Written Question
Overseas Trade: China
29 May 2020, 11:12 a.m.

Questioner: Lord Alton of Liverpool

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the report by the Henry Jackson Society Breaking the China Supply Chain: How the ‘Five Eyes’ Can Decouple From Strategic Dependency, published on 14 May, which states that the UK is strategically dependent on China for 229 categories of goods, 57 of which are used in critical national infrastructure

Answer (Lord Grimstone of Boscobel)

HM Government is protecting our national security while ensuring the United Kingdom remains a global champion of free trade and an attractive destination for international investment.

My Department is working with other departments and our counterparts overseas to ensure the continued flow of critical equipment and supplies through this pandemic, as well as supporting trading businesses as the economy recovers. This includes diversifying the import and export markets for British businesses, which will allow them to build resilience into their supply chains.


Written Question
Department for International Trade: Chief Scientific Advisers
27 May 2020, 3:18 p.m.

Questioner: Greg Clark

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how many meetings she had with her Department’s Chief Scientific Adviser (a) from 1 September to 30 November 2019 and (b) from 1 December 2019 to 29 February 2020.

Answer (Graham Stuart)

The Department for International Trade draws from a range of scientific advice and expertise, including from the Government Chief Scientific Adviser, the Chief Scientific Advisers in individual Government Departments, and academics and researchers. In line with the practice of successive administrations, details of internal meetings are not normally disclosed.


Written Question
Football Association Premier League: Illegal Broadcasting
26 May 2020, 5:44 p.m.

Questioner: Justin Madders

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what assessment he has made of the effect on Premier League income of piracy from overseas broadcast rights.

Answer (Graham Stuart)

We are aware of the impact of overseas broadcast piracy on major sports rights holders, including the Premier League, and other UK-owned intellectual property rights owners. This is a commercial matter and the direct impact of overseas broadcasting piracy can be found in their public statements. We will remain vigilant in respect of any instances of illegal broadcasting of Premier League football and other UK-owned intellectual property rights, at home and abroad.


Written Question
Protectionism: Drugs and Food
26 May 2020, 5:39 p.m.

Questioner: Sir John Hayes

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, if she will take steps to promote protectionism to reduce the UK's dependence on international trade for supplies of (a) medicines and (b) food.

Answer (Mr Ranil Jayawardena)

As set out in my previous answer to my Hon. Friend for South Holland and The Deepings on 21st May, UIN:46540, free trade has a vital role in addressing the immediate impact – and resolving the longer-term effects – of this pandemic. It is imperative that we keep our markets open to maintain the flow of essential goods and services, including medical products. Free trade is the best way to both back Britain’s businesses and make sure we have the supplies we need.


Written Question
Overseas Trade: Africa
26 May 2020, 4:52 p.m.

Questioner: Lord Chidgey

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to mitigate disruption to UK–Africa supply chains during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Answer (Lord Grimstone of Boscobel)

The Department for International Trade is actively monitoring trade restrictions and their impact on supply chains and is working with partner governments in Africa to reduce disruption to them. At the G20, the United Kingdom supported commitment to keeping supply chains open and ensuring that restrictions are proportionate, temporary, and transparent. We have worked with Egypt on the supply of PPE and other medical equipment, and with Tunisia and Morocco so that electronic certificates of origin for goods they import are accepted for the duration of the Covid-19 period, mitigating disruption to UK-Africa supply chains by streamlining the customs process.

HMG is supporting African countries during the Covid-19 crisis through development assistance. This includes a vulnerable supply chains facility and programmes working in partnership with countries to respond to disruptions in global trade and supply chains in several countries, including South Africa, Nigeria, Botswana, Eswatini, Namibia, Mozambique and Lesotho.


Written Question
World Economy: Coronavirus
26 May 2020, 4:50 p.m.

Questioner: Lord Stevenson of Balmacara

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the aim expressed in OUR PLAN TO REBUILD: The UK Government’s COVID-19 recovery strategy (CP 239) to deliver a “cleaner, more sustainable” world economy after the COVID-19 pandemic, what steps they are taking to achieve this aim through trade policy.

Answer (Lord Grimstone of Boscobel)

HM Government intends to support Britain’s economy to become stronger, cleaner, and more resilient after this crisis. A clean and resilient economic recovery will boost exports and create employment in the low-carbon industries of the future, while ensuring we address the linked challenges of public health, climate change, and biodiversity. Our ambitious trade policy agenda can support these aims, by promoting trade in low-carbon goods and services through Free Trade Agreements and at the WTO. HM Government will also continue to lead work on the international economic recovery through our upcoming COP26 and G7 Presidencies.


Written Question
Iran: Arms Trade
26 May 2020, 3:02 p.m.

Questioner: Baroness Eaton

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they have taken to ensure British dual-use exports to Iran will not be deployed for non-civilian purposes following the expiration of the UN conventional arms embargo in October.

