Lord Strathcarron Portrait

Lord Strathcarron

Conservative - Excepted Hereditary

Became Member: 18th February 2022


Lord Strathcarron has no previous appointments


There are no upcoming events identified
Division Votes
Tuesday 6th February 2024
Automated Vehicles Bill [HL]
voted No - in line with the party majority
One of 184 Conservative No votes vs 0 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 200 Noes - 204
Speeches
Friday 9th February 2024
Conversion Therapy Prohibition (Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity) Bill [HL]
My Lords, there are many areas of concern with the Bill, as we have heard, but I would like to …
Written Answers
Thursday 15th February 2024
Coronavirus: Vaccination
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the answer by Lord Evans of Rainow on 11 January (HL Deb col …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
None available
MP Financial Interests
None available

Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Lord Strathcarron has voted in 200 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Lord Strathcarron Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
(4 debate interactions)
Lord Stewart of Dirleton (Conservative)
Advocate General for Scotland
(2 debate interactions)
Earl of Leicester (Conservative)
(2 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Leader of the House
(2 debate contributions)
Scotland Office
(2 debate contributions)
Department for Transport
(2 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Lord Strathcarron's debates

Lords initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Lord Strathcarron, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.


Lord Strathcarron has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

Lord Strathcarron has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


24 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
28th Jun 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government which government departments have banned the use of (1) Hikvision, and (2) Dahua Technology, surveillance equipment from their offices; and what plans they have for that equipment to be banned in all other government departments.

As has been the case under successive administrations, it is not government policy to comment on the security arrangements of government departments. Specific details regarding the security systems used by departments are withheld on national security grounds.

Lord True
Leader of the House of Lords and Lord Privy Seal
14th Nov 2022
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the data protection and privacy risks posed by private facial recognition companies such as PimEyes to UK citizens.

All organisations in the UK which process personal data, including biometric data, have to comply with the requirements of the UK General Data Protection Regulation and the Data Protection Act 2018.

The Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) is the UK’s independent regulator for data protection and is responsible for providing advice and guidance on compliance with the UK’s data protection laws.

The ICO is currently considering whether PimEyes’s practices may raise data protection concerns. It would not be appropriate for His Majesty’s Government to comment on an ongoing ICO consideration.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
9th Nov 2022
To ask His Majesty's Government how much money they have spent on Oak National Academy; and what assessment they have made of the effects of that spending on the private academic publishing sector.

As set out in Oak National Academy’s Framework Agreement, Oak will be operationally independent from the department. The department will not prescribe or approve the content of curriculum packages or educational resources. Oak’s resources will be created independently, will be free to access and non-compulsory for schools to use, and evidence based. In creating curriculum packages and educational resources, Oak will ensure alignment with the national curriculum, and have due regard to the department’s non-statutory curriculum guidance.

Citizenship forms a core part of the statutory national curriculum at Key Stages 3 and 4 and primary schools can choose to teach citizenship at Key Stages 1 and 2, following the non-statutory framework for citizenship. The citizenship curriculum provides a rigorous framework for pupils to explore complex concepts and issues facing society.

History is also part of the national curriculum from Key Stages 1 to 3 and is included in the English Baccalaureate suite of GCSE subjects for Key Stage 4. The department is developing a Model History Curriculum which is a non-statutory guidance document to support the national curriculum and the teaching of a high quality, knowledge rich and diverse history curriculum. The guidance will be published in 2024.

The department does not prescribe how these subjects should be taught but we expect schools to develop a curriculum that meets the need of their pupils.

The department made £4.84 million available for Oak both for the summer term of the academic year 2019/20, and then for the 2020/21 academic year, to provide video lessons in a broad range of subjects for Reception up to Year 11. In the 2022/23 financial year, a total of £9.8 million has been budgeted for Oak. Part of this £9.8 million of funding was allocated through the Grant Funding Agreement, which enabled Oak National Academy to maintain its activity prior to becoming an Arm’s Length Body (ALB). The government has set aside up to £43 million over the next three years to support Oak National Academy, a significant proportion of which is expected to be provided directly to schools, publishers, and other organisations for the creation of resources.

