Debates between Edward Miliband and Matt Hancock

There have been 4 exchanges between Edward Miliband and Matt Hancock

1 Mon 16th March 2020 Covid-19
Department of Health and Social Care
3 interactions (618 words)
2 Wed 9th May 2018 Data Protection Bill [Lords]
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
3 interactions (165 words)
3 Wed 7th March 2018 Blagging: Leveson Inquiry
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
3 interactions (276 words)
4 Tue 23rd January 2018 Sky/Fox Update
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
3 interactions (372 words)

Covid-19

Debate between Edward Miliband and Matt Hancock
Monday 16th March 2020

(4 months, 3 weeks ago)

Commons Chamber
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Department of Health and Social Care
Matt Hancock Portrait Matt Hancock - Hansard

My right hon. Friend is precisely correct on the third question. The difference between the advice for seven days and 14 is precisely as follows. If you have symptoms yourself, if you live on your own you should self-isolate for seven days, but if you live in a household with others, the whole household now needs to stay at home for 14 days. The reason is that if you live in a household with someone who has coronavirus it is highly likely that you will catch it, so it is important, to protect against onward transmission, that everybody stays at home. That is the reason for the distinction between the seven days and the 14 days, and I hope that is clear—seven days for individuals, 14 for households.

On the point about the World Health Organisation saying that we should “test, test, test”, I wholeheartedly agree. We have continued the increase in testing in this country throughout this outbreak. The point that was made last week was that as the increase in the number of cases continues, so our testing capability must increase faster, and at this stage we have to make sure that the use of the tests we have are prioritised. As we expand testing capability, we will expand the number of people who can get hold of those tests. I understand the frustrations of those who want a test, but the whole House will agree that we have to make sure that we use those tests on the people who need them most, which means saving lives in hospitals.

On the point about the over-70s, to reiterate the answer that I gave a moment ago, the advice to everybody is to avoid unnecessary social contact. For the over-70s, for their own protection, that is strongly advised. The shielding, which is essentially reducing all contact as much as possible, is for those who have underlying health conditions and will be contacted by the NHS. The precise details of all these will be published on the gov.uk website so that everybody can see not only the answers I am giving to the questions, but the precise wording of what we expect everybody to do, as I have set out in the statement.

Edward Miliband Portrait Edward Miliband (Doncaster North) (Lab) - Hansard

Can I say to the Secretary of State that the House has always come together at times of national crisis as one, and that is the spirit across the House today? In that spirit, can I ask him to match the unprecedented public health measures that he has announced today with unprecedented economic measures to support all the businesses, large and small, their workers, and the self-employed, who will be affected by the measures announced today? We have seen across the world—for example, in Denmark—workers’ wages being guaranteed by a combination of Government and employers. It is no fault of the Chancellor of the Exchequer that his Budget last Wednesday is now out of date, but can I ask the Secretary of State to urge him to come back to the House with economic measures that match the gravity of the moment?

Matt Hancock Portrait Matt Hancock - Hansard

I absolutely understand the point that the right hon. Member is making, and he is right to make it. Of course, these are matters for the Chancellor of the Exchequer, rather than me. There was a G7 call today, in which the Prime Minister participated, during which economic considerations like this were considered. Finally, every single one of us in the House will have businesses in our constituencies that are already facing the brunt of this virus. We saw from the collapse of Flybe right at the start—that feels like weeks ago—the very significant economic consequences, and we have our eyes wide open to those.

Data Protection Bill [Lords]

(3rd reading: House of Commons)
(Report stage: House of Commons)
Debate between Edward Miliband and Matt Hancock
Wednesday 9th May 2018

(2 years, 3 months ago)

Commons Chamber
Read Full debate Bill Main Page
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Matt Hancock Portrait Matt Hancock - Hansard
9 May 2018, 2:21 p.m.

I would characterise it as a review aligned with new clause 23, which we are bringing in for the whole country, specifically to look at the effects in Northern Ireland. The crucial point is that we will make sure, through the review in new clause 23, that the future of the press is both free and reasonable, that its behaviour is reasonable, and yet that it is not subject to statutory regulation. I want to see a press that is both free and fair.

Edward Miliband Portrait Edward Miliband (Doncaster North) (Lab) - Hansard
9 May 2018, 2:22 p.m.

This is an extraordinary way to make policy. Will the Secretary of State explain to us why there can be a Leveson for Northern Ireland, but not for the rest of the United Kingdom?

