Lord Morrow Portrait

Lord Morrow

Democratic Unionist Party - Life peer

Became Member: 7th June 2006


Lord Morrow is not a member of any APPGs
1 Former APPG membership
Family Separation
Lord Morrow has no previous appointments


Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Lord Morrow has voted in 351 divisions, and 11 times against the majority of their Party.

6 Jan 2021 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Morrow voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 1 Democratic Unionist Party No votes vs 2 Democratic Unionist Party Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 298 Noes - 252
30 Nov 2020 - High Speed Rail (West Midlands–Crewe) Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Morrow voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 2 Democratic Unionist Party Aye votes vs 3 Democratic Unionist Party No votes
Tally: Ayes - 265 Noes - 274
10 Jun 2021 - Town and Country Planning (General Permitted Development etc.) (England) (Amendment) Order 2021 - View Vote Context
Lord Morrow voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 2 Democratic Unionist Party Aye votes vs 2 Democratic Unionist Party No votes
Tally: Ayes - 260 Noes - 229
4 Apr 2022 - Nationality and Borders Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Morrow voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 1 Democratic Unionist Party Aye votes vs 1 Democratic Unionist Party No votes
Tally: Ayes - 191 Noes - 148
4 Apr 2022 - Nationality and Borders Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Morrow voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 1 Democratic Unionist Party Aye votes vs 1 Democratic Unionist Party No votes
Tally: Ayes - 199 Noes - 132
4 Apr 2022 - Nationality and Borders Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Morrow voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 1 Democratic Unionist Party Aye votes vs 1 Democratic Unionist Party No votes
Tally: Ayes - 176 Noes - 153
4 Apr 2022 - Nationality and Borders Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Morrow voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 1 Democratic Unionist Party Aye votes vs 1 Democratic Unionist Party No votes
Tally: Ayes - 159 Noes - 150
4 Apr 2022 - Nationality and Borders Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Morrow voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 1 Democratic Unionist Party Aye votes vs 1 Democratic Unionist Party No votes
Tally: Ayes - 162 Noes - 141
4 Apr 2022 - Nationality and Borders Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Morrow voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 1 Democratic Unionist Party Aye votes vs 1 Democratic Unionist Party No votes
Tally: Ayes - 116 Noes - 111
4 Apr 2022 - Nationality and Borders Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Morrow voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 1 Democratic Unionist Party Aye votes vs 1 Democratic Unionist Party No votes
Tally: Ayes - 108 Noes - 107
28 Jun 2022 - Pharmacy (Responsible Pharmacists, Superintendent Pharmacists etc.) Order 2022 - View Vote Context
Lord Morrow voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 2 Democratic Unionist Party Aye votes vs 2 Democratic Unionist Party No votes
Tally: Ayes - 193 Noes - 119
View All Lord Morrow Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Lord Caine (Conservative)
(10 debate interactions)
Lord Sharpe of Epsom (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
(5 debate interactions)
Lord True (Conservative)
Shadow Leader of the House of Lords
(4 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Northern Ireland Office
(57 debate contributions)
Home Office
(23 debate contributions)
Scotland Office
(16 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Lord Morrow's debates

Lords initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Lord Morrow, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.


1 Bill introduced by Lord Morrow


A Bill to bring into force the remaining sections of Part 3 of the Digital Economy Act 2017

Lords - 40%

Last Event - 2nd Reading
Friday 28th January 2022
(Read Debate)

Lord Morrow has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


Latest 23 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
19th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they intend to publish the report of the Dunlop Review into UK Government Union capability.

As the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office told the House of Commons Public Administration and Constitutional Affairs Committee on 10 September, the Government intends to publish the Dunlop Review before the end of the year.

Lord True
Shadow Leader of the House of Lords
4th Mar 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government, following their announcement of the proposed ratification of the 2003 UNESCO Convention for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage, what steps they will take to ensure that they discharge their obligations under that convention in relation to the Ulster Scots community in a manner that is consistent with the recognition of Ulster Scots as a national minority of the United Kingdom under the Council of Europe Framework Convention for the Protection of National Minorities.

HM Government is taking an inclusive approach to the ratification of the 2003 UNESCO Convention for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage across the whole UK. We want to engage with everyone, including the Ulster Scots community, and to provide the conditions to allow everyone to express, preserve, and develop their culture and identity within the UK’s implementation of the framework of the 2003 Convention.

