Lord Taylor of Goss Moor Portrait

Lord Taylor of Goss Moor

Liberal Democrat - Life peer

Became Member: 16th July 2010


Lord Taylor of Goss Moor is not a member of any APPGs
Chair of the Liberal Democrat Parliamentary Party
12th Jun 2003 - 5th May 2005
Liberal Democrat Spokesperson (Treasury)
9th Aug 1999 - 12th Jun 2003
Liberal Democrat Spokesperson (Environment and Transport)
2nd May 1997 - 9th Aug 1999
Environmental Audit Committee
17th Nov 1997 - 2nd Dec 1997
Liberal Democrat Spokesperson (Environment)
1st Sep 1994 - 2nd May 1997
Liberal Democrat Spokesperson (Citizens Charter)
1st Sep 1992 - 1st Sep 1994
Chair of Campaigns and Communications, Liberal Democrat Party
1st Sep 1992 - 1st Sep 1994
Chair of Communications, Liberal Democrat Party
16th Jun 1989 - 1st Sep 1992
Liberal Democrat Spokesperson (Education)
1st Jan 1990 - 1st Jan 1992
Liberal Democrat Spokesperson (Trade and Industry)
1st Jan 1989 - 1st Jan 1990
Liberal Democrat Spokesperson (Local Government, Housing and Transport)
1st Sep 1988 - 1st Sep 1989
Liberal Democrat Spokesperson (Energy)
3rd Mar 1988 - 1st Sep 1988
Liberal-SDP Alliance Spokesperson (Energy)
11th Jun 1987 - 3rd Mar 1988
Liberal-SDP Alliance Spokesperson (Youth)
13th Mar 1987 - 11th Jun 1987


Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Lord Taylor of Goss Moor has voted in 234 divisions, and 1 time against the majority of their Party.

29 Jan 2024 - Safety of Rwanda (Asylum and Immigration) Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Taylor of Goss Moor voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 1 Liberal Democrat No votes vs 67 Liberal Democrat Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 84 Noes - 206
View All Lord Taylor of Goss Moor Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

View all Lord Taylor of Goss Moor's debates

Lords initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Lord Taylor of Goss Moor, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.


Lord Taylor of Goss Moor has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

Lord Taylor of Goss Moor has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


Latest 39 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
20th Nov 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government how many babies were born in England each year since 1945.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority.

Please see the letter attached from the National Statistician and Chief Executive of the UK Statistics Authority.

Lord Taylor of Goss Moor

House of Lords

London

SW1A 0PW

27 November 2023

Dear Lord Taylor,

As National Statistician and Chief Executive of the UK Statistics Authority, I am responding to your Parliamentary Question asking a) how many babies were born in England each year since 1945 (HL435) and b) how many babies were registered in Cornwall in each year since 1945 (HL436).

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) publishes statistics on births registered in England. Birth statistics are based on year of registration, rather than date of birth.

Table 1 of the attached dataset provides numbers of live births registered in England from 1945 to 2022, and stillbirths registered from 1981 to 2023. Data on stillbirths registered in England prior to 1981 are not available.

Table 2 of the attached dataset provides numbers of live births and stillbirths registered in Cornwall from 1981 to 2022. Figures for Cornwall are based on the mother’s usual residence. Data on the mother’s usual residence prior to 1981 is not available.

Yours sincerely,

Professor Sir Ian Diamond

Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
20th Nov 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government how many babies were registered in Cornwall in each year since 1945.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority.

Please see the letter attached from the National Statistician and Chief Executive of the UK Statistics Authority.

Lord Taylor of Goss Moor

House of Lords

London

SW1A 0PW

27 November 2023

Dear Lord Taylor,

As National Statistician and Chief Executive of the UK Statistics Authority, I am responding to your Parliamentary Question asking a) how many babies were born in England each year since 1945 (HL435) and b) how many babies were registered in Cornwall in each year since 1945 (HL436).

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) publishes statistics on births registered in England. Birth statistics are based on year of registration, rather than date of birth.

Table 1 of the attached dataset provides numbers of live births registered in England from 1945 to 2022, and stillbirths registered from 1981 to 2023. Data on stillbirths registered in England prior to 1981 are not available.

Table 2 of the attached dataset provides numbers of live births and stillbirths registered in Cornwall from 1981 to 2022. Figures for Cornwall are based on the mother’s usual residence. Data on the mother’s usual residence prior to 1981 is not available.

Yours sincerely,

Professor Sir Ian Diamond

Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
20th Nov 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what was the number of (1) over 65 year olds, and (2) over 80 year olds, in each year since 1945.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority.

Please see the letter attached from the National Statistician and Chief Executive of the UK Statistics Authority.

The Lord Taylor of Goss Moor

House of Lords

London

SW1A 0PW

28 November 2023

Dear Lord Taylor,

As National Statistician and Chief Executive of the UK Statistics Authority, I am responding to your Parliamentary Questions asking about the number of (1) over 65-year-olds (HL437), and (2) over 80-year-olds in each year since 1945 for both the UK as a whole and those living in Cornwall (HL438).

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) is responsible for publishing population estimates for the United Kingdom. The attached Excel file provides estimates for the United Kingdom from 1953 to 2021 and for England and Wales from 1945 to 2022. United Kingdom age group estimates are not available from before 1953. Estimates for the United Kingdom for 2022 are not yet available due to synchronisation issues caused by the latest census being held in 2021 in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland and in 2022 in Scotland.

The file also contains estimates for Cornwall from 1971 to 2022. Age group estimates prior to 1991 are not available for Cornwall as local authority reorganisation in the early 1970s prevents comparisons prior to 1971.

When accessing any of our files please read the 'notes, terms and conditions' contained within them.

Yours sincerely,

Professor Sir Ian Diamond

Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
20th Nov 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what was the number of (1) over 65 year olds, and (2) over 80 year olds, living in Cornwall in each year since 1945.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority.

Please see the letter attached from the National Statistician and Chief Executive of the UK Statistics Authority.