As an integral part of the process to set up Oak as an ALB, with close regard to Cabinet Office guidance, the department produced a business case that included an assessment of potential market impact. This business case was published on GOV.UK on 1 November at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/oak-national-academy-business-case. Monitoring market impact will be a priority throughout Oak National Academy’s lifetime and will be factored into the body’s ongoing evaluation and two-year review.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
9th Nov 2022
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of (1) their relationship with Oak National Academy, and (2) the ways in which students are taught about (a) society, and (b) history, through the National Curriculum.

As set out in Oak National Academy’s Framework Agreement, Oak will be operationally independent from the department. The department will not prescribe or approve the content of curriculum packages or educational resources. Oak’s resources will be created independently, will be free to access and non-compulsory for schools to use, and evidence based. In creating curriculum packages and educational resources, Oak will ensure alignment with the national curriculum, and have due regard to the department’s non-statutory curriculum guidance.

Citizenship forms a core part of the statutory national curriculum at Key Stages 3 and 4 and primary schools can choose to teach citizenship at Key Stages 1 and 2, following the non-statutory framework for citizenship. The citizenship curriculum provides a rigorous framework for pupils to explore complex concepts and issues facing society.

History is also part of the national curriculum from Key Stages 1 to 3 and is included in the English Baccalaureate suite of GCSE subjects for Key Stage 4. The department is developing a Model History Curriculum which is a non-statutory guidance document to support the national curriculum and the teaching of a high quality, knowledge rich and diverse history curriculum. The guidance will be published in 2024.

The department does not prescribe how these subjects should be taught but we expect schools to develop a curriculum that meets the need of their pupils.

The department made £4.84 million available for Oak both for the summer term of the academic year 2019/20, and then for the 2020/21 academic year, to provide video lessons in a broad range of subjects for Reception up to Year 11. In the 2022/23 financial year, a total of £9.8 million has been budgeted for Oak. Part of this £9.8 million of funding was allocated through the Grant Funding Agreement, which enabled Oak National Academy to maintain its activity prior to becoming an Arm’s Length Body (ALB). The government has set aside up to £43 million over the next three years to support Oak National Academy, a significant proportion of which is expected to be provided directly to schools, publishers, and other organisations for the creation of resources.

As an integral part of the process to set up Oak as an ALB, with close regard to Cabinet Office guidance, the department produced a business case that included an assessment of potential market impact. This business case was published on GOV.UK on 1 November at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/oak-national-academy-business-case. Monitoring market impact will be a priority throughout Oak National Academy’s lifetime and will be factored into the body’s ongoing evaluation and two-year review.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
2nd Oct 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the (1) value for money, and (2) benefit to the community, of the public funding granted to the charity Sustrans.

The Department for Transport has previously provided around £75m to Sustrans to maintain and upgrade the National Cycle Network since 2018/19. The Department keeps all funding under close review.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Secretary (HM Treasury)
5th Sep 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government whether they intend to use all or any of sections 141(1), 142(2) or 143 of the Greater London Authority Act 1999 to reverse the expansion of London’s Ultra Low Emission Zone.

It was the Mayor's decision to expand the ULEZ to the Greater London boundary. There was no legal requirement for the Mayor to consult Government on his decision. The only powers for Government sit under Section 143 of the GLA Act which are focused on correcting inconsistencies between national transport policy and the Mayor's Transport Strategy. Therefore, these powers cannot be exercised.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Secretary (HM Treasury)
24th Jan 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government whether they intend to publish the scientific evidence and data upon which the COVID-19 rules in place for passengers on direct flights from China to England are based; and what assessment they have made of (1) the cost of imposing the rules, and (2) whether the benefits of the rules outweigh their costs.

The basis for the decision to introduce pre-departure and post-arrival testing for passengers arriving from mainland China is the lack of comprehensive health information being shared by China, low confidence in their published case rates and lack of transparency around genomic sequencing. Domestic infection and hospitalisation rates have surged in China and the measures introduced reduce the number of cases being imported and allow us to monitor for variants.

The measures are proportionate, targeted and time limited. They are being kept under review and will be removed if no longer necessary. HMG and other international partners are encouraging China to provide greater transparency on their COVID data. Passengers may use a PCR or low-cost lateral flow device as their pre-departure test.

