Lord Knight of Weymouth Portrait

Lord Knight of Weymouth

Labour - Life peer

Regenerating Seaside Towns and Communities Committee
17th May 2018 - 19th Mar 2019
Shadow Spokesperson (Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th Oct 2011 - 18th Jul 2014
Shadow Spokesperson (Work and Pensions)
8th Oct 2010 - 5th Sep 2011
Minister of State (Regional Affairs) (South West)
9th Jun 2009 - 6th May 2010
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
9th Jun 2009 - 6th May 2010
Minister of State (Department for Children, Schools and Families) (Schools and Learners)
29th Jun 2007 - 9th Jun 2009
Minister of State (Education and Skills) (Schools and 14-19 Learners)
5th May 2006 - 28th Jun 2007
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs) (Rural Affairs, Landscape and Biodiversity)
10th May 2005 - 5th May 2006
Defence Committee
16th Jul 2001 - 20th Oct 2003


Select Committee Meeting
Monday 25th October 2021
13:00
Select Committee Meeting
Monday 25th October 2021
14:00
Draft Online Safety Bill (Joint Committee) - Oral evidence
Subject: Draft Online Safety Bill
25 Oct 2021, 2 p.m.
At 2.30pm: Oral evidence
Frances Haugen
View calendar
Select Committee Meeting
Wednesday 27th October 2021
08:45
Draft Online Safety Bill (Joint Committee) - Oral evidence
Subject: Draft Online Safety Bill
27 Oct 2021, 8:45 a.m.
At 9.00am: Oral evidence
Maria Ressa - CEO at Rappler
View calendar
Select Committee Meeting
Wednesday 27th October 2021
14:00
Select Committee Meeting
Wednesday 27th October 2021
15:00
Select Committee Meeting
Thursday 28th October 2021
09:30
Select Committee Meeting
Thursday 28th October 2021
14:20
Draft Online Safety Bill (Joint Committee) - Oral evidence
Subject: Draft Online Safety Bill
28 Oct 2021, 2:20 p.m.
At 3.00pm: Oral evidence
Rebecca Stimson - UK Director of Public Policy at Facebook
Antigone Davies - Global Head of Safety at Facebook
At 4.30pm: Oral evidence
Leslie Miller - Vice President, Government Affairs and Public Policy at YouTube
Markham C. Erickson - Vice President, Government Affairs and Public Policy at Google
At 6.00pm: Oral evidence
Nick Pickles - Director, Senior Director, Global Public Policy Strategy, Development and Partnerships, at Twitter
Dr Theo Bertram - Director of Government Relations, Europe at TikTok
View calendar
Select Committee Meeting
Monday 1st November 2021
14:00
Draft Online Safety Bill (Joint Committee) - Oral evidence
Subject: Draft Online Safety Bill
1 Nov 2021, 2 p.m. View calendar
Select Committee Meeting
Wednesday 3rd November 2021
14:00
Select Committee Meeting
Thursday 4th November 2021
09:30
Draft Online Safety Bill (Joint Committee) - Oral evidence
Subject: Draft Online Safety Bill
4 Nov 2021, 9:30 a.m. View calendar
Select Committee Meeting
Wednesday 10th November 2021
15:00
Select Committee Meeting
Wednesday 24th November 2021
15:00
Division Votes
Tuesday 12th October 2021
Skills and Post-16 Education Bill [HL]
voted Aye - in line with the party majority
One of 100 Labour Aye votes vs 0 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 193 Noes - 186
Speeches
Tuesday 12th October 2021
Skills and Post-16 Education Bill [HL]

What the Minister said about the net-zero strategy and the Skills and Productivity Board was really reassuring, but how does …

Written Answers
Monday 29th March 2021
Bereavement Leave: Costs
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of the cost to employers of Parental Bereavement Leave since …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
Tuesday 25th May 2021
Education (Environment and Sustainable Citizenship) Bill [HL] 2021-22
A Bill to make provision in the national curriculum regarding sustainable citizenship and protection of the environment
MP Financial Interests
None available

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Lord Knight of Weymouth has voted in 122 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Lord Knight of Weymouth Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

View all Lord Knight of Weymouth's debates

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Lord Knight of Weymouth, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Lord Knight of Weymouth has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Lord Knight of Weymouth has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

1 Bill introduced by Lord Knight of Weymouth


A Bill to make provision in the national curriculum regarding sustainable citizenship and protection of the environment


Last Event - 2nd Reading (Lords)
Friday 16th July 2021
(Read Debate)

Lord Knight of Weymouth has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


6 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
15th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of the cost to employers of Parental Bereavement Leave since April 2020.

