Written Question
Manston Airport: Large Goods Vehicles
7 Aug 2020, 12:38 p.m.

Questioner: Lord Pendry

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Vere of Norbiton on 24 July (HL6859), how much they have spent on preparations for the provision of additional lorry parking capacity at Manston Airport.

Answer (Baroness Vere of Norbiton)

I can confirm that between August 2015 to June 2020, the Department for Transport (DfT) has paid a total of £19.4m for the use of Manston Airfield as a lorry park. DfT paid £10.3m as part of the EU Exit no deal preparation contingency planning and £9.1m for the use of Manston Airfield for business as usual and Operation Stack. This has enabled DfT to use Manston Airfield to hold HGVs for traffic management purposes, in the event of disruption of flow at the short straits crossings.


Written Question
Shipping: Charities
6 Aug 2020, 12:42 p.m.

Questioner: Lord Patten

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the role of (1) the Apostleship of the Sea, (2) the Mission to Seafarers, and (3) other UK based maritime worker welfare charities.

Answer (Baroness Vere of Norbiton)

The Department recognises the role charities can play in addressing the hardships currently impacting transport workers, however the DfT does not conduct assessment of any charities, including those in the maritime sector.


Written Question
Travel: Coronavirus
4 Aug 2020, 4:02 p.m.

Questioner: Viscount Waverley

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government whether a UK resident must quarantine when arriving into the UK from Portugal yet departing back to that country on the same day.

Answer (Baroness Vere of Norbiton)

Coronavirus regulations mean that you must self-isolate for 14 days if you arrive in the UK from a country outside the common travel area.

Though the Government is satisfied that it is now safe to ease these measures in England and has introduced travel corridor exemptions for some countries and territories, Portugal is not presently part of the travel corridor exemptions. Therefore, people must self-isolate for 14 days when arriving into the UK from Portugal. However, if they wish to leave the UK within the 14-day period then they are able to do so.


Written Question
Electric Scooters
4 Aug 2020, 3:53 p.m.

Questioner: Lord Russell of Liverpool

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they will set lower regulatory limits for the maximum speed, power and weight limits of e-scooters if the current trials suggest that these are too high in relation to their impacts on (1) road safety, (2) environmental outcomes, (3) physical activity levels, or (4) other impacts.

Answer (Baroness Vere of Norbiton)

We have no current plans to publish any criteria. We will use the evidence we gather from rental e-scooter trials, the responses to the Future of Transport regulatory review call for evidence and other research, to consider whether to legalise both rental and privately-owned e-scooters. E-scooters are a new vehicle type; evidence around the benefits and risks of these vehicles is limited and inconclusive. We know there are some risks, and we want to understand these and how to mitigate them. Running on-road trials of rental e-scooters is the best way to assess the safety and wider impacts of this type of vehicle and service. Data will be collected by e-scooter providers. The details of the data to be shared and the process for doing so are still being developed and will be set out in data sharing agreements between the Department and e-scooter providers, and with local authorities where required.

We have carried out an equality analysis for e-scooter trials under the Public Sector Equality Duty (s.149 Equalities Act 2010).

The combination of speed and power limits constrain how an e-scooter can be used and are intended to ensure the vehicles can be used safely, but we recognise e-scooters are likely to have a particular impact on blind and visually impaired people.

To mitigate potentially negative impacts, we have proposed:

  • That e-scooters used in trials must have a horn or bell so that users can make themselves heard to pedestrians.

  • That e-scooters should not be used on the pavement (except in shared cycle/pedestrian space). Local authorities already have powers to prohibit vehicles from specific spaces (included shared spaces) on a case by case basis using Traffic Regulation Orders.

We will also work with disability groups in monitoring and evaluating the trials and considering the implications for future policy

We increased the speed, power and weight limits of e-scooters after considering the responses to the recent consultation on e-scooter trials. We balanced these views against the equality analysis. The 15.5 mph for trial e-scooters makes the maximum speed for e-scooters the same as e-bikes and is consistent with the maximum speed for e-scooters in many other countries.

