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Written Question
World Health Organization: Finance
Thursday 23rd May 2024

Asked by: Earl of Leicester (Conservative - Excepted Hereditary)

Question to the Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office:

To ask His Majesty's Government how much of the World Health Organization's $6.83 billion budget for 2024–25 is, and will be, funded by (1) the UK, and (2) non-state actors.

Answered by Lord Benyon

It has not proved possible to respond to this question in the time available before Prorogation.


Written Question
Evictions
Wednesday 6th March 2024

Asked by: Earl of Leicester (Conservative - Excepted Hereditary)

Question to the Department for Levelling Up, Housing & Communities:

To ask His Majesty's Government how many section 21 eviction notices were recorded in England in (1) 2019, (2) 2020, (3) 2021, and (4) 2022.

Answered by Baroness Scott of Bybrook - Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)

The Department for Levelling up, Housing and Communities does not hold data on the number of section 21 notices which are served by landlords.

The prescribed form for serving a notice requiring possession under section 21 is published at: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/assured-tenancy-forms.


Written Question
Pets: Disease Control
Monday 11th December 2023

Asked by: Earl of Leicester (Conservative - Excepted Hereditary)

Question to the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs:

To ask His Majesty's Government when they expect the Veterinary Medicines Directorate to report on their research into potential environmental exposure pathways for flea and tick products.

Answered by Lord Benyon

The research in question is currently under peer review. Although publication is anticipated in the next few months, it is not possible to give an exact time due to the external peer review process.


Written Question
Pets: Disease Control
Wednesday 6th December 2023

Asked by: Earl of Leicester (Conservative - Excepted Hereditary)

Question to the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs:

To ask His Majesty's Government whether they will make it a mandatory requirement for dog and cat flea treatments only to be approved for use if they have passed an environmental damage test.

Answered by Lord Benyon

Exposure to fleas and ticks may give rise to parasitic disease in pets and present zoonotic risks to humans, as well as causing distress and discomfort. Topical flea treatments form an important part of effective parasite control to protect both human and animal health. Therefore, it is essential to take a balanced approach in terms of the benefits of these treatments and their potential environmental impact when considering this issue.

Nevertheless, the Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD) recognises the concerns raised by stakeholders with regard to the potential contribution of flea and tick treatments for companion animals to the levels of certain chemicals of concern currently being detected in UK surface waters, such as fipronil and imidacloprid.

The VMD is reviewing the environmental risk assessment process for companion animal flea and tick treatments, and this is being treated as a priority.


Written Question
Tree Planting: Finance
Tuesday 27th June 2023

Asked by: Earl of Leicester (Conservative - Excepted Hereditary)

Question to the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs:

To ask His Majesty's Government how much money has been awarded to date from the Woodland Creation Accelerator Fund; and how many local authorities have applied.

Answered by Lord Benyon

Forestry is a devolved matter; this answer is for England only. To date, a total of £9.5m of the Woodland Creation Accelerator Fund has been awarded. A total of 107 Local Authorities applied.


Written Question
Tree Planting: Finance
Tuesday 27th June 2023

Asked by: Earl of Leicester (Conservative - Excepted Hereditary)

Question to the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs:

To ask His Majesty's Government what the overall success rate of tree planting and survival was recorded from local authorities who received funds in (1) 2021, and (2) 2022, from (a) the Local Authority Treescapes Fund, and (b) the Urban Tree Challenge Fund.

Answered by Lord Benyon

Forestry is a devolved matter and so this answer is for England only.

The Urban Tree Challenge Fund (UTCF) has an expected survival rate of 100% for standard trees in the first two years, dropping to 90% from year three. A selection of planting sites is inspected each year. Any excess failures will require remedial action for trees to be replaced. All post-planting reports for the Local Authority Treescape Fund (LATF) confirm a survival rate of at least 75%.

The UTCF also includes three years of establishment payments for weeding, watering and aftercare to help secure successful establishment. In 2022, this government also offered extraordinary payments to UTCF holders to replace trees lost due to the hot and dry weather.

Figures for these funds are provided in the table below.

