Baroness Royall of Blaisdon

Labour - Life peer

Became Member: 25th June 2004


Shadow Leader of the House of Lords
12th May 2010 - 27th May 2015
Liaison Committee (Lords)
17th Nov 2007 - 30th Mar 2015
Procedure and Privileges Committee
28th Jan 2008 - 30th Mar 2015
Committee of Selection (Lords)
28th Jan 2008 - 30th Mar 2015
House Committee (Lords)
7th Oct 2008 - 30th Mar 2015
Committee for Privileges and Conduct (Lords)
28th Jan 2008 - 30th Mar 2015
Shadow Spokesperson (Equalities and Women's Issues)
17th Oct 2011 - 6th Sep 2012
Shadow Spokesperson (Cabinet Office)
8th Oct 2010 - 6th Sep 2012
Shadow Spokesperson (Northern Ireland)
8th Oct 2010 - 5th Sep 2011
Leader of the House of Lords and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
6th Jun 2009 - 6th May 2010
Leader of the House of Lords and Lord President of the Council (Privy Council Office)
3rd Oct 2008 - 5th Jun 2009
Chief Whip (House of Lords)
25th Jan 2008 - 5th Oct 2008
Merits of Statutory Instruments Committee
29th Nov 2004 - 7th May 2005
Secondary Legislation Scrutiny Committee
29th Nov 2004 - 7th May 2005


There are no upcoming events identified
Division Votes
Monday 18th September 2023
Levelling-up and Regeneration Bill
voted Aye - in line with the party majority
One of 101 Labour Aye votes vs 1 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 177 Noes - 152
Speeches
Monday 26th February 2024
Victims and Prisoners Bill
My Lords, I support Amendments 148A and 148B. I am late to participate in this Bill, for which I apologise, …
Written Answers
Friday 24th November 2023
Visas: New Businesses
To ask His Majesty's Government how many Global Entrepreneur visas have been issued to date.
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
None available
MP Financial Interests
None available

Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Baroness Royall of Blaisdon has voted in 245 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Baroness Royall of Blaisdon Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon (Conservative)
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
(5 debate interactions)
Lord Kamall (Conservative)
(4 debate interactions)
Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
(4 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Home Office
(10 debate contributions)
Ministry of Justice
(8 debate contributions)
Leader of the House
(7 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
Legislation Debates
Domestic Abuse Bill 2019-21
(5,812 words contributed)
Victims and Prisoners Bill 2022-23
(1,587 words contributed)
View All Legislation Debates
View all Baroness Royall of Blaisdon's debates

Lords initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Baroness Royall of Blaisdon, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.


Baroness Royall of Blaisdon has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

Baroness Royall of Blaisdon has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


26 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
4th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of the proportion of deaths per year recorded as suicide where the person had been diagnosed with a terminal illness.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have therefore asked the Authority to respond.

Professor Sir Ian Diamond | National Statistician

The Baroness Royall of Blaisdon

House of Lords
London
SW1A 0PW

10 February 2021

Dear Baroness Royall,

As National Statistician and Chief Executive of the UK Statistics Authority, I am responding to your Parliamentary Questions asking what estimate has been made of proportion of deaths per year recorded as suicide where the person had been diagnosed with a terminal illness (HL13017); what consideration has been given to collecting data on deaths recorded as suicides where a terminally ill person has taken their own life (HL13018); and the number of people per year who die as a result of suicide and, prior to their deaths, (1) had been diagnosed with, and (2) had been treated for (a) cancer, (b) neurological disease, (c) respiratory disease, or (d) heart or circulatory disease, in the previous 12 months (HL13019).

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) publishes annual suicide death registration statistics for England and Wales as part of our annual statistical release for the UK[1],[2]. The latest available figures were published by the ONS in September 2020 and covered calendar years up to 2019.