The Lord Taylor of Goss Moor

House of Lords

London

SW1A 0PW

28 November 2023

Dear Lord Taylor,

As National Statistician and Chief Executive of the UK Statistics Authority, I am responding to your Parliamentary Questions asking about the number of (1) over 65-year-olds (HL437), and (2) over 80-year-olds in each year since 1945 for both the UK as a whole and those living in Cornwall (HL438).

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) is responsible for publishing population estimates for the United Kingdom. The attached Excel file provides estimates for the United Kingdom from 1953 to 2021 and for England and Wales from 1945 to 2022. United Kingdom age group estimates are not available from before 1953. Estimates for the United Kingdom for 2022 are not yet available due to synchronisation issues caused by the latest census being held in 2021 in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland and in 2022 in Scotland.

The file also contains estimates for Cornwall from 1971 to 2022. Age group estimates prior to 1991 are not available for Cornwall as local authority reorganisation in the early 1970s prevents comparisons prior to 1971.

When accessing any of our files please read the 'notes, terms and conditions' contained within them.

Yours sincerely,

Professor Sir Ian Diamond

Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
26th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord True on 26 January (HL12011), what reasonable worst-case planning scenario estimates were applied to the forecast modelling used to inform the decision to place England under national restrictions to address the COVID-19 pandemic on 5 January, including (1) the modelled projections, and (2) the amended assumptions, based on the increased transmissibility of the B.1.1.7 variant of SARS-CoV-2.

Throughout the pandemic, the Government has used a broad range of health, social and economic evidence to inform decision making. The Scientific Advisory Group for Emergency (SAGE) is responsible for providing coordinated scientific advice to support decisions made by the Government. The SAGE subgroup, the Scientific Pandemic Influenza Group on Modelling (SPI-M), uses estimates across a range of metrics to support this advice, including short term modelling including on cases & hospitalisations. These models include a range of projections based on the observed rates of infection and hospitalisations. The assumptions underpinning these models develop as our understanding of the virus changes.

At the end of October, it was clear that rising infections had the potential to exceed NHS regular and surge capacity within weeks. Case projections showed increases in every region, and that national intervention was therefore necessary.

In December, the SAGE subgroup on New and Emerging Respiratory Virus Threats (NERVTAG), estimated that the B.1.1.7 variant may be up to 70% more transmissible. This informed the rapid escalation of areas and regions through the tier system in late December and a creation of Tier 4. Further analysis across a number of infection metrics, along with SPI-M modelled projections, helped inform the decision that national restrictions were again required on 5 January.

Lord True
Shadow Leader of the House of Lords
11th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answers by Lord Bethell on 6 January (HL9878, HL9881, HL9883, HL9957), what reasonable worst-case planning scenario estimates were applied to the forecast modelling used to inform the decision to place England under national restrictions in (1) March 2020, (2) November 2020 and (3) January 2021; and to what extent the new COVID-19 variant has altered the assumptions underpinning the January restrictions.

The Reasonable Worst Case Scenario is an operational contingency planning tool. The Government has used a broad range of health, social and economic evidence to inform decision making, including modelled projections. The evidence used to introduce measures on 5 January 2021 included amended assumptions based on the increased transmissibility of the B.1.1.7 variant.

Lord True
Shadow Leader of the House of Lords
3rd Jul 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the effectiveness of a market-led strategy through which developers are responsible for the installation of solar photovoltaic panels on suitably oriented roofs on new buildings.

The Government is working to publish a full technical consultation later this year on the Future Homes and Building Standards. As part of the consultation, we will explore how we can continue to drive onsite renewable electricity generation, such as solar panels, where appropriate in new homes and buildings.

14th Nov 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government in real terms what was the average per pupil funding for secondary schools in (1) England, and (2) Cornwall, (a) this year, and (b) for each year since 2005 for which figures are available.

I refer the Noble Lord to my answer of 24 November 2023 to Question HL257.

14th Nov 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government in real terms what was the average per student funding for further education colleges in (1) England, and (2) Cornwall, (a) this year, and (b) for each year since 2005 for which figures are available.

Since the 2020/21 academic year, the department has made significant increases in funding per student for 16–19 year-old education. The 2021 Spending Review made available an extra £1.6 billion for 16-19 education in the 2024/25 financial year compared with 2021/22.

In July 2023, the department announced that it will be investing £185 million in 2023/24 and £285 million in 2024/25 to drive forward skills delivery in the further education sector. This funding will help colleges and other providers to continue to deliver high-value technical, vocational, and academic provision needed to power economic growth and prosperity. This investment will be delivered via core 16-19 year-old funding, including through boosting programme cost weightings for higher-cost subject areas, as well as increasing the per-student funding rate. This investment is on top of £125 million the department announced in January 2023 for 16-19 education in the 2023/24 financial year.

In October 2023, the government announced that, in the future, students retaking English and mathematics GCSE while studying at Level 2 or below will attract the same funding that those studying at Level 3 already receive.

The department does not record the real terms changes to funding as requested and therefore does not hold this information.

The table below uses the published 16-19 funding allocations to derive the average funding per student, in both England and Cornwall from 2014/15 and the subsequent nine academic years, in cash terms. This includes all 16-19 funded students, including those in further education colleges, school sixth forms, and other types of provider. The figures are not available for 2005/06 to 2013/14.

Average total programme funding per student[1] England

Cornwall

2014/2015

£4,432

£4,200

2015/2016

£4,489

£4,326

2016/2017

£4,488

£4,396

2017/2018

£4,514

£4,393

2018/2019

£4,504

£4,410

2019/2020

£4,516

£4,447

2020/2021

£4,958

£4,783

2021/2022

£4,994

£4,878

2022/2023

£5,469

£5,321

2023/2024

£5,923

£5,779

[1] This calculation only includes institutions that have students receiving total programme funding. Some institutions receive only high needs funding – their students are not included in this calculation.

The department is continuing to invest in education and skills training for adults through the Adult Education Budget (AEB). This resulted in £1.34 billion of investment in the 2023/24 Funding Year.