Year

Fund

Funding awarded (£m)

Local authorities funded

2021-22

LATF

8.4

42

2021-22

UTCF

8.4

63

2022-23

LATF

6.7

35

2021-23

UTCF

3.6

39


Written Question
Tree Planting: Finance
Tuesday 27th June 2023

Asked by: Earl of Leicester (Conservative - Excepted Hereditary)

Question to the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs:

To ask His Majesty's Government how many local authorities in (1) 2021, and (2) 2022, received grants from (a) the Local Authority Treescapes Fund, and (b) the Urban Tree Challenge Fund.

Answered by Lord Benyon

Forestry is a devolved matter and so this answer is for England only.

The Urban Tree Challenge Fund (UTCF) has an expected survival rate of 100% for standard trees in the first two years, dropping to 90% from year three. A selection of planting sites is inspected each year. Any excess failures will require remedial action for trees to be replaced. All post-planting reports for the Local Authority Treescape Fund (LATF) confirm a survival rate of at least 75%.

The UTCF also includes three years of establishment payments for weeding, watering and aftercare to help secure successful establishment. In 2022, this government also offered extraordinary payments to UTCF holders to replace trees lost due to the hot and dry weather.

Figures for these funds are provided in the table below.

Year

Fund

Funding awarded (£m)

Local authorities funded

2021-22

LATF

8.4

42

2021-22

UTCF

8.4

63

2022-23

LATF

6.7

35

2021-23

UTCF

3.6

39


Written Question
Tree Planting: Finance
Tuesday 27th June 2023

Asked by: Earl of Leicester (Conservative - Excepted Hereditary)

Question to the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs:

To ask His Majesty's Government how much funding was awarded to local authorities in (1) 2021, and (2) 2022, from (a) the Local Authority Treescapes Fund, and (b) the Urban Tree Challenge Fund.

Answered by Lord Benyon

Forestry is a devolved matter and so this answer is for England only.

The Urban Tree Challenge Fund (UTCF) has an expected survival rate of 100% for standard trees in the first two years, dropping to 90% from year three. A selection of planting sites is inspected each year. Any excess failures will require remedial action for trees to be replaced. All post-planting reports for the Local Authority Treescape Fund (LATF) confirm a survival rate of at least 75%.

The UTCF also includes three years of establishment payments for weeding, watering and aftercare to help secure successful establishment. In 2022, this government also offered extraordinary payments to UTCF holders to replace trees lost due to the hot and dry weather.

Figures for these funds are provided in the table below.

Year

Fund

Funding awarded (£m)

Local authorities funded

2021-22

LATF

8.4

42

2021-22

UTCF

8.4

63

2022-23

LATF

6.7

35

2021-23

UTCF

3.6

39


Written Question
Arboriculture: Apprentices
Monday 26th June 2023

Asked by: Earl of Leicester (Conservative - Excepted Hereditary)

Question to the Department for Education:

To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Barran on 7 March (HL5760), how the increased funding for apprenticeships in England to £2.7 billion by the 2024–25 financial year for supporting apprenticeships in arboriculture will be spent.

Answered by Baroness Barran

Apprenticeships provide people with the opportunity to earn and learn the skills needed to start a career in the arboriculture sector. There have been over 5.4 million apprenticeship starts since 2010, with 99.6% of the apprenticeships budget spent to support employers of all sizes to deliver high-quality apprenticeships in the 2021/22 financial year.

To support more employers across the country to recruit new apprentices, the department is increasing funding for apprenticeships in England to £2.7 billion by the 2024/25 financial year. This funding will not only help employers to create new apprenticeships across various sectors, including in arboriculture, but it will also cover the ongoing costs of apprentices already undergoing training, the cost of end-point assessments and any additional payments made to employers and training providers.

The below table shows apprenticeship starts and achievements for the level 2 Arborist apprenticeship standard, with a typical duration of 24 months. There have been no starts on the level 4 Arboriculturist or level 6 Professional Arboriculturist apprenticeship standards, as they are currently awaiting an appropriate end-point assessment organisation to be appointed.

Academic Year

Number of Starts

Number of Achievements

2017/18

130

0

2018/19

170

0

2019/20

170

0

2020/21

220

10

2021/22

190

20

2022/23 (Aug to Jan, as published in March 2023)

170

10

Note: Volumes are rounded to the nearest 10. Annual starts and achievements measures should not be directly compared, as apprentices will not achieve in the same year in which they started. The apprenticeship typically takes around two years to complete, and learners may take a break in learning during their apprenticeship.