The information we hold on deaths is limited to what is recorded at death registration, which is based primarily on the death certificate by a doctor, or information about the cause and circumstances of the death provided by a coroner. We are unable at present to collect data or provide figures specifically on suicide where the person had been diagnosed with a terminal illness, since information on the deceased’s circumstances prior to death, such as diagnosis or treatment, is not among the particulars generally recorded on the death certificate.

Table 1 below shows the number of deaths where the underlying cause was suicide, and where the conditions requested where mentioned as contributory causes for the latest available year. It is important to note that death certificates do not record all health conditions the deceased might have had if they did not contribute directly or indirectly to the cause of death.

The ONS has acquired a range of other datasets, including Hospital Episode Statistics and General Practitioner records, which will be linked to mortality records. It is possible that we will be able to use such data linkages in the future to understand how many people who die by suicide had a terminal illness.

Yours sincerely,

Professor Sir Ian Diamond

Table 1: Number of deaths where the underlying cause was suicide and where cancer, neurological, respiratory or heart disease was mentioned as a contributory cause; England and Wales, registered in 2019[3][4][5][6][7]1,2,3,4,5

Cause of death

Deaths

All Suicide

5,691

...of which mentioned cancer

56

...of which mentioned neurological disease

264

...of which mentioned respiratory disease

168

…of which mentioned heart disease

321

Source: ONS

[1]https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/bulletins/suicidesintheunitedkingdom/latest

[2] Due to operational difficulties, suicides registered in 2019 in Northern Ireland and Scotland were unavailable at the time of analysis, and so last year’s annual release is for England and Wales only. The ONS will update the UK figures at a later stage.

[3] The National Statistics definition of suicide is given in Box 1 below for deaths registered since 2001.

[4] The definitions used to define the selected contributory causes are given in Box 2 below.

[5] Figures for England and Wales (area code K04000001) include deaths of non-residents, based on postcode boundaries as of November 2020.

[6] Figures are for deaths registered, rather than deaths occurring in each calendar year. Due to the length of time it takes to complete a coroner’s inquest, it can take months or even years for a suicide to be registered. More details can be found in the ‘Suicide Registrations In The UK’ statistical bulletin.

[7] A single death certificate may contain a number of contributory causes. For this reason, the categories above are not mutually exclusive.

Box 1: International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10) codes used to define suicide

ICD-10 codes

Description

Notes

X60-X84

Intentional self-harm

Persons aged 10 years and above

Y10-Y34

Injury/poisoning of undetermined intent

Persons aged 15 years and above; excludes Y33.9 where coroner’s verdict was pending for the years 2001 - 2006

Box 2: International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10) codes used to define the selected contributory causes

ICD-10 Codes

Description

C00-D48

Cancer

G00-G99

Neurological Disease

J00-J99

Respiratory Disease

I00-I99

Heart Disease

Lord True
Leader of the House of Lords and Lord Privy Seal
4th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what consideration they have given to collecting data on deaths recorded as suicides where a terminally ill person has taken their own life.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have therefore asked the Authority to respond.

Professor Sir Ian Diamond | National Statistician

The Baroness Royall of Blaisdon

House of Lords
London
SW1A 0PW

10 February 2021

Dear Baroness Royall,

As National Statistician and Chief Executive of the UK Statistics Authority, I am responding to your Parliamentary Questions asking what estimate has been made of proportion of deaths per year recorded as suicide where the person had been diagnosed with a terminal illness (HL13017); what consideration has been given to collecting data on deaths recorded as suicides where a terminally ill person has taken their own life (HL13018); and the number of people per year who die as a result of suicide and, prior to their deaths, (1) had been diagnosed with, and (2) had been treated for (a) cancer, (b) neurological disease, (c) respiratory disease, or (d) heart or circulatory disease, in the previous 12 months (HL13019).

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) publishes annual suicide death registration statistics for England and Wales as part of our annual statistical release for the UK[1],[2]. The latest available figures were published by the ONS in September 2020 and covered calendar years up to 2019.

