with the likely volume of such requests.

25 Mar 2020, 1:28 p.m. Special Educational Needs: Coronavirus Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the covid-19 outbreak, if he will issue guidance for commissioners and providers of school-based medical services for children with complex health and care needs in special schools and other settings.

Answer (Vicky Ford)

COVID-19 is clearly an unprecedented situation and the department’s highest priority.

We are working closely with colleagues across government to ensure that appropriate arrangements and support are in place for all the department’s sectors – from early years and childcare to schools and children’s social care, and for vulnerable groups including children with complex health and care needs.

The government has published guidance for implementing isolation in atypical settings, such as special settings, which can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-guidance-on-isolation-for-residential-educational-settings.

We have also published questions and answers about the provisions being made for vulnerable children and young people: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-guidance-on-vulnerable-children-and-young-people.

23 Mar 2020, 5:18 p.m. Children: Coronavirus Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the covid-19 outbreak, if he will take steps to ensure that (a) parents with and (b) parents of children with underlying health conditions do not receive fines for unauthorised school absences during the covid-19 outbreak.

Answer (Nick Gibb)

From Friday 20 March, schools, colleges and early years settings are closed to everyone except children of critical workers and vulnerable children, as part of the country’s ongoing response to COVID-19.

Guidance has been issued to schools setting out how they should record attendance at this time.

The Government has also introduced emergency legislation to allow a suspension of the requirement on parents to secure regular school attendance for their child of compulsory school age.

The Government has asked local authorities to suspend any penalty notice action or prosecutions for COVID-19 related absence with immediate effect. Local authorities should update their Code of Conduct for issuing penalty notices to make this clear. New cases should not be taken forward and any cases from 16 March should be withdrawn. This approach should also be applied to prosecutions for non-attendance.

23 Mar 2020, 5:14 p.m. Free School Meals: Coronavirus Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the covid-19 outbreak, if he will issue guidance on the use of free school meal funding in the event of school closures.

Answer (Vicky Ford)

On 19 March, the government published guidance for schools, giving them the flexibility to provide meals or shop vouchers to the 1.3 million children entitled to free school meals if they are no longer attending school, either due to closures or as a result of self-isolating at home.

The guidance can be viewed at the following address: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-free-school-meals-guidance.

28 Feb 2020, 9:43 a.m. Children in Care: Siblings Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he plans to take to amend the Care Planning, Placement and Case Review (England) Regulations 2010 to allow for contact to take place between a looked-after child and a sibling that is not looked after.

Answer (Vicky Ford)

It remains our intention to undertake a review of the regulations, as committed to during the passage of the Children and Social Work Bill, as soon as resources permit. In the meantime, we are clear that allowing reasonable contact between looked after children and their siblings is absolutely right where this is in the best interests of the children involved and the Children Act 1989 already provides for this.

26 Feb 2020, 4:26 p.m. Children in Care Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will publish the number of children in England aged (a) under one, (b) one to four, (c) five to nine, (d) 10 to 15 and (e) 16 and over in each placement type in National Tables: children looked after in England including adoption A2 in each (i) local authority area and (ii) region at 31 March (A) 2016, (B) 2017 and (C) 2018.

Answer (Vicky Ford)

The information is not readily available and could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

The latest figures on children taken into care by age and placement type are published for England at 31 March 2019 in Table A1 and A2 of the statistical release ‘Children Looked after in England including adoptions: 2018:2019’ which is available at the following link: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/children-looked-after-in-england-including-adoption-2018-to-2019.

Figures on children by age and placement type have also been published separately, at local authority and regional level, in the underlying data table ‘CLA2019’. These are available at the same link.

26 Feb 2020, 3:52 p.m. Children in Care Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will publish the number of children in England that started to be looked by (a) placement type and (b) age in each year ending 31 March (i) 2015, (ii) 2016, (iii) 2017 (iv) 2018 and (v) 2019.

Answer (Vicky Ford)

Information on the number of children who started to be looked after by individual age group and within a week of birth is shown in the attached table.

Table C2 of the statistical release ‘Children looked after in England (including adoption): 2018 to 2019’ is available at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/children-looked-after-in-england-including-adoption-2018-to-2019 and includes information for the same population of children by placement type.

26 Feb 2020, 3:52 p.m. Children in Care: Babies Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many babies aged under 7 days old that started to be looked after during the years ending 31 March there were in each year from 2015 to 2019.

Answer (Vicky Ford)

Information on the number of children who started to be looked after by individual age group and within a week of birth is shown in the attached table.

Table C2 of the statistical release ‘Children looked after in England (including adoption): 2018 to 2019’ is available at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/children-looked-after-in-england-including-adoption-2018-to-2019 and includes information for the same population of children by placement type.

26 Feb 2020, 3:41 p.m. Children in Care Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will publish the number of looked after children by placement type as set out in National Tables: children looked after in England including adoption A2 in the last 12 months.

Answer (Vicky Ford)

Information on children looked after as at 31 March 2019 by placement is published in Table A2 of the annual statistical release ‘Children looked after in England including adoption: 2018 to 2019’, which is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/children-looked-after-in-england-including-adoption-2018-to-2019.

The information requested on family context is not held centrally.

Data relating to the year ended 31 March 2020 will be released in Autumn 2020, in line with our publication schedule.

26 Feb 2020, 3:41 p.m. Children in Care Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many looked-after children there were at (a) 31 March 2019, (b) 31 March 2018, (c) 31 March 2017 and (d) 31 March 2016 in England; and how many and what proportion of those children were (a) two or more siblings that were looked after, (b) two or more siblings that were placed together and (c) one or more children that were not placed with a brother or sister.

Answer (Vicky Ford)

Information on children looked after as at 31 March 2019 by placement is published in Table A2 of the annual statistical release ‘Children looked after in England including adoption: 2018 to 2019’, which is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/children-looked-after-in-england-including-adoption-2018-to-2019.

The information requested on family context is not held centrally.

Data relating to the year ended 31 March 2020 will be released in Autumn 2020, in line with our publication schedule.

21 Oct 2019, 4:49 p.m. Holiday Activities and Food Research Fund: North East Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to his 8 May 2019 press release entitled Free meals and activities for 50,000 children over 2019 summer holidays, how many unsuccessful bids for that funding were made by organisations based in the North East; what the value of those unsuccessful bids was; and what feedback his Department has given to organisations that made unsuccessful bids.

Answer (Michelle Donelan)

This year we received 13 bids from organisations in the North East for the Holiday Activities and Food programme funding. Of the 11 organisations selected for funding, 2 were based in the North East and more than £1.2 million was allocated to Street Games in Newcastle upon Tyne and Gateshead Local Authority.

The value of the 11 unsuccessful bids from organisations in the North East was £5,625,109.45.

All of the unsuccessful organisations who requested feedback were provided with this in writing.

4 Oct 2019, 1:57 p.m. Teachers: Pay Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to his Department's press release dated 2 September 2019 entitled £30,000 starting salaries proposed for teachers, whether the increase in starting salaries will be funded through (a) the National Funding Formula and (b) a separate grant.

Answer (Nick Gibb)

An increase in teachers’ starting salaries to £30,000 by 2022-23, along with increases elsewhere on the rest of the pay framework, will be affordable for schools within the additional funding announced at the Spending Round that will be paid out through the schools National Funding Formula (NFF). This will see an additional £2.6 billion in core schools funding next year, with increases of £4.8 billion and £7.1 billion in 2021-22 and 2022-23 respectively.

Pay reform is subject to the School Teacher Review Body (STRB) process and recommendations, but the Department’s assessment of affordability will be part of the evidence provided as part of that process.

Funding to support pay increases relating to the 2018 and 2019 pay awards will continue to be invested in the existing Teachers’ Pay Grant in 2020-21. From 2021-22 the Department intends to include this funding within NFF allocations.

9 Jul 2019, 3:17 p.m. Apprentices: Taxation Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the value of apprenticeship levy funds expiring from employers' accounts was in June 2019; and what plans the Government has for those funds.

Answer (Anne Milton)

The amount of funds expiring in employers’ digital apprenticeship service accounts in June 2019 was £26 million.

As well as funding apprenticeships in levy-paying employers, levy contributions are also used to fund training for existing apprenticeship learners and new apprenticeships in non-levy paying employers. We do not anticipate that all employers who pay the levy will need or want to use all the funds in their accounts, however they are able to do this.

26 Jun 2019, 2:38 p.m. Apprentices: Taxation Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what (a) proportion and (b) total value of Apprenticeship Levy funds available to NHS organisations is currently unspent; and if he will make a statement.

Answer (Anne Milton)

As the NHS is made up of a large number of diverse employers, it is not possible to identify apprenticeship levy contributions or expired funds for the NHS as a whole. Moreover, due to taxpayer confidentiality, we are unable to publish the amount that individual employers have contributed through the apprenticeship levy.

We introduced the levy to create long-term sustainable investment in high quality apprenticeship training. Widening the scope of the apprenticeship levy would divert funding away from apprenticeship training and reduce the opportunities for individuals and employers to benefit from them. It is important that we maximise the effectiveness of government investment in training and our reforms are making sure that apprenticeships are delivering the high quality training that both individuals and employers need.

26 Jun 2019, 2:38 p.m. Apprentices: Taxation Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of allowing NHS organisations to use their Apprenticeship Levy funds to cover the backfill costs incurred by providing apprenticeship places.

Answer (Anne Milton)

As the NHS is made up of a large number of diverse employers, it is not possible to identify apprenticeship levy contributions or expired funds for the NHS as a whole. Moreover, due to taxpayer confidentiality, we are unable to publish the amount that individual employers have contributed through the apprenticeship levy.

We introduced the levy to create long-term sustainable investment in high quality apprenticeship training. Widening the scope of the apprenticeship levy would divert funding away from apprenticeship training and reduce the opportunities for individuals and employers to benefit from them. It is important that we maximise the effectiveness of government investment in training and our reforms are making sure that apprenticeships are delivering the high quality training that both individuals and employers need.

26 Jun 2019, 2:34 p.m. Apprentices: Taxation Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent discussions he has held with the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care on the barriers preventing NHS organisations from being able to fully utilise their Apprenticeship Levy funds; and if he will make a statement.

Answer (Anne Milton)

The Department for Education and the Department of Health and Social Care are working together, along with employers and Health Education England (HEE), to make sure that the NHS is fully supported to recruit the apprentices that they need to deliver high quality care.

I met my hon. Friend, the Minister of State for Health, in January 2019, where we had a constructive discussion about the ways in which we are jointly supporting the NHS. The detailed steps that we have taken together are set out in the government’s response to the Education Select Committee’s inquiry on nurse degree apprenticeships, which was published in March 2019.