Matt Hancock Portrait Matt Hancock - Hansard
9 May 2018, 2:22 p.m.

I have explained that new clause 23, which I hope the right hon. Gentleman supports, will in the future bring in a review of behaviour following the new system that we are putting into place. That is true here, and it is true right across the country.

Blagging: Leveson Inquiry

Debate between Edward Miliband and Matt Hancock
Wednesday 7th March 2018

(2 years, 5 months ago)

Commons Chamber
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Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Matt Hancock Portrait Matt Hancock - Parliament Live - Hansard
7 Mar 2018, 11:59 a.m.

Yes, of course. We have a good working relationship with the Information Commissioner. Her powers are being strengthened by the Data Protection Bill, and I am sure that the level to which and the ways in which they are strengthened will be properly scrutinised as the Bill goes through Committee and further stages.

Edward Miliband Portrait Edward Miliband (Doncaster North) (Lab) - Parliament Live - Hansard
7 Mar 2018, 11:59 a.m.

I urge the Secretary of State to stop trying to hide behind the Leveson inquiry, because the man who was responsible for that inquiry says he fundamentally disagrees with him. In the remarkable letter he wrote to the Secretary of State, he said:

“I have no doubt that there is still a legitimate expectation on behalf of the public and, in particular, the alleged victims of phone hacking and other unlawful conduct, that there will be a full public examination of the circumstances that allowed that behaviour to develop and clear reassurances that nothing of the same scale could occur again”.

That is the point. Of course the police can look into specific instances, but the question Sir Brian is posing is: what was the culture that allowed those practices to happen, and how can we have reassurance that that culture has changed? How can we have that reassurance without a Leveson 2 inquiry?

Matt Hancock Portrait Matt Hancock - Parliament Live - Hansard
7 Mar 2018, 11:59 a.m.

Not only has there already been a Leveson inquiry into those areas, but the culture has clearly changed, and the fact that these practices ended in 2010 underlines the fact that they are historical. What we now have to address is how we ensure that there is high-quality journalism in the years to come, rather than revisiting the time when the right hon. Gentleman was at the height of his powers.

Sky/Fox Update

Debate between Edward Miliband and Matt Hancock
Tuesday 23rd January 2018

(2 years, 6 months ago)

Commons Chamber
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Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Matt Hancock Portrait Matt Hancock - Parliament Live - Hansard
23 Jan 2018, 1:40 p.m.

Both those points are covered in the CMA report that was published today. If my right hon. Friend the former Secretary of State wishes to make to the CMA any further comments like those he just made, he has three weeks in which to do so, after which I will consider the final report in full.

Edward Miliband Portrait Edward Miliband (Doncaster North) (Lab) - Parliament Live - Hansard
23 Jan 2018, 1:40 p.m.

I warmly welcome the CMA’s strong set of findings on plurality. The CMA says explicitly that the deal would give the Murdoch family trust

“too much influence over public opinion and the political agenda.”

I pay warm tribute to the Secretary of State’s predecessor, the right hon. Member for Staffordshire Moorlands (Karen Bradley), because we would not be here had she not had the guts to stand up and say that this matter should be referred to the CMA. We all owe her a debt of gratitude for having done that.

I very much hope that the new Secretary of State, whom I welcome to his place, follows his predecessor’s lead. He can do that by doing two things. First, it is important that he and the CMA should not allow a back-door attempt by the Murdochs to get control of Sky through the so-called remedies process. The simple way to stop the deal going ahead is to prohibit it, not to have some carve out or complicated process. Secondly, it is relevant to the context, so I think the Secretary of State was wrong to attack the other place for what it did on Leveson 2, which was promised by David Cameron, by me and by people from all parts of this House to the victims of phone hacking. If the Secretary of State is to stand up to the Murdochs, he has to allow Leveson 2 to go ahead to get at the truth, because that is what the victims were promised.

Matt Hancock Portrait Matt Hancock - Parliament Live - Hansard
23 Jan 2018, 1:42 p.m.

It was enjoyable to hear a rendition of the right hon. Gentleman’s greatest hit on Leveson, but on the points relevant to today’s statement and the decision on this deal, I intend fully to exercise my quasi-judicial decision-making role by taking into account all relevant considerations, based on the CMA’s final report. It is in that straightforward and reasonable way that I intend to proceed.