In 2023/24, the government has devolved approximately 60% of the AEB to 9 Mayoral Combined Authorities (MCAs) and the Greater London Authority (GLA). These authorities are now responsible for the provision of AEB-funded adult education for their residents, allocation of the AEB to providers, and for reporting funding in devolved areas. The Education and Skills Funding Agency (ESFA) is responsible for the remaining AEB in non-devolved areas. In ESFA AEB areas the department applied a 2.2% increase to the final earnings for all AEB formula-funded provision (excluding associated learner and learning support) in the 2022/23 and 2023/24 academic years. In addition, the department also applied a 20% boost on top of earnings for all AEB formula-funded provision in 6 sector subject areas: Engineering, Manufacturing Technologies, Transport Operations and Maintenance, Building and Construction, ICT for Practitioners, and Mathematics and Statistics.

Spend by the department on further education is reported through publication of the Annual Report and Accounts, which is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/dfe-annual-reports. The department is unable to provide average funding per learner as funding is determined by a combination of factors including funding rates, funding formulas, earnings method and support funding.

13th Nov 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what was the average real-terms, per-pupil funding for primary schools in (1) England and (2) Cornwall in each year since 2005.

The table below provides per pupil funding units from 2013/14 to 2023/24, which represent the funding provided by the government for schools in Cornwall each year.

The school funding system changed significantly between 2012/13 and 2013/14, which is when the schools block was first introduced. The department does not have comparable data for primary schools from 2005 to 2012/13.

From 2013/14, the department has supplied data on the “schools block per-pupil unit of funding”. This covers both primary and secondary schools together. The department does not have separate data for primary pupils for this period.

The funding system changed again in 2018/19 when the National Funding Formula (NFF) was introduced. With the introduction of the NFF, funding was provided by reference to primary and secondary schools separately. The table below shows both per primary and per secondary pupil funding amounts.

The scope of the per pupil figures pre and post-2018 in the table below are not directly comparable. In particular, the central services provided by local authorities was split out from the schools block funding in 2018/19, and instead funded separately through the central school services block from that year onwards.

The figures in the table below are provided on a cash basis. The department also published real-terms statistics on schools funding at the national level which does not distinguish by phase. The department used the GDP deflator to calculate real-terms funding levels. Further information can be found at: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/school-funding-statistics, and the GDP deflator can be found online at: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/methodology/school-funding-statistics-methodology.

Year

DSG
Unit of Funding

England

Cornwall

2013-14

Schools Block per-pupil Unit of Funding

£4,550.54

£4,396.58

2014-15

Schools block per-pupil unit of funding

£4,555.02

£4,396.58

2015-16

Schools block unit of funding

£4,612.11

£4,464.04

2016-17

Schools block unit of funding (SBUF)

£4,636.43

£4,467.43

2017-18

Schools block unit of funding (SBUF)

£4,618.63

£4,428.26

2018-19

Schools block primary unit of funding

£4,057.87

£3,957.13

Schools block secondary unit of funding

£5,228.74

£4,992.96

2019-20

Schools block primary unit of funding

£4,098.82

£3,989.71

Schools block secondary unit of funding

£5,294.78

£5,030.28

2020-21

Schools block primary unit of funding

£4278.92

£4,218.40

Schools block secondary unit of funding

£5495.88

£5,187.28

2021-22

Schools block primary unit of funding

£4,610.68

£4,573.43

Schools block secondary unit of funding

£5,934.86

£5,623.44

2022-23

Schools block primary unit of funding

£4,731.72

£4,751.53

Schools block secondary unit of funding

£6,100.01

£5,784.42

2023-24

Schools block primary unit of funding

£4,954.27

£4,988.31

Schools block secondary unit of funding

£6,421.94

£6,117.31

The NFF takes account of a wide range of factors that affect the costs schools face, including the particular challenges faced by small schools in rural areas through the sparsity factor. This recognises that some schools are necessarily small because they are remote and do not have the same opportunities to grow or make efficiency savings as other schools, and that such schools often play a significant role in the rural communities they serve.

In recent years, the government has made changes to the sparsity factor which have seen the total amount allocated, nationally, increase from £26 million in 2020/21 to £97 million in 2023/24. In 2023/24, 108 of Cornwall’s 268 schools (40.3%) are in receipt of this funding. The change in Cornwall’s schools’ sparsity funding over time is illustrated in the table below:

Financial Year

Total Sparsity Funding Allocated to Cornwall Through the NFF

2018/19

£1,094,868

2019/20

£1,144,828

2020/21

£1,161,341

2021/22

£1,884,761

2022/23

£4,196,307

2023/24

£4,265,424

Note: In financial year 2022/23 the sparsity calculation was changed

14th Nov 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what was their expenditure in real terms on road maintenance each year since 2000 for which figures are available.

The table summarises maintenance expenditure by road class, adjusted for inflation, in England, from April 2005 onwards.

Road class

Financial Year Ending (FYE)

Structural Treatment [Note 1, 2]

Routine and other Treatment [Note 1, 2]

Highways Maintenance Policy, Planning and Strategy [Note 2]

Total [Note 2]

Trunk motorway and trunk 'A' roads [Note 3]

FYE 2006

728

457

[z]

1,185

Trunk motorway and trunk 'A' roads [Note 3]

FYE 2007

681

466

[z]

1,148

Trunk motorway and trunk 'A' roads [Note 3]

FYE 2008

646

513

[z]

1,159

Trunk motorway and trunk 'A' roads [Note 3]

FYE 2009

633

530

[z]

1,164

Trunk motorway and trunk 'A' roads [Note 3]

FYE 2010 [Note 4]

1,166

477

[z]

1,643

Trunk motorway and trunk 'A' roads [Note 3]

FYE 2011

579

375

[z]

954

Trunk motorway and trunk 'A' roads [Note 3]

FYE 2012

595

387

[z]

982

Trunk motorway and trunk 'A' roads [Note 3]

FYE 2013

513

332

[z]

845

Trunk motorway and trunk 'A' roads [Note 3]

FYE 2014

620

306

[z]