The information we hold on deaths is limited to what is recorded at death registration, which is based primarily on the death certificate by a doctor, or information about the cause and circumstances of the death provided by a coroner. We are unable at present to collect data or provide figures specifically on suicide where the person had been diagnosed with a terminal illness, since information on the deceased’s circumstances prior to death, such as diagnosis or treatment, is not among the particulars generally recorded on the death certificate.

Table 1 below shows the number of deaths where the underlying cause was suicide, and where the conditions requested where mentioned as contributory causes for the latest available year. It is important to note that death certificates do not record all health conditions the deceased might have had if they did not contribute directly or indirectly to the cause of death.

The ONS has acquired a range of other datasets, including Hospital Episode Statistics and General Practitioner records, which will be linked to mortality records. It is possible that we will be able to use such data linkages in the future to understand how many people who die by suicide had a terminal illness.

Yours sincerely,

Professor Sir Ian Diamond

Table 1: Number of deaths where the underlying cause was suicide and where cancer, neurological, respiratory or heart disease was mentioned as a contributory cause; England and Wales, registered in 2019[3][4][5][6][7]1,2,3,4,5

Cause of death

Deaths

All Suicide

5,691

...of which mentioned cancer

56

...of which mentioned neurological disease

264

...of which mentioned respiratory disease

168

…of which mentioned heart disease

321

Source: ONS

[1]https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/bulletins/suicidesintheunitedkingdom/latest

[2] Due to operational difficulties, suicides registered in 2019 in Northern Ireland and Scotland were unavailable at the time of analysis, and so last year’s annual release is for England and Wales only. The ONS will update the UK figures at a later stage.

[3] The National Statistics definition of suicide is given in Box 1 below for deaths registered since 2001.

[4] The definitions used to define the selected contributory causes are given in Box 2 below.

[5] Figures for England and Wales (area code K04000001) include deaths of non-residents, based on postcode boundaries as of November 2020.

[6] Figures are for deaths registered, rather than deaths occurring in each calendar year. Due to the length of time it takes to complete a coroner’s inquest, it can take months or even years for a suicide to be registered. More details can be found in the ‘Suicide Registrations In The UK’ statistical bulletin.

[7] A single death certificate may contain a number of contributory causes. For this reason, the categories above are not mutually exclusive.

Box 1: International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10) codes used to define suicide

ICD-10 codes

Description

Notes

X60-X84

Intentional self-harm

Persons aged 10 years and above

Y10-Y34

Injury/poisoning of undetermined intent

Persons aged 15 years and above; excludes Y33.9 where coroner’s verdict was pending for the years 2001 - 2006

Box 2: International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10) codes used to define the selected contributory causes

ICD-10 Codes

Description

C00-D48

Cancer

G00-G99

Neurological Disease

J00-J99

Respiratory Disease

I00-I99

Heart Disease

Lord True
Leader of the House of Lords and Lord Privy Seal
4th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of the number of people per year who die as a result of suicide and, prior to their deaths, (1) had been diagnosed with, and (2) had been treated for (a) cancer, (b) neurological disease, (c) respiratory disease, or (d) heart or circulatory disease, in the previous 12 months.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have therefore asked the Authority to respond.

Professor Sir Ian Diamond | National Statistician

The Baroness Royall of Blaisdon

House of Lords
London
SW1A 0PW

10 February 2021

Dear Baroness Royall,

As National Statistician and Chief Executive of the UK Statistics Authority, I am responding to your Parliamentary Questions asking what estimate has been made of proportion of deaths per year recorded as suicide where the person had been diagnosed with a terminal illness (HL13017); what consideration has been given to collecting data on deaths recorded as suicides where a terminally ill person has taken their own life (HL13018); and the number of people per year who die as a result of suicide and, prior to their deaths, (1) had been diagnosed with, and (2) had been treated for (a) cancer, (b) neurological disease, (c) respiratory disease, or (d) heart or circulatory disease, in the previous 12 months (HL13019).

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) publishes annual suicide death registration statistics for England and Wales as part of our annual statistical release for the UK[1],[2]. The latest available figures were published by the ONS in September 2020 and covered calendar years up to 2019.