We increased the weight limit to take account of the heavier batteries of some e-scooters. We expect that most e-scooters used in trials will be well below the 55kg maximum.

We increased the power limit to 500W to ensure e-scooters are able to go up steeper inclines and carry heavier users. This was a matter raised with us during the consultation.

We have designed the trials so that e-scooters use is limited and controlled. Speed, power and weight limits constrain how an e-scooter can be used and are intended to ensure the vehicles can be used safely. Local areas are free to set limits below the maximum, but it is important that the evidence gathered in trials is representative of how e-scooters may be used in the future.

We are preparing a comprehensive monitoring and evaluation plan to gather evidence from the trials. This will assess the safety risks presented by e-scooters, the mode shift to e-scooters from other forms of transport, public perceptions around their use and identify other impacts that should be considered for any potential future legalisation of e-scooters.

It is for local traffic authorities to undertake their own risk assessment of the appropriateness of using the powers available to them to permit e-scooters to share road space with pedal cycles. This assessment will be required on a case by case basis.

The Department consulted on the issue of amending the Traffic Signs Regulations and General Directions 2016 to enable e-scooters to share cycle lanes with pedal cycles. The consultation responses supported this approach. The Government made the necessary regulatory changes to include e-scooters within the definition of vehicles permitted to use cycle lanes and to extend signs that apply to pedal cycles to also apply to e-scooters being used in legal trials. This will be supplemented by traffic regulation orders issued by the local areas.

As the definition of cycle tracks is contained in primary legislation, the Government has not amended this definition in advance of trials starting. Instead, where deemed necessary, local authorities can re-designate cycle tracks using the TRO process as appropriate.


Written Question
Electric Scooters: Cycleways
4 Aug 2020, 3:53 p.m.

Questioner: Lord Russell of Liverpool

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to publish any assessment made of the legal implications of their advice to local authorities planning to hold e-scooter trials that such authorities should convert cycle tracks to cycle lanes in those areas so that e-scooters can be permitted to use them.

Answer (Baroness Vere of Norbiton)

We have no current plans to publish any criteria. We will use the evidence we gather from rental e-scooter trials, the responses to the Future of Transport regulatory review call for evidence and other research, to consider whether to legalise both rental and privately-owned e-scooters. E-scooters are a new vehicle type; evidence around the benefits and risks of these vehicles is limited and inconclusive. We know there are some risks, and we want to understand these and how to mitigate them. Running on-road trials of rental e-scooters is the best way to assess the safety and wider impacts of this type of vehicle and service. Data will be collected by e-scooter providers. The details of the data to be shared and the process for doing so are still being developed and will be set out in data sharing agreements between the Department and e-scooter providers, and with local authorities where required.

We have carried out an equality analysis for e-scooter trials under the Public Sector Equality Duty (s.149 Equalities Act 2010).

The combination of speed and power limits constrain how an e-scooter can be used and are intended to ensure the vehicles can be used safely, but we recognise e-scooters are likely to have a particular impact on blind and visually impaired people.

To mitigate potentially negative impacts, we have proposed:

  • That e-scooters used in trials must have a horn or bell so that users can make themselves heard to pedestrians.

  • That e-scooters should not be used on the pavement (except in shared cycle/pedestrian space). Local authorities already have powers to prohibit vehicles from specific spaces (included shared spaces) on a case by case basis using Traffic Regulation Orders.

We will also work with disability groups in monitoring and evaluating the trials and considering the implications for future policy

We increased the speed, power and weight limits of e-scooters after considering the responses to the recent consultation on e-scooter trials. We balanced these views against the equality analysis. The 15.5 mph for trial e-scooters makes the maximum speed for e-scooters the same as e-bikes and is consistent with the maximum speed for e-scooters in many other countries.

We increased the weight limit to take account of the heavier batteries of some e-scooters. We expect that most e-scooters used in trials will be well below the 55kg maximum.

We increased the power limit to 500W to ensure e-scooters are able to go up steeper inclines and carry heavier users. This was a matter raised with us during the consultation.