926

Trunk motorway and trunk 'A' roads [Note 3]

FYE 2015

864

270

[z]

1,135

Trunk motorway and trunk 'A' roads [Note 3]

FYE 2016

790

305

[z]

1,095

Trunk motorway and trunk 'A' roads [Note 3]

FYE 2017

716

292

[z]

1,007

Trunk motorway and trunk 'A' roads [Note 3]

FYE 2018

870

287

[z]

1,157

Trunk motorway and trunk 'A' roads [Note 3]

FYE 2019

744

299

[z]

1,043

Trunk motorway and trunk 'A' roads [Note 3]

FYE 2020

777

283

[z]

1,060

Trunk motorway and trunk 'A' roads [Note 3]

FYE 2021

763

297

[z]

1,059

Trunk motorway and trunk 'A' roads [Note 3]

FYE 2022

887

285

[z]

1,172

Local authority roads [Note 6, 7, 8]

FYE 2006

2,439

1,664

389

4,492

Local authority roads [Note 6, 7, 8]

FYE 2007

2,315

1,596

428

4,338

Local authority roads [Note 6, 7, 8]

FYE 2008

2,265

1,721

419

4,406

Local authority roads [Note 6, 7, 8]

FYE 2009

2,213

1,315

390

3,918

Local authority roads [Note 6, 7, 8]

FYE 2010 [Note 4]

2,502

1,774

421

4,696

Local authority roads [Note 6, 7, 8]

FYE 2011

2,386

1,673

390

4,449

Local authority roads [Note 6, 7, 8]

FYE 2012

2,313

1,573

345

4,231

Local authority roads [Note 6, 7, 8]

FYE 2013

2,022

1,528

339

3,888

Local authority roads [Note 6, 7, 8]

FYE 2014

2,119

1,496

358

3,973

Local authority roads [Note 6, 7, 8]

FYE 2015

2,539

1,315

323

4,178

Local authority roads [Note 6, 7, 8]

FYE 2016

2,489

1,246

369

4,103

Local authority roads [Note 6, 7, 8]

FYE 2017

2,507

1,198

380

4,085

Local authority roads [Note 6, 7, 8]

FYE 2018

2,442

1,243

363

4,047

Local authority roads [Note 6, 7, 8]

FYE 2019

2,792

1,116

351

4,259

Local authority roads [Note 6, 7, 8]

FYE 2020

2,661

1,103

403

4,167

Local authority roads [Note 6, 7, 8]

FYE 2021

2,650

1,092

399

4,141

Local authority roads [Note 6, 7, 8]

FYE 2022

2,484

1,153

532

4,168

Of which: Local authority motorway and 'A' roads

FYE 2006

745

552

[z]

1,297

Of which: Local authority motorway and 'A' roads

FYE 2007

690

487

[z]

1,177

Of which: Local authority motorway and 'A' roads

FYE 2008

616

608

[z]

1,224

Of which: Local authority motorway and 'A' roads

FYE 2009

601

370

[z]

971

Of which: Local authority motorway and 'A' roads

FYE 2010 [Note 4]

779

686

[z]

1,464

Of which: Local authority motorway and 'A' roads

FYE 2011

774

565

[z]

1,339

Of which: Local authority motorway and 'A' roads

FYE 2012

874

601

[z]

1,474

Of which: Local authority motorway and 'A' roads

FYE 2013

688

581

[z]

1,270

Of which: Local authority motorway and 'A' roads

FYE 2014

750

608

[z]

1,358

Of which: Local authority motorway and 'A' roads

FYE 2015

976

426

[z]

1,401

Of which: Local authority motorway and 'A' roads

FYE 2016

927

464

[z]

1,391

Of which: Local authority motorway and 'A' roads

FYE 2017

1,192

415

[z]

1,607

Of which: Local authority motorway and 'A' roads

FYE 2018

1,047

477

[z]

1,524

Of which: Local authority motorway and 'A' roads

FYE 2019

1,069

359

[z]

1,428

Of which: Local authority motorway and 'A' roads

FYE 2020

1,021

326

[z]

1,347

Of which: Local authority motorway and 'A' roads

FYE 2021

973

321

[z]

1,295

Of which: Local authority motorway and 'A' roads

FYE 2022

852

360

[z]

1,212

Of which: Local authority minor roads ('B', 'C' and 'U')

FYE 2006

1,694

1,112

[z]

2,806

Of which: Local authority minor roads ('B', 'C' and 'U')

FYE 2007

1,625

1,108

[z]

2,733

Of which: Local authority minor roads ('B', 'C' and 'U')

FYE 2008

1,649

1,114

[z]

2,763

Of which: Local authority minor roads ('B', 'C' and 'U')

FYE 2009

1,612

945

[z]

2,557

Of which: Local authority minor roads ('B', 'C' and 'U')

FYE 2010 [Note 4]

1,723

1,088

[z]

2,811

Of which: Local authority minor roads ('B', 'C' and 'U')

FYE 2011

1,612

1,108

[z]

2,720

Of which: Local authority minor roads ('B', 'C' and 'U')

FYE 2012

1,439

973

[z]

2,412

Of which: Local authority minor roads ('B', 'C' and 'U')

FYE 2013

1,333

946

[z]

2,280

Of which: Local authority minor roads ('B', 'C' and 'U')

FYE 2014

1,369

889

[z]

2,258

Of which: Local authority minor roads ('B', 'C' and 'U')

FYE 2015

1,564

890

[z]

2,453

Of which: Local authority minor roads ('B', 'C' and 'U')

FYE 2016

1,561

782

[z]

2,343

Of which: Local authority minor roads ('B', 'C' and 'U')

FYE 2017

1,315

783

[z]

2,098

Of which: Local authority minor roads ('B', 'C' and 'U')

FYE 2018

1,394

766

[z]

2,160

Of which: Local authority minor roads ('B', 'C' and 'U')

FYE 2019

1,723

758

[z]

2,480

Of which: Local authority minor roads ('B', 'C' and 'U')

FYE 2020

1,640

777

[z]

2,417

Of which: Local authority minor roads ('B', 'C' and 'U')

FYE 2021

1,676

771

[z]

2,447

Of which: Local authority minor roads ('B', 'C' and 'U')

FYE 2022

1,632

793

[z]

2,42

Lord Davies of Gower
Shadow Secretary of State for Wales
14th Nov 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what was the value in real terms of vehicle excise duty receipts each year since 2000 for which figures are available.