We are already seeing the positive impact that apprenticeships can make in the NHS to workforce recruitment and retention. For example, in the last financial year, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust employed nearly 600 Level 2 to 7 apprentices, across 29 programmes and a variety of disciplines, ranging from Business Administration to Facilities Management to Dental Nursing. The Trust has used the apprenticeship levy to build interest across the organisation and attract employees into rewarding apprenticeship roles.

In addition, Registered Nurse degree apprenticeship and Nursing Associate starts in the first half of 2018/19 are 77% and 30% higher respectively than the starts reported in the entire 2017/18 year.

Both departments continue to collaborate and work closely with employers and our delivery partners to share best practice and support a wide programme of activities to help NHS employers to get the most from our apprenticeship reforms.

26 Jun 2019, 2:26 p.m. Apprentices: Taxation Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the value of Apprenticeship Levy funds expiring from employers' accounts was in May 2019; and what plans the Government has for those funds.

Answer (Anne Milton)

The amount of funds entering employers’ digital apprenticeship service accounts in May 2017 was £135 million, of which £11 million in unspent funds expired in May 2019. This was the first month of expiry of funds.

As well as funding apprenticeships in levy-paying employers, levy contributions are also used to fund training for existing apprenticeship learners and new apprenticeships in non- levy paying employers. We do not anticipate that all employers who pay the levy will need or want to use all the funds in their accounts, however they are able to.

2 May 2019, 12:48 p.m. Schools: North East Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether the potential benefits of (a) additional funding for training chairs of governance and (b) careers pilots in primary schools in Opportunity Area designation will be extended to the Opportunity North East initiative.

Answer (Nadhim Zahawi)

The additional funding announced by my right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education, in June 2018 is helping to improve the capacity and capability of governors, including training for chairs and vice-chairs through our existing governance leadership programmes. These programmes are available to eligible participants in Opportunity North East local authorities and the £500 rate will fully fund participation of the chair or vice-chair of governors. For ONE Vision schools, where governor training is identified as a priority by the analysis of need for both the chair or vice-chair, additional support will be provided. More information on the national programme can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/school-governors-professional-development.

The government’s careers strategy, published in 2017, called for more evidence of effective approaches in primary schools to allow schools to learn from best practice and build their expertise. We asked our delivery partner, the Careers & Enterprise Company, to publish research on ‘what works’ in career-related learning activities in primary school. The findings have informed a £2 million investment fund to develop and extend career-related learning. Successful applicants will be confirmed soon, with delivery beginning in September 2019 and both local enterprise partnerships in the North East were eligible to apply. More information can be found here: https://www.careersandenterprise.co.uk/funding/primary-fund.

2 May 2019, 12:42 p.m. Young People: North East Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps Opportunity North East will take to partner with local businesses to improve job prospects for young people across the region.

Answer (Nadhim Zahawi)

Opportunity North East is working collaboratively with both Local Enterprise Partnerships (LEPs) in the North East - the Tees Valley LEP and North East LEP - to improve career prospects for the region’s young people. Both LEPs already have established networks of business engagement with schools. Every school has a designated Enterprise Advisor, typically a volunteer from the business community, providing support to the school leadership team. These advisors are supported by a network of other business leaders who offer school specific experiences. Following the implementation of the National Career Benchmarks, piloted here in the North East, every child will have a bespoke career plan generating at least 4 meaningful work experiences.

The chairs of both LEPs are members of the Opportunity North East Strategic Board. They are working jointly to develop an enhanced offer of careers and enterprise engagement and support for students in the ONE Vision schools, funded through Opportunity North East. The LEPs will use their extensive industry networks to harness the support of local businesses in developing this offer where it makes sense to do so.

2 May 2019, 12:37 p.m. Opportunity North East Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will list meetings (a) he and (b) his Ministers have had to discuss the Opportunity North East initiative outside of Opportunity North East Strategic Board meetings since January 2018.

Answer (Nadhim Zahawi)

My right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education and his ministers have met with officials to discuss the Opportunity North East (ONE) initiative outside of ONE Strategic Board meetings on 10 occasions since January 2018.

2 May 2019, 12:35 p.m. Schools: North East Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps Opportunity North East will take to smooth transitions from primary to secondary education.

Answer (Nadhim Zahawi)

Our intention is to invite schools, trusts and local authorities to bring forward proposals for improving secondary outcomes for young people through better transition from primary to secondary school. Through Opportunity North East we will then fund several projects to test the impact of the most promising proposals. This will support more young people in the North East to continue to achieve well at secondary school. It will also enable us to learn more about which approaches have the greatest positive impact so that a greater number of young people are able to benefit in the future.

2 May 2019, 12:32 p.m. Schools: North East Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the Opportunity North East Strategic Board, if he will appoint (a) a North East based headteacher as the Board’s co-chair; and (b) one or more North East based classroom teachers to the Board.

Answer (Nadhim Zahawi)

Opportunity North East is different from an Opportunity Area in a number of ways, including that it operates across 12 local authority areas. It also has a highly focused remit to accelerate the improvement in educational outcomes from secondary school and beyond, leading to improved employment outcomes for the region’s young people.

The existing constitution of the board includes leaders from schools, further education and higher education, local government and business, and reflects the need to work across these sectors to bring about sustainable improvements to outcomes for young people in the region. The board includes the leaders of multi-academy trusts who have a good track record in improving school performance in the North East. The school sector is further represented by three local authority Directors of Children’s Services, and the Director of Schools North East. We do not intend to appoint a headteacher as a co-chair, or one or more classroom teachers to the Strategic Board. A schools sub group, which includes an additional three school leaders and the region’s Education Endowment Foundation Research School, advises the Strategic Board. Details about members of the board can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/expert-panel-confirmed-to-raise-education-outcomes-in-north-east.

The current composition of the board has enabled swift decision making, and strong commitment from across the department, so that activity can get underway through the ONE Vision programme from this September, meaning that young people can begin to benefit from as early as September this year. Officials will continue to work closely with a great number of school leaders in the region, through the various strands of work, to ensure that the programme delivers sustainable improvements in outcomes.

2 May 2019, 12:32 p.m. Schools: North East Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he made of the potential merits of the recommendations of the report entitled, Implementation of Opportunity Areas: An independent evaluation published by the National Foundation for Educational Research when appointing the chair of the Opportunity North East Strategic Board.

Answer (Nadhim Zahawi)

Opportunity North East is different from an Opportunity Area in a number of ways, including that it operates across 12 local authority areas. It also has a highly focused remit to accelerate the improvement in educational outcomes from secondary school and beyond, leading to improved employment outcomes for the region’s young people.

The existing constitution of the board includes leaders from schools, further education and higher education, local government and business, and reflects the need to work across these sectors to bring about sustainable improvements to outcomes for young people in the region. The board includes the leaders of multi-academy trusts who have a good track record in improving school performance in the North East. The school sector is further represented by three local authority Directors of Children’s Services, and the Director of Schools North East. We do not intend to appoint a headteacher as a co-chair, or one or more classroom teachers to the Strategic Board. A schools sub group, which includes an additional three school leaders and the region’s Education Endowment Foundation Research School, advises the Strategic Board. Details about members of the board can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/expert-panel-confirmed-to-raise-education-outcomes-in-north-east.

The current composition of the board has enabled swift decision making, and strong commitment from across the department, so that activity can get underway through the ONE Vision programme from this September, meaning that young people can begin to benefit from as early as September this year. Officials will continue to work closely with a great number of school leaders in the region, through the various strands of work, to ensure that the programme delivers sustainable improvements in outcomes.

2 May 2019, 12:27 p.m. Schools: North East Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will publish the number of schools (a) offered support under Opportunity North East’s ONE Vision programme and (b) that have indicated they will accept that support.

Answer (Nadhim Zahawi)

We will publish both the number of schools that were made an offer of support, the number that accepted the support, and the methodology used to determine eligibility for the Opportunity North East’s ONE Vision Schools programme in due course.

The ONE Vision programme aims to improve outcomes for young people at key stages 4 and 5 in 30 secondary phase schools. We selected Ofsted Requires Improvement (RI) as the single indicator to identify the long list of secondary phase schools in scope to become a ONE Vision school and, by exception, Ofsted Inadequate schools. We then shortlisted schools using a comprehensive review of their performance data, pupil demographics, Ofsted history and intelligence from local authorities and trusts on which schools were priorities for support. We made an initial offer of support to 32 schools, of which 30 accepted.

The support that each ONE Vision school receives will be bespoke to their individual circumstances. It will be determined by an analysis of need comprising an External Review of Governance, undertaken by a National Leader of Governance; a Financial Health Check, undertaken by a School Resource Management Adviser; and a School Development Review, undertaken by a National Leader of Education or other high performing school leader. This analysis will identify the schools’ main priorities for improvement.

The following table shows the number of pupils in 2017/18 (a) attending all state-funded mainstream schools in the North East who are in the region’s lowest quintile of Attainment 8 scores, and (b) attending ONE Vision Schools who are within the region’s lowest quintile of Attainment 8 scores.

Number of pupils in North East in lowest quintile[1] of Attainment 8 scores (state-funded mainstream schools[2])

Number of pupils in North East in One Vision schools in lowest quintile1 of Attainment 8 scores (state-funded mainstream schools2)

4,836

1,169

The following table shows the number of pupils in 2017/18 (a) attending all state-funded schools in the North East who are within the region’s lowest quintile of capped GCSE point scores, based on their best eight entries, and (b) attending ONE Vision Schools who are within the region’s lowest quintile of capped GCSE point scores, based on their best eight entries.

Number of pupils in North East in lowest quintile1 of best eight entries scores (all state-funded schools)

Number of pupils in North East in One Vision schools in lowest quintile1 of best eight entries scores (all state-funded schools)

4,879

1,135

It is a goal of the ONE Vision programme to build capacity in these 30 schools so that they are able to support other schools in the future. To ensure that the ONE Vision activity does not adversely affect schools that are not participating in the programme, we will continue to speak with local authorities and trusts as part of our monitoring activities to understand what impact ONE Vision is having on the wider community. We will also continue to monitor the performance of all schools across the region.

[1] Quintiles are based on pupil ranking rather than school ranking. As more than one pupil can have the same attainment score, more than 20 percent of pupils can have scores in the lowest 20 percent.

[2] Region figures cover achievements in state-funded schools only. They do not include pupils recently arrived from overseas.

2 May 2019, 12:27 p.m. Schools: North East Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the Opportunity North East initiative, if he will publish the methodology used to determine eligibility for the ONE Vision Schools programme.