The information we hold on deaths is limited to what is recorded at death registration, which is based primarily on the death certificate by a doctor, or information about the cause and circumstances of the death provided by a coroner. We are unable at present to collect data or provide figures specifically on suicide where the person had been diagnosed with a terminal illness, since information on the deceased’s circumstances prior to death, such as diagnosis or treatment, is not among the particulars generally recorded on the death certificate.

Table 1 below shows the number of deaths where the underlying cause was suicide, and where the conditions requested where mentioned as contributory causes for the latest available year. It is important to note that death certificates do not record all health conditions the deceased might have had if they did not contribute directly or indirectly to the cause of death.

The ONS has acquired a range of other datasets, including Hospital Episode Statistics and General Practitioner records, which will be linked to mortality records. It is possible that we will be able to use such data linkages in the future to understand how many people who die by suicide had a terminal illness.

Yours sincerely,

Professor Sir Ian Diamond

Table 1: Number of deaths where the underlying cause was suicide and where cancer, neurological, respiratory or heart disease was mentioned as a contributory cause; England and Wales, registered in 2019[3][4][5][6][7]1,2,3,4,5

Cause of death

Deaths

All Suicide

5,691

...of which mentioned cancer

56

...of which mentioned neurological disease

264

...of which mentioned respiratory disease

168

…of which mentioned heart disease

321

Source: ONS

[1]https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/bulletins/suicidesintheunitedkingdom/latest

[2] Due to operational difficulties, suicides registered in 2019 in Northern Ireland and Scotland were unavailable at the time of analysis, and so last year’s annual release is for England and Wales only. The ONS will update the UK figures at a later stage.

[3] The National Statistics definition of suicide is given in Box 1 below for deaths registered since 2001.

[4] The definitions used to define the selected contributory causes are given in Box 2 below.

[5] Figures for England and Wales (area code K04000001) include deaths of non-residents, based on postcode boundaries as of November 2020.

[6] Figures are for deaths registered, rather than deaths occurring in each calendar year. Due to the length of time it takes to complete a coroner’s inquest, it can take months or even years for a suicide to be registered. More details can be found in the ‘Suicide Registrations In The UK’ statistical bulletin.

[7] A single death certificate may contain a number of contributory causes. For this reason, the categories above are not mutually exclusive.

Box 1: International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10) codes used to define suicide

ICD-10 codes

Description

Notes

X60-X84

Intentional self-harm

Persons aged 10 years and above

Y10-Y34

Injury/poisoning of undetermined intent

Persons aged 15 years and above; excludes Y33.9 where coroner’s verdict was pending for the years 2001 - 2006

Box 2: International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10) codes used to define the selected contributory causes

ICD-10 Codes

Description

C00-D48

Cancer

G00-G99

Neurological Disease

J00-J99

Respiratory Disease

I00-I99

Heart Disease

Lord True
Leader of the House of Lords and Lord Privy Seal
9th Nov 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what lessons they have learned from the disbanding of the Energy Efficiency Taskforce.

My Rt hon Friend the Secretary of State, after careful deliberation, concluded that the draft work of the Energy Efficiency Taskforce could be streamlined into ongoing government activity. The numerous ideas, discussions and draft recommendations will be instrumental in driving forward energy efficiency.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
24th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government on what basis there is a limit on non-professional singers of six people singing indoors in the context of restrictions in place to address the COVID-19 pandemic; and why this limit is more restrictive than the one that was in place in autumn 2020.

We know that the restrictions on singing are frustrating to large numbers of amateur choirs and performance groups across the country and that many people have made sacrifices in order to drive down infections and protect the NHS over the last year.

However, it is important that we take a cautious approach in easing restrictions. We have followed the views of public health experts on singing. We are aware, through the NERVTAG and PERFORM studies that singing can increase the risk of COVID-19 transmission through the spread of aerosol droplets. This was backed up by a consensus statement from SAGE, resulting in the suggested principles of safer singing being published.