We have designed the trials so that e-scooters use is limited and controlled. Speed, power and weight limits constrain how an e-scooter can be used and are intended to ensure the vehicles can be used safely. Local areas are free to set limits below the maximum, but it is important that the evidence gathered in trials is representative of how e-scooters may be used in the future.

We are preparing a comprehensive monitoring and evaluation plan to gather evidence from the trials. This will assess the safety risks presented by e-scooters, the mode shift to e-scooters from other forms of transport, public perceptions around their use and identify other impacts that should be considered for any potential future legalisation of e-scooters.

It is for local traffic authorities to undertake their own risk assessment of the appropriateness of using the powers available to them to permit e-scooters to share road space with pedal cycles. This assessment will be required on a case by case basis.

The Department consulted on the issue of amending the Traffic Signs Regulations and General Directions 2016 to enable e-scooters to share cycle lanes with pedal cycles. The consultation responses supported this approach. The Government made the necessary regulatory changes to include e-scooters within the definition of vehicles permitted to use cycle lanes and to extend signs that apply to pedal cycles to also apply to e-scooters being used in legal trials. This will be supplemented by traffic regulation orders issued by the local areas.

As the definition of cycle tracks is contained in primary legislation, the Government has not amended this definition in advance of trials starting. Instead, where deemed necessary, local authorities can re-designate cycle tracks using the TRO process as appropriate.


Written Question
Electric Scooters
4 Aug 2020, 3:53 p.m.

Questioner: Lord Russell of Liverpool

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment was made of the equalities impacts of their decision to increase the speed, power and weight limits of e-scooters involved in trials, as compared with those originally proposed in their consultation on such trials.

Answer (Baroness Vere of Norbiton)

We have no current plans to publish any criteria. We will use the evidence we gather from rental e-scooter trials, the responses to the Future of Transport regulatory review call for evidence and other research, to consider whether to legalise both rental and privately-owned e-scooters. E-scooters are a new vehicle type; evidence around the benefits and risks of these vehicles is limited and inconclusive. We know there are some risks, and we want to understand these and how to mitigate them. Running on-road trials of rental e-scooters is the best way to assess the safety and wider impacts of this type of vehicle and service. Data will be collected by e-scooter providers. The details of the data to be shared and the process for doing so are still being developed and will be set out in data sharing agreements between the Department and e-scooter providers, and with local authorities where required.

We have carried out an equality analysis for e-scooter trials under the Public Sector Equality Duty (s.149 Equalities Act 2010).

The combination of speed and power limits constrain how an e-scooter can be used and are intended to ensure the vehicles can be used safely, but we recognise e-scooters are likely to have a particular impact on blind and visually impaired people.

To mitigate potentially negative impacts, we have proposed:

  • That e-scooters used in trials must have a horn or bell so that users can make themselves heard to pedestrians.

  • That e-scooters should not be used on the pavement (except in shared cycle/pedestrian space). Local authorities already have powers to prohibit vehicles from specific spaces (included shared spaces) on a case by case basis using Traffic Regulation Orders.

We will also work with disability groups in monitoring and evaluating the trials and considering the implications for future policy

We increased the speed, power and weight limits of e-scooters after considering the responses to the recent consultation on e-scooter trials. We balanced these views against the equality analysis. The 15.5 mph for trial e-scooters makes the maximum speed for e-scooters the same as e-bikes and is consistent with the maximum speed for e-scooters in many other countries.

We increased the weight limit to take account of the heavier batteries of some e-scooters. We expect that most e-scooters used in trials will be well below the 55kg maximum.

We increased the power limit to 500W to ensure e-scooters are able to go up steeper inclines and carry heavier users. This was a matter raised with us during the consultation.

We have designed the trials so that e-scooters use is limited and controlled. Speed, power and weight limits constrain how an e-scooter can be used and are intended to ensure the vehicles can be used safely. Local areas are free to set limits below the maximum, but it is important that the evidence gathered in trials is representative of how e-scooters may be used in the future.