Answer (Nadhim Zahawi)

We will publish both the number of schools that were made an offer of support, the number that accepted the support, and the methodology used to determine eligibility for the Opportunity North East’s ONE Vision Schools programme in due course.

The ONE Vision programme aims to improve outcomes for young people at key stages 4 and 5 in 30 secondary phase schools. We selected Ofsted Requires Improvement (RI) as the single indicator to identify the long list of secondary phase schools in scope to become a ONE Vision school and, by exception, Ofsted Inadequate schools. We then shortlisted schools using a comprehensive review of their performance data, pupil demographics, Ofsted history and intelligence from local authorities and trusts on which schools were priorities for support. We made an initial offer of support to 32 schools, of which 30 accepted.

The support that each ONE Vision school receives will be bespoke to their individual circumstances. It will be determined by an analysis of need comprising an External Review of Governance, undertaken by a National Leader of Governance; a Financial Health Check, undertaken by a School Resource Management Adviser; and a School Development Review, undertaken by a National Leader of Education or other high performing school leader. This analysis will identify the schools’ main priorities for improvement.

The following table shows the number of pupils in 2017/18 (a) attending all state-funded mainstream schools in the North East who are in the region’s lowest quintile of Attainment 8 scores, and (b) attending ONE Vision Schools who are within the region’s lowest quintile of Attainment 8 scores.

Number of pupils in North East in lowest quintile[1] of Attainment 8 scores (state-funded mainstream schools[2])

Number of pupils in North East in One Vision schools in lowest quintile1 of Attainment 8 scores (state-funded mainstream schools2)

4,836

1,169

The following table shows the number of pupils in 2017/18 (a) attending all state-funded schools in the North East who are within the region’s lowest quintile of capped GCSE point scores, based on their best eight entries, and (b) attending ONE Vision Schools who are within the region’s lowest quintile of capped GCSE point scores, based on their best eight entries.

Number of pupils in North East in lowest quintile1 of best eight entries scores (all state-funded schools)

Number of pupils in North East in One Vision schools in lowest quintile1 of best eight entries scores (all state-funded schools)

4,879

1,135

It is a goal of the ONE Vision programme to build capacity in these 30 schools so that they are able to support other schools in the future. To ensure that the ONE Vision activity does not adversely affect schools that are not participating in the programme, we will continue to speak with local authorities and trusts as part of our monitoring activities to understand what impact ONE Vision is having on the wider community. We will also continue to monitor the performance of all schools across the region.

[1] Quintiles are based on pupil ranking rather than school ranking. As more than one pupil can have the same attainment score, more than 20 percent of pupils can have scores in the lowest 20 percent.

[2] Region figures cover achievements in state-funded schools only. They do not include pupils recently arrived from overseas.

2 May 2019, 12:27 p.m. Schools: North East Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the Opportunity North East initiative, what criteria will be used to determine the interventions employed in ONE Vision Schools; and who is responsible for determining that criteria.

Answer (Nadhim Zahawi)

We will publish both the number of schools that were made an offer of support, the number that accepted the support, and the methodology used to determine eligibility for the Opportunity North East’s ONE Vision Schools programme in due course.

The ONE Vision programme aims to improve outcomes for young people at key stages 4 and 5 in 30 secondary phase schools. We selected Ofsted Requires Improvement (RI) as the single indicator to identify the long list of secondary phase schools in scope to become a ONE Vision school and, by exception, Ofsted Inadequate schools. We then shortlisted schools using a comprehensive review of their performance data, pupil demographics, Ofsted history and intelligence from local authorities and trusts on which schools were priorities for support. We made an initial offer of support to 32 schools, of which 30 accepted.

The support that each ONE Vision school receives will be bespoke to their individual circumstances. It will be determined by an analysis of need comprising an External Review of Governance, undertaken by a National Leader of Governance; a Financial Health Check, undertaken by a School Resource Management Adviser; and a School Development Review, undertaken by a National Leader of Education or other high performing school leader. This analysis will identify the schools’ main priorities for improvement.

The following table shows the number of pupils in 2017/18 (a) attending all state-funded mainstream schools in the North East who are in the region’s lowest quintile of Attainment 8 scores, and (b) attending ONE Vision Schools who are within the region’s lowest quintile of Attainment 8 scores.

Number of pupils in North East in lowest quintile[1] of Attainment 8 scores (state-funded mainstream schools[2])

Number of pupils in North East in One Vision schools in lowest quintile1 of Attainment 8 scores (state-funded mainstream schools2)

4,836

1,169

The following table shows the number of pupils in 2017/18 (a) attending all state-funded schools in the North East who are within the region’s lowest quintile of capped GCSE point scores, based on their best eight entries, and (b) attending ONE Vision Schools who are within the region’s lowest quintile of capped GCSE point scores, based on their best eight entries.

Number of pupils in North East in lowest quintile1 of best eight entries scores (all state-funded schools)

Number of pupils in North East in One Vision schools in lowest quintile1 of best eight entries scores (all state-funded schools)

4,879

1,135

It is a goal of the ONE Vision programme to build capacity in these 30 schools so that they are able to support other schools in the future. To ensure that the ONE Vision activity does not adversely affect schools that are not participating in the programme, we will continue to speak with local authorities and trusts as part of our monitoring activities to understand what impact ONE Vision is having on the wider community. We will also continue to monitor the performance of all schools across the region.

[1] Quintiles are based on pupil ranking rather than school ranking. As more than one pupil can have the same attainment score, more than 20 percent of pupils can have scores in the lowest 20 percent.

[2] Region figures cover achievements in state-funded schools only. They do not include pupils recently arrived from overseas.

2 May 2019, 12:27 p.m. Schools: North East Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will publish the number of pupils (a) attending all mainstream schools in the North East who are in the region’s lowest quintile of Attainment 8 scores and (b) attending ONE Vision Schools who are within the region’s lowest quintile of Attainment 8 scores.

Answer (Nadhim Zahawi)

We will publish both the number of schools that were made an offer of support, the number that accepted the support, and the methodology used to determine eligibility for the Opportunity North East’s ONE Vision Schools programme in due course.

The ONE Vision programme aims to improve outcomes for young people at key stages 4 and 5 in 30 secondary phase schools. We selected Ofsted Requires Improvement (RI) as the single indicator to identify the long list of secondary phase schools in scope to become a ONE Vision school and, by exception, Ofsted Inadequate schools. We then shortlisted schools using a comprehensive review of their performance data, pupil demographics, Ofsted history and intelligence from local authorities and trusts on which schools were priorities for support. We made an initial offer of support to 32 schools, of which 30 accepted.

The support that each ONE Vision school receives will be bespoke to their individual circumstances. It will be determined by an analysis of need comprising an External Review of Governance, undertaken by a National Leader of Governance; a Financial Health Check, undertaken by a School Resource Management Adviser; and a School Development Review, undertaken by a National Leader of Education or other high performing school leader. This analysis will identify the schools’ main priorities for improvement.

The following table shows the number of pupils in 2017/18 (a) attending all state-funded mainstream schools in the North East who are in the region’s lowest quintile of Attainment 8 scores, and (b) attending ONE Vision Schools who are within the region’s lowest quintile of Attainment 8 scores.

Number of pupils in North East in lowest quintile[1] of Attainment 8 scores (state-funded mainstream schools[2])

Number of pupils in North East in One Vision schools in lowest quintile1 of Attainment 8 scores (state-funded mainstream schools2)

4,836

1,169

The following table shows the number of pupils in 2017/18 (a) attending all state-funded schools in the North East who are within the region’s lowest quintile of capped GCSE point scores, based on their best eight entries, and (b) attending ONE Vision Schools who are within the region’s lowest quintile of capped GCSE point scores, based on their best eight entries.

Number of pupils in North East in lowest quintile1 of best eight entries scores (all state-funded schools)

Number of pupils in North East in One Vision schools in lowest quintile1 of best eight entries scores (all state-funded schools)

4,879

1,135

It is a goal of the ONE Vision programme to build capacity in these 30 schools so that they are able to support other schools in the future. To ensure that the ONE Vision activity does not adversely affect schools that are not participating in the programme, we will continue to speak with local authorities and trusts as part of our monitoring activities to understand what impact ONE Vision is having on the wider community. We will also continue to monitor the performance of all schools across the region.

[1] Quintiles are based on pupil ranking rather than school ranking. As more than one pupil can have the same attainment score, more than 20 percent of pupils can have scores in the lowest 20 percent.

[2] Region figures cover achievements in state-funded schools only. They do not include pupils recently arrived from overseas.

2 May 2019, 12:27 p.m. Schools: North East Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will publish the number of pupils attending (a) all schools in the North East who are within the region’s lowest quintile of capped GCSE point scores, based on their best eight entries and (b) attending ONE Vision Schools who are within the region’s lowest quintile of capped GCSE point scores, based on their best eight entries.

Answer (Nadhim Zahawi)

We will publish both the number of schools that were made an offer of support, the number that accepted the support, and the methodology used to determine eligibility for the Opportunity North East’s ONE Vision Schools programme in due course.

The ONE Vision programme aims to improve outcomes for young people at key stages 4 and 5 in 30 secondary phase schools. We selected Ofsted Requires Improvement (RI) as the single indicator to identify the long list of secondary phase schools in scope to become a ONE Vision school and, by exception, Ofsted Inadequate schools. We then shortlisted schools using a comprehensive review of their performance data, pupil demographics, Ofsted history and intelligence from local authorities and trusts on which schools were priorities for support. We made an initial offer of support to 32 schools, of which 30 accepted.

The support that each ONE Vision school receives will be bespoke to their individual circumstances. It will be determined by an analysis of need comprising an External Review of Governance, undertaken by a National Leader of Governance; a Financial Health Check, undertaken by a School Resource Management Adviser; and a School Development Review, undertaken by a National Leader of Education or other high performing school leader. This analysis will identify the schools’ main priorities for improvement.

The following table shows the number of pupils in 2017/18 (a) attending all state-funded mainstream schools in the North East who are in the region’s lowest quintile of Attainment 8 scores, and (b) attending ONE Vision Schools who are within the region’s lowest quintile of Attainment 8 scores.

Number of pupils in North East in lowest quintile[1] of Attainment 8 scores (state-funded mainstream schools[2])

Number of pupils in North East in One Vision schools in lowest quintile1 of Attainment 8 scores (state-funded mainstream schools2)

4,836

1,169

The following table shows the number of pupils in 2017/18 (a) attending all state-funded schools in the North East who are within the region’s lowest quintile of capped GCSE point scores, based on their best eight entries, and (b) attending ONE Vision Schools who are within the region’s lowest quintile of capped GCSE point scores, based on their best eight entries.