4th Mar 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government, following their announcement of the proposed ratification of the 2003 UNESCO Convention for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage, what is their reason for not proposing a threshold of longevity for recognition of a cultural practice.

HM Government has taken on board guidance from UNESCO which defines Intangible Cultural Heritage as ‘traditional, contemporary, and living at the same time’. In line with this, we want to ensure that newer practices of Intangible Cultural Heritage can be recognised as well as more long-standing ones.

4th Mar 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the risk that ratification of the 2003 UNESCO Convention for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage will promote social fragmentation rather than social cohesion.

HM Government aims to use the ratification of the 2003 UNESCO Convention for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage to create a discussion about the role that living heritage of all sorts plays in the identity, pride and cohesion of all parts of the UK. To support this, we are taking an inclusive approach to the ratification and seeking to ensure as many people and groups as possible can be involved, which has included launching a public consultation on details of the ratification.

13th Mar 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of reports that the Free Trees for Schools and Communities scheme run by the Woodland Trust to encourage children to plant native trees cannot operate in Northern Ireland, despite all of the tree species involved being certified as UK and Ireland-grown.

As part of the Windsor Framework, we have worked closely with industry to identify and lift the EU prohibition on movements to Northern Ireland for eleven priority species of tree: European beech, English oak, Sessile oak, Norway maple, Japanese maple, Sycamore maple, Field maple, Crab apple, Common apple, Hawthorn and two types of privet (wax leaf and delavey). In addition, the ban on Common hazel will also be lifted soon. An additional 26 species from other prohibited genera are currently under consideration for removal from the prohibited list. Many of those species are those included in the Woodland Trust tree packs. We have reached out to the Woodland Trust to discuss this matter further. Moreover, we continue to work with stakeholders to identify further species to be considered by the EU for removal from the prohibited list.

8th Mar 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government how the (1) rules, and (2) processes, for transport of livestock to and from Great Britain will differ under the Windsor Framework from the position prior to 2019; in particular, the length of time that cattle are sent to an approved test centre before being sent to Northern Ireland.

The Windsor Framework respects that for decades the island of Ireland has been treated as a single epidemiological unit, meaning that there have been additional requirements for the movement of livestock. In 2021 technical easements were agreed with the EU to simplify the movements of livestock moving from Northern Ireland (NI) to Great Britain (GB) and back. Cattle moving directly from GB to NI do not need to be sent to an approved test centre before moving to NI, but need to arrive into NI through a Point of Entry for relevant sanitary and phytosanitary checks, as they did pre-EU exit. We are working closely with the livestock sector in GB and NI to ensure movements can continue with as little friction as possible.

23rd May 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the increase in (1) costs, and (2) checks, of transporting livestock from Northern Ireland to Great Britain and back since the introduction of the Protocol on Ireland/Northern Ireland; and what steps they intend to take to reduce those costs.

The UK Government has not formally assessed the costs associated with the movements and checks of transporting livestock between Great Britain and Northern Ireland. The UK Government does consider that the introduction of the protocol has had an effect on the costs involved in moving livestock between Great Britain and Northern Ireland. The UK Government has therefore secured a derogation from EU rules for livestock moving from Northern Ireland to Great Britain for shows and sales. The derogation allows livestock to return to Northern Ireland within 15 days, which has reduced costs and burdens to traders.

23rd May 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the requirement for animals transported from Great Britain to Northern Ireland (1) to go to an approved export centre prior to transport, and (2) to remain there for six months while being tested and health certified; and what steps they are taking to reduce these requirements.

The Northern Ireland Protocol requires animals to attend approved assembly centres for a maximum of 6 days once they have remained in Great Britain for a period of 3-6 months, or from birth, depending on the reason for the movement to Northern Ireland.

The UK Government continues to discuss these extra burdens with the EU in an effort to reduce requirements.

23rd May 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they assessment they have made of the requirement for animals purchased in Great Britain to be returned to the selling herd or sent to an approved test centre for 42 days before they can be transported to Northern Ireland; what analysis they have conducted of the impact of this period increasing from 30 days to 42 days since the introduction of the Protocol on Ireland/Northern Ireland; and what steps they are taking to reduce this period.