We are preparing a comprehensive monitoring and evaluation plan to gather evidence from the trials. This will assess the safety risks presented by e-scooters, the mode shift to e-scooters from other forms of transport, public perceptions around their use and identify other impacts that should be considered for any potential future legalisation of e-scooters.

It is for local traffic authorities to undertake their own risk assessment of the appropriateness of using the powers available to them to permit e-scooters to share road space with pedal cycles. This assessment will be required on a case by case basis.

The Department consulted on the issue of amending the Traffic Signs Regulations and General Directions 2016 to enable e-scooters to share cycle lanes with pedal cycles. The consultation responses supported this approach. The Government made the necessary regulatory changes to include e-scooters within the definition of vehicles permitted to use cycle lanes and to extend signs that apply to pedal cycles to also apply to e-scooters being used in legal trials. This will be supplemented by traffic regulation orders issued by the local areas.

As the definition of cycle tracks is contained in primary legislation, the Government has not amended this definition in advance of trials starting. Instead, where deemed necessary, local authorities can re-designate cycle tracks using the TRO process as appropriate.


Written Question
Electric Scooters
4 Aug 2020, 3:53 p.m.

Questioner: Lord Russell of Liverpool

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to publish (1) the criteria that they will use to determine whether, and on what basis, they will legalise the use of e-scooters following the current trials, and (2) the specification for the data they have required local authorities to collect in association with those trials, to inform their decisions about whether and how to legalise their use.

Answer (Baroness Vere of Norbiton)

We have no current plans to publish any criteria. We will use the evidence we gather from rental e-scooter trials, the responses to the Future of Transport regulatory review call for evidence and other research, to consider whether to legalise both rental and privately-owned e-scooters. E-scooters are a new vehicle type; evidence around the benefits and risks of these vehicles is limited and inconclusive. We know there are some risks, and we want to understand these and how to mitigate them. Running on-road trials of rental e-scooters is the best way to assess the safety and wider impacts of this type of vehicle and service. Data will be collected by e-scooter providers. The details of the data to be shared and the process for doing so are still being developed and will be set out in data sharing agreements between the Department and e-scooter providers, and with local authorities where required.

We have carried out an equality analysis for e-scooter trials under the Public Sector Equality Duty (s.149 Equalities Act 2010).

The combination of speed and power limits constrain how an e-scooter can be used and are intended to ensure the vehicles can be used safely, but we recognise e-scooters are likely to have a particular impact on blind and visually impaired people.

To mitigate potentially negative impacts, we have proposed:

  • That e-scooters used in trials must have a horn or bell so that users can make themselves heard to pedestrians.

  • That e-scooters should not be used on the pavement (except in shared cycle/pedestrian space). Local authorities already have powers to prohibit vehicles from specific spaces (included shared spaces) on a case by case basis using Traffic Regulation Orders.

We will also work with disability groups in monitoring and evaluating the trials and considering the implications for future policy

We increased the speed, power and weight limits of e-scooters after considering the responses to the recent consultation on e-scooter trials. We balanced these views against the equality analysis. The 15.5 mph for trial e-scooters makes the maximum speed for e-scooters the same as e-bikes and is consistent with the maximum speed for e-scooters in many other countries.

We increased the weight limit to take account of the heavier batteries of some e-scooters. We expect that most e-scooters used in trials will be well below the 55kg maximum.

We increased the power limit to 500W to ensure e-scooters are able to go up steeper inclines and carry heavier users. This was a matter raised with us during the consultation.

We have designed the trials so that e-scooters use is limited and controlled. Speed, power and weight limits constrain how an e-scooter can be used and are intended to ensure the vehicles can be used safely. Local areas are free to set limits below the maximum, but it is important that the evidence gathered in trials is representative of how e-scooters may be used in the future.

We are preparing a comprehensive monitoring and evaluation plan to gather evidence from the trials. This will assess the safety risks presented by e-scooters, the mode shift to e-scooters from other forms of transport, public perceptions around their use and identify other impacts that should be considered for any potential future legalisation of e-scooters.