Number of pupils in North East in lowest quintile1 of best eight entries scores (all state-funded schools)

Number of pupils in North East in One Vision schools in lowest quintile1 of best eight entries scores (all state-funded schools)

4,879

1,135

It is a goal of the ONE Vision programme to build capacity in these 30 schools so that they are able to support other schools in the future. To ensure that the ONE Vision activity does not adversely affect schools that are not participating in the programme, we will continue to speak with local authorities and trusts as part of our monitoring activities to understand what impact ONE Vision is having on the wider community. We will also continue to monitor the performance of all schools across the region.

[1] Quintiles are based on pupil ranking rather than school ranking. As more than one pupil can have the same attainment score, more than 20 percent of pupils can have scores in the lowest 20 percent.

[2] Region figures cover achievements in state-funded schools only. They do not include pupils recently arrived from overseas.

2 May 2019, 12:27 p.m. Schools: North East Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to ensure the ONE Vision Schools programme does not adversely effect schools that are not participating in that scheme.

Answer (Nadhim Zahawi)

We will publish both the number of schools that were made an offer of support, the number that accepted the support, and the methodology used to determine eligibility for the Opportunity North East’s ONE Vision Schools programme in due course.

The ONE Vision programme aims to improve outcomes for young people at key stages 4 and 5 in 30 secondary phase schools. We selected Ofsted Requires Improvement (RI) as the single indicator to identify the long list of secondary phase schools in scope to become a ONE Vision school and, by exception, Ofsted Inadequate schools. We then shortlisted schools using a comprehensive review of their performance data, pupil demographics, Ofsted history and intelligence from local authorities and trusts on which schools were priorities for support. We made an initial offer of support to 32 schools, of which 30 accepted.

The support that each ONE Vision school receives will be bespoke to their individual circumstances. It will be determined by an analysis of need comprising an External Review of Governance, undertaken by a National Leader of Governance; a Financial Health Check, undertaken by a School Resource Management Adviser; and a School Development Review, undertaken by a National Leader of Education or other high performing school leader. This analysis will identify the schools’ main priorities for improvement.

The following table shows the number of pupils in 2017/18 (a) attending all state-funded mainstream schools in the North East who are in the region’s lowest quintile of Attainment 8 scores, and (b) attending ONE Vision Schools who are within the region’s lowest quintile of Attainment 8 scores.

Number of pupils in North East in lowest quintile[1] of Attainment 8 scores (state-funded mainstream schools[2])

Number of pupils in North East in One Vision schools in lowest quintile1 of Attainment 8 scores (state-funded mainstream schools2)

4,836

1,169

The following table shows the number of pupils in 2017/18 (a) attending all state-funded schools in the North East who are within the region’s lowest quintile of capped GCSE point scores, based on their best eight entries, and (b) attending ONE Vision Schools who are within the region’s lowest quintile of capped GCSE point scores, based on their best eight entries.

Number of pupils in North East in lowest quintile1 of best eight entries scores (all state-funded schools)

Number of pupils in North East in One Vision schools in lowest quintile1 of best eight entries scores (all state-funded schools)

4,879

1,135

It is a goal of the ONE Vision programme to build capacity in these 30 schools so that they are able to support other schools in the future. To ensure that the ONE Vision activity does not adversely affect schools that are not participating in the programme, we will continue to speak with local authorities and trusts as part of our monitoring activities to understand what impact ONE Vision is having on the wider community. We will also continue to monitor the performance of all schools across the region.

[1] Quintiles are based on pupil ranking rather than school ranking. As more than one pupil can have the same attainment score, more than 20 percent of pupils can have scores in the lowest 20 percent.

[2] Region figures cover achievements in state-funded schools only. They do not include pupils recently arrived from overseas.

1 May 2019, 4:58 p.m. Schools: North East Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will list meetings (a) he and (b) his Ministers have had with (i) academics and (ii) multi-academy trusts and school leaders on the priorities of the Opportunity North East initiative.

Answer (Nadhim Zahawi)

The Department for Education has set up a board which includes academics, multi-academy trusts and school leaders to discuss the priorities of the Opportunity North East (ONE) initiative. My right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education chaired the launch meeting of the ONE board on 8 October 2018, and my noble Friend Lord Agnew has chaired the three subsequent board meetings on 4 February 2019, 14 March 2019 and 27 March 2019.

1 May 2019, 4:55 p.m. Higher Education: North East Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps Opportunity North East will take to boost the rate of participation in higher education, degree apprenticeships and other high quality technical education options.

Answer (Nadhim Zahawi)

Opportunity North East will challenge the most selective higher education (HE) institutions across the country to do more to increase the number of young people from the region who secure places. There are already a range of programmes that offer support to young people in the North East to help them think about progression to HE, such as Futureme offered through the North East Collaborative Outreach Programme (NECOP): https://futureme.ac.uk/about. We are working in collaboration with NECOP and others to assess which of these widening participation programmes have potential for the greatest impact, and we will work with HE institutions on these to boost the rate of participation of the region’s young people.

We are working closely with Local Enterprise Partnerships in the North East and their business partners to improve careers and enterprise education and connect young people to the regional economy, and to find more ways for regional and national employers to be part of providing word-class careers and enterprise education in the region’s schools.

We will engage with North East T level providers to support their delivery planning, and we will identify if there are any particular sectors/geographic areas where the National Apprenticeship Service could do some targeted work with employers.

30 Apr 2019, 4:54 p.m. Children: Social Services Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent discussions he has held with the Chancellor of the Exchequer and the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government on increasing the level of funding available for children’s services in the forthcoming Spending Review; and if he will make a statement.

Answer (Nadhim Zahawi)

My right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education and I regularly meet our ministerial colleagues from HM Treasury and the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government to discuss children’s services including funding.

As part of our preparation for the Spending Review, our departments are working together to assess the level of funding local government needs to meet demand and deliver its statutory duties.

31 Jan 2019, 5:35 p.m. Apprentices: Finance Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what account his Department takes of inflation when allocating funding for apprenticeships.

Answer (Anne Milton)

Spending on the apprenticeship programme is demand led, and employers can choose which apprenticeships they offer, how many and when.

Funding available for levy-paying employers depends on their levy contributions and how many of their employees live in England. For employers who do not pay the levy, we allocate funding to apprenticeship training providers directly based on our assessment of demand in the system and overall affordability of the programme. The funding allocated to providers is for non-levy starts is not directly inflation-linked.

Separately, the Institute for Apprenticeships is responsible for advising on the funding bands for individual apprenticeships, which are kept under review to make sure they continue to support high-quality delivery and represent value for money.

31 Jan 2019, 5:31 p.m. Apprentices: EU Nationals Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether EU nationals undertaking an apprenticeship in the UK will be able to complete their apprenticeship in the event that the UK leaves the EU without a withdrawal agreement.

Answer (Anne Milton)

We have agreed to protect the rights of EU citizens in the UK in both a deal and no deal scenario. Should the UK leave the EU without a deal, EU nationals living in the UK before 29 March 2019 will be able to remain in the UK and work, study, and access benefits and services, including education, training and appretniceships, on broadly the same terms as now. They will need to apply to stay in the UK, through the EU Settlement Scheme, if they are planning to continue living in the UK after 2020. They would need to make an application by 29 March 2020.

22 Jan 2019, 5:22 p.m. Apprentices Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether his Department plans to publish a long-term strategy for the apprenticeships sector.

Answer (Anne Milton)

The longer-term direction and funding for the programme post-2020 will be considered as part of the 2019 Spending Review.

We want to make sure that the apprenticeship levy continues to help develop the skilled workforce businesses need to grow. As my right hon. Friend, the Chancellor of the Exchequer announced in his budget speech in October, we are seeking views from a range of employers on the operation of the levy after 2020. As part of this work, we are holding a number of roundtables across the country with a cross-section of employers and training providers.

22 Jan 2019, 3:37 p.m. Apprentices: Management Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether his Department undertook an impact assessment of its recently approved reductions in funding bands for management apprenticeships.

Answer (Anne Milton)

The Institute for Apprenticeships (IfA) leads on the process of reviewing funding bands for existing standards and on consultation with the business community. The review announced in May 2018 included the Chartered Manager Degree apprenticeship, the Operations/Departmental Manager apprenticeship and the Team Leader/Supervisor apprenticeship.

The IfA worked with employer trailblazer groups throughout the review process and discussed the management apprenticeship standards directly with business stakeholders. In addition, the department undertook its own analysis on the market impact to ensure that employers can continue to access high quality apprenticeships, and that funding bands represent good value for money for employers and government.

17 Jan 2019, 5:41 p.m. Apprentices Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will publish the meetings (a) he, (b) Ministers in his Department and (c) officials in his Department have held with stakeholders from the apprenticeships sector in the last 12 months; and what the principal topics for discussion were at those meetings.

Answer (Anne Milton)

My right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State, ministers and department officials meet with stakeholders from across the apprenticeships sector frequently to discuss the apprenticeships agenda, including employers, business representative organisations and providers. This includes a regular meeting between my right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State and national business bodies.

Stakeholder meetings cover a variety of topics across the apprenticeships programme. The department will continue to work closely with all key stakeholders to help them take advantage of apprenticeships and the apprenticeship reform programme to invest in the long-term skills needs of the country.

16 Jan 2019, 4:43 p.m. Institute for Apprenticeships Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will publish the (a) dates of and (b) principal topics for discussion at the meetings that (i) he, (ii) Ministers in his Department and (iii) officials in his Department have had with the Institute for Apprenticeships since it was established.

Answer (Anne Milton)

Since the Institute for Apprenticeships was established in April 2017, ministers and officials in the department have had regular meetings with the institute. These have included 6 monthly ministerial reviews with the institute, and quarterly performance reviews at senior official level. These reviews have discussed the progress of the institute in discharging its apprenticeship responsibilities and preparing to take on responsibilities for T levels. Ministers and officials have met the institute regularly between these meetings to discuss a range of issues related to the business of the institute and the apprenticeship and technical education reform programmes.

16 Jan 2019, 4:40 p.m. Apprentices: Taxation Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much Apprenticeship Levy funding has been (a) spent, (b) drawn down by Levy contributor employers, (c) spent on apprenticeships training by non-Levy contributor employers, (d) allocated in incentives and payments to apprentices, (e) spent on English and Maths requirements and (f) allocated to other Levy-related spending in each financial year since the introduction of that Levy.

Answer (Anne Milton)

The following information pertains to the 2017-18 financial year and is based on the aggregate spending on apprenticeships as set out in the department’s 2017-18 annual report and accounts.