Answer (Lord Grimstone of Boscobel)

Although the UN conventional arms embargo is due to expire in October 2020, the EU arms embargo will remain in place until October 2023 and is binding on the United Kingdom until the end of the transition period, at which point our sanctions on exports to Iran will come into force.

Dual-use exports not prohibited under the Iran sanctions are subject to the normal export licensing process and currently assessed against the Consolidated EU and National Arms Export Licensing Criteria.


Written Question
World Trade Organisation
22 May 2020, 9:53 a.m.

Questioner: John Spellar

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what the UK's policy is on the future of the World Trade Organisation.

Answer (Greg Hands)

The UK believes a strong, rules based, multilateral trading system, with the World Trade Organisation (WTO) at its core, is in the best interests of all nations. The UK is working to strengthen and reform the WTO, so it can continue to deliver a free, fair, non-discriminatory, transparent framework for trade between countries. This will play an important role in resolving the economic effects of the global pandemic.

We are engaging closely with the WTO Secretariat and the wider Membership to achieve an early resumption of the WTO’s regular work. Our priorities are making progress on updating the WTO rulebook, in particular in the areas of digital, services and the environment, and to improve transparency.

We continue to support a fully-functioning dispute settlement system with an appeal function and remain committed to finding a permanent resolution to the impasse of the Appellate Body.


Written Question
Trade: Disease Control
21 May 2020, 2:37 p.m.

Questioner: Sir John Hayes

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what assessment she has made of the relationship between (a) free trade, (b) porous borders and (c) the spread of highly contagious pandemics.

Answer (Mr Ranil Jayawardena)

Free trade has a vital role in addressing the immediate impact – and resolving the longer term effects – of this pandemic. This Department is working with our international partners to co-ordinate international strategy that will help protect and manage global supply of essential goods and services, including medical products.


Written Question
Exports: Worcestershire
21 May 2020, 12:26 p.m.

Questioner: Sajid Javid

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what steps her Department is taking to support exporters in (a) Worcestershire (b) Bromsgrove constituency.

Answer (Graham Stuart)

The Department for International Trade (DIT) delivers a range of export services across the West Midlands. The steps include support for accessing international exporting opportunities and participation in trade missions; providing export credit and insurance through UK Export Finance (UKEF); access to DIT’s international network and face to face support provided by experienced international trade advisers. There is a dedicated local DIT team of five international trade advisers based in Worcester, which covers Hereford and Worcestershire including the Bromsgrove constituency.

UKEF also has its own network of Export Finance managers who act as local points of contact for exporters and businesses with export potential. Further information is available at: www.gov.uk/government/publications/find-an-export-finance-manager.


Written Question
Fossil Fuels: Argentina
21 May 2020, 12:22 p.m.

Questioner: Caroline Lucas

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what the value was of export credits awarded to oil, gas and fracking projects in Argentina in each of the last 10 years.

Answer (Graham Stuart)

Since current records began in May 2011, UK Export Finance (UKEF) has not provided support directly to any fracking projects in Argentina.

UKEF provided an export working capital guarantee of £375,000 to support a UK company to provide a drilling simulator and consultancy services in Argentina in March 2017.

In September 2017 UKEF provided an export working capital guarantee of £290,000 to the same exporter for provision of drilling consultancy services in Argentina.


Written Question
Trade Barriers: Scotland
20 May 2020, 5:45 p.m.

Questioner: David Mundell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether she has made representations to her counterparts in the (a) EU and (b) US Administration on urgently suspending tariffs on US and EU consumer goods as a result of the steel-aluminium and Airbus disputes during the covid-19 outbreak, in order to support Scottish exporters that are subject to US tariffs.

Answer (Greg Hands)

The UK Government takes the negative impact of US tariffs and the additional impact of Covid-19 on Scottish exporters very seriously.

Last week, my Rt Hon. Friend the Secretary of State for International Trade engaged with her opposite numbers in both the US administration and the European Commission. She will continue to work with the EU, other Airbus nations and the US on a negotiated settlement to the Airbus-Boeing disputes. She will also continue to push the US and work with the EU for the removal of tariffs on both sides of the Atlantic and the rebalancing measures imposed in response.


Written Question
Trade Agreements: Japan
20 May 2020, 2:15 p.m.

Questioner: Bill Esterson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 13 May 2020 to Question 42995, if she will publish the responses from the automotive industry.

Answer (Greg Hands)

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 13 May 2020 to Question UIN: 42995.

My department published a summary of responses to the Call for Input and the Government’s response to those comments on 13 May. This is available on gov.uk, alongside the UK’s negotiating objectives for a UK-Japan Free Trade Agreement.