Once an animal has been purchased at a show in Great Britain, this animal can then move to Northern Ireland, as long as it has fulfilled its residency requirements. This means the animal must have been a resident in GB for 3-6 months, or from birth, depending on the reason for movement. These requirements apply to GB originating animals that are intending to move into Northern Ireland after purchase.

In order to support the ability for Northern Ireland livestock (sheep, goats, cattle) to attend shows, sales and exhibitions in Great Britain an easement was formally agreed between the UK Government and EU Commission in January this year, which allows Northern Ireland livestock to attend shows and sales in Great Britain without being subject to a 6-month residency requirement in Great Britain, on the condition that they return to Northern Ireland after 15 days. This allows for livestock to return to Northern Ireland without having to spend 6 months in Great Britain.

Following their arrival in or return to Northern Ireland, DAERA then require livestock to be subject to 30 days in isolation with a minimum time lapse of 42 days between Tuberculosis tests.

14th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of whether companies registered in Northern Ireland can continue to tender for EU Commission contracts during the implementation period.

Access to new procurement procedures during the implementation period will continue as normal. For any procedures ongoing at the end of the implementation period the existing regime will continue up to award. Therefore, companies registered in Northern Ireland will be able to continue to tender for EU Commission contracts during the implementation period as they do now.

14th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of evidence that suggests people can be reinfected with COVID-19 more than once; and what estimate they have made of the number of people who have contracted COVID-19 for a second time.

The SARS-CoV-2 Immunity & REinfection EvaluatioN (SIREN) study follows up healthcare workers across the United Kingdom to estimate reinfection risk following a natural infection with SARS-CoV-2. Preliminary results suggest that reinfection is possible, though rare. This is supported by several case reports on reinfection internationally.

Forty four potential cases of reinfections were detected among 6,614 participants who had evidence of a past infection, contributing 1,339,078 days of follow-up. Those who had antibodies upon enrolment had a rate of becoming (re)infected that was 83% lower than that among those who had no antibodies upon enrolment. No estimate has been made of the number of people who have contracted COVID-19 for a second time in the general population.

27th Mar 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government how many companies are registered on the UK Internal Market Scheme which are based in Northern Ireland.

As of April 2024, over 7,800 businesses are authorised under the UK Internal Market Scheme, including over 4,100 which are established in Northern Ireland.

27th Mar 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government how many companies were registered on the UK Trader Scheme at the highest point of its operation.

As of 30 September 2023, when the UK Trader Scheme was replaced by the UK Internal Market Scheme, 5,700 businesses were authorised on the UK Trader Scheme. Around 3,800 businesses were actively using their authorisation in 2023.

27th Mar 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government, following the commencement of section 45B of the UK Internal Market Act 2020, what export procedures will apply to goods moving from Northern Ireland to Great Britain when placed under a procedure listed in Article 210 of Regulation (EU) No 952/2013; what is a practical example of what a business moving a good in this context will encounter in terms of paperwork and checks; when the export procedure will be commenced; and how they plan to apply the procedure if there is no Border Control Post at Cairnryan.

The Windsor Framework removes the requirement for export procedures that existed under the original Protocol and the subsequent 2020 agreement on the need for "equivalent information", with such controls only applying to a niche set of goods. Consistent with this, we have now laid domestic legislation under the Safeguarding the Union package that expressly prohibits export procedures applying to goods moving Northern Ireland to Great Britain, restoring our unfettered access safeguards. Detailed guidance on the treatment of relevant goods where exceptions apply is available on gov.uk.

27th Mar 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government, following the commencement of section 45B of the UK Internal Market Act 2020, what export procedures will apply to goods moving from Northern Ireland to Great Britain to goods that are in temporary storage in accordance with Article 144 of Regulations (EU) No 952/2013; what is a practical example of what a business moving a good in this context will encounter in terms of paperwork and checks; when the export procedure will be commenced; and how they plan to apply the procedure if there is no Border Control Post at Cairnryan.

The Windsor Framework removes the requirement for export procedures that existed under the original Protocol and the subsequent 2020 agreement on the need for "equivalent information", with such controls only applying to a niche set of goods. Consistent with this, we have now laid domestic legislation under the Safeguarding the Union package that expressly prohibits export procedures applying to goods moving Northern Ireland to Great Britain, restoring our unfettered access safeguards. Detailed guidance on the treatment of relevant goods where exceptions apply is available on gov.uk.