In the 2017-18 financial year, the department spent £1.58 billion on apprenticeships. Of the £1.58 billion, £1.52 billion was spent on training and assessing apprentices:

  • £1.065 billion on ongoing costs of training apprentices who started before the levy was introduced in May 2017.
  • £268 million was spent on training for apprentices who started on or after 1 May 2017 with levy paying employers.
  • £189 million was spent on training for apprentices who started on or after 1 May 2017 with employers who do not pay the levy.

Additional payments relating to apprentices who started on or after 1 May 2017 were £99 million. English and maths training for apprentices who started on or after 1 May 2017 was £38 million.

The remaining spending of £58 million was on maintaining the apprenticeship programme and service, and on learners still funded under legacy areas of policy (now closed to new learners).

16 Jan 2019, 2:08 p.m. Apprentices Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what (a) skills and (b) economic sectors his Department has classified as priority for the apprenticeships sector.

Answer (Anne Milton)

The government want to see high-quality apprenticeship opportunities at all levels, right across the economy, and we are working with employer groups in a wide range of sectors to develop the standards their industries need. A total of 390 apprenticeship standards are now approved for delivery.[1]

Apprenticeships benefit people of all ages and backgrounds, and the government’s reforms are driving up quality and enabling people to gain the skills employers need.

As part of the Industrial Strategy, the department contributes to Sector Deals: business-led agreements between a sector and government, with each side making commitments to work in new and innovative ways to improve productivity.[2] All of the sector deals include elements relating to skills and the labour market specific to those sectors, including commitments to increase the number of apprenticeships at all levels across priority sectors. This could include promoting apprenticeships to existing workers, to support progression and re-training to provide the highly skilled workforce employers need.

Further sector deals are in progress towards formal negotiation. The government is fully engaged in this process and seeks opportunities to embed skills policy initiatives within each deal.

[1] https://www.instituteforapprenticeships.org/apprenticeship-standards/?includeApprovedForDelivery=true.

[2] https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/industrial-strategy-sector-deals/introduction-to-sector-deals.

16 Jan 2019, 2:02 p.m. Apprentices Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether it is his Department’s policy to prioritise the take-up of higher-level apprenticeship programmes at Levels 4-7, over programmes at Levels 2-3.

Answer (Anne Milton)

Employers choose the type, level and quantity of apprenticeships that they offer, as well as when they offer the apprenticeships, to meet their current and future skills needs.

The Institute for Apprenticeships is supporting employers to design and take charge of high quality apprenticeship standards that give them the skills that they need. There are currently 390 standards available at all levels and in a range of occupations.

Apprenticeship starts at levels 2 and 3 make up the vast majority of the programme. There were 327,600 starts at these levels in 2017/18, which represents over 87% of starts. Apprenticeships at higher levels (from level 4 onwards) are continuing to grow, with an increase of 31.7% in 2017/18 compared to 2016/17. There were over six times more starts on apprenticeships at levels 6 and 7 in 2017/18 (10,880 starts) than in 2016/17 (1,700 starts).

This shows how apprenticeships are helping people to train in skilled occupations at all levels and to progress in their careers.

16 Jan 2019, 1:59 p.m. Apprentices: Finance Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what discussions his Department has had with stakeholders from the apprenticeships sector on the apprenticeship funding band reviews.

Answer (Anne Milton)

The Institute for Apprenticeships is responsible for running the funding band reviews. As part of the review process for every apprenticeship, the Institute for Apprenticeships has worked closely with trailblazer groups of employers to gather evidence to inform the review and to assess sector views on funding.

Both the Institute for Apprenticeships and the department have also met regularly with wider employers, providers, assessment organisations and sector representative organisations to discuss the funding band review.

16 Jan 2019, 1:16 p.m. Apprentices: Finance Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the stated aims are of the apprenticeship funding band review; and how those aims align with Government policy on apprenticeships.

Answer (Anne Milton)

The aim of the apprenticeship funding band review is to assess whether apprenticeship standards are set in the appropriate funding band to support high-quality delivery and to provide value for money for employers and government, following the introduction of the 30 band funding structure in August 2018. This is set out on the Institute for Apprenticeships’ website: https://www.instituteforapprenticeships.org/about/news-events/funding-band-review/.

This is in line with our commitment to create an apprenticeships programme which delivers high-quality apprenticeship training in a sustainable way.

16 Jan 2019, 11:48 a.m. Apprentices: Taxation Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate he has made of Apprenticeship Levy (a) funding and (b) spending for 2018-19.

Answer (Anne Milton)

The Department for Education has a ring-fenced apprenticeship budget which has been set regardless of how much levy receipts are each year. This budget was set at £2.23 billion for the 2018-19 financial year. It is used to fund new apprenticeship starts in levy and non-levy paying employers and to cover the ongoing training costs of apprentices that are already in training.

Spending on the apprenticeship programme is demand led - employers choose which apprenticeships they offer and at what level, how many and when, to meet their current and future skills needs.

We will publish details on aggregate apprenticeship spending in our departmental end of year accounts as part of our annual financial reporting cycle.

22 Oct 2018, 5:01 p.m. Secondary Education: Pupil Exclusions Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department is taking to support pupils who have been excluded from secondary school to access (a) apprenticeships and (b) other forms of post-16 training.

Answer (Nick Gibb)

There are duties in place to make sure that suitable, full time alternative provision (AP) is available for children of compulsory school age who have been excluded for a fixed period or permanently. Local authorities are responsible for making sure that provision meets the needs of young people in their area. This includes identifying 16 to 19 year olds who are not in education, employment or training, such as those excluded from school, and providing the help they need to participate and progress.

Young people have access to a range of support and guidance, including the 16-19 Bursary Fund to assist with the costs associated with staying in post-16 further education, and Access to Work funding to support apprentices who are disabled or have a physical or mental health condition.

In March 2018, the Government published its vision for AP, including a plan for improving the support it offers to young people.The Department will continue to engage with AP and post-16 providers to identify and share new ways of helping young people make the transition into post-16 settings, apprenticeships and adult life. The Department has published primary research into the recent experiences of children, schools, AP and post-16 providers regarding this transition. The Department has also announced the successful AP Innovation fund projects to improve outcomes for young people leaving AP at age 16.

22 Oct 2018, 4:57 p.m. Secondary Education: Pupil Exclusions Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if will publish a ranked list of the reasons for fixed-period exclusions of pupils in secondary schools in (a) the North East and (b) England in the last two years.

Answer (Nick Gibb)

The National Statistics release ‘Permanent and fixed-period exclusions in England 2016 to 2017’ includes information on the reasons for exclusions. The full release is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/permanent-and-fixed-period-exclusions-in-england-2016-to-2017.[1]

[1] National and regional information on reasons for exclusions by academic year by school type is available in the underlying data section of the release, in the file “reason_for_exclusion_exc1617.csv”. The data can be filtered by the columns “year, “level”, “region_name” and “school_type”.

22 Oct 2018, 2:06 p.m. Secondary Education: Pupil Exclusions Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment his Department has made of trends in the level of fixed-period exclusions in secondary schools in (a) the North East of England and (b) England.

Answer (Nick Gibb)

The National Statistics release ‘Permanent and fixed-period exclusions in England 2016 to 2017’ includes information on the number and rate of permanent and fixed period exclusions. The full release is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/permanent-and-fixed-period-exclusions-in-england-2016-to-2017.[1]

The attached table provides the number of exclusions in the North East of England in national curriculum years 10 and 11 for academic years 2010/11 to 2016/17.

The Department does not hold information centrally on the number of pupils taken off roll. Local authorities have a duty to make arrangements to establish the identities of children of compulsory school age in their area who are not registered pupils at a school and are not receiving suitable education otherwise.

The law is clear that a pupil’s name can only be deleted from the admission register on the grounds prescribed in regulation 8 of the Education (Pupil Registration) (England) Regulations 2006 as amended.

If a school removes a child from their roll when not at the point of a standard transition, it must inform the local authority and set out the grounds for their action. When removing a pupil’s name, the notification to the local authority must include: the full name of the pupil, the full name and address of any parent with whom the pupil normally resides, at least one telephone number of the parent, and the pupil’s future address and destination school, if applicable.

[1] National and regional information by academic year is available in the Underlying data section of the release, in the file ‘national_region_la_school_data_exc1617.csv’. The data can be filtered by the columns ‘year’, ‘level’ and ‘region_name’.

22 Oct 2018, 2:06 p.m. Pupil Exclusions: North East Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many (a) exclusions and (b) instances of off-rolling in school year (a) ten and (b) eleven there were in the North East of England in each year since 2010.

Answer (Nick Gibb)

The National Statistics release ‘Permanent and fixed-period exclusions in England 2016 to 2017’ includes information on the number and rate of permanent and fixed period exclusions. The full release is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/permanent-and-fixed-period-exclusions-in-england-2016-to-2017.[1]

The attached table provides the number of exclusions in the North East of England in national curriculum years 10 and 11 for academic years 2010/11 to 2016/17.

The Department does not hold information centrally on the number of pupils taken off roll. Local authorities have a duty to make arrangements to establish the identities of children of compulsory school age in their area who are not registered pupils at a school and are not receiving suitable education otherwise.

The law is clear that a pupil’s name can only be deleted from the admission register on the grounds prescribed in regulation 8 of the Education (Pupil Registration) (England) Regulations 2006 as amended.

If a school removes a child from their roll when not at the point of a standard transition, it must inform the local authority and set out the grounds for their action. When removing a pupil’s name, the notification to the local authority must include: the full name of the pupil, the full name and address of any parent with whom the pupil normally resides, at least one telephone number of the parent, and the pupil’s future address and destination school, if applicable.

[1] National and regional information by academic year is available in the Underlying data section of the release, in the file ‘national_region_la_school_data_exc1617.csv’. The data can be filtered by the columns ‘year’, ‘level’ and ‘region_name’.

22 Oct 2018, 1:50 p.m. Apprentices: Taxation Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, a) what estimate he has made of the amount of unspent funds in employers’ accounts under the Apprenticeship Levy; for what reasons those funds remain unspent; and whether he has plans to extend the period of time within which levy-paying employers can use those funds.

Answer (Anne Milton)

At the end of September, the total balance of employers’ Apprenticeship Service accounts was £2.7 billion, which includes government top-ups. This will change as payments are made in and out of apprenticeship service accounts. Some of these funds are already committed.

The apprenticeships programme (and therefore the expenditure) is demand-led. Employers choose which apprenticeships they want to offer, how many apprentices they want to employ and when they want them to begin. We do not anticipate that all employers who pay the levy will need or want to use all the funds in their accounts.

Levy-paying employers have up to 24 months in which to spend the funds available to them. The 24 month expiry period is designed to give employers time to develop their apprenticeship programmes whilst encouraging employers to take action to create new apprenticeship opportunities. We currently have no plans to extend the expiry period.