Information about the value in real terms of vehicle excise duty (VED) receipts is not held. The table below provides the VED figures reported in the published Annual Report & Accounts between years 2005-06 and 2022-23. Net Revenue stated as VED in the Statement of revenue & expenditure published Accounts.

Year

£m

2022-23

7,325

2021-22

7,133

2020-21

6,898

2019-20

6,775

2018-19

6,390

2017-18

6,001

2016-17

5,876

2015-16

5,930

2014-15

6,023

2013-14

6,052

2012-13

6,013

2011-12

5,932

2010-11

5,782

2009-10

5,742

2008-09

5,543

2007-08

5,269

2006-07

4,984

2005-06

4,953

Lord Davies of Gower
Shadow Secretary of State for Wales
13th Nov 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what was the average waiting time for an ambulance (1) in the Royal Cornwall Hospitals NHS Trust, and (2) across all NHS trusts in England, in each year since 2000.

Ambulance response time standards were reformed following the recommendations of the Ambulance Response Programme in 2017, including the publication of average response times.

We recognise the pressures the ambulance service is facing which is why we published our Recovery Plan for Urgent and Emergency Care Services. The ambition is to deliver one of the fastest and longest sustained improvements in emergency waiting times in the National Health Service's history. We aim to reduce average Category 2 response times to 30 minutes this year with further improvements towards pre-pandemic levels next year.

Ambulance response times are recorded at an ambulance trust level. Royal Cornwall Hospitals NHS Trust is served by South West Ambulance Service. The following table shows the South West Ambulance Service average response time since the introduction of the standards in August 2017.

South West Ambulance Service average response times (hh:mm:ss)

Year

Category 1 mean

Category 2 mean

Category 3 mean

Category 4 mean

2017/18 (August-March)

00:09:42

00:33:22

01:15:30

02:00:33

2018/19

00:07:18

00:27:26

01:12:09

02:06:25

2019/20

00:07:03

00:28:38

01:17:17

01:33:56

2020/21

00:07:35

00:23:30

01:00:03

01:23:46

2021/22

00:10:20

1:01:57

02:44:01

02:53:39

2022/23

00:11:05

1:09:04

02:41:37

02:45:25

2023/24 (so far)

00:09:27

00:40:40

01:46:15

02:02:26

The following table shows the National average ambulance response time since the introduction of the standards in August 2017.

Year

Category 1 mean

Category 2 mean

Category 3 mean

Category 4 mean

2017/18 (August-March)

00:08:23

00:25:51

01:04:36

01:30:32

2018/19

00:07:18

00:21:47

01:01:46

01:25:42

2019/20

00:07:18

00:23:50

01:11:04

01:26:09

2020/21

00:07:03

00:20:57

00:54:41

01:22:51

2021/22

00:08:39

00:41:18

02:13:39

03:07:10

2022/23

00:09:18

00:50:01

02:35:19

03:07:43

2023/24 (so far)

00:08:25

00:34:25

01:57:07

02:24:33

13th Nov 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what was the average waiting time in accident and emergency (1) in the Royal Cornwall Hospitals NHS Trust, and (2) across all NHS trusts in England, in each year since 2000.

Official data on accident and emergency waiting times is collected and published by NHS England including the number and proportion of patient attendances that meet the national four-hour accident and emergency access standard and is published monthly. The latest published data from NHS England shows that the Royal Cornwall NHS Trust achieved 78.5% of patient attendances within the four-hour standard in October 2023.

Some information on median waiting time data is collected by NHS England, however this remains experimental data subject to quality issues and is not intended for official performance monitoring use.

13th Nov 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what was the real-terms, per-patient GP funding in (1) Cornwall, (2) the South West NHS region, (3) England, and (4) London in each year since 2000.

Spending on general practice (GP) services rose by just over a fifth in real terms between 2017/18 and the most recent data in 2021/22. More specifically it rose from £11.3 billion in 2017/18 to £13.5 billion in 2021/22, representing a 19% increase in real terms.

Payments to general practices are published by NHS Digital. The attached tables show the requested real-terms, per-patient GP funding figures from from 2014/15, which is the first year for which cilinical commissioning group summary figures are available; there is no data prior to 2013/14.

The tables summarise payments to GPs both in cash terms and adjusted for inflation. From 2020/21, payments are also made for primary care network-related activities. The final annual figures for inflation have been adjusted using the GDP deflator published by HM Treasury.

The figures attached are presented for payments per registered patient, as well as payments per weighted patient, where the weighting adjusts for differences in workload associated with age/sex, additional health needs, care home residents, list turnover, as well as areas costs and costs related to rurality. The figures include dispensing doctors related payments and the number of dispensing doctors in each area will therefore impact payment figures.

We have reported the health geography most closely fitting the request, with data availability changing over the years; for example, the data for 2022/23 is available at integrated care board (ICB) level but not at a sub-ICB level, while previous years’ data is available for NHS Kernow Clinical Commissioning Group.

3rd Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate of the percentage of COVID-19 fatalities they applied to the forecasting models that were used to inform the decision to place England under further national restrictions to address the COVID-19 pandemic; and what was the evidence base used for this estimate.

The Scientific Advisory Group for Emergency’s (SAGE) subgroup, Scientific Pandemic Influenza Group on Modelling, Operational, do not have a single estimate for asymptomatic case proportions, infection hospitalisation rates, case hospitalisation rates, infection fatality rates, or case fatality rates. Individual modelling groups use their own estimates of these metrics, which are based on a wide range of data sources, including testing data, hospital admission, intensive care unit admissions, and deaths. Their models are regularly updated to fit to the observed transmission of the disease and further details are publicly available.