24th May 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government how much funding was added to the Welsh block grant as a result of the 2016 agreement on the Welsh Government’s fiscal framework in each financial year from 2017/18 to 2021/22.

The Block Grant Transparency publication sets out a full breakdown of funding for the Welsh Government, including the impact of the 5% uplift.

The publication is regularly updated after each UK Budget. The next update is expected before summer recess following Spring Budget 2023.

The most recent publication can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/block-grant-transparency-december-2021

18th May 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government, in each of the past five years, how many decision makers there have been in the competent authorities making conclusive grounds decisions identifying victims of modern slavery.

There are 207.93 full-time equivalent (FTE) decision makers working in the Single Competent Authority. There are 111.87 decision makers working within the Immigration Enforcement Competent Authority. Both Competent Authorities carry a number of vacancies being filled through recruitment activity.

It is not possible to provide a breakdown of only Conclusive Grounds Decision Makers; staff can be dual skilled and will work on both, Reasonable Grounds decision and Conclusive Ground decision, workstreams according to business needs.

It is not possible to provide a breakdown of decision maker numbers for the past five years.

Lord Sharpe of Epsom
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
25th May 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government how many (1) army personnel, (2) Royal Air Force personnel, and (3) Royal Navy personnel, are based in Northern Ireland.

The attached supporting table details the number of UK regulars and Future Reserves 2020 (FR20) personnel stationed in Northern Ireland by service as at 1 January 2023.

The figures are based on Service personnel's stationed location and not their location of residence - where personnel work isn't necessarily where they live. Personnel deployed on operations to an area away from their stationed location are shown against their most recent stationed location. The Royal Navy/Royal Marines personnel on sea service are included against the local authority containing the home port of their ship.

2nd Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether female prisoners can be searched by transgender prison staff (1) with, and (2) without, a Gender Recognition Certificate.

In accordance with the Gender Recognition Act 2004, transgender people may apply for a Gender Recognition Certificate. Prisoners and staff members in receipt of a GRC have the legal right to be treated as their acquired gender in every respect.

The national policy on the searching of prisoners, staff and visitors (PSI 07/2016 – Searching of the Person) is currently under review and it is intended to publish a revised version later this year.

The updated policy will include direction on transgender staff conducting searches. This policy will encompass staff with or without a Gender Recognition Certificate.

In reviewing the policy, Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) has consulted with the Government’s Legal Department and HMPPS Equalities Team. The new policy will be compliant with the Equality Act 2010, the Gender Recognition Act 2004 and the European Convention of Human Rights.

2nd Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to amend the Searching the Person prison service instruction (PSI 48/2010) issued on 12 October 2010, that “female prisoners, visitors and staff must only be searched by female staff”.

The Prison Service Instruction PSI48/2010 Searching of the Person was replaced in 2016 by PSI07/2016 Searching of the Person.

This policy, which has been in place since 1992, allows for male officers to conduct rub down searches on the same sex only and female officers to conduct rub down searches on both sexes. Full searches must only be conducted by a person of the same sex.

The national policy on the searching of prisoners, staff and visitors (PSI 07/2016 – Searching of the Person) is currently under review and it is intended to publish a revised version later this year.

The updated policy will also include direction on transgender staff conducting searches. This will encompass staff with or without a Gender Recognition Certificate.

In reviewing the policy, Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) has consulted with the Government’s Legal Department and HMPPS Equalities Team. The new policy will be compliant with the Equality Act 2010, the Gender Recognition Act 2004 and the European Convention of Human Rights.

1st Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to introduce a new section to their publication Procedures for searching people: PSI 07/2016, published on 26 July 2016, (1) on the conduct of searches by transgender prison officers, and (2) to confirm that the right of women prisoners to be searched only by officers of female sex assigned at birth will be maintained.

The national policy on the searching of prisoners, staff and visitors (PSI 07/2016 – Searching of the Person) is currently under review and it is intended to publish a revised version later this year.

The updated policy will include direction on transgender staff conducting searches. This will encompass staff with or without a Gender Recognition Certificate.

In reviewing the policy, Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) has consulted with the Government’s Legal Department and HMPPS Equalities Team. The new policy will be compliant with the Equality Act 2010, the Gender Recognition Act 2004 and the European Convention of Human Rights.