16 Oct 2018, 4:50 p.m. Pupils: Carers Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many pupils in schools in (a) the North East of England and (b) England are young carers.

Answer (Nadhim Zahawi)

The information requested is not held centrally on the number of pupils who are young carers.

However, according to the 2011 Census, there are almost 166,000 young carers aged 5 to 17 in England, although estimates from other studies using different methodologies or question wording to identify carers are much higher.

In January 2017 the Department for Education (DfE) published the omnibus survey report ‘The lives of young carers in England’ available on https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-lives-of-young-carers-in-england. This was a significant piece of research carried out by the department in partnership with Loughborough University looking to improve understanding of the numbers and needs of young carers and their families.

The government is committed to supporting young carers - to improve their health and wellbeing, and to protect them from excessive or inappropriate caring responsibilities that can impact on their education. That is why earlier this year, we launched the cross-government 'Carers Action Plan': https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/713781/carers-action-plan-2018-2020.pdf. This is a two-year programme of tailored work to support unpaid carers of all ages, including specifically to support young carers. This includes plans to improve: identification of young carers; educational opportunities and outcomes; access to support and services; and transition for young adult carers. In delivering on these commitments, together with the Department for Health and Social Care, the DfE is currently inviting bids to undertake a review of best practice in identifying young carers.

This action builds on significant changes to the law through the Children and Families Act 2014, to improve how young carers and their families are identified and supported.

15 Oct 2018, 4:46 p.m. Carers: Education Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department is taking to support young carers with their education in the (a) North East of England and (b) UK.

Answer (Nadhim Zahawi)

The government is committed to supporting young carers; to improve their health and wellbeing, and to protect them from excessive or inappropriate caring responsibilities that can impact on their education.

In June, the cross-government Carers Action Plan, a two-year programme of tailored work to support unpaid carers of all ages, was launched: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/carers-action-plan-2018-to-2020. Section 3 sets out the government’s actions specifically to support young carers. This includes plans to improve: identification of young carers; educational opportunities and outcomes; access to support and services; and transition for young adult carers. In delivering on these commitments, together with the Department for Health and Social Care, the Department for Education is currently inviting bids to undertake a review of best practice in identifying young carers.

This action builds on significant changes to the law through the Children and Families Act 2014, to improve how young carers and their families are identified and supported.

15 Oct 2018, 4:28 p.m. T-levels Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether his Department has made an assessment of the benefits of extending T-levels to 19-23 year-olds; and if he will make a statement.

Answer (Anne Milton)

T Levels will be two year, full time study programmes of up to 1800 hours. We are introducing them for 16-19 year olds initially, and will consider whether they could also be suitable for some adults in due course.

In our manifesto, we also pledged to introduce a National Retraining Scheme. The National Retraining Scheme is an ambitious, far-reaching programme set up to drive the adult learning and retraining that will deliver the skills that individuals need to thrive. It was also set up to support employers to adapt as the economy changes.

The Chancellor recently announced funding of £100 million for the National Retraining Scheme. This funding will help us to roll out the initial elements of the scheme, delivering parts of the service to the public. It will also allow us to substantively test, evaluate and learn as we build the service. In addition to the National Retraining Scheme, apprenticeships are available to learners of all ages.

11 Sep 2018, 4:54 p.m. Apprentices Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what his Department's target is for apprenticeship starts by 2020.

Answer (Anne Milton)

In 2015 we set an ambitious goal of three million apprenticeship starts by 2020, and that remains our ambition. Whilst we do want to see an increasing number of apprenticeship starts, we will not sacrifice quality for quantity.

New, employer-designed standards are replacing the existing frameworks which were often not fit-for-purpose. Starts on these standards continue to grow; latest data on apprenticeships in England show there have been 119,500 starts on standards in the first three quarters of the 2017/2018 academic year; more than ten times higher than the 11,000 reported at this time last year (2016/17). This represents just over 40 per cent of all stats reported in the 2017/18 academic year, compared to 2.5 per cent in 2016/17.

9 Jul 2018, 1:46 p.m. Apprentices: Taxation Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate he has made of the number of apprenticeship levy-paying employers in England that have used that funding to pay for MBA courses.

Answer (Anne Milton)

Apprenticeship funding can only be used to pay for apprenticeships and not courses, such as a Master of Business Administration. Whilst apprenticeships may replicate some training delivered by traditional courses, an apprenticeship has to meet certain requirements to make sure it combines on and off-the-job training and delivers occupational competence.

The Senior Leader apprenticeship standard, which is at masters’ level, has only been available since 27 February 2018. The department holds the overall number of starts on each apprenticeship standard but does not currently have published data on the number of Senior Leader starts.

We do not hold data on which apprenticeship standards levy-paying employers spend their apprenticeship funding on.

13 Jun 2018, 10:37 a.m. Apprentices: Taxation Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 21 May 2018 to Question 144910, on Apprentices: Taxation, what estimate he has made of the amount of funds that will be unspent in apprenticeship levy-paying employers’ apprenticeship service accounts after the two year deadline.

Answer (Anne Milton)

The Department for Education has a ring-fenced apprenticeship budget which has been set regardless of how much levy receipts are each year. This budget was set at £2.01 billion for the 2017-18 financial year and £2.23 billion for 2018/19. It is used to fund new apprenticeship starts in levy and non-levy paying employers and to cover the ongoing training costs of apprentices that are already in training.

Levy-paying employers have up to 24 months in which to spend the funds available to them, with the first levy funds starting to expire in May 2019. This allows sufficient time for employers to establish apprenticeship programmes, while incentivising behaviour to drive starts and manage the department’s spend.

Spending on the apprenticeship programme is demand led, and employers can choose which apprenticeships they offer, how many and when, and we do not anticipate that all employers who pay the levy will want to use all the funds in their accounts. Therefore, robust estimates of employers’ future spending and any underspends are not possible. We will publish details on aggregate apprenticeship spending in our departmental end-of-year accounts as part of our normal financial reporting cycle.

To help employers we have ongoing face-to-face support for over 1,000 of the largest levy-paying employers through our national account managers, and ongoing support via telephone for small and medium-sized enterprises to encourage them to invest their levy funds through registering for an apprenticeship service account.

We also encourage self-service support via comprehensive guidance on our web pages:

12 Jun 2018, 4:23 p.m. Apprentices: Employment Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what proportion of apprenticeship starts involved people (a) already employed by their employer and (b) recruited by their employer in order to undertake an apprenticeship in the last 12 months; and if he will make a statement.

Answer (Anne Milton)

The department does not hold this information for the last 12 months.

We conducted the 2017 apprenticeship evaluation learner survey, which found 56 per cent of all level 2 and 3 apprentices were recruited specifically with the intention of completing an apprenticeship. Just over two-fifths of level 2 and 3 apprenticeships (42 per cent) were undertaken by those in existing roles already working for their employer: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/apprenticeships-evaluation-2017-learners-survey.

The 2017 apprenticeship evaluation employers’ survey found that 60 per cent of employers provided their apprenticeships to people who were recruited specifically to start an apprenticeship, with the training starting straight away. A smaller group of employers (10 per cent) had provided apprenticeships to people who were recruited with the intention that they would start an apprenticeship, but the training did not start immediately. 32 per cent provided apprenticeships to existing employees that were already working for them; this excludes any recruited with the intention of starting an apprenticeship: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/apprenticeships-evaluation-2017-employers-survey.

11 Jun 2018, 4:59 p.m. Apprentices: Taxation Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 21 May 2018 to Question 144910, on Apprentices: Taxation, if he will publish his Department's guidance on how unspent funds in apprenticeship service accounts will be used to support levy-paying employers.

Answer (Anne Milton)

The Department for Education has a ring-fenced apprenticeship budget which has been set regardless of how much levy receipts are each year. This budget was set at £2.01 billion for the 2017-18 financial year and £2.23 billion for 2018/19. It is used to fund new apprenticeship starts in levy and non-levy paying employers and to cover the ongoing training costs of apprentices that are already in training.

Levy-paying employers have up to 24 months in which to spend the funds available to them, with the first levy funds starting to expire in May 2019. This allows sufficient time for employers to establish apprenticeship programmes, while incentivising behaviour to drive starts and manage the department’s spend.

Spending on the apprenticeship programme is demand led, and employers can choose which apprenticeships they offer, how many and when, and we do not anticipate that all employers who pay the levy will want to use all the funds in their accounts. Therefore, robust estimates of employers’ future spending and any underspends are not possible. We will publish details on aggregate apprenticeship spending in our departmental end-of-year accounts as part of our normal financial reporting cycle.

To help employers we have ongoing face-to-face support for over 1,000 of the largest levy-paying employers through our national account managers, and ongoing support via telephone for small and medium-sized enterprises to encourage them to invest their levy funds through registering for an apprenticeship service account.

We also encourage self-service support via comprehensive guidance on our web pages:

11 Jun 2018, 4:59 p.m. Apprentices: Taxation Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 21 May 2018 to Question 144910, on Apprentices: Taxation, what plans his Department has to ensure that levy-paying employers will spend all the funds in their apprenticeship service accounts.

Answer (Anne Milton)

The Department for Education has a ring-fenced apprenticeship budget which has been set regardless of how much levy receipts are each year. This budget was set at £2.01 billion for the 2017-18 financial year and £2.23 billion for 2018/19. It is used to fund new apprenticeship starts in levy and non-levy paying employers and to cover the ongoing training costs of apprentices that are already in training.

Levy-paying employers have up to 24 months in which to spend the funds available to them, with the first levy funds starting to expire in May 2019. This allows sufficient time for employers to establish apprenticeship programmes, while incentivising behaviour to drive starts and manage the department’s spend.

Spending on the apprenticeship programme is demand led, and employers can choose which apprenticeships they offer, how many and when, and we do not anticipate that all employers who pay the levy will want to use all the funds in their accounts. Therefore, robust estimates of employers’ future spending and any underspends are not possible. We will publish details on aggregate apprenticeship spending in our departmental end-of-year accounts as part of our normal financial reporting cycle.

To help employers we have ongoing face-to-face support for over 1,000 of the largest levy-paying employers through our national account managers, and ongoing support via telephone for small and medium-sized enterprises to encourage them to invest their levy funds through registering for an apprenticeship service account.

We also encourage self-service support via comprehensive guidance on our web pages:

4 Jun 2018, 7:38 a.m. T-levels Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how the Government made its decision that the four T-level routes of Transport and Logistics, Sales, Marketing and Procurement, Social Care and Protective Services will be delivered without any classroom-based learning; and what evidence supports that decision.