The Office for National Statistics COVID-19 Infection Study has estimated that approximately 55% of those individuals who test positive do not record evidence of symptoms at or around the time of the test. This does not mean these individuals will not go on to develop symptoms or had symptoms previously.

Other SAGE evidence has shown that there is wide variation in the estimated proportion of infections that are truly asymptomatic across different studies with the rapid review providing a pooled estimate, based on 22 studies, of 28% but with very wide confidence intervals.

NHS England use data from their daily COVID-19 situation report collection from individual hospital trusts to estimate current average length of stay and the proportion who require mechanical ventilation. In the run up to the national restrictions this gave an average length of stay of 7.7 days, of which 5.5% of those would be with mechanical ventilation.

The decision to re-introduce greater restrictions from 5 November until 2 December 2020 was based on a wide range of data, not just modelling estimates. These included analysis from the National Health Service on hospital capacity, the rapidly rising hospital admissions, and deaths, and the similar second waves seen across Europe.

SAGE papers from its meetings are published in an online only format on GOV.UK.


3rd Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate of the percentage of COVID-19 fatalities they applied to the forecasting models that were used to inform the decision to place England under national restrictions in March to address the COVID-19 pandemic; and what was the evidence base used for this estimate.

The Scientific Advisory Group for Emergency (SAGE) is responsible for ensuring that timely and coordinated scientific advice is made available to support decisions by the Government. The SAGE subgroup, Scientific Pandemic Influenza Group on Modelling, Operational use their own estimates of metrics such as asymptomatic case proportions, infection hospitalisation rates, or infection fatality rates. These are based on a wide range of available data sources, including testing data, hospital admission, intensive care unit admissions, and deaths. Their models are regularly updated to fit to the observed transmission of the disease.

In the reasonable worst-case planning scenario from late March, SAGE’s best estimate of the infection fatality ratio was approximately 1%, however this was highly age-dependent. Precise estimates of the case fatality ratio – the proportion of people with clinical symptoms who die – are much harder, as the proportion of cases who are asymptomatic is difficult to estimate. Due to the difficulty with ascertaining the proportion of infections that are truly asymptomatic, modelling is based on estimates of the total number of infections in a population. At the time, the best estimate of the proportion of cases that were asymptomatic was 33%.

Estimates of mortality rates for those hospitalised were around 12%. However, again this was highly age-dependent, with 50% mortality in those hospitalised who require invasive ventilation.

SAGE’s estimate of the proportion of infections that required hospitalisation was 5% overall, but that this was also highly dependent on age. This reasonable worse-case planning scenario used an estimate for the number of patients requiring ventilation, mechanical or otherwise, of 30%. A copy of the SAGE paper Reasonable Worst-Case Planning Scenario – 29/03/2020 is attached.

2nd Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate of the proportion of COVID-19 cases that are asymtomatic they applied to the forecasting models that were used to inform the decision to place England under national restrictions in March to address the COVID-19 pandemic; and what was the evidence base used for this estimate.

The Scientific Advisory Group for Emergency (SAGE) is responsible for ensuring that timely and coordinated scientific advice is made available to support decisions by the Government. The SAGE subgroup, Scientific Pandemic Influenza Group on Modelling, Operational use their own estimates of metrics such as asymptomatic case proportions, infection hospitalisation rates, or infection fatality rates. These are based on a wide range of available data sources, including testing data, hospital admission, intensive care unit admissions, and deaths. Their models are regularly updated to fit to the observed transmission of the disease.

In the reasonable worst-case planning scenario from late March, SAGE’s best estimate of the infection fatality ratio was approximately 1%, however this was highly age-dependent. Precise estimates of the case fatality ratio – the proportion of people with clinical symptoms who die – are much harder, as the proportion of cases who are asymptomatic is difficult to estimate. Due to the difficulty with ascertaining the proportion of infections that are truly asymptomatic, modelling is based on estimates of the total number of infections in a population. At the time, the best estimate of the proportion of cases that were asymptomatic was 33%.

Estimates of mortality rates for those hospitalised were around 12%. However, again this was highly age-dependent, with 50% mortality in those hospitalised who require invasive ventilation.

SAGE’s estimate of the proportion of infections that required hospitalisation was 5% overall, but that this was also highly dependent on age. This reasonable worse-case planning scenario used an estimate for the number of patients requiring ventilation, mechanical or otherwise, of 30%. A copy of the SAGE paper Reasonable Worst-Case Planning Scenario – 29/03/2020 is attached.

2nd Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate of the percentage of COVID-19 cases that lead to hospital admissions was applied to the forecast modelling used to inform their decision to place England under national restrictions until 2 December; and what was the evidence base used for this estimate.

The Scientific Advisory Group for Emergency’s (SAGE) subgroup, Scientific Pandemic Influenza Group on Modelling, Operational, do not have a single estimate for asymptomatic case proportions, infection hospitalisation rates, case hospitalisation rates, infection fatality rates, or case fatality rates. Individual modelling groups use their own estimates of these metrics, which are based on a wide range of data sources, including testing data, hospital admission, intensive care unit admissions, and deaths. Their models are regularly updated to fit to the observed transmission of the disease and further details are publicly available.

The Office for National Statistics COVID-19 Infection Study has estimated that approximately 55% of those individuals who test positive do not record evidence of symptoms at or around the time of the test. This does not mean these individuals will not go on to develop symptoms or had symptoms previously.

Other SAGE evidence has shown that there is wide variation in the estimated proportion of infections that are truly asymptomatic across different studies with the rapid review providing a pooled estimate, based on 22 studies, of 28% but with very wide confidence intervals.

NHS England use data from their daily COVID-19 situation report collection from individual hospital trusts to estimate current average length of stay and the proportion who require mechanical ventilation. In the run up to the national restrictions this gave an average length of stay of 7.7 days, of which 5.5% of those would be with mechanical ventilation.