It is for local traffic authorities to undertake their own risk assessment of the appropriateness of using the powers available to them to permit e-scooters to share road space with pedal cycles. This assessment will be required on a case by case basis.

The Department consulted on the issue of amending the Traffic Signs Regulations and General Directions 2016 to enable e-scooters to share cycle lanes with pedal cycles. The consultation responses supported this approach. The Government made the necessary regulatory changes to include e-scooters within the definition of vehicles permitted to use cycle lanes and to extend signs that apply to pedal cycles to also apply to e-scooters being used in legal trials. This will be supplemented by traffic regulation orders issued by the local areas.

As the definition of cycle tracks is contained in primary legislation, the Government has not amended this definition in advance of trials starting. Instead, where deemed necessary, local authorities can re-designate cycle tracks using the TRO process as appropriate.


Written Question
High Speed 2 Railway Line: Wendover
3 Aug 2020, 1:52 p.m.

Questioner: Lord Berkeley

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they will place (1) the external consultant review report, and (2) the Infrastructure and Projects Authority review report, on the Wendover Short-Mined Tunnel proposal, in the Library of the House.

Answer (Baroness Vere of Norbiton)

The Government will not be placing copies of the reports referred to in the Libraries of either House. These reports are internal to the Department for Transport and are not intended for publication.


Written Question
Commuters: Greater London
3 Aug 2020, 1:26 p.m.

Questioner: Lord Grocott

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government what are the (1) absolute numbers, and (2) proportions of commuters, travelling into by London by (a) rail including London Underground, (b) bus, (c) car, (d) bicycle, and (e) motor cycle.

Answer (Baroness Vere of Norbiton)

To monitor the use of the transport system during the coronavirus (Covid-19) pandemic, the Department for Transport provides statistics on transport use by mode, published every Wednesday. Data on usage of the different transport modes is available on GOV.UK.

This includes usage of Tube and Bus in London compared to a pre Covid-19 baseline. Specific data on the purpose of a journey (e.g. commuting) by mode is not available for the Covid-19 period yet. Historic data on this can be found in the National Travel Survey and in Transport Statistics Great Britain both available on GOV.UK.


Written Question
Transport: Schools
3 Aug 2020, 1:25 p.m.

Questioner: Baroness Randerson

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government what additional funding they intend to provide to bus and coach operators to ensure that COVID-19 (1) safety, and (2) additional capacity, requirements are in place when schools return in September; and when they plan to announce their funding decisions for such provision.

Answer (Baroness Vere of Norbiton)

The return of pupils to education settings in September will be a considerable challenge for public transport capacity while maintaining social distancing. The Department is working with the Department for Education as a matter of urgency to explore options to increase capacity to ensure students can get to school or college in September.

Solutions must be locally-led with authorities working closely with transport operators, and the Government will do what we can to support local authorities. The Government is therefore supporting local authorities with travel demand management, and we will continue to provide financial support for bus services in September in order to boost the amount of local transport capacity available.


Written Question
Transport for the North
3 Aug 2020, 1:25 p.m.

Questioner: Lord Greaves

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government, following the creation of the Northern Transport Acceleration Council, what plans they have to amend (1) the constitution, (2) the powers, and (3) the methods of operation and decision-making of Transport for the North.

Answer (Baroness Vere of Norbiton)

Matters concerning the constitution, methods of operation and decision-making of Transport for the North (TfN) are for the TfN Board to consider. The creation of the Northern Transport Acceleration Council does not impact on TfN’s powers in any way.


Written Question
Bus Services and Trams: Coronavirus
31 Jul 2020, 1:05 p.m.

Questioner: Baroness Randerson

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Vere of Norbiton on 22 July (HL6684), what additional funding they intend to provide to support bus and tram services outside of London once the current COVID-19-related funding expires on 4 August; and when they intend to announce the arrangements for any such funding.