Answer (Anne Milton)

Following extensive analysis and stakeholder engagement, the Independent Panel on Technical Education led by Lord Sainsbury, identified that four technical routes (Transport and Logistics, Sales, Marketing and Procurement, Social Care and Protective Services) would be better suited to delivery via work-based training (apprenticeships), rather than classroom-based provision such as T levels. The government accepted their recommendation and these routes formed the basis for developing the occupational maps, which are now owned by the Institute for Apprenticeships.

8 May 2018, 12:30 p.m. Apprentices: Taxation Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the implications are for his policies on the apprenticeship levy of the recommendations in the April 2018 EEF report, A levy price to pay? The apprenticeship levy one year on; and if he will make a statement.

Answer (Anne Milton)

The apprenticeship levy is an important part of our reforms - it means there is long-term investment in apprenticeship training so that employers get the skills they need. Nearly 60 per cent of people starting on the new apprenticeship standards are levy supported, showing that levy payers are working well with the new system.

I recently met with EEF as part of a roundtable meeting to discuss how apprenticeships are working in the engineering and manufacturing sectors. We will continue to work closely with employers to support them to take advantage of the levy, and wider funding and quality reforms, to invest in the long-term skills needs of their business.

We have recently seen an increase in the number of people starting on higher level apprenticeships, such as engineering and law, and on our new quality apprenticeship standards. These new apprenticeships are designed by employers themselves to meet their needs, and are within a wide range of industries. Higher quality training leads to increased productivity; so it is positive news that over 250 of the new standards have already been approved.

Our reforms to the apprenticeship system are about increasing the number of quality apprenticeships in this country and creating the long-term investment in skills training that British businesses need to grow.

26 Apr 2018, 2:49 p.m. Teachers: North East Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the net change has been in the number of (a) primary school teachers and (b) secondary school teachers in the North East in each year since 2010.

Answer (Nick Gibb)

The attached table provides the full-time equivalent number of qualified and unqualified teachers in state funded nursery and primary schools, and state funded secondary schools in the North East region in England. The table also shows the net change between years. All figures are as at November each year.

26 Apr 2018, 9:30 a.m. Teachers: Mental Health Services Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what mental health support is available for teachers in (a) the North East and (b) England.

Answer (Nick Gibb)

Head teachers have a duty to lead and manage a healthy workforce with a proper regard for their well-being. It is their responsibility to ensure that systems are in place to support teachers who are experiencing problems and to provide them with the appropriate level of support.

24 Apr 2018, 4:42 p.m. Young People: Unemployment Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what information the Government holds on the number of young people not in education, employment or training in Newcastle.

Answer (Nadhim Zahawi)

Official national and regional estimates of the number of young people aged 16-24 not in education, employment or training (NEET) for England and the UK are taken from the labour force survey. Because this is survey data it cannot be disaggregated to local authority level due to sample sizes.

Local authorities are required to monitor and record the extent to which young people are meeting their duty to participate in education or training and provide local statistics to the department. This information is published on GOV.UK as transparency data and is available via the following links.

Participation of 16 and 17 year olds in education or training: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/participation-in-education-and-training-by-local-authority.

16 and 17 year olds NEET and not known: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/neet-data-by-local-authority-2012-16-to-18-year-olds-not-in-education-employment-or-training.

NEET and not known local authority scorecards: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/young-people-neet-comparative-data-scorecard.

24 Apr 2018, 9:09 a.m. Education Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether his Department has conducted any impact assessments on the effect on the British education system of the UK leaving the EU.

Answer (Nadhim Zahawi)

We are working with departments across government, in close coordination with the Department for Exiting the European Union, to carry out a programme of work to inform our negotiating position with the EU and our understanding of how EU exit will affect the UK’s domestic policies and frameworks.

Where appropriate, an impact assessment often accompanies major bills and regulations to illustrate the effects of the changes. For example, the government published an Impact Assessment alongside the EU (Withdrawal) Bill. We will continue publishing Impact Assessments to accompany legislation, where appropriate.

23 Apr 2018, 4:55 p.m. Pupils: Disadvantaged Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether his Department's review on the educational outcomes of children in need of help or support aged 16 and 17 will consider any other outcomes where the support those children have received may cause an effect.

Answer (Nadhim Zahawi)

On 16 March 2018, the government published data and analysis as part of the Department for Education’s Children in Need Review. This included the finding that Children in Need have worse educational outcomes than their peers from the early years, make less progress throughout school, and are more likely than other children to become a young adult who is Not in Education, Employment or Training three years after completing Key Stage 4.

The scope of the review is focussed on educational outcomes, and we have no plans to extend this. However, we recognise that the factors affecting these children and young people’s educational outcomes, such as the support they receive, may also lead to other poorer outcomes. That is why our data publication sets out our intention to understand the lifetime outcomes of Children in Need, including exploring the feasibility of matching the Department for Education’s Children in Need data with data from other government departments.

Children’s social care and schools have a central role in supporting Children in Need. It is therefore important for us to focus the review on what we can do now whilst making progress and working across government to understand more about other outcomes over the longer-term.

23 Apr 2018, 4:50 p.m. Homelessness: Care Leavers Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many young people classified as homeless were previously in care in (a) the North East and (b) England.

Answer (Nadhim Zahawi)

This information is publically available in the statistical first release Children looked after in England including adoption 2016 to 2017 at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/children-looked-after-in-england-including-adoption-2016-to-2017.

16 Apr 2018, 1:53 p.m. Children: North of England Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will make an assessment of the implications for his Department’s policies of the Children’s Commissioner's report, Growing Up North, Look North: A generation of children await the powerhouse promise, published on 26 March 2018.

Answer (Nadhim Zahawi)

The Children’s Commissioner’s Growing Up North covers a wide range of areas which relate to the education and life experiences of a wide range on children and regions. This is an area which we are already focussing on and we are determined to create an education system that offers opportunity to everyone, at every stage of their lives.

We are taking forward key actions from the ‘Northern Powerhouse Schools Strategy’, including the independent review of schools in the north undertaken by Sir Nick Weller, Chief Executive of Dixon’s Academy Trust in Bradford. The strategy commits government to working with the regions and the sector on plans to design, fund, and test a range of approaches to attracting and retaining high-quality teachers in the north, including in Opportunity Areas.

The Opportunity Areas programme will not only create opportunities for young people in social mobility ‘coldspots’ across the country, but will ensure that best practice will be spread wider to more schools to ensure all young people get the opportunities they deserve. Seven of the twelve Opportunity Areas are in the north and the midlands (Blackpool, Bradford, Doncaster, North Yorkshire Coast, Oldham). We are targeting local and national resource in these areas to drive improved outcomes and social mobility for the children and young people who live there.

The government committed £70 million to raise education standards in the north and we have taken forward this strategy through programmes such as £5 million to build multi academy trust and sponsor capacity and £11.5 million of funding on designing, funding, and testing approaches to attract and retain teachers in the north. Through this funding we are supporting our best teacher trainer providers, including top multi academy trusts, to expand their reach in to challenging areas in the north and are providing £12 million to establish a network of English hubs with a specific focus on improving early language and literacy. Our expansion of Maths Hubs will spread excellence in maths teaching and a £5 million investment to trial evidence-based home learning environment support programmes in the north will provide a focus on early language and literacy.



19 Mar 2018, 5:54 p.m. Apprentices Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, for what reason the Government classes older apprentices as those over the age of 25; and if his Department will make an assessment of the potential merits of raising that age.

Answer (Anne Milton)

Apprenticeships offer an excellent route into skilled employment for people of all ages.

The department’s historic measure of finishing formal education is 25, and for all historic and future social mobility measures, the age of 25 is classed as adult.

We provide detailed figures for apprenticeship starts by age as part of our Statistical First Release, which is published at: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/675513/201617_apprenticeships_detailed_demographic_tool_by_SSAv2.xlsx.

15 Mar 2018, 3:36 p.m. Free School Meals: North East Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether his Department has made an assessment on the effect of the changes to the eligibility of free school meals under universal credit and on child poverty in the North East of England.

Answer (Nadhim Zahawi)

Our new criteria for free school meals eligibility will increase the number of children eligible for this vital benefit. We have not made specific regional assessments of the effect of these changes. Due to the generous protections we will provide, all children receiving free school meals at the point the threshold is introduced, and all those who gain eligibility as Universal Credit (UC) rolls out, will continue to receive free school meals until the end of UC rollout. After this point, those children who were protected – if they are still in school – will continue to be protected until the end of their phase of education. While we estimate around 50,000 children more will benefit from our proposals once UC rollout is complete, many more children again will benefit as a result of our transitional arrangements.

15 Mar 2018, 3:33 p.m. Children: Day Care Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 20 February 2018 to Question 128522, how many childcare providers in (a) the North East and (b) England (i) are and (ii) are not offering 30 hours free childcare without extra cost to parents that are eligible for that scheme.

Answer (Nadhim Zahawi)

We do not hold this information. Our statutory guidance is clear that government funding is intended to deliver 15 or 30 hours a week of free, high quality, flexible childcare. It is not intended to cover the costs of meals, other consumables, additional hours or additional services. Our statutory guidance is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/early-education-and-childcare--2.

We have restated our position on additional charges in the operational guidance for local authorities and providers. In this we are clear that providers should publish a statement of how they deliver the free entitlement and any additional charges for optional activities outside of the entitlement. This is to ensure that parents can make informed decisions on their choice of childcare. Our operational guidance is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/30-hours-free-childcare-la-and-early-years-provider-guide.

13 Mar 2018, 3:59 p.m. Apprentices Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the average length of time was for an apprenticeship programme undertaken by (a) women and (b) men in each sector subject area in 2016-17.

Answer (Anne Milton)

The average length of stay on apprenticeship programmes in England in the 2016/17 academic year is as follows:

Average length of stay (days)

Sector Subject Area

Male

Female

All learners

Agriculture, Horticulture and Animal Care

570

558

565

Arts, Media and Publishing

492

470

482

Business, Administration and Law

432

425

428

Construction, Planning and the Built Environment

617

640

617

Education and Training

452

454

454

Engineering and Manufacturing Technologies

643

490

631

Health, Public Services and Care

462

465

464

Information and Communication Technology

455

450

454

Leisure, Travel and Tourism

450

416

437

Retail and Commercial Enterprise

409

442

427

Science and Mathematics

779

702

744

Not Applicable/Not Known

491

608

502

Overall average

520

448

483

Notes:

  1. Data source: Single Individualised Learner Record.
  2. Within the Individualised Learner Record, providers can record the start date, planned end date, and actual end date for each apprenticeship record.
  3. Actual end date is only recorded for learners who have reached the end of their programme, or those who have withdrawn early.
  4. This calculation only includes those learners who have completed their programme in 2016/17.
  5. Some learners can complete their programme in a shorter time due to prior learning.
  6. Some learners take longer than expected due to planned breaks in learning.
  7. A small number of learners from the Employer Outcome Pilot are not included in this calculation
12 Mar 2018, 5:23 p.m. Apprentices: Ethnic Groups Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent steps his Department has taken to encourage apprenticeship uptake by people who are from a BAME background.

