Baroness Morris of Yardley Portrait

Baroness Morris of Yardley

Labour - Life peer

Became Member: 14th June 2005


Baroness Morris of Yardley is not a member of any APPGs
6 Former APPG memberships
Acquired Brain Injury, Education Technology, Schools, Learning and Assessment, Social Mobility, T Levels, Teaching Profession
Democracy and Digital Technologies Committee
13th Jun 2019 - 16th Jun 2022
National Plan for Sport and Recreation Committee
15th Oct 2020 - 24th Nov 2021
Citizenship and Civic Engagement Committee
29th Jun 2017 - 28th Mar 2018
Social Mobility Committee
11th Jun 2015 - 16th Mar 2016
Secondary Legislation Scrutiny Committee
16th May 2012 - 14th May 2014
Secondary Legislation Scrutiny Committee
24th Nov 2009 - 14th May 2014
Merits of Statutory Instruments Committee
24th Nov 2009 - 15th May 2012
Minister of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport) (Arts)
13th Jun 2003 - 5th May 2005
Secretary of State for Education and Skills
8th Jun 2001 - 24th Oct 2002
Minister of State (Department for Education and Employment) (School Standards)
28th Jul 1998 - 8th Jun 2001
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education and Employment)
2nd May 1997 - 28th Jul 1998
Consolidation etc. Bills (Joint Committee)
27th Apr 1992 - 9th Dec 1994


Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Baroness Morris of Yardley has voted in 344 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Baroness Morris of Yardley Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Baroness Berridge (Conservative)
(18 debate interactions)
Baroness Barran (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
(17 debate interactions)
Lord Addington (Liberal Democrat)
(4 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Department for Education
(33 debate contributions)
Department for International Trade
(23 debate contributions)
Department of Health and Social Care
(6 debate contributions)
Home Office
(3 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
Legislation Debates
Schools Bill [HL] 2022-23
(10,224 words contributed)
Skills and Post-16 Education Act 2022
(4,829 words contributed)
Health and Care Act 2022
(1,090 words contributed)
View All Legislation Debates
View all Baroness Morris of Yardley's debates

Lords initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Baroness Morris of Yardley, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.


Baroness Morris of Yardley has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

Baroness Morris of Yardley has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


Latest 6 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
16th Sep 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they had prior to the announcement of the Skills Accelerator: Local Skills Improvement Plan Trailblazers and Strategic Development Fund pilot areas with (1) the mayor of Teeside, (2) the mayors from other trailblazer areas, and (3) council leaders from trailblazer areas.

The Skills Accelerator programme was launched on 20 April 2021 with a prospectus inviting expressions of interest from employer representative bodies to lead a Local Skills Improvement Plan Trailblazer. The successful Local Skills Improvement Plan Trailblazers were subsequently announced on 15 July 2021.

During this time period, there were no discussions regarding the Skills Accelerator programme or Local Skills Improvement Plans between the former Secretary of State for Education, my right hon. Friend for South Staffordshire; the former Minister for Apprenticeships and Skills, my hon. Friend for Chichester; Special Advisors; or officials with mayors or council leaders in any of the areas which were subsequently announced as Trailblazers. Over the same time period, the former Secretary of State for Education met the Mayor of Tees Valley on 20 May 2021. This was a political meeting in his capacity as a Member of Parliament for South Staffordshire, not on departmental business.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
14th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the minimum qualification or requirement for a person to teach physical education to (1) primary students, (2) secondary students, and (3) post-16 students.

The table below shows the number of new postgraduate trainee teachers recruited compared to the corresponding Teacher Supply Model (TSM) target in each of the last five years for physical education (PE).

Academic Year1

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

2019/20

2020/21

TSM target

999

999

1,078

1,222

1,200

Postgraduate new entrants2

1,087

1,103

1,242

1,281

1,615

Percentage of TSM target reached

109%

110%

115%

105%

135%

Source: Department for Education initial teacher training (ITT) Census statistical publications
Footnote:

  1. Refers to the ITT Census year.
  2. Figures for 2020/21 are provisional and are subject to change.

Information for the number of individuals employed by private providers to teach PE in primary schools is not available as data is only collected from a sample of state-funded secondary schools with electronic timetabling.

The number and proportion of hours of PE taught by a teacher without a relevant post-A level qualification, in state funded secondary schools, in each of the last five years for which data are available, is provided in the table attached. A relevant post-A level qualification is a level 4 qualification or above in PE, sports science, sports physiology, sports psychology, or dance (including ballet).

Data for 2020 is not available because, due to the COVID-19 outbreak, schools and local authorities were not required to provide information on teacher qualifications during the November 2020 school workforce census.

Data for 2019 is published in the ‘School Workforce in England’ statistical publication found here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/school-workforce-in-england/2019.

All entrants to teaching must hold a first degree from a United Kingdom higher education institution or equivalent qualification. Legislation does not specify that teachers must have a degree in a particular subject of discipline. There is no specific qualification required for physical education.

In further education, there is no minimum qualification requirement for anyone employed to teach PE or any specific sport or activity. It is for employers to determine the best qualifications and experience required to meet the needs of their pupils. A number of organisations have developed specific qualifications that provide an individual with recognition that they can coach or teach an activity safely.

14th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of the number of secondary school physical education classes taught by a person without a physical education qualification in each of the last five academic years.

The table below shows the number of new postgraduate trainee teachers recruited compared to the corresponding Teacher Supply Model (TSM) target in each of the last five years for physical education (PE).

