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Written Question
Insolvency
8 Feb 2021

Questioner: Baroness Morgan of Cotes (CON - Life peer)

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the cumulative impact on business (1) lending, and (2) cashflow, of the extension of secondary preferential creditor status to HMRC in the context of (a) the changes to the insolvency regime brought in by the Corporate Insolvency and Governance Act 2020, (b) the increase of the maximum value of the prescribed part to £800,000 on 6 April 2020, and (c) the value of taxes deferred under the VAT deferral scheme.

Answered by Lord Agnew of Oulton

The recent reforms to HMRC’s creditor status for certain debts ensures that when a business enters insolvency, more of the taxes paid in good faith by its employees and customers, but held temporarily by the business, go to fund public services as intended, rather than be distributed to other creditors.

This measure is not expected to have a significant impact on the lending market or wider economy. The change is forecast to raise up to £255 million a year. To put this into perspective, bank lending to small and medium-sized businesses alone was £57 billion in 2019.

In 2020/21 this change is expected to raise an additional £40 million for the Exchequer. With regards to cash flow, the Government deferred an estimated £30 billion of VAT due during 2019/20 that can be paid off by instalments, interest-free, via the VAT New Payment Scheme as announced in the Winter Economy Plan.

At the same time, via changes to the Corporate Insolvency and Governance Act, there has been a moratorium on winding-up petitions by creditors, including HMRC. The changes to the Insolvency Act to increase the cap on the prescribed part is an overdue reform to bring it in line with inflation and has no detrimental effect on any of the other measures mentioned here.

The numerous support measures taken by the Government were put in place to prevent the failure or closure of viable businesses. The scale of these support measures far outweighs the recoveries that the Government would receive via HMRC’s preferential claims in insolvency.


Written Question
Insolvency
8 Feb 2021

Questioner: Baroness Morgan of Cotes (CON - Life peer)

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to review the impact of the extension of secondary preferential creditor on levels of (1) business insolvencies, (2) job losses, and (3) the value of economic growth and taxes foregone, in 12 months’ time.

Answered by Lord Agnew of Oulton

The Government undertook careful work to assess the impact of the measures ahead of announcement and implementation. As with all tax policy changes, the Government published this assessment in a tax information and impact note which can be found on GOV.UK.[1]

The policy will be monitored through continuing communications with affected taxpayer groups and insolvency practitioners.

[1] https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/changes-to-protect-tax-in-insolvency-cases


Written Question
Youth Investment Fund
9 Nov 2020

Questioner: Baroness Morgan of Cotes (CON - Life peer)

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government when they expect to announce the initial funding allocations to be made from the previously announced Youth Investment Fund.

Answered by Baroness Barran

DCMS officials continue to assess how COVID-19 is impacting on young people and youth services. We will keep engaging with the youth sector as plans for the Youth Investment Fund develop, and expect to publish further details in due course.


Written Question
Primary Education: Sports
23 Jun 2020

Questioner: Baroness Morgan of Cotes (CON - Life peer)

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government when they expect to announce a decision on the continuation of the Primary PE and Sport Premium for the next academic year.

Answered by Baroness Berridge

The government will confirm arrangements for the PE and Sport Premium in the 2020-21 academic year as soon as possible.


Written Question
Hospices: Children
3 Jun 2020

Questioner: Baroness Morgan of Cotes (CON - Life peer)

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government when they plan to publish their standard operating procedure for children’s hospices and community-provided children’s palliative care during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Answered by Lord Bethell

Working with key stakeholders, NHS England and NHS improvement have developed a standard operating procedure (SOP), for palliative care for children and young people in community and hospice settings during the COVID-19 pandemic, which is due to be published shortly.

The SOP is aimed at supporting staff who are providing care or supporting children and young people, and their families, who have palliative and/or end of life care needs in the community, including home and hospice care. Palliative care will include some children and young people who have life-limiting long-term conditions and complex health needs. It encourages all providers of children’s palliative care (statutory and voluntary sector) to work collaboratively and flexibly across health settings to support this group of children and young people and keep them safe during the pandemic.


Written Question
DMRC Headley Court: Veterans
13 May 2019

Questioner: Baroness Morgan of Cotes (CON - Life peer)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many veterans have been granted access to the Defence Medical Rehabilitation Centre through the Veterans Prosthetic Panel in the last 12 months.

Answered by Tobias Ellwood

Twelve veteran patients have been seen at the Defence Medical Rehabilitation Centre in the last calendar year.


Written Question
DMRC Headley Court: Veterans
13 May 2019

Questioner: Baroness Morgan of Cotes (CON - Life peer)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many veterans were granted access to Headley Court in each of the last 10 years.

Answered by Lord Lancaster of Kimbolton

Since 2016, veterans with amputation-related complications can be referred by the NHS to the Complex Prosthetics Assessment Clinic (CPAC) at the Defence Medical Rehabilitation Centre, which relocated from Headley Court to the Stanford Hall Rehabilitation Estate in 2018. To date, 41 patients have been seen at the CPAC since it began. A breakdown of patients by year is not available.


Written Question
DMRC Headley Court: Veterans
13 May 2019

Questioner: Baroness Morgan of Cotes (CON - Life peer)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many veterans requested but were refused access to Headley Court in each of the last ten years.