We will continue to keep guidance and restrictions under review, in line with the changing situation. Further detail on step 4 will be set out as soon as possible.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
9th Nov 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government how many adults completed Multiply adult numeracy courses in (1) 2021, (2) 2022, and (3) 2023 to date.

Completion figures are not currently published for the Multiply programme. The next data release, expected at the end of November, will include completion figures by region for all four quarters of the 2022/23 academic year.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
9th Nov 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government how many adults have completed Multiply adult numeracy courses, broken down by region.

Completion figures are not currently published for the Multiply programme. The next data release, expected at the end of November, will include completion figures by region for all four quarters of the 2022/23 academic year.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
18th Aug 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they will publish their final response to recommendations made in the Report of the Independent Panel led by Dr Philip Augar.

The government is carefully considering its response to the Review of Post-18 Education and Funding, to which the independent panel reported. We remain committed to introducing further reforms which will ensure a sustainable student finance system, drive up the quality of higher education provision, and promote genuine social mobility. We plan to consult on further reforms to the higher education system before setting out a full conclusion to the Review of Post-18 Education and Funding.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
3rd Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they expect to be able to inform EU students who wish to study in the UK from the 2021/22 academic year whether they will be liable for (1) UK, or (2) overseas, fees.

We recognise how important it is that higher education students and institutions have information on eligibility for student support before applications open for university courses.

Applications for courses starting in the academic year 2021/22 do not open until September 2020. We will provide sufficient notice for prospective EU students on fee arrangements ahead of the 2021/22 academic year and subsequent years in the future.

5th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to ensure that the most vulnerable children whose education is being disrupted during the COVID-19 pandemic will be able to catch up with their peers in due course.

The department will do whatever it can to make sure no child, whatever their background or location, falls behind as a result of coronavirus.

Schools remain open for the children of critical workers and vulnerable children, who are encouraged to attend where it is appropriate for them to do so. Where vulnerable children are not attending an educational setting, we have asked local authorities, schools and colleges to continue to keep in touch with these children and young people during this period.

Schools are continuing to receive additional funding in the form of the pupil premium – worth around £2.4 billion annually – to help them support their disadvantaged pupils.

The government has also committed over £100 million to support children learn at home during this crisis and is considering, with a range of partner organisations, how best to support all pupils who have been affected by school closures. We are working at pace with experts, including the Education Endowment Foundation, to understand and address the immediate and longer-term impacts of school closures. This includes considering the benefits and challenges of a targeted online tutoring offer and the feasibility of some support over the summer.

4th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Viscount Younger of Leckie on 6 November 2018 (HL10959), whether they are now in a position to ensure that higher education providers have access to free school meals data at the start of the undergraduate admissions cycle as part of measures to widen access to higher education.

Everyone with the talent and capability to succeed in higher education should have the opportunity to benefit from a high-quality university education, regardless of age, background or where they grew up.

So that providers are identifying talent in areas of disadvantage, they need to use good-quality and meaningful data. We encourage higher education providers to use a range of measures including individual-level indicators, area data (such as Participation of Local Areas, Index of Multiple Deprivation or postcode classification from ACORN), school data, intersectional data such as Universities and Colleges Admissions Service’s (UCAS) Multiple Equality Measure, and participation in outreach activities.

We are actively considering how we can make available free school meals data, taking in to account relevant data protection legislation, and will continue to work closely with UCAS and the Office for Students to this end. In general, we are looking to make data as illuminating as possible.

The government believes that every young person with the potential should have the opportunity to access higher education, if it is right for them. A person’s background or start in life should not determine their future.

8th Nov 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government how many people have used the Universal Support programme in 2023 in England and Wales.

Universal Support is a new, voluntary employment programme for inactive disabled people and those with health conditions who have additional barriers to employment. The main programme expected to launch in Autumn 2024, will offer individuals up to 12 months of ‘place and train’ support by a dedicated keyworker, helping them find a suitable role and catering to their needs.