Answer (Baroness Vere of Norbiton)

Officials are engaging with HMT on the future of emergency funding for the bus and light rail sectors, as a matter of the highest priority. The department will be in contact with operators as soon as we are in a position to update them.


Written Question
Bus Services and Trams: Coronavirus
31 Jul 2020, 1:03 p.m.

Questioner: Baroness Randerson

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to provide long-term financial support to bus, coach and tram services outside of London whilst there is reduced capacity and demand for public transport due to the COVID-19 pandemic; and how any such funding will be dispersed.

Answer (Baroness Vere of Norbiton)

The Department continues to work closely with transport authorities and operators to understand the risks and ongoing issues in the bus and coach industry and how these can be addressed, so that public transport services can adapt to any ‘new normal’ that emerges from the COVID-19 outbreak and work towards a sustainable long-term recovery.

The Department is engaging with HMT on the future of emergency funding for the bus and light rail sectors as a matter of the highest priority. My department will be in contact with operators as soon as we are in a position to update them.

We are continuing to engage with the coach sector to understand what the ongoing risks and issues are, and how these could be addressed.


Written Question
High Speed 2 Railway Line: Wendover
31 Jul 2020, 12:59 p.m.

Questioner: Lord Berkeley

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government whether a full and independent engineering review has been carried out to assess the (1) construction, and (2) whole life costs, of the (a) Wendover Short Mined Tunnel proposal, and (b) current HS2 Phase One above surface route proposals at Wendover.

Answer (Baroness Vere of Norbiton)

I refer to my answer to Lord Berkeley’s question on 30 June. In spring 2018, the Department instructed KPMG to undertake an independent review of the presented options for the Wendover area, both from HS2 Ltd (surface route) and from mbpc Ltd (mined tunnel proposal). The Department asked the review to examine and consider both options, including a comparative assessment of their relative cost, schedule and constructability. The review did not consider whole life costs.


Written Question
Speed Limits
31 Jul 2020, 12:58 p.m.

Questioner: Lord Bradshaw

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government whether any consultation took place with (1) the Health and Safety Executive, and (2) the Office for Rail and Road, before the decision was made to increase the basic speed limit at which motorists can drive through roadworks; and what assessment they have made of the ability to enforce speed limits at such sites.

Answer (Baroness Vere of Norbiton)

Whilst no specific consultation took place with the Health and Safety Executive, Highways England did engage throughout the trials with the Office for Rail and Road (ORR) to update them on the progress and outputs of the trials.

The enforcement of speed limits will be undertaken in the same way any speed limit through roadworks is enforced, by using average speed camera systems.


Written Question
Aviation
31 Jul 2020, 12:57 p.m.

Questioner: Lord Kennedy of Southwark

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government how many commercial flights have (1) taken off, and (2) landed, in the UK each day from 23 March to 16 July.

Answer (Baroness Vere of Norbiton)

The Department for Transport does not currently hold complete official statistics on commercial flight operations for the period requested. Data on the operation of commercial flights in the UK is collected by the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) and received from UK airports typically up to two months after the end of each month in adherence to statistical regulation (EC) 437/2003 on statistical returns in respect of the carriage of passengers, freight and mail by air. As indicated on the CAA’s website, some airports have not yet reported data, which prevents the full UK picture being established.

Monitoring of flight traffic conducted by Eurocontrol, which publicly reports on daily flight traffic levels across its member states on their website, can be used to identify the overall number of flights operated in the UK each day since 1 March 2020, and includes both commercial and non-commercial operations for international arrival, departure and domestic flights.


Written Question
Aviation: Coronavirus
31 Jul 2020, 12:56 p.m.

Questioner: Baroness Ritchie of Downpatrick

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government, further (1) to the statement by the Airport Operators Association that airports may have lost at least £4 billion in revenue by the end of 2020, and (2) the job losses in the aviation sector, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, what steps they are taking to assist financially the aviation industry. [T]

Answer (Baroness Vere of Norbiton)

The Government recognises the challenging times facing the aviation sector as a result of COVID-19. The aviation sector is crucial to the UK’s economy and businesses across the industry will be able to draw on the unprecedented package of economic measures we have put in place during this time.