The level 2 Arborist standard is presently undergoing a comprehensive review led by the trailblazer group, in collaboration with the Institute for Apprenticeships and Technical Education. Their collective efforts aim to improve the end-point assessment process, thereby increasing the number of apprentices who successfully attain the qualification. The revised standard is scheduled to be introduced by autumn 2023.

To encourage more starts, the department is making apprenticeships more flexible for employers in all sectors, supporting them to build a skilled workforce and develop a diverse pipeline of talent for the future. Furthermore, we have removed the limit to the number of apprentices that smaller employers can take on, making it easier for small and medium-sized enterprises to grow their businesses with the skilled apprentices they need. The department also provides £1,000 to employers and training providers when they take on certain younger apprentices.

The department continues to actively promote apprenticeships in schools and colleges through our Apprenticeships Support and Knowledge Programme. This free service provides resources and interventions to help better educate young people about apprenticeships by giving them up-to-date information on the options available, including apprenticeships in arboriculture sector.

We do not hold information on the number of employers and professional bodies in the arboriculture sector that are signed up to Inspiring the Future, because the programme is not government funded. To obtain comprehensive and accurate information, we recommend contacting Inspiring the Future directly via their website, which can be accessed at: https://www.inspiringthefuture.org/about/contact-us/.


Written Question
Arboriculture: Vocational Guidance
Monday 26th June 2023

Asked by: Earl of Leicester (Conservative - Excepted Hereditary)

Question to the Department for Education:

To ask His Majesty's Government how many (1) employers, and (2) professional bodies, in the arboriculture sector are currently signed up to the Inspiring the Future programme.

Answered by Baroness Barran

Apprenticeships provide people with the opportunity to earn and learn the skills needed to start a career in the arboriculture sector. There have been over 5.4 million apprenticeship starts since 2010, with 99.6% of the apprenticeships budget spent to support employers of all sizes to deliver high-quality apprenticeships in the 2021/22 financial year.

To support more employers across the country to recruit new apprentices, the department is increasing funding for apprenticeships in England to £2.7 billion by the 2024/25 financial year. This funding will not only help employers to create new apprenticeships across various sectors, including in arboriculture, but it will also cover the ongoing costs of apprentices already undergoing training, the cost of end-point assessments and any additional payments made to employers and training providers.

The below table shows apprenticeship starts and achievements for the level 2 Arborist apprenticeship standard, with a typical duration of 24 months. There have been no starts on the level 4 Arboriculturist or level 6 Professional Arboriculturist apprenticeship standards, as they are currently awaiting an appropriate end-point assessment organisation to be appointed.

Academic Year

Number of Starts

Number of Achievements

2017/18

130

0

2018/19

170

0

2019/20

170

0

2020/21

220

10

2021/22

190

20

2022/23 (Aug to Jan, as published in March 2023)

170

10

Note: Volumes are rounded to the nearest 10. Annual starts and achievements measures should not be directly compared, as apprentices will not achieve in the same year in which they started. The apprenticeship typically takes around two years to complete, and learners may take a break in learning during their apprenticeship.

The level 2 Arborist standard is presently undergoing a comprehensive review led by the trailblazer group, in collaboration with the Institute for Apprenticeships and Technical Education. Their collective efforts aim to improve the end-point assessment process, thereby increasing the number of apprentices who successfully attain the qualification. The revised standard is scheduled to be introduced by autumn 2023.

To encourage more starts, the department is making apprenticeships more flexible for employers in all sectors, supporting them to build a skilled workforce and develop a diverse pipeline of talent for the future. Furthermore, we have removed the limit to the number of apprentices that smaller employers can take on, making it easier for small and medium-sized enterprises to grow their businesses with the skilled apprentices they need. The department also provides £1,000 to employers and training providers when they take on certain younger apprentices.

The department continues to actively promote apprenticeships in schools and colleges through our Apprenticeships Support and Knowledge Programme. This free service provides resources and interventions to help better educate young people about apprenticeships by giving them up-to-date information on the options available, including apprenticeships in arboriculture sector.

We do not hold information on the number of employers and professional bodies in the arboriculture sector that are signed up to Inspiring the Future, because the programme is not government funded. To obtain comprehensive and accurate information, we recommend contacting Inspiring the Future directly via their website, which can be accessed at: https://www.inspiringthefuture.org/about/contact-us/.