Academic Year1

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

2019/20

2020/21

TSM target

999

999

1,078

1,222

1,200

Postgraduate new entrants2

1,087

1,103

1,242

1,281

1,615

Percentage of TSM target reached

109%

110%

115%

105%

135%

Source: Department for Education initial teacher training (ITT) Census statistical publications
Footnote:

  1. Refers to the ITT Census year.
  2. Figures for 2020/21 are provisional and are subject to change.

Information for the number of individuals employed by private providers to teach PE in primary schools is not available as data is only collected from a sample of state-funded secondary schools with electronic timetabling.

The number and proportion of hours of PE taught by a teacher without a relevant post-A level qualification, in state funded secondary schools, in each of the last five years for which data are available, is provided in the table attached. A relevant post-A level qualification is a level 4 qualification or above in PE, sports science, sports physiology, sports psychology, or dance (including ballet).

Data for 2020 is not available because, due to the COVID-19 outbreak, schools and local authorities were not required to provide information on teacher qualifications during the November 2020 school workforce census.

Data for 2019 is published in the ‘School Workforce in England’ statistical publication found here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/school-workforce-in-england/2019.

All entrants to teaching must hold a first degree from a United Kingdom higher education institution or equivalent qualification. Legislation does not specify that teachers must have a degree in a particular subject of discipline. There is no specific qualification required for physical education.

In further education, there is no minimum qualification requirement for anyone employed to teach PE or any specific sport or activity. It is for employers to determine the best qualifications and experience required to meet the needs of their pupils. A number of organisations have developed specific qualifications that provide an individual with recognition that they can coach or teach an activity safely.

14th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of the number of individuals employed by private providers to teach physical education in primary schools in each of the last five years; and how many of these individuals hold a qualification in physical education.

The table below shows the number of new postgraduate trainee teachers recruited compared to the corresponding Teacher Supply Model (TSM) target in each of the last five years for physical education (PE).

Academic Year1

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

2019/20

2020/21

TSM target

999

999

1,078

1,222

1,200

Postgraduate new entrants2

1,087

1,103

1,242

1,281

1,615

Percentage of TSM target reached

109%

110%

115%

105%

135%

Source: Department for Education initial teacher training (ITT) Census statistical publications
Footnote:

  1. Refers to the ITT Census year.
  2. Figures for 2020/21 are provisional and are subject to change.

Information for the number of individuals employed by private providers to teach PE in primary schools is not available as data is only collected from a sample of state-funded secondary schools with electronic timetabling.

The number and proportion of hours of PE taught by a teacher without a relevant post-A level qualification, in state funded secondary schools, in each of the last five years for which data are available, is provided in the table attached. A relevant post-A level qualification is a level 4 qualification or above in PE, sports science, sports physiology, sports psychology, or dance (including ballet).

Data for 2020 is not available because, due to the COVID-19 outbreak, schools and local authorities were not required to provide information on teacher qualifications during the November 2020 school workforce census.

Data for 2019 is published in the ‘School Workforce in England’ statistical publication found here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/school-workforce-in-england/2019.

All entrants to teaching must hold a first degree from a United Kingdom higher education institution or equivalent qualification. Legislation does not specify that teachers must have a degree in a particular subject of discipline. There is no specific qualification required for physical education.

In further education, there is no minimum qualification requirement for anyone employed to teach PE or any specific sport or activity. It is for employers to determine the best qualifications and experience required to meet the needs of their pupils. A number of organisations have developed specific qualifications that provide an individual with recognition that they can coach or teach an activity safely.

14th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what their Initial Teacher Training recruitment targets were for secondary physical education in each of the last five years; and what the actual recruitment level was in each of those years.

The table below shows the number of new postgraduate trainee teachers recruited compared to the corresponding Teacher Supply Model (TSM) target in each of the last five years for physical education (PE).

Academic Year1

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

2019/20

2020/21

TSM target

999

999

1,078

1,222

1,200

Postgraduate new entrants2

1,087

1,103

1,242

1,281

1,615

Percentage of TSM target reached

109%

110%

115%

105%

135%

Source: Department for Education initial teacher training (ITT) Census statistical publications
Footnote:

  1. Refers to the ITT Census year.
  2. Figures for 2020/21 are provisional and are subject to change.

Information for the number of individuals employed by private providers to teach PE in primary schools is not available as data is only collected from a sample of state-funded secondary schools with electronic timetabling.

The number and proportion of hours of PE taught by a teacher without a relevant post-A level qualification, in state funded secondary schools, in each of the last five years for which data are available, is provided in the table attached. A relevant post-A level qualification is a level 4 qualification or above in PE, sports science, sports physiology, sports psychology, or dance (including ballet).

Data for 2020 is not available because, due to the COVID-19 outbreak, schools and local authorities were not required to provide information on teacher qualifications during the November 2020 school workforce census.

Data for 2019 is published in the ‘School Workforce in England’ statistical publication found here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/school-workforce-in-england/2019.

All entrants to teaching must hold a first degree from a United Kingdom higher education institution or equivalent qualification. Legislation does not specify that teachers must have a degree in a particular subject of discipline. There is no specific qualification required for physical education.

In further education, there is no minimum qualification requirement for anyone employed to teach PE or any specific sport or activity. It is for employers to determine the best qualifications and experience required to meet the needs of their pupils. A number of organisations have developed specific qualifications that provide an individual with recognition that they can coach or teach an activity safely.

24th Jul 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact of (1) the Voluntary Scheme for Branded Medicines Pricing and Access, and (2) the alternative statutory scheme, on the cost of homecare medicines services to the NHS.

The Voluntary Scheme for Branded Medicines Pricing and Access and the alternative statutory scheme apply to medicines cost and not to service delivery.

Lord Markham
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)