Parental Bereavement Leave and Pay was introduced in April 2020. The Impact Assessment carried out by the Department (copy attached) estimated that annual costs to employers of the policy would be £2.6m, with an additional £4.8m in one-off costs for employers to familiarise themselves with the policy when it was introduced.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
1st Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what incentives are in place for schools in England (1) to measure, and (2) to reduce, carbon emissions.

Reduction in energy use in new and existing buildings to meet the net zero carbon emissions by 2050 target is a priority for the UK government.

The department published the Good Estate Management for Schools guidance in April 2018. The guidance includes a section on ‘Energy and water management’, and tips on reducing energy and water use in schools, including measuring energy and water consumption. It also signposts schools to other organisations that provide training, information, and support in relation to sustainability and energy efficiency in schools.

In 2020, the Department for Business, Energy, and Industrial Strategy setup the £1 billion Public Sector Decarbonisation Scheme which provided grants for public sector bodies including schools to fund energy efficiency and heat decarbonisation measures. This scheme has now ended, however, schools can apply for funding through Salix for projects to reduce carbon emissions as well as accessing funding through the department’s own Condition Improvement Fund for improvements to buildings and services within schools which contribute to reducing emissions.

1st Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether (1) the causes of climate change, and (2) actions that can benefit and decrease any negative impact on the natural environment, are taught in schools in England.

It is vital that young people are taught about climate change. For this reason, related topics are included throughout both the science and geography curricula and GCSEs. In primary science and geography, pupils are given a firm foundation for the further study of the environment in secondary school. For example, in primary science, pupils are taught about how environments can change as a result of human actions. They will learn about animals’ habitats, including that changes to the environment may pose dangers to living things. In primary geography, pupils will be taught about seasonal and daily weather patterns, climate zones and human geography, including land use, economic activity and the distribution of natural resources.

In secondary science, pupils are taught about the production of carbon dioxide by human activity and the effect this has on the climate. This is expanded on in GCSE science where pupils will consider the evidence for additional anthropogenic causes of climate change. In secondary geography, pupils will look at how human and physical processes interact to influence and change landscapes, environments and the climate. As part of GCSE geography, pupils will look at the causes, consequences of, and responses to extreme weather conditions and natural weather hazards. In 2017, the department also introduced a new environmental science A level. This will enable pupils to study topics that will support their understanding of climate change and how it can be tackled.

School and teachers can go beyond the topics set out in the national curriculum, or do more in-depth teaching of these topic areas, if they so wish.

26th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the ideal age range to begin financial education in schools; and what plans they have to support the delivery of financial education to primary children.

Education on financial matters helps to ensure that young people are prepared to manage their money well, make sound financial decisions and know where to seek further information when needed. In 2014, for the first time, financial literacy was made statutory within the national curriculum as part of the citizenship curriculum for 11 to 16 year olds.

We also introduced a rigorous mathematics curriculum, which provides young people with the knowledge and mathematical skills to make important financial decisions. The government has published statutory programmes of study for mathematics and citizenship that outline what pupils should learn about financial education from key stages one to four.

In the primary mathematics curriculum, there is a strong emphasis on essential arithmetic. This is vital, as a strong understanding of numeracy and numbers will underpin pupils’ ability to manage budgets and money, including, for example, percentages. There is also some specific content about financial education such as calculations with money.

We trust schools to use their professional judgement and understanding of their pupils to develop the right teaching approach for their particular school, drawing on the expertise of subject associations and organisations such as Young Money.

Schools should have resumed teaching an ambitious and broad curriculum in all subjects from the start of the autumn term. This means that all pupils will be taught a wide range of subjects so they can maintain their choices for further study and employment. Our latest guidance on teaching to support children is set out here:
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/actions-for-schools-during-the-coronavirus-outbreak/guidance-for-full-opening-schools.

Our £1 billion COVID-19 “catch-up” package with £650 million shared across schools over the 2020/21 academic year will support schools to put the right catch-up support in place. Details of the catch up package can be found at:
https://www.gov.uk/government/news/billion-pound-covid-catch-up-plan-to-tackle-impact-of-lost-teaching-time.