Post arrival testing is being managed by UKHSA and it is for them to decide about publishing data.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Secretary (HM Treasury)
1st Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the answer by Lord Evans of Rainow on 11 January (HL Deb col 98), what assessment they have made of whether it is appropriate to describe COVID-19 vaccinations as “very safe” given that the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency's Blue Guide, says that "advertising which states or implies that a product is 'safe' is unacceptable"; and whether they intend to publish the evidence base that supports the claim that the COVID-19 vaccinations are “very safe.”

All vaccines used in the United Kingdom must be authorised by the UK’s independent medicines’ regulator, the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Each COVID-19 vaccine is only authorised once it has met robust standards of effectiveness, safety, and quality. As with all vaccines and medicines, the safety of COVID-19 vaccines is continuously monitored, and the advice from the MHRA remains that the benefits of vaccination in preventing COVID-19 and serious complications associated with COVID-19 outweigh any currently known side effects in the majority of patients. Information on the characteristics of each vaccine is published by the MHRA on the GOV.UK website. The MHRA’s Blue Guide relates to the advertising and promotion of medicinal products, and in general, debates in Parliament about vaccination are considered to be outside its scope.

Lord Markham
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
16th May 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Markham on 27 April (HL7380), whether they considered whether materials disseminated by public bodies in support of a public health campaign to increase routine vaccination uptake were seen to "promote the prescription, supply, sale or use" of specific medicine or medicines, either intentionally or unintentionally; if so, whether this material fell within the definition under regulation 7 of the Human Medicines Regulations 2012; and if not, which legal provision provided an exemption from regulation 7 for public health campaign advertisements.

It is the view of the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) that materials disseminated by Government bodies in support of a public health campaign are not caught by the definition of an advertisement for a medicine as given in regulation 7. This is because these materials were not ‘designed to promote the prescription, supply, sale or use’ of a specific medicine or medicines. Instead, these materials were disseminated to promote public health by encouraging people to seek appropriate medical intervention, in this case uptake of vaccination against COVID-19.

The MHRA is obliged to consider any complaints made to it about the advertising of medicines. While carrying out its statutory duties, the MHRA will assess each case on its own merits and in light of the available evidence.

Lord Markham
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
21st Apr 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Markham on 11 April (HL6877), in which legislation it states that advertisements which form part of Government campaigns to encourage routine vaccination uptake “sit outside of the scope of United Kingdom advertising regulations”, and how that is consistent with (1) regulation 280 of the Human Medicines Regulations 2012, and (2) the definition of the promotion of a medicinal product in the MHRA’s Blue Guide as any thing or any activity "designed to promote the prescription, supply, sale or consumption of medicinal products".

The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) is responsible, on behalf of Health Ministers, for administering the legislation on advertising medicines as set out in Part 14 of the Human Medicines Regulations 2012, as amended. The relevant definition of an advertisement for a medicine is given in regulation 7. It is the view of the MHRA that materials disseminated by Government bodies in support of a public health campaign are not caught by this definition as they are not ‘designed to promote the prescription, supply, sale or use’ of a specific medicine or medicines. Their purpose is rather to promote public health by encouraging people to seek appropriate medical intervention, in this case uptake of vaccination against COVID-19. On the basis of this view, that Government campaigns are outside the definition outlined in regulation 7, regulation 280 does not apply.

Lord Markham
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
27th Mar 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Markham on 21 March (HL5868), what steps they will take to uphold the provisions of Chapter 4 of the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency’s Blue Guide, which sets out the general rules for advertising medicines to both healthcare workers and the public, and states there is a requirement not to exaggerate the benefits of medicines; and whether the reference in Chapter 4 to section 6.6 “for more information on safety claims” implies that the rules around the use of the word “safe” are applicable to advertising aimed at the general public.

The Department is committed to following the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) Blue book and Advertising Standards Agency guidelines. Careful consideration is given to what guidance is applicable to the campaigns that are run. Government campaigns to encourage routine vaccination uptake are considered as public health interventions and therefore sit outside the scope of United Kingdom advertising regulations, which are interpreted in the MHRA Blue Guide. Whether or not specific guidance applies, all campaign messaging is subject to rigorous clinical and policy approvals, to ensure information is communicated accurately.