Universal Support is in the early stages of development, and we will publish further information in due course.

Viscount Younger of Leckie
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
8th Nov 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government how many staff were employed in (1) 2021, (2) 2022, and (3) 2023, in roles which target fraud, error and debt across the benefit system.

Everyone in DWP has a role to play in stopping fraud and error.

In recent Spending Rounds we secured additional funding enabling us to enhance our counter-fraud and error capabilities including a new Targeted Case Review (TCR) team to review millions of Universal Credit claims, as well as recruitment into our Counter Fraud & Compliance Directorate (CFCD).

We are continuing to create a culture where stopping fraud and error and minimising debt is a shared goal of everyone in DWP and those who deliver services for us. All staff will understand the part they play within DWP, and they will have the knowledge, skills and tools they need to deliver.

Oct-21

Oct-22

Oct-23

CFCD/TCR staffing

7,410

9,240

10,260

Source: Derived from the Department’s Activity Based Model (ABM).

Notes:

  • Data is drawn at the end of each month. Data is correct as of the end of October in 2021, 2022 and 2023 and has been rounded to the nearest 10.
  • Figures were derived from the Department’s Activity Based Model (ABM), which provides Full Time Equivalent (FTE) figures based on point in time estimate by Line Managers. They cover only FTE of staff with paid employment. No overtime FTE is included.
  • The number of Fraud, Error and Debt staff is unpublished management information, collected and intended for internal department use and has not been quality assured to National Statistics or Official Statistics standard.

Viscount Younger of Leckie
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
8th Nov 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government how many employment advisors there are in health settings in England.

There are 1,500 employment advisors as of the end of October 2023 in England.

Activity

FTE

(UCJC) Armed Forces Champion Lead.

10

(UCJC) Armed Forces Champion.

30

(UCJC) DWP Group Partnerships Mgmt.

30

(UCJC) DWP National Emp/Pship Teams.

70

(UCJC) DWP Partnerships LM/Skills Prov.

200

(UCJC) DWP Partnerships Relationship Mgmt.

180

(UCJC) Emp/Pship Admin Support.

40

(UCJC) Employer Engagement.

750

(UCJC) FJ Verification Svs.

10

(UCJC) SWAP Employer Partnership.

190

JC Employer and Partnerships - TOTAL

1,500

Source: Derived from the department’s Activity Based Model (ABM).

  • Employment Advisers (EAs) are based in Jobcentres and not in health settings. Their role includes finding employment opportunities for Work Coaches to discuss with claimants, setting up job fairs and liaising with employers. Data is drawn at the end of each month. Data is correct as of the end of October 2023 and has been rounded to the nearest 10.
  • For the purposes of answering this question the JC Employer and Partnerships product group has been used which contains the activity lines as shown in the table above.
  • Only those in England have been included.
  • Figures were derived from the department’s Activity Based Model (ABM), which provides Full Time Equivalent (FTE) figures based on point in time estimate by Line Managers. They cover only FTE of staff with paid employment. No overtime FTE is included.
  • The number of Employment Advisers is unpublished management information, collected and intended for internal department use and has not been quality assured to National Statistics or Official Statistics standard. As the department holds the information, we have released it.

Viscount Younger of Leckie
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
8th Nov 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what proportion of Universal Credit claimants met with a dedicated work coach in 2023 under the In-Work Progression Offer.

The Government is committed to supporting individuals who are in low paid work to progress, helping them increase their earnings and move into better paid quality jobs. Universal Credit seeks to ensure that claimants are better off working more hours and earning more money, helping them ultimately to become financially independent.

Universal Credit claimants who earn below the Administrative Earnings Threshold (AET) of £677 for an individual and £1083 for a couple are placed within the Universal Credit Intensive Work Search (IWS) labour market regime. This means they receive mandatory support from a work coach and must look for and take up more or better-paid work, as well as attend regular meetings with their work coach.

Currently information regarding the proportion of Universal Credit claimants that met with a dedicated work coach in 2023 is not available, as data on work coach appointments is not currently recorded in a way that would allow this to be measured.