The Education Endowment Foundation have published a COVID-19 support guide to support schools to direct this funding. This is available at: https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/covid-19-resources/national-tutoring-programme/covid-19-support-guide-for-schools/#closeSignup.

For the longer term, the department will continue to work closely with The Money and Pension Service and Her Majesty's Treasury, to consider how to provide further support for the teaching of financial education in schools.

26th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, what assessment they have made of the importance of financial education at primary level in the light of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on household finances; and what plans they have to provide additional support to schools to offer high-quality financial education.

Education on financial matters helps to ensure that young people are prepared to manage their money well, make sound financial decisions and know where to seek further information when needed. In 2014, for the first time, financial literacy was made statutory within the national curriculum as part of the citizenship curriculum for 11 to 16 year olds.

We also introduced a rigorous mathematics curriculum, which provides young people with the knowledge and mathematical skills to make important financial decisions. The government has published statutory programmes of study for mathematics and citizenship that outline what pupils should learn about financial education from key stages one to four.

In the primary mathematics curriculum, there is a strong emphasis on essential arithmetic. This is vital, as a strong understanding of numeracy and numbers will underpin pupils’ ability to manage budgets and money, including, for example, percentages. There is also some specific content about financial education such as calculations with money.

We trust schools to use their professional judgement and understanding of their pupils to develop the right teaching approach for their particular school, drawing on the expertise of subject associations and organisations such as Young Money.

Schools should have resumed teaching an ambitious and broad curriculum in all subjects from the start of the autumn term. This means that all pupils will be taught a wide range of subjects so they can maintain their choices for further study and employment. Our latest guidance on teaching to support children is set out here:
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/actions-for-schools-during-the-coronavirus-outbreak/guidance-for-full-opening-schools.

Our £1 billion COVID-19 “catch-up” package with £650 million shared across schools over the 2020/21 academic year will support schools to put the right catch-up support in place. Details of the catch up package can be found at:
https://www.gov.uk/government/news/billion-pound-covid-catch-up-plan-to-tackle-impact-of-lost-teaching-time.

The Education Endowment Foundation have published a COVID-19 support guide to support schools to direct this funding. This is available at: https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/covid-19-resources/national-tutoring-programme/covid-19-support-guide-for-schools/#closeSignup.

For the longer term, the department will continue to work closely with The Money and Pension Service and Her Majesty's Treasury, to consider how to provide further support for the teaching of financial education in schools.

26th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to integrate financial education and money management skills more widely into the national primary curriculum.

Education on financial matters helps to ensure that young people are prepared to manage their money well, make sound financial decisions and know where to seek further information when needed. In 2014, for the first time, financial literacy was made statutory within the national curriculum as part of the citizenship curriculum for 11 to 16 year olds.

We also introduced a rigorous mathematics curriculum, which provides young people with the knowledge and mathematical skills to make important financial decisions. The government has published statutory programmes of study for mathematics and citizenship that outline what pupils should learn about financial education from key stages one to four.

In the primary mathematics curriculum, there is a strong emphasis on essential arithmetic. This is vital, as a strong understanding of numeracy and numbers will underpin pupils’ ability to manage budgets and money, including, for example, percentages. There is also some specific content about financial education such as calculations with money.

We trust schools to use their professional judgement and understanding of their pupils to develop the right teaching approach for their particular school, drawing on the expertise of subject associations and organisations such as Young Money.

Schools should have resumed teaching an ambitious and broad curriculum in all subjects from the start of the autumn term. This means that all pupils will be taught a wide range of subjects so they can maintain their choices for further study and employment. Our latest guidance on teaching to support children is set out here:
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/actions-for-schools-during-the-coronavirus-outbreak/guidance-for-full-opening-schools.

Our £1 billion COVID-19 “catch-up” package with £650 million shared across schools over the 2020/21 academic year will support schools to put the right catch-up support in place. Details of the catch up package can be found at:
https://www.gov.uk/government/news/billion-pound-covid-catch-up-plan-to-tackle-impact-of-lost-teaching-time.

The Education Endowment Foundation have published a COVID-19 support guide to support schools to direct this funding. This is available at: https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/covid-19-resources/national-tutoring-programme/covid-19-support-guide-for-schools/#closeSignup.

For the longer term, the department will continue to work closely with The Money and Pension Service and Her Majesty's Treasury, to consider how to provide further support for the teaching of financial education in schools.