This includes a Bank of England scheme for firms to raise capital and the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme which facilitates access to finance for businesses affected by the outbreak. Firms are also able to access ‘Time to Pay’ scheme which eases restrictions with tax bills and VAT deferrals.

The Government is also ensuring financial support for employees through the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme covering 80% of furloughed employees’ usual monthly wage costs, up to £2,500 a month, alongside the associated Employer National Insurance contributions and pension contributions.

The Department is in close contact with the aviation sector ensuring that the Government is kept fully aware of the latest developments with all firms and to understand where additional policy measures may be useful and to address specific industry issues.

The Department has established a Restart and Recovery Unit for aviation. The unit will immediately focus on restart, in particular:

  • Examining new standards on health and wellbeing across the customer journey;

  • Measures needed to sustain and boost the sector;

  • Ensuring new standards are established at an international level; and

  • Engagement with the sector to ensure the proposals developed are fit for purpose.

The unit will also focus on establishing a clear vision and objectives for the sector looking forward to the recovery phase. We are working closely with the aviation sector to support it to ensure there is sufficient capacity to protect global travel routes, continue repatriation, freight and maintain vital connectivity.


Written Question
Northern Trains: Fares
31 Jul 2020, 12:55 p.m.

Questioner: Baroness Bennett of Manor Castle

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to allow off-peak tickets on Northern Rail services into Leeds, Sheffield, Bradford or Manchester to be used between 4.00pm and 6.30pm.

Answer (Baroness Vere of Norbiton)

There are no planned changes to Northern’s off-peak travel requirements. In the current COVID-19 crisis, Northern has prioritised running a service for customers that is both resilient and reliable, rather than ramping up services too quickly or introducing measures that may lead to increased passenger demand and thereby exceed restrictions on social distancing.


Written Question
Shipping: Coronavirus
31 Jul 2020, 12:53 p.m.

Questioner: Lord Patten

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Vere of Norbiton on 20 July (HL6506), what is the median length of time that foreign national crew have spent stranded in UK ports; what is the cost of the repatriation programme; and whether they claim back the costs of repatriation from ship owners.

Answer (Baroness Vere of Norbiton)

We do not have median figures. The Department began work on facilitating repatriation 90 days ago (as at 29 July). At that time there were 11,374 crew in the UK. To date we have facilitated the repatriation of over 13,000 seafarers and there are currently 4,258 awaiting repatriation.

Many vessels arriving in the UK are able to repatriate large numbers of seafarers over the 2-3 days after arrival. However, for seafarers from certain countries the length of time in the UK will be longer due to restrictions in their own state.

It should also be noted that seafarers arriving in the UK may still be under their original contract and, outside the pandemic conditions, would not be due to be repatriated. The cost of repatriation is met by the shipping company and not by the Government.


Written Question
Cycling: Accidents
31 Jul 2020, 12:53 p.m.

Questioner: The Marquess of Lothian

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government how many accidents in England involving (1) pedestrians, (2) motor vehicles, and (3) other cyclists, have been caused by cyclists using mobile phones while cycling (a) in the past 12 months, and (b) in the past five years.

Answer (Baroness Vere of Norbiton)

The number of accidents involving where the contributory factor ‘Driver using mobile phone’ was allocated to a pedal cyclist, by road user involved, in England, between 2013 and 2018 can be found in the below table. 2018 is the latest year for which data is available.

Contributory factors assigned by police officers do not assign blame for the accident to any specific road user, however they do provide some insight into why and how road accidents occur. They give an indication of which factors the attending officer thought contributed to the accident. Officers do not need to carry out a full investigation of the incident before allocating contributory factors; they usually use professional judgement about what they can see at the scene. Not all accidents are included in the contributory factor data; only accidents where the police attended the scene and reported at least one contributory factor are included.