Lord Markham
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
15th Mar 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Markham on 8 February (HL5061), when data for April 2022 and beyond will be validated for release; and on what grounds this information is commercially sensitive.

The data relating to the number of lateral flow device (LFD) tests purchased between 1 April 2022 and 31 March 2023 will be available in late 2023 on completion of the National Audit Office audit on financial year 2022/23. The timescales of the audit are currently being discussed and agreed.

The UK Health Security Agency consider that releasing the information on the total costs of LFD tests would not be in the public interest as it could prejudice future commercial relations with suppliers if this information were to be disclosed in the public domain.

Lord Markham
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
8th Feb 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Markham on 6 February 2023 (HL4993), what plans they have to launch an evidence-led investigation into why more people are dying unexpectedly than normal.

The Office for Health Improvement and Disparities is already working closely with the Office for National Statistics to understand excess deaths. Deaths involving acute respiratory infections (including influenza and pneumonia) are likely to explain many of the excess deaths in the four week period to 27 January 2023. There were 3,389 more deaths involving acute respiratory infections than expected. Deaths involving all cardiovascular diseases were 12% higher than expected during the four week period to 27 January 2023, while deaths involving heart failure were 21% higher than expected. The Government is taking a range of actions to address excess deaths, including preparing for the challenge of variants of COVID-19 and respiratory infections, with an integrated COVID-19 booster and flu vaccination programme. We will be announcing details of our action on cardiovascular diseases in the forthcoming Major Conditions Strategy.

Lord Markham
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
23rd Jan 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government why, in advertisements distributed as part of NHS public health campaigns, the word "safe" has been used to promote the COVID-19 vaccines, given that the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency's Blue Guide, published in November 2020, says that "advertising which states or implies that a product is 'safe' is unacceptable".

The Winter Vaccinations campaign ‘Boost Your Immunity This Winter’ ran over two years (2021/22 and 2022/23). The campaign prompted those eligible to get a COVID-19 booster to ‘Get Vaccinated. Get Boosted. Get Protected’. The Department is unable to locate any paid advertising – delivered as part of this multi-year campaign – using the word ‘safe’ to encourage uptake of COVID-19 vaccines. Our aim is that all paid advertising follows Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency and Advertising Standards Authority guidance.

Lord Markham
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
23rd Jan 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the analysis in chapter 10 of the Technical report on the COVID-19 pandemic in the UK, published on 1 December 2022, that non-COVID excess deaths are being caused by, among other factors, patients not receiving statins or blood pressure medicines during the pandemic.

We have made no specific assessment; however, it is likely that a combination of factors has contributed to non-COVID-19 excess deaths, including high flu prevalence and health conditions such as heart disease and diabetes. Different organisations are producing diverse estimates based on differing methodologies.

Lord Markham
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
1st Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made, having regard to the relative burden of disease, of the level of investment in the World Health Organization's pandemic agenda, relative to efforts to counter endemic diseases such as malaria, tuberculosis, and HIV/AIDS.

The UK provides the vast majority of funding to WHO as unearmarked flexible funding (£340 million in 2020-2024). Funding helps WHO deliver its General Programme of Work, supporting WHO reform and addressing UK global health priorities. This includes building resilient health systems around the world, especially in the poorest countries, and helping prevent and prepare for pandemics. Additionally, over its lifetime, the UK has been the 3rd largest contributor to the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. This funding has contributed towards saving 59 million lives, our recent pledge of £1 billion will continue to contribute to this effort.

Lord Benyon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
20th Nov 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what are their specific reasons for planning to cede sovereignty of the Chagos Islands to Mauritius; and what assessment they have made of China’s intentions for the Chagos Islands given their relationship with Mauritius.

The UK and Mauritius have reiterated that any agreement between our two countries will ensure the continued effective operation of the joint UK-US military base on Diego Garcia, which plays a vital role in regional and global security. The UK will only enter into an agreement that protects our national interests and those of our partners, including from any malign actors in the Indian Ocean.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
19th Sep 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government whether they plan to table a motion to enable the House of Lords to debate the Political Declaration of the United Nations General Assembly High-level Meeting on Pandemic Prevention, Preparedness and Response, which will be discussed by the UN General Assembly on 20 September.

