Ban urban and garden pesticides to protect bees, other wildlife and human health

Ban the use of pesticides in urban areas & end their sale for use in gardens. There is simply no need to spray poisons in our streets, parks & gardens for cosmetic purposes, where they harm bees & other wildlife & pose a risk to human health. Safe alternatives are available, where necessary.

40,052 Signatures

Status
Open
Opened
Monday 26th July 2021
Last 24 hours signatures
3
Signature Deadline
Wednesday 26th January 2022
Estimated Final Signatures: 40,227

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Recent Documents related to Ban urban and garden pesticides to protect bees, other wildlife and human health

1. Ban urban and garden pesticides to protect bees, other wildlife and human health
30/06/2021 - Petitions

Found: Ban the use of pesticides in urban areas & end their sale for use in gardens. There is simply no need

2. Written evidence: UK Pesticides Campaign (EB77)
13/11/2020 - Bill Documents

Found: evidence submitted by Georgina Downs of the UK Pesticides Campaign (EB77) Executive Summary 1.1 It

3. National pollinator strategy: for bees and other pollinators in England
10/04/2019 - Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
- View source

Found: ocument to t he National Pollinator Strategy : for bees and other pollinators in England November 201

4. Draft evaluations of substances proposed as persistent organic pollutants (POPs)
23/04/2021 - Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
- View source

Found: ................... 13 2.3 Information on alternatives (products and processes) .................

5. UK Pesticides Campaign - written evidence
24/10/2018 - Inquiry: Agriculture Bill - Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Committee
- View source

Found: Written evidence - UK Pesticides CampaignWritten Evidence submitted by the UK Pesticides Campaign (SAB0069) UK

Latest Documents
Recent Speeches related to Ban urban and garden pesticides to protect bees, other wildlife and human health

1. Environment Bill
13/09/2021 - Lords Chamber

1: insert— “(b) are made of plastic or any other single use material, and”Member’s explanatory statement - Speech Link
2: allow charges to be levied against sellers of single-use plastic items. Our amendment would make it clear - Speech Link

2. Bee Population
19/06/2018 - Lords Chamber

1: confess that I was generally pretty ignorant about bees and pollinators until around a year ago when a remarkable - Speech Link

3. UK Bee Population
14/11/2017 - Westminster Hall

1: that.Before I turn to the specific issue of bees, I want to say a little about the wider environmental - Speech Link
2: he is saying, bees are massively important for the production of crops and for the health of our ecosystems - Speech Link

4. Environment Bill
05/07/2021 - Lords Chamber

1: portion sizes, which has an obvious impact on public health. It would also have a dramatic impact on the aluminium - Speech Link
2: only way that they could keep their products on sale has been to sell them in bottles and cans. It is - Speech Link
3: look at what we are trying to do, which is to protect the environment. The bigger and wider the deposit - Speech Link

5. Songbirds
28/06/2018 - Grand Committee

1: LBJs are those that delight many of us on our back-garden feeders and nesting boxes and on farms or other - Speech Link

Latest Speeches
Recent Questions related to Ban urban and garden pesticides to protect bees, other wildlife and human health
Latest Questions

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Wild bees & other wildlife are in decline, a potential catastrophe for us all. Pesticides also threaten human health, many of them being carcinogens &/or neurotoxins. One way to help combat bee decline is to encourage them in urban areas. Our 22 million gardens, plus parks, road verges & other green spaces could form a network of wildlife friendly habitats. This will only work if, like France, we stop spraying pesticides in gardens and public urban spaces.


Petition Signatures over time

Government Response

Thursday 19th August 2021

The Government is committed to supporting alternatives to chemical pest control and recently consulted on a National Action Plan to minimise the risks and impacts associated with pesticides.


The UK Government’s priority with regards to pesticides is to ensure that they will not harm people or wildlife, or pose unacceptable risks to the environment. To this end, we operate a strict system for regulating pesticides.

A pesticide may only be placed on the market in the UK if the product has been authorised by our regulator, the Health and Safety Executive, following a thorough risk assessment, which includes impacts on people, animals and the environment. If there are found to be unacceptable risks, to pollinators for example, the product is not authorised. The risk assessment also specifically addresses the situation of people living near where pesticides are used. Pesticide users are legally required to ensure that use is kept to the area to be treated and not allowed to drift onto neighbouring properties, and there are statutory conditions of use for all authorised pesticide products that must be followed.

The Government is committed to supporting alternatives to chemical pesticides. In our 25 Year Environment Plan, the Government has outlined its approach to reducing the environmental impact of pesticides. Integrated Pest Management (IPM) lies at the heart of our approach to maximise the use of non-chemical control techniques and minimise the use of chemical pesticides. IPM is defined as the combined use of all available control methods. This means that pesticide users can take a holistic approach in reducing the associated risks (including indirect effects) whilst combating pest resistance. IPM also includes measures to optimise pesticide application, with the aim of reducing non target effects and unnecessary environmental exposure. This includes increasing the use of nature-based, low toxicity solutions and precision technologies, with the potential to enhance biodiversity, as well as benefit pollinators.

Our approach is detailed in the draft revised ‘National Action Plan for the Sustainable Use of Pesticides’ (NAP), which sets out the ambition to improve indicators of pesticide usage, risk and impacts. This was the subject of a recent public consultation, with over 1,500 responses received and analysed. The summary of responses will be published in due course and the revised NAP later this year.

The objective must be to reduce the risks and impacts associated with pesticides. These depend not only on the amount of pesticide used, but which pesticide is used and where use takes place. The draft revised NAP supports the development of low toxicity methods and improved advice and support for pesticides users, to reduce their impacts on human health and the environment.

We are also taking action alongside many partners to implement the National Pollinator Strategy’s provisions to help wild and managed pollinators to thrive. The Strategy sets out actions to address key risks and pressures, such as: habitat loss and fragmentation; invasive species; pests and disease; and climate change. This includes supporting IPM by restoring and creating habitats in rural and urban areas, including parks and gardens, and raising awareness across society so that people can take action themselves, by carefully considering whether or not to use pesticides in gardens, parks and other urban areas.

More broadly, our Environment Bill sets a new legal foundation for Government action to improve the environment. For example, it introduces Local Nature Recovery Strategies (LNRSs) to underpin the development of the Nature Recovery Network (NRN), an expanded and better-connected network of places that are richer in wildlife, more resilient to climate change and provide a range of benefits for people. LNRSs and the NRN Delivery Partnership, led by Natural England, will help bring people and organisations together at local and national levels to identify priorities and opportunities for nature recovery. We are integrating the goals for the network into a wide range of funding streams, including: land management schemes that reward environmental benefits; biodiversity net gain; and the Nature for Climate Fund.

Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs


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