The decision to re-introduce greater restrictions from 5 November until 2 December 2020 was based on a wide range of data, not just modelling estimates. These included analysis from the National Health Service on hospital capacity, the rapidly rising hospital admissions, and deaths, and the similar second waves seen across Europe.

SAGE papers from its meetings are published in an online only format on GOV.UK.


2nd Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate of the percentage of COVID-19 cases that lead to hospital admissions was applied to the forecast modelling used to inform their decision to place England under national restrictions in March; and what was the evidence base used for this estimate.

The Scientific Advisory Group for Emergency (SAGE) is responsible for ensuring that timely and coordinated scientific advice is made available to support decisions by the Government. The SAGE subgroup, Scientific Pandemic Influenza Group on Modelling, Operational use their own estimates of metrics such as asymptomatic case proportions, infection hospitalisation rates, or infection fatality rates. These are based on a wide range of available data sources, including testing data, hospital admission, intensive care unit admissions, and deaths. Their models are regularly updated to fit to the observed transmission of the disease.

In the reasonable worst-case planning scenario from late March, SAGE’s best estimate of the infection fatality ratio was approximately 1%, however this was highly age-dependent. Precise estimates of the case fatality ratio – the proportion of people with clinical symptoms who die – are much harder, as the proportion of cases who are asymptomatic is difficult to estimate. Due to the difficulty with ascertaining the proportion of infections that are truly asymptomatic, modelling is based on estimates of the total number of infections in a population. At the time, the best estimate of the proportion of cases that were asymptomatic was 33%.

Estimates of mortality rates for those hospitalised were around 12%. However, again this was highly age-dependent, with 50% mortality in those hospitalised who require invasive ventilation.

SAGE’s estimate of the proportion of infections that required hospitalisation was 5% overall, but that this was also highly dependent on age. This reasonable worse-case planning scenario used an estimate for the number of patients requiring ventilation, mechanical or otherwise, of 30%. A copy of the SAGE paper Reasonable Worst-Case Planning Scenario – 29/03/2020 is attached.

2nd Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate of the percentage of COVID-19 cases that require mechanical ventilation was applied to the forecast modelling used to inform their decision to place England under national restrictions until 2 December; and what was the evidence base used for this estimate.

The Scientific Advisory Group for Emergency’s (SAGE) subgroup, Scientific Pandemic Influenza Group on Modelling, Operational, do not have a single estimate for asymptomatic case proportions, infection hospitalisation rates, case hospitalisation rates, infection fatality rates, or case fatality rates. Individual modelling groups use their own estimates of these metrics, which are based on a wide range of data sources, including testing data, hospital admission, intensive care unit admissions, and deaths. Their models are regularly updated to fit to the observed transmission of the disease and further details are publicly available.

The Office for National Statistics COVID-19 Infection Study has estimated that approximately 55% of those individuals who test positive do not record evidence of symptoms at or around the time of the test. This does not mean these individuals will not go on to develop symptoms or had symptoms previously.

Other SAGE evidence has shown that there is wide variation in the estimated proportion of infections that are truly asymptomatic across different studies with the rapid review providing a pooled estimate, based on 22 studies, of 28% but with very wide confidence intervals.

NHS England use data from their daily COVID-19 situation report collection from individual hospital trusts to estimate current average length of stay and the proportion who require mechanical ventilation. In the run up to the national restrictions this gave an average length of stay of 7.7 days, of which 5.5% of those would be with mechanical ventilation.

The decision to re-introduce greater restrictions from 5 November until 2 December 2020 was based on a wide range of data, not just modelling estimates. These included analysis from the National Health Service on hospital capacity, the rapidly rising hospital admissions, and deaths, and the similar second waves seen across Europe.

SAGE papers from its meetings are published in an online only format on GOV.UK.


2nd Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate of the percentage of COVID-19 cases that require mechanical ventilation was applied to the forecast modelling used to inform the decision to place England under national restrictions in March; and what was the evidence base used for this estimate.

The Scientific Advisory Group for Emergency (SAGE) is responsible for ensuring that timely and coordinated scientific advice is made available to support decisions by the Government. The SAGE subgroup, Scientific Pandemic Influenza Group on Modelling, Operational use their own estimates of metrics such as asymptomatic case proportions, infection hospitalisation rates, or infection fatality rates. These are based on a wide range of available data sources, including testing data, hospital admission, intensive care unit admissions, and deaths. Their models are regularly updated to fit to the observed transmission of the disease.

In the reasonable worst-case planning scenario from late March, SAGE’s best estimate of the infection fatality ratio was approximately 1%, however this was highly age-dependent. Precise estimates of the case fatality ratio – the proportion of people with clinical symptoms who die – are much harder, as the proportion of cases who are asymptomatic is difficult to estimate. Due to the difficulty with ascertaining the proportion of infections that are truly asymptomatic, modelling is based on estimates of the total number of infections in a population. At the time, the best estimate of the proportion of cases that were asymptomatic was 33%.

Estimates of mortality rates for those hospitalised were around 12%. However, again this was highly age-dependent, with 50% mortality in those hospitalised who require invasive ventilation.

SAGE’s estimate of the proportion of infections that required hospitalisation was 5% overall, but that this was also highly dependent on age. This reasonable worse-case planning scenario used an estimate for the number of patients requiring ventilation, mechanical or otherwise, of 30%. A copy of the SAGE paper Reasonable Worst-Case Planning Scenario – 29/03/2020 is attached.

13th Nov 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government how many speeding penalties were issued by police authorities for each year since 2000.

The Home Office collects and publishes data on fixed penalty notices (FPNs) and other outcomes for motoring offences in England and Wales on an annual basis. The most recent data, up to 2021, is available here:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/1118166/fixed-penalty-notices-and-other-motoring-offences-statistics-police-powers-and-procedures-year-ending-31-december-2021.ods

Table 1 below shows the number of speeding offences recorded by police between 2011 and 2021, and how many resulted in a fine being paid.