A Westminster Hall Debate on the three health-focused High-Level Meetings taking place at the UN General Assembly High-Level Week this year was held on 11th July 2023. This provided a helpful opportunity for Members to discuss the UK's aims for the three High-Level Meetings. UN resolutions, including those such as this political declaration, issued as the outcome of UN General Assembly High-Level Meetings, are non-binding recommendations. In keeping with usual practice relating to such resolutions, the Government does not propose to table a motion relating to the declaration.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
4th Sep 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the Bank of England’s financial forecasting record; and what steps, if any, they plan to take to improve the Bank’s forecasting.

The Bank of England has statutory responsibilities for monetary policy and financial stability, and operational independence from the Government to carry out those responsibilities. The Government remains fully committed to the Bank’s independence.

The Court of the Bank of England has commissioned the Bank’s Independent Evaluation Office (IEO) to review the Bank’s forecasting, and related processes. It will be led by Dr Ben Bernanke. The review began this summer and is expected to publish its findings in spring 2024.

Baroness Penn
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
7th Jul 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they will review the 45 pence per mile HMRC mileage rate motoring allowance in the light of current levels of inflation.

The Government sets the Approved Mileage Allowance Payments (AMAP) rates to minimise administrative burdens. The AMAP rates aim to reflect running costs including fuel, servicing and depreciation. Depreciation is estimated to constitute the most significant proportion of the AMAP rates.

Employers are not required to use the AMAP rates. Instead, they can agree to reimburse the actual cost incurred, where individuals can provide evidence of the expenditure, without an Income Tax or National Insurance charge arising.

Alternatively, they can choose to pay a different mileage rate that is higher or lower than the AMAP rates. If an employee is paid less than the approved amount, they are allowed to claim Mileage Allowance Relief (MAR) from HMRC. However, if the payment exceeds the relevant AMAP rate, and this results in a profit for the individual, they will be liable to pay Income Tax and National Insurance contributions on the difference.

As with all taxes and allowances, the Government keeps the AMAP rates under review and any changes are considered by the Chancellor.

Baroness Penn
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
24th Oct 2022
To ask His Majesty's Government what progress they have made to ensure that the recording of non-crime hate incidents is governed by a Code of Practice that is subject to parliamentary approval.

I fully recognise the concern that surrounds the recording of non-crime hate incidents. Home Office officials are currently working with the College of Policing to ensure that the right to freedom of expression is better protected.

Lord Sharpe of Epsom
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
18th May 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many fixed penalty notices have been issued for infringements of the COVID-19 lockdown regulations; what was the (1) total, and (2) average, value of those fines; and what percentage of the fines have been paid.

Data on the number of Fixed Penalty Notices (FPNs) issued under the COVID-19 regulations by police forces in England and Wales is not held centrally by the Home Office. These figures were collected by police forces and published monthly by the National Police Chiefs' Council (NPCC).

The final tranche of figures relating to coronavirus breaches was published on 16 March 2022 and can be found here on the NPCC website at Update on Coronavirus FPNs issued by forces in England and Wales, and the payment of FPNs (npcc.police.uk)

The data includes the number of FPN letters issued by ACRO, FPNs paid, FPNs contested, and those not complied with, broken down by force area.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
11th May 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to delete records for those accused of non-crime hate incidents.

The Government recognises the concern surrounding the recording of non-crime hate incidents (NCHIs). We also note the Court of Appeal judgment in the Harry Miller v College of Policing case that was handed down on 20 December 2021. The Court found that the recording of NCHIs is lawful provided that there are robust safeguards in place so that the interference with freedom of expression is proportionate.

Accordingly, the Government included provisions in the Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill - which received Royal Assent on 28 April 2022 - to ensure that the recording of NCHIs is governed by a Code of Practice that is subject to Parliamentary approval.

The content of the Code will be drafted in due course, and will make the processes surrounding the recording of NCHI data more transparent and subject to stronger safeguards, including on retention. In the short term, we have no plans to ask police forces to review or delete existing personal NCHI data that they may have on record. To do so would be a disproportionately costly, time consuming and resource-intensive process that is not warranted at this stage.

The College of Policing is also reflecting on the Court of Appeal’s judgment carefully and make any changes that are necessary to its existing guidance which will remain in force in the interim period before the new Code enters into effect.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)