Viscount Younger of Leckie
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
4th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of the number of people per year who have attempted suicide and, prior to their deaths, (1) had been diagnosed with, and (2) had been treated for (a) cancer, (b) neurological diseases, (c) respiratory diseases, or (d) heart or circulatory diseases, in the previous 12 months.

We have made no such estimate as information on attempted suicides is not held.

3rd Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to add colleges and universities to the list of institutions set out in Regulation 22 of the Human Medicines (No. 2) Regulations 2014 so that those institutions may obtain, without a prescription, adrenaline auto-injector devices for use in emergencies.

We have no current plans to add colleges and universities to the list of institutions set out in Regulation 22 of the Human Medicines (No. 2) Regulations 2014.

In the Regulations, ‘Schools’ are defined in accordance with Education Acts. It is the Department’s understanding that educational establishments so defined would not immediately extend to all colleges and universities. However, the provisions within the current legislation may offer scope for some higher education institutions to be included. We will consider if we can provide a more definitive – and easily understood - list of educational establishments that would fall within the scope of the present legislation.

9th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether providing sanitary products for employees is (1) a taxable payment, or (2) a benefit for employees; and, if not, whether they will update the published guidance to reflect this.

The provision of sanitary products for employees is normally a taxable benefit in kind. Depending on the particular circumstances, the rules on trivial benefits may apply, in which case there would be no tax liability.

Her Majesty’s Revenue and Customs have published guidance on the tax treatment of trivial benefits.

9th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether providing access to applications that support employees' mental health is (1) a taxable payment or (2) a benefit for employees; and, if not, whether they will update the published guidance to reflect this.

The provision of access to applications that support employees’ mental health can be a taxable benefit in kind in some circumstances. There are statutory tax exemptions for employee support provided as part of recommended medical treatment, or as welfare counselling. If these do not apply, and the cost of providing access does not exceed £50, this may be covered by the exemption for trivial benefits, provided the conditions are met.

Her Majesty’s Revenue and Customs have published guidance on the tax treatment of recommended medical treatment, welfare counselling and trivial benefits.

21st Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of employees (1) taking, and (2) being required to take, annual leave whilst on furlough.

The Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme is a vital element of the Government’s efforts to protect the economy during COVID-19. Employees continue to accrue holiday while on furlough, as per their employment contract, unless the employer and employee agree to vary this as part of the furlough agreement. It remains the case in employment law that an employer may ask employees to take holiday in the period of furlough. This would be a negotiation between employer and employee, and Working Time Regulations require holiday pay to be paid at an employee’s normal rate of pay. In order to provide extra flexibility, where it is not reasonably practical for an employee to take some, or all, of the holiday to which they are entitled due to Covid-19, holiday can now be carried over into the next two leave years.

During this unprecedented time, the Government is keeping the policy on holiday pay under review.

9th Nov 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government how many (1) India Young Professionals Scheme visas, (2) Entrepreneur visas (Tier 1), (3) Investor visas (Tier 1), (4) Global Talent visas, and (5) High Potential Individual visas, have been issued to date.

The Home Office publishes data on Entry clearance visas in the ‘Immigration System Statistics Quarterly Release’ which can be found at www.gov.uk/government/collections/immigration-statistics-quarterly-release

Global Talent visas issued to end of September 2023 = 8,707 main applicants with a further 6,380 dependants

Entrepreneur visas issued to end of September 2023 = 10,213 main applicants, with a further 16,451 dependants

Indian Youth Mobility visas issued to end of September 2023 = 1,956

Investor visas issued to end of September 2023 = 5,104 main applicants with a further 8,785 dependants

High Potential Individuals to end of September 2023 = 3,062 main applicants with a further 419 dependants

Global Talent Network and Global Entrepreneur figures are included in the Global Talent and Entrepreneur respective responses above.

Lord Sharpe of Epsom
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
9th Nov 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government how many Global Entrepreneur visas have been issued to date.