We took the approach of publishing a summary of responses, including from the automotive industry, rather than publishing by individual sector to protect any business sensitive information that was shared.


Written Question
Trade Agreements: USA
19 May 2020, 2:12 p.m.

Questioner: Bill Esterson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether it is her policy to include (a) mutual recognition of professional standards, (b) the movement of people and (c) visas as part of an international trade agreement with the United States; and if she will make a statement.

Answer (Greg Hands)

On 2 March 2020, the Department for International trade published our negotiating objectives, available at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-uks-approach-to-trade-negotiations-with-the-us.

The Government stated its objective to enhance opportunities for UK service suppliers and investors for business travel to the US and to support the recognition of professional qualifications.


Written Question
BeoutQ
19 May 2020, 1:35 p.m.

Questioner: Karl McCartney

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to the potential acquisition of Newcastle football club by Saudi Arabia, what discussions she has had with her Cabinet colleagues on the potential effect of internet piracy by state-sponsored pirate broadcasters such as beoutQ on the export value of the UK creative industry's intellectual property.

Answer (Graham Stuart)

Officials in the Department for International Trade work closely with their counterparts in the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport and the Intellectual Property Office on matters relating to the protection of intellectual property (IP) rights around the world.

Government ministers and our Ambassador to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia have raised this matter with the Saudi Arabian government and will continue to make representations about any alleged broadcast infringement activities of UK IP.

We understand broadcasting piracy on satellite in Saudi Arabia, through the pirate operator beoutQ, has now stopped. This followed pressure by the UK, the US, European countries, and major sports rights holders.

We are aware that there are continued issues of infringement of UK-owned intellectual property rights across all industries through the use of IPTV apps, and we will work with the IPO to address these issues and work to protect UK intellectual property in all territories.


Written Question
BeoutQ
19 May 2020, 1:34 p.m.

Questioner: Mr Alistair Carmichael

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, in light of the potential acquisition of Newcastle football club by Saudi Arabia, what steps her Department is taking to tackle ongoing internet piracy by Saudi Arabia-backed pirate broadcaster beoutQ.

Answer (Graham Stuart)

Officials in the Department for International Trade work closely with their counterparts in the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport and the Intellectual Property Office on matters relating to the protection of intellectual property (IP) rights around the world.

Government ministers and our Ambassador to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia have raised this matter with the Saudi Arabian government and will continue to make representations about any alleged broadcast infringement activities of UK IP.

We understand broadcasting piracy on satellite in Saudi Arabia, through the pirate operator beoutQ, has now stopped. This followed pressure by the UK, the US, European countries, and major sports rights holders.

We are aware that there are continued issues of infringement of UK-owned intellectual property rights across all industries through the use of IPTV apps, and we will work with the IPO to address these issues and work to protect UK intellectual property in all territories.


Written Question
BeoutQ
19 May 2020, 1:34 p.m.

Questioner: Mr Alistair Carmichael

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what assessment she has made of the effect on the export value of the UK sports’ broadcasting rights of pirate broadcaster, BeoutQ.

Answer (Graham Stuart)

Officials in the Department for International Trade work closely with their counterparts in the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport and the Intellectual Property Office on matters relating to the protection of intellectual property (IP) rights around the world.

Government ministers and our Ambassador to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia have raised this matter with the Saudi Arabian government and will continue to make representations about any alleged broadcast infringement activities of UK IP.

We understand broadcasting piracy on satellite in Saudi Arabia, through the pirate operator beoutQ, has now stopped. This followed pressure by the UK, the US, European countries, and major sports rights holders.

We are aware that there are continued issues of infringement of UK-owned intellectual property rights across all industries through the use of IPTV apps, and we will work with the IPO to address these issues and work to protect UK intellectual property in all territories.


Written Question
Illegal Broadcasting: Internet
19 May 2020, 1:34 p.m.

Questioner: Mr Alistair Carmichael

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what discussions she has had with Cabinet colleagues on the effect of internet piracy by pirate broadcasters, such as beoutQ, on the export value of the UK’s intellectual property.

Answer (Graham Stuart)

Officials in the Department for International Trade work closely with their counterparts in the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport and the Intellectual Property Office on matters relating to the protection of intellectual property (IP) rights around the world.

Government ministers and our Ambassador to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia have raised this matter with the Saudi Arabian government and will continue to make representations about any alleged broadcast infringement activities of UK IP.

We understand broadcasting piracy on satellite in Saudi Arabia, through the pirate operator beoutQ, has now stopped. This followed pressure by the UK, the US, European countries, and major sports rights holders.

We are aware that there are continued issues of infringement of UK-owned intellectual property rights across all industries through the use of IPTV apps, and we will work with the IPO to address these issues and work to protect UK intellectual property in all territories.


Written Question
Trade Agreements: USA
19 May 2020, 11:49 a.m.

