Lord Bruce of Bennachie Portrait

Lord Bruce of Bennachie

Liberal Democrat - Life peer

Became Member: 19th October 2015

Liberal Democrat Lords Spokesperson (Scotland)

(since October 2016)

1 APPG membership (as of 30 May 2024)
Aid Match
1 Former APPG membership
Britiish Offshore Oil and Gas Industry
Environment and Climate Change Committee
31st Jan 2023 - 31st Jan 2024
Common Frameworks Scrutiny Committee
17th Sep 2020 - 31st Dec 2023
EU Services Sub-Committee
23rd Apr 2020 - 31st Mar 2021
Liberal Democrat Spokesperson (Northern Ireland)
29th Aug 2019 - 31st Aug 2020
EU Financial Affairs Sub-Committee
27th Jun 2017 - 23rd Apr 2020
Committees on Arms Export Controls
10th Mar 2008 - 30th Mar 2015
International Development Committee
14th Jul 2005 - 30th Mar 2015
International Development Committee
12th Jul 2005 - 30th Mar 2015
Liaison Committee (Commons)
11th Jul 2005 - 30th Mar 2015
National Security Strategy (Joint Committee)
13th Jan 2010 - 30th Mar 2015
Deputy Leader, Liberal Democrats
29th Jan 2014 - 30th Mar 2015
Shadow Secretary of State for Trade and Industry
1st Jun 2003 - 1st Jun 2005
Shadow Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
1st Jan 2001 - 1st Jan 2002
Standards and Privileges
3rd Nov 1999 - 11th May 2001
Shadow Spokesperson (Treasury)
1st Jan 1994 - 1st Jan 1999
Treasury Committee
15th Nov 1995 - 31st Jul 1998
Trade & Industry
26th Oct 1992 - 28th Nov 1994
Shadow Spokesperson (Trade and Industry)
1st Jan 1992 - 1st Jan 1994
Science and Technology Committee
27th Apr 1992 - 9th Nov 1992
Science, Innovation and Technology Committee
27th Apr 1992 - 9th Nov 1992
Science and Technology Committee (Commons)
27th Apr 1992 - 9th Nov 1992
Shadow Spokesperson (Scotland)
1st Jan 1990 - 1st Jan 1992
Trade & Industry
17th Jun 1987 - 15th Feb 1990
Shadow Spokesperson (Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
1st Jan 1988 - 1st Jan 1989
Shadow Spokesperson (Energy and Climate Change)
1st Jan 1988 - 1st Jan 1989
Shadow Spokesperson (Trade and Industry)
1st Jan 1987 - 1st Jan 1988
Scottish Affairs Committee
9th Jun 1983 - 15th May 1987
Shadow Spokesperson (Energy and Climate Change)
1st Jan 1985 - 1st Jan 1987
Shadow Spokesperson (Work and Pensions)
1st Jan 1987 - 1st Jan 1987


Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Lord Bruce of Bennachie has voted in 472 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Lord Bruce of Bennachie Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Lord True (Conservative)
Shadow Leader of the House of Lords
(15 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Cabinet Office
(25 debate contributions)
Northern Ireland Office
(21 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
Legislation Debates
Subsidy Control Act 2022
(4,688 words contributed)
Agriculture Act 2020
(4,540 words contributed)
View All Legislation Debates
View all Lord Bruce of Bennachie's debates

Lords initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Lord Bruce of Bennachie, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.


1 Bill introduced by Lord Bruce of Bennachie


The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to establish a body to assess provision of communication support for Deaf people and to make recommendations; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 19th June 2013

Lord Bruce of Bennachie has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


Latest 7 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
11th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what are the circumstances in which they would refer a bill passed by one of the devolved legislatures to the Supreme Court.

The Law Officers may refer the question of whether a Bill or any provision of a Bill would be within the legislative competence of a devolved legislature to the Supreme Court for a decision.

This power is set out in relation to the Scottish Parliament, the Senedd and the Northern Ireland Assembly in section 33 of the Scotland Act 1998, section 112 of the Government of Wales Act 2006, and section 11 of the Northern Ireland Act 1998, respectively. The power must be exercised within four weeks of the Bill passing its final stage in the relevant devolved legislature.

The Law Officers exercise this power where we believe that a Bill, or a provision of a Bill, is outside the legislative competence of the relevant devolved legislature. The parameters of the devolved legislatures’ competence are set out in the relevant Acts of Parliament which have devolved various policy areas. The power in each case is discretionary and exercised in accordance with the wider public interest.

Turning to the particular Act of the Scottish Parliament to which the question refers, the UK Withdrawal from the European Union (Continuity) (Scotland) Bill passed its final stage in the Scottish Parliament on 22 December 2020. Having taken all relevant matters into consideration, the Law Officers decided that in all the circumstances to use their discretion not to refer the UK Withdrawal from the European Union (Continuity) (Scotland) Bill to the Supreme Court.

11th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government why the law officers did not refer the UK Withdrawal from the European Union (Continuity) (Scotland) Act 2021 to Supreme Court within four weeks of the bill being passed by the Scottish Parliament.