Reported road accidents where the contributory factor (CF)1 of 'driver using a mobile phone' was assigned to a pedal cyclist, by road user involved, England, 2013-2018

Accidents involving road user

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

Injured pedestrian

1

0

0

1

1

1

Motor vehicle

12

13

10

13

12

8

Other pedal cyclist (not allocated with CF)

1

1

0

0

0

0

Source: DfT, STATS19

1 Includes only accidents where a police officer attended the scene and in which a contributory factor was reported.


Written Question
A27: East Sussex
31 Jul 2020, 12:52 p.m.

Questioner: Baroness Randerson

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Vere of Norbiton on 21 July (HL6569), how Highways England was able to determine three possible new routes for the A27 between Polegate and Lewes before completing consideration of (1) environmental impacts, and (2) the impact on the towns and communities at the two endpoints of these routes.

Answer (Baroness Vere of Norbiton)

The “A27 East of Lewes Off-line Study” represents an early stage of work to evaluate the need or otherwise for an enhancement of the A27 off the existing line of route. The study uses three different alignments for modelling purposes only. Development of specific route options and a detailed assessment of their benefits and costs, including environmental impacts, would follow at a later stage of work.


Written Question
Northern Transport Acceleration Council
31 Jul 2020, 12:51 p.m.

Questioner: Lord Greaves

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the membership of the Northern Transport Acceleration Council; what powers and role that Council will possess; what is its operational budget; how often it will meet; and whether its meetings and papers will be publicly accessible.

Answer (Baroness Vere of Norbiton)

The membership of the Northern Transport Acceleration Council will comprise key leaders from across the North, including Mayors and council leaders and will be chaired by the Secretary of State. The Council will give leaders from the North direct access to Ministers to discuss priority transport projects and make sure they are being progressed at pace, providing a mechanism for speeding up decision making.

The Council’s first meeting is expected to take place in September when the details of its role and working arrangements will be agreed.


Written Question
Northern Transport Acceleration Council: Transport for the North
31 Jul 2020, 12:51 p.m.

Questioner: Lord Greaves

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government what consultation took place with Transport for the North about the establishment of the Northern Transport Acceleration Council; what the relationship between Transport for the North and the Northern Transport Acceleration Council will be; and whether members of the Northern Transport Acceleration Council will also sit on the board of Transport for the North.

Answer (Baroness Vere of Norbiton)

The Secretary of State and his Ministers consulted with the Mayors and Council Leaders in the North, who are Transport for the North members, prior to the establishment of the Northern Transport Acceleration Council.

The membership of the Northern Council will comprise key leaders from across the North, including Mayors and Council Leaders and will be chaired by the Secretary of State.

The Transport for the North Board will continue its role of bringing together Northern stakeholders and developing strategic transport advice for the Secretary of State.


Written Question
Public Transport: Greater London
30 Jul 2020, 1:14 p.m.

Questioner: Lord Watson of Invergowrie

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to reimburse local authorities in London for any additional costs incurred as a result of the loss of free public transport for people under the age of 18 living in that city.

Answer (Baroness Vere of Norbiton)

The £1.6 billion Extraordinary Funding and Financing Agreement to enable Transport for London (TfL) to continue operating services contained a series of conditions to facilitate safe travel on public transport in London, including the temporary suspension of free travel for under 18s.

The Department is working closely with TfL, the Department for Education and the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government on how the temporary suspension can be operationalised.


Written Question
Buses: Exhaust Emissions
28 Jul 2020, 4:30 p.m.

Questioner: Ian Paisley

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to the Prime Minister's statement of 11 February 2020, Transport Infrastructure, Official Report, column 712, what discussions he has had with the Prime Minister on the timeline for the deployment of the funding committed to the purchase of more than 4,000 zero-carbon buses.

Answer (Chris Heaton-Harris)

The Secretary of State has not had any specific conversations with the Prime Minister regarding the timeline for allocating the buses portion of the £5 billion funding package, that was announced in February this year.

Details of the 4,000 zero-emission buses from the funding package, including how the funding will be distributed, will be announced in due course.