Questioner: Bill Esterson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether it is her policy to include the cancellation of section 232 tariffs as a condition for an international trade agreement with the United States.

Answer (Greg Hands)

The UK has consistently opposed US section 232 tariffs on steel and aluminium. The UK is a close national security ally of the US and our steel and aluminium products are important for US businesses and defence, and we continue to reject any claim that they harm US national security.

The Government published its strategic and outline approach to negotiations with the United States for a UK-US Free Trade Agreement on 2 March. As set out in that paper, we will be pressing the US for the swift removal of these unjustified tariffs.


Written Question
Overseas Trade: Far East
18 May 2020, 5:39 p.m.

Questioner: Mr Gregory Campbell

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what steps her Department is taking to promote trade that was previously undertaken with China with Taiwan.

Answer (Graham Stuart)

China and Taiwan remain strategically important trade partners for the UK as the world recovers from Covid-19.

The Department is continuing work to identify market opportunities through its dedicated teams in Taipei and Beijing, who are ready to provide advice and support to ensure UK businesses take full advantage of emerging opportunities.

The UK also holds annual ministerial trade talks with Taiwan, and with China through the UK-China Joint Economic and Trade Committee (JETCO), designed to develop our trading relationships further and improve market access.


Written Question
Turkey: Arms Trade
18 May 2020, 5:35 p.m.

Questioner: Kate Osamor

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether the Government has issued any export licences to EDO MBM Technology Ltd for the export of military munitions and equipment or components to be used by the Turkish armed forces.

Answer (Mr Ranil Jayawardena)

Licences have been granted to both EDO MBM Technology Ltd and other companies for military items for use by the Turkish armed forces.

We continue to monitor the situation in Syria very closely and are considering the licensing position in the light of recent developments. No further export licences to Turkey, for items which might be used in military operations in Syria, will be granted while we do so.

HM Government publishes official statistics (on a quarterly and annual basis) about export licences on gov.uk; these reports contain detailed information on the type of export licences issued, refused or revoked, by destination type (e.g. military, other) and a summary of the items covered by these licences.


Written Question
Turkey: Arms Trade
18 May 2020, 5:35 p.m.

Questioner: Kate Osamor

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether the Government has issued any export licences to companies for the export of military munitions and equipment or components to be used by the Turkish armed forces.

Answer (Mr Ranil Jayawardena)

Licences have been granted to both EDO MBM Technology Ltd and other companies for military items for use by the Turkish armed forces.

We continue to monitor the situation in Syria very closely and are considering the licensing position in the light of recent developments. No further export licences to Turkey, for items which might be used in military operations in Syria, will be granted while we do so.

HM Government publishes official statistics (on a quarterly and annual basis) about export licences on gov.uk; these reports contain detailed information on the type of export licences issued, refused or revoked, by destination type (e.g. military, other) and a summary of the items covered by these licences.


Written Question
Medical Equipment: Africa
18 May 2020, 5:30 p.m.

Questioner: Baroness Sheehan

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government what restrictions they have placed, or plan to put in place, on the export of testing kits and requisite materials to countries in Africa.

Answer (Lord Grimstone of Boscobel)

The Department for International Trade has not introduced any trade restrictions on the export of testing kits and requisite materials to countries in Africa.


Written Question
Trade Agreements: Dispute Resolution
18 May 2020, 10:28 a.m.

Questioner: Bill Esterson

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether it is her policy to include investor state dispute settlement mechanisms in international trade agreements.

Answer (Mr Ranil Jayawardena)

The precise details of any future Free Trade Agreement are a matter for formal negotiations, and we would not seek to pre-empt these discussions.


The United Kingdom has negotiated investment agreements with investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS) provisions with over 90 existing treaty partners and recognises the important role that investment protection standards can play in reassuring our investors abroad. For example, these provisions can ensure that the assets of British investors are not expropriated without compensation, and that they are not treated in a discriminatory or arbitrary manner.


Written Question
Motor Vehicles: Turkey
15 May 2020, 12:34 p.m.

Questioner: Gareth Thomas

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what recent assessment she has made of the potential effect on the (a) manufacturer finances and (b) employment figures in the UK motor manufacturing industry of proposed post-transition customs arrangements with Turkey.

Answer (Graham Stuart)

The UK’s manufacturing and motor manufacturing industry plays a vital role in the UK’s economy by driving exports, innovation, job creation and productivity. We want to ensure that it continues to succeed.

At the end of the transition period, the UK will no longer be a member of the partial EU-Turkey customs union. We are preparing to negotiate a trade agreement with Turkey that would allow businesses in both the UK and Turkey to continue to trade with each other under preferential terms and deliver continuity of current arrangements as far as possible.

This department continues to engage with businesses in the automotive industry to understand their priorities and inform the UK’s approach.