The Home Office publishes data on Entry clearance visas in the ‘Immigration System Statistics Quarterly Release’ which can be found at www.gov.uk/government/collections/immigration-statistics-quarterly-release

Global Talent visas issued to end of September 2023 = 8,707 main applicants with a further 6,380 dependants

Entrepreneur visas issued to end of September 2023 = 10,213 main applicants, with a further 16,451 dependants

Indian Youth Mobility visas issued to end of September 2023 = 1,956

Investor visas issued to end of September 2023 = 5,104 main applicants with a further 8,785 dependants

High Potential Individuals to end of September 2023 = 3,062 main applicants with a further 419 dependants

Global Talent Network and Global Entrepreneur figures are included in the Global Talent and Entrepreneur respective responses above.

Lord Sharpe of Epsom
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
9th Nov 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government how many Global Talent Network visas have been issued to date.

The Home Office publishes data on Entry clearance visas in the ‘Immigration System Statistics Quarterly Release’ which can be found at www.gov.uk/government/collections/immigration-statistics-quarterly-release

Global Talent visas issued to end of September 2023 = 8,707 main applicants with a further 6,380 dependants

Entrepreneur visas issued to end of September 2023 = 10,213 main applicants, with a further 16,451 dependants

Indian Youth Mobility visas issued to end of September 2023 = 1,956

Investor visas issued to end of September 2023 = 5,104 main applicants with a further 8,785 dependants

High Potential Individuals to end of September 2023 = 3,062 main applicants with a further 419 dependants

Global Talent Network and Global Entrepreneur figures are included in the Global Talent and Entrepreneur respective responses above.

Lord Sharpe of Epsom
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
25th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they will provide details about how local authorities and charities can access the £105 million funding announced for addressing homelessness.

Nearly?15,000 vulnerable people have been housed in emergency accommodation, including hotels, since the start of the?COVID-19 emergency?, according to returns from local authorities. This includes people coming in directly from the streets, people previously housed in shared night shelters and people who have become vulnerable to rough sleeping during the pandemic.

The 24 June announcement that we are providing local authorities with a further £105 million to enable them to best support those placed into emergency accommodation during the pandemic reflects our commitment to ensure that as few of these people return to the streets as possible. With this included, the overall amount of Government funding specifically spent on rough sleeping and homelessness this year is over half a billion pounds.

We are currently working to finalise the process by which local areas can access this funding as quickly as possible. With various streams of funding becoming available, we want to ensure that the process for local areas to set out their plans for next steps and recovery is coherent and focussed on both short and long-term outcomes for rough sleepers. Further information on the process to allocate funding will be developed with partners and published in due course.

Further information on the process to allocate funding will be developed with partners?and published in due course.

10th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what specific measures will be included in the Ministry of Justice’s temporary accommodation service for prison leavers to address the complex needs of vulnerable women.

We are investing more than £20m in supporting prison leavers at risk of homelessness into temporary accommodation. Individuals released from prison will be provided up to 12 weeks of temporary accommodation and will be supported to secure long-term settled accommodation before the end of that 12-week period. Initially launching in five probation regions, the service will support around 3,000 offenders in its first year and will be commencing this Summer. It will be in operation during the financial year 2021-22, with a view to scaling up and rolling out nationally.

The service will take account of the needs of women, including those with complex needs, and accommodation provision will be dedicated to single gender usage as required. Community Probation Practitioners, working together with local partners, will be responsible for ensuring that vulnerable female prison leavers receive appropriate support and are provided with housing beyond the 12 weeks’ emergency accommodation.

Commissioned Rehabilitation Services are due to start delivery on 26 June 2021 which includes services to assist in accommodation; employment training and education; financial benefit and debt and personal well-being.

These provide a holistic service for all women leaving prison by providers based in the community in to which they are released. The accommodation service and mentoring service both start pre-release. The mentoring service aims to support those who lack social support in making the transition from prison to community and to assist in building social networks.