Answered by Tobias Ellwood

Veteran referrals and requests for DMRC treatment can be received in many different ways, for which there is no central record. Consequently, an answer to this question cannot be provided.


Written Question
DMRC Stanford Hall: Veterans
13 May 2019

Questioner: Baroness Morgan of Cotes (CON - Life peer)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what plans his Department has to grant veterans access to Stanford Hall for rehabilitation purposes.

Answered by Tobias Ellwood

The Defence Medical Rehabilitation Centre (DMRC) mission is to provide sick and injured Service personnel the rehabilitation they require to be able to return to duty or transition back into civilian life, at which point the NHS becomes responsible for their care.

The access policy at the new DMRC Stanford Hall remains unchanged from that previously in place at DMRC Headley Court, in that there is no provision generally for veterans to access the facility. We have, however, in collaboration with the NHS, established a specialist clinic whereby NHS Limb Fitting Centres can refer selected veterans (who are ex-DMRC patients) back to the DMRC for assistance with the management of amputation-related complications.

This Complex Prosthetics Assessment Clinic (CPAC) has also been used to identify suitable candidates (serving and veterans) for the LIBOR-funded MOD/NHS osseointegration surgical pilot. After surgery all these patients (including veterans) are rehabilitated at the DMRC. We are also currently exploring options for a limited expansion of the CPAC eligibility criteria to include those non-amputee patients that have been fitted with medical devices such as offload braces.


Written Question
Railway Stations: Disability
15 Apr 2019

Questioner: Baroness Morgan of Cotes (CON - Life peer)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, which railway stations were considered for Access for All funding in Control Period 6 but were not successful.

Answered by Nusrat Ghani

The Department for Transport asked the industry to nominate stations for the new funding by 16 November last year, and received nominations for over 300 stations. In the Loughborough constituency, Loughborough Station was nominated unsuccessfully as it was made step-free under Access for All in 2011/12. Neither Barrow-Upon-Soar nor Sileby Stations were nominated.

In total 73 stations are set to benefit from this funding by 2024. This is in addition to the 24 Access for All projects that are currently in design or construction.


Written Question
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Research
28 Mar 2019

Questioner: Baroness Morgan of Cotes (CON - Life peer)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of ring-fencing Medical Research Council funds for biomedical research on myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) in order to ensure that overall research funding for ME is proportional to that spent on research into similarly prevalent health conditions.

Answered by Chris Skidmore

I refer my rt. hon. Friend to the answer I gave to my hon. Friend the Member for North West Norfolk on 20th March 2019 to Question 231931.


Written Question
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Training
27 Mar 2019

Questioner: Baroness Morgan of Cotes (CON - Life peer)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent discussions he has had with medical training bodies on ensuring that training programs for doctors, nurses and other health professionals include the most up to date guidance on diagnosis and appropriate treatment of myalgic encephalomyelitis.

Answered by Stephen Hammond

There have been no recent discussions between Departmental Ministers and training bodies for doctors, nurses or other health professionals about myalgic encephalomyelitis.

National Health Service employers are responsible for ensuring staff they employ are trained to the required standards to deliver appropriate treatment for patients.


Written Question
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
27 Mar 2019

Questioner: Baroness Morgan of Cotes (CON - Life peer)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the debate of 24 January 2019 on Appropriate ME Treatment, what recent discussions his Department has had with NICE on the potential merits of issuing an interim warning on the potential dangers of graded exercise therapy as a treatment for myalgic encephalomyelitis prior to issuing its revised guideline myalgic encephalomyelitis in October 2020.

Answered by Caroline Dinenage

The Department has had no such discussions. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) is an independent body and responsible for developing its guidelines in accordance with its published methods and processes. NICE expects to publish its final updated guideline in October 2020 with a consultation on draft guidance starting in April 2020.


Written Question
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
27 Mar 2019

Questioner: Baroness Morgan of Cotes (CON - Life peer)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the debate of 24 January 2019 on Appropriate ME Treatment, what recent discussions his Department has had with NICE on the potential merits of fast-tracking the release of the revised NICE guideline on myalgic encephalomyelitis due to be published in October 2020.

Answered by Caroline Dinenage

The Department has had no such discussions. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) is an independent body and responsible for developing its guidelines in accordance with its published methods and processes. NICE expects to publish its final updated guideline in October 2020 with a consultation on draft guidance starting in April 2020.


Written Question
EU External Trade: Trade Agreements
22 Jan 2019

Questioner: Baroness Morgan of Cotes (CON - Life peer)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, which nations that have trade agreements with the EU have agreed to continue those agreements with the UK after the UK leaves the EU.

Answered by George Hollingbery

Discussions with all partner countries have demonstrated a commitment to finding a pragmatic way to ensure continuity of our existing international agreements.

As part of the Withdrawal Agreement, the EU agreed to notify its treaty partners that the UK be treated as a Member State for the purposes of EU international agreements during the Implementation Period (IP). This includes trade agreements.

A number have already publicly welcomed this approach (Library deposit of 13 September DEP2018-0926 provides a list of countries). Others are, understandably, waiting for the notification to be issued before responding formally.

The Government will continue to do the responsible thing and prepare for all eventualities with partner countries, including a ‘no deal’ scenario. However, when we reach agreement will depend on the progress of these ongoing discussions. The Government will inform Parliament and the public when agreements are signed.