Answer (Anne Milton)

To drive up apprenticeships among underrepresented groups, including black, Asian and minority ethnic individuals, last month we launched a new partnership with five major cities in England, supported by city Mayors, to ensure apprenticeships are accessible to individuals from all backgrounds.

Our Apprenticeship Diversity Champions Network, now comprised of over 40 employers, continues to influence the behaviour of other employers to support more people from underrepresented groups, including those with disabilities, women, and members of black, Asian and minority ethnic communities, to access apprenticeships.

We celebrated National Apprenticeship in 5-9 March, celebrating the positive impact apprenticeships have on individuals, businesses and the wider economy.

12 Mar 2018, 5:23 p.m. Apprentices Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent steps his Department has taken to encourage apprenticeship uptake by people who are aged over 45.

Answer (Anne Milton)

To drive up apprenticeships among underrepresented groups, including black, Asian and minority ethnic individuals, last month we launched a new partnership with five major cities in England, supported by city Mayors, to ensure apprenticeships are accessible to individuals from all backgrounds.

Our Apprenticeship Diversity Champions Network, now comprised of over 40 employers, continues to influence the behaviour of other employers to support more people from underrepresented groups, including those with disabilities, women, and members of black, Asian and minority ethnic communities, to access apprenticeships.

We celebrated National Apprenticeship in 5-9 March, celebrating the positive impact apprenticeships have on individuals, businesses and the wider economy.

12 Mar 2018, 2:02 p.m. Apprentices: Average Earnings Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the average hourly rate of pay is for (a) women and (b) men undertaking apprenticeships in each sector subject area.

Answer (Anne Milton)

Data on apprenticeship pay is published in the Apprenticeship Pay Survey 2016 which provides an average (median) hourly rate of pay for women and men undertaking Level 2 and 3 apprenticeships in England. This information was provided in our previous written response of 27 February 2018: http://www.parliament.uk/business/publications/written-questions-answers-statements/written-question/Commons/2018-02-23/129432/.

The Survey provides the average (median) basic hourly pay for Level 2 and Level 3 apprentices in England in 2014 and 2016 by type of apprenticeship undertaken by those surveyed. This information can be found on page 6, Table 1.2 of the Apprenticeship Pay Survey 2016 (England): https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/630082/apprenticeship-pay-survey-2016-report-england.pdf.

The Survey does not provide a further breakdown by gender.

28 Feb 2018, 4:41 p.m. Children: Day Care Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the cost to the public purse has been of the Government's 30 hours free childcare scheme to date.

Answer (Nadhim Zahawi)

Provisional allocations to local authorities in respect of the additional 15 hours entitlement for three and four year olds of working parents for the financial year 2017 to 2018 are available in the 2017 to 2018 dedicated schools grant allocations table on GOV.UK at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/dedicated-schools-grant-dsg-2017-to-2018.

Final allocations for 2017 to 2018 will be made in the summer of 2018.

28 Feb 2018, 3:04 p.m. Apprentices: Pay Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask Secretary of State for Education, what the average rate of hourly pay is for (a) women and (b) men in apprenticeships.

Answer (Anne Milton)

The 2016 Apprenticeship Pay Survey estimates that the average (median) hourly pay for level 2 and 3 apprentices across England is £6.79 for females and £6.60 for males.

Further details on apprenticeship pay can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/630082/apprenticeship-pay-survey-2016-report-england.pdf.

27 Feb 2018, 5:52 p.m. Apprentices: Disability Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that apprenticeship programmes are accessible to people with a disability.

Answer (Anne Milton)

The department is delivering the recommendations of the Maynard Taskforce to improve access to apprenticeships for people with learning difficulties and/or disabilities. We have adjusted the minimum standard for English and mathematics for people with a learning difficulty or a disability who have an Education, Health and Care Plan, a statement of Special Educational Need or a Learning Difficulty Assessment. In addition, British Sign Language (BSL) is now an alternative to English Functional Skills for those apprentices with BSL as their first language.

We also offer providers an additional £150 a month where the cost of supporting an apprentice is higher. If further support is required, providers can claim up to £19,000 for each apprentice in a funding year from the Learning Support Fund. In agreement with the Education and Skills Funding Agency, exceptional Learning Support is available for specific cases that requires funding in excess of this.

End-Point Assessment Organisations are required to make sure there is fair access for those with disabilities, by having a policy of reasonable adjustments. Apprentice employers and training providers are also obliged under equalities law to offer reasonable adjustments for disabled apprentices. Access to Work funding is available from the Department for Work and Pensions to support adjustments that apprentices may need in the workplace.

20 Feb 2018, 2:56 p.m. Vocational Guidance Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether he plans to consult further with (a) further education colleges and (b) other stakeholders on proposals contained in the Government's Careers Strategy.

Answer (Anne Milton)

The department wants to work closely with all key stakeholders, including further education colleges when taking forward proposals announced in the recently published careers strategy.

Since publishing the careers strategy, we have also published guidance for colleges so that their students receive high quality careers information, advice and guidance. The guidance is published at: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/679639/Careers-Guidance.pdf.

In developing this guidance, we worked with the Association of Colleges, and several other colleges and key stakeholders to make sure that the guidance was fit for purpose and in-line with commitments in the careers strategy. We want all young people to receive a programme of advice and guidance that is stable, structured and delivered by individuals with the right skills and experience.

The government has asked The Careers & Enterprise Company to play a central role in the implementation of the careers strategy. The Company intends to publish a full implementation plan in March. This will be completed through consultation with a wide range of stakeholders, including Local Enterprise Partnerships and partners from the education and business sectors.

1 Feb 2018, 5:04 p.m. Apprentices Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 22 January 2018 to Question 123518, Carillion: Insolvency, what steps his Department is taking to support the Construction Industry Training Board in identifying alternative employers.

Answer (Anne Milton)

The government’s priority is to minimise disruption to the apprentices that have been affected by the liquidation of Carillion, and to find them new employers.

The Construction Industry Training Board has been identified as the best placed alternative training provider. They are on the register of approved apprenticeship training providers, and deliver good quality provision, with a proven track record of delivering the specific frameworks and standards that current Carillion apprentices are studying.

CITB centres are geographically situated between what is anticipated to be a reasonable travel time for the apprentices – and critically, they have the capacity and capability to take on displaced apprentices and study programme learners.

A dedicated team of advisers and assessors in the CITB are working with their established network of college partners to support all affected apprentices and study programme learners to complete their programmes. They are also using their existing employer contacts in the sector to find the apprentices alternative employers to complete their apprenticeships with. CITB has got in touch with 40,000 external contacts.

The Education and Skills Funding Agency has written to all affected apprentices, and the CITB have contacted over 1100. Over 550 apprentices have already been matched to an employer by CITB.

CITB have established a dedicated helpline for apprentices seeking support - carillion.apprenticeshipsupport@citb.co.uk or 0344 994 4010. CITB have also delivered a series of workshops for learners, which provided advice on next steps and 1 to 1 support as required.

CITB have written to all MPs outlining their support offer, including contact information which can then be shared with affected individuals within constituencies.

1 Feb 2018, 4:36 p.m. Apprentices Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment his Department has made of the reasons for the reduction from 103,000 to 20,000 in the number of people aged 25 and over starting apprenticeships between the final two quarters of 2016-17.

Answer (Anne Milton)

In the first quarter (August to October 2017) of the 2017/18 academic year, 33,400 people aged 25 and over started an apprenticeship (see attached).

We have made significant changes to the way we build a skilled workforce and in light of this it would be premature to draw definitive conclusions on the basis of the limited data available. We fully expect there to be a period of adjustment while employers decide how to maximise the opportunities these reforms present them.

Apprenticeships offer an excellent route into skilled employment for people of all ages and backgrounds. We are working with employers closely to support them in growing their apprenticeship programmes and feedback shows they are positive about the benefits that apprenticeships can bring to their business.

A new phase of our communications campaign started on 26 January 2018, to encourage employers to offer high quality apprenticeship opportunities and to promote these to potential apprentices, including those over 25.

We are clear that everyone should benefit from the apprenticeship reforms and we are seeing that across England with over 1.2 million starts since 2015.

1 Feb 2018, 4:36 p.m. Apprentices Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department is taking to increase the number of people aged 25 and over undertaking training in apprenticeships.

Answer (Anne Milton)

In the first quarter (August to October 2017) of the 2017/18 academic year, 33,400 people aged 25 and over started an apprenticeship (see attached).

We have made significant changes to the way we build a skilled workforce and in light of this it would be premature to draw definitive conclusions on the basis of the limited data available. We fully expect there to be a period of adjustment while employers decide how to maximise the opportunities these reforms present them.

Apprenticeships offer an excellent route into skilled employment for people of all ages and backgrounds. We are working with employers closely to support them in growing their apprenticeship programmes and feedback shows they are positive about the benefits that apprenticeships can bring to their business.

A new phase of our communications campaign started on 26 January 2018, to encourage employers to offer high quality apprenticeship opportunities and to promote these to potential apprentices, including those over 25.

We are clear that everyone should benefit from the apprenticeship reforms and we are seeing that across England with over 1.2 million starts since 2015.

11 Sep 2017, 4:29 p.m. Free School Meals Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment she has made of the proportion of infant pupils in (a) Newcastle upon Tyne, (b) the North East and (c) England who would currently be entitled to receive free school meals under the pre-universal free school meals system.

Answer (Robert Goodwill)

The proportion of pupils eligible for, and claiming, free school meals under the pre-universal free school meals system is published at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/schools-pupils-and-their-characteristics-january-2017.

11 Sep 2017, 4:29 p.m. Free School Meals Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what proportion of children in (a) Newcastle upon Tyne, (b) the North East and (c) England were entitled to receive free school meals in each of the last seven years.

Answer (Robert Goodwill)

Figures on the proportion of children eligible for free school meals are published annually for all authorities and regions in England. The figures can be found in the statistical first releases, which are available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/statistics-school-and-pupil-numbers.

29 Jun 2017, 4:24 p.m. Grammar Schools Catherine McKinnell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether her Department plans to allow new selective schools to be established; and if she will make a statement.

Answer (Nick Gibb)

I refer the hon. Member to the answer the Secretary of State provided to the hon. Member for Hornsey and Wood Green on 26 June.