The Law Officers may refer the question of whether a Bill or any provision of a Bill would be within the legislative competence of a devolved legislature to the Supreme Court for a decision.

This power is set out in relation to the Scottish Parliament, the Senedd and the Northern Ireland Assembly in section 33 of the Scotland Act 1998, section 112 of the Government of Wales Act 2006, and section 11 of the Northern Ireland Act 1998, respectively. The power must be exercised within four weeks of the Bill passing its final stage in the relevant devolved legislature.

The Law Officers exercise this power where we believe that a Bill, or a provision of a Bill, is outside the legislative competence of the relevant devolved legislature. The parameters of the devolved legislatures’ competence are set out in the relevant Acts of Parliament which have devolved various policy areas. The power in each case is discretionary and exercised in accordance with the wider public interest.

Turning to the particular Act of the Scottish Parliament to which the question refers, the UK Withdrawal from the European Union (Continuity) (Scotland) Bill passed its final stage in the Scottish Parliament on 22 December 2020. Having taken all relevant matters into consideration, the Law Officers decided that in all the circumstances to use their discretion not to refer the UK Withdrawal from the European Union (Continuity) (Scotland) Bill to the Supreme Court.

4th Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to review the vulnerability of electricity power lines to disruption caused by storm damage.

The Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy has commissioned a post-incident review into Storm Arwen to identify lessons and best practice for system resilience, consumer protection and additional response support. The Interim Report was published on 17 February 2022 and can be accessed on gov.uk

13th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to publish the details of (1) the criteria they will apply to, and (2) the timetable for making, a decision on participating in (a) Horizon 2020, and (b) Erasmus Plus, after the transition period of the UK's departure from the EU.

On the issue of Horizon Europe, I refer the noble Lord to the answer I gave to the noble Lord Bassam of Brighton on 20th May 2020 to Question HL3887.

On the issue of Erasmus Plus, the Government remains open to considering participation the next Erasmus+ programme, provided it is in the UK’s interest to do so.

The UK will consider options for participation in elements of Erasmus+ on a time limited basis, provided they are in line with UK interests and we can agree a fair and proportionate financial contribution. Erasmus+ is a complex programme with very many elements, of which some provide value to the British taxpayer. This will be subject to our ongoing negotiations with the EU.

We will, in parallel with these negotiations, continue to develop a domestic alternative to Erasmus+, to ensure we are prepared for every eventuality as the Government remains committed to international exchanges in education, both with the EU and beyond.

23rd Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what action they are taking, or plan to take, to support the UK offshore oil and gas industry and its supply chain through (1) the changes in the global oil market, and (2) the COVID-19 pandemic. [T]

My Rt. Hon. Friend Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer has announced a host of measures to help business in this period with £330bn worth of government backed and guaranteed loans to support businesses across the UK. These support measures remain under review and have been adapted based on feedback from industry to ensure they continue to meet the needs of all sectors of the economy.

Over the past month, Ministers and officials have been proactively engaging with the oil and gas sector and its supply chain by holding virtual meetings with representatives, individual businesses, trade associations, their members and the regulators to ensure that the sector can benefit from the far-reaching package of interventions that the government has put in place to help businesses through the current situation.

Officials in the Department are working closely with the Oil and Gas Authority, to monitor and mitigate the impacts of low oil prices and Covid-19 on the sector and track any financial and operational risks, particularly any that could impact on health, safety, the environment or security of supply.

4th Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to rebuild development capacity once the commitment to a target spending of 0.7 per cent of Gross National Income for Official Development Assistance is restored.

The FCDO continues to maintain its development capability, and is focusing its learning and development efforts to ensure that it has the right people with the right capabilities working on the highest priorities. The launch of the FCDO removed outdated and artificial distinctions between diplomacy and overseas development. The successes of COP26, the Global Education Summit, and the UK's G7 Presidency, all show the value of integrating development and diplomatic expertise to deliver for the UK.

The Government is committed to returning to spending 0.7% of GNI on official development assistance (ODA) when the fiscal situation allows and has provided a clear measure for this. The two key tests are (1) When we are not borrowing to support day-to-day spending; (2) When underlying debt is falling. Improving economic forecasts show that HMG may meet its test to return to spending 0.7% of GNI on ODA in the final year of this Spending Review.

4th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to encourage (1) stakeholders of, and (2) users of reports by, the Independent Commission for Aid Impact to contribute to the review of that Commission’s role; whether that review will consider any views submitted after 11 November; what plans they have to invite a member of the House of Commons International Development Committee to be a member of the team conducting the review; whether they plan to seek external challenge to the outcome of the review; and if so, by whom.

The Review Team has published Terms of Reference for the Review of the Independent Commission for Aid Impact and sought feedback from the public. They have also asked for written information from a range of stakeholders; and are conducting a series of interviews and roundtables. The Review Team will consider written views from members of the public until 11 November.

This is an internal departmental review. The International Development Committee is being consulted and there will be a small panel of independent experts to provide challenge to the review.