Table 1 Number of speeding offences recorded by police in England and Wales, and how many resulted in a fine being paid, 2011 to 2021

Calendar Year

Number of speeding offences

..of which a fine was paid

2011

1,494,183

705,444

2012

1,590,384

731,329

2013

1,659,846

722,503

2014

1,863,317

745,576

2015

1,944,978

787,092

2016

1,970,207

784,654

2017

2,013,830

778,486

2018

2,101,647

807,273

2019

2,253,948

820,308

2020

2,006,382

758,418

2021

2,378,373

853,811

Excludes ‘cancelled’ and ‘incomplete’ offences.

These figures may be an underestimation, as Durham, North Wales, South Wales, Gwent, North Yorkshire, Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire forces do not record all outcomes on the PentiP system.

Equivalent information for years prior to 2011 is not available.

Lord Sharpe of Epsom
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
13th Nov 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what was the average mile-per-hour excess over the speed limit for speeding penalties issued in 2022, or the last year for which figures are available.

The Home Office collects and publishes data on fixed penalty notices (FPNs) and other outcomes for motoring offences, including speed limit offences, in England and Wales on an annual basis. The most recent data, up to 2021, is available here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/1118166/fixed-penalty-notices-and-other-motoring-offences-statistics-police-powers-and-procedures-year-ending-31-december-2021.ods

These statistics include the number of speed limit offences recorded by police forces in England and Wales and the subsequent outcomes, such as whether a fine was paid or a driver retraining course was attended.

However, the Home Office does not centrally collect data on mile-per-hour excess over the speed limit, or any information regarding the speed of the vehicle, for speeding penalties issued.

Lord Sharpe of Epsom
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
4th Sep 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Murray of Blidworth on 17 July (HL9008), how many times in 2022 the Passport Office asked (1) male, and (2) female, parents renewing their child’s passport to provide documentation proving custody, or a written letter of authorisation from the other parent before issuing the passport.

HM Passport Office is unable to provide the information requested as it is not held in a reportable format.

3rd Jul 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government how many times in each of the last five years the Passport Office has asked (1) male, and (2) female, single parents renewing their child’s passport to provide documentation in the form of birth certificates, court papers proving custody, or a written letter of authorisation from the other parent before issuing the passport.

The information requested could not be obtained without disproportionate cost.

16th Apr 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the potential impact of an increase in the non-residential limit for collective enfranchisement on the composition of retail streets in London’s Central Activity Zone.

An Impact Assessment for the Leasehold and Freehold Reform Bill was published on 11 December 2023 and is available on the Parliament website at: Leasehold and Freehold Reform Bill publications - Parliamentary Bills - UK Parliament. The Impact Assessment considers the non-monetised impact of increasing the non-residential for collective enfranchisement claims including the potential impact on freeholders, high streets, and businesses.

Baroness Scott of Bybrook
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
16th Apr 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the extent to which overseas investors will benefit from an increase in the non-residential limit for collective enfranchisement under proposed leasehold reforms.

An Impact Assessment for the Leasehold and Freehold Reform Bill was published on 11 December 2023 and is available on the Parliament website at: Leasehold and Freehold Reform Bill publications - Parliamentary Bills - UK Parliament. The Impact Assessment considers the non-monetised impact of increasing the non-residential for collective enfranchisement claims including the potential impact on freeholders, high streets, and businesses.

Baroness Scott of Bybrook
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
16th Apr 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government how many high streets in local authority ownership will be affected by an increase in the non-residential limit for collective enfranchisement under proposed leasehold reforms.

An Impact Assessment for the Leasehold and Freehold Reform Bill was published on 11 December 2023 and is available on the Parliament website at: Leasehold and Freehold Reform Bill publications - Parliamentary Bills - UK Parliament. The Impact Assessment considers the non-monetised impact of increasing the non-residential for collective enfranchisement claims including the potential impact on freeholders, high streets, and businesses.

Baroness Scott of Bybrook
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
18th Mar 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made, if any, of which region will see the largest transfer of marriage value from freeholder to leaseholder under proposed leasehold reforms.

An Impact Assessment for the Leasehold and Freehold Reform Bill was published on 11 December 2023 and is available on the Parliament website (attached) at: Leasehold and Freehold ReformBill publications - Parliamentary Bills - UK Parliament. This includes an estimate of the impact of removing marriage value on different groups and regions.

Baroness Scott of Bybrook
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
18th Mar 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact of the proposed removal of marriage value under proposed leasehold reforms on (1) property investors and (2) foreign investors.

An Impact Assessment for the Leasehold and Freehold Reform Bill was published on 11 December 2023 and is available on the Parliament website (attached) at: Leasehold and Freehold ReformBill publications - Parliamentary Bills - UK Parliament. This includes an estimate of the impact of removing marriage value on different groups and regions.

Baroness Scott of Bybrook
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
20th Nov 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government when was the last time the provisions of the New Towns Act 1946 was used to support delivery of a new community.

The last time the provisions of the New Towns Act 1946 were used in England was in 1964 with the designation of Washington, Tyne and Wear New Town. The New Towns Act 1946 was subsequently consolidated into the New Towns Act 1965 and the Central Lancashire New Town in 1970 was the last new town in England designated under that Act. There have been no new towns designated in England since then.

Well planned, well-designed, locally led garden communities will play a vital role in helping to meet this country’s housing need well into the future, providing a pipeline of new homes. We are supporting 47 locally led Garden Community projects across the country, with the capacity to deliver around 300,000 homes by 2050.

14th Nov 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government how many new homes were completed each year since 2005 for which figures are available.

The department publishes an annual release entitled ‘Housing supply: net additional dwellings, England’, which is the primary and most comprehensive measure of housing supply, with estimates of new homes delivered, in each financial year shown in Table 1 below.

Table 1. Housing Supply Net Additional Dwellings, England, 2004-05 to 2021-221.

2004-05

185553

2005-06

202653

2006-07

214936

2007-08

223534

2008-09

182767

2009-10

144870

2010-11

137394

2011-12

134896

2012-13

124722

2013-14

136605

2014-15

170693

2015-16

189645

2016-17

217345

2017-18

222281

2018-19

241877

2019-20

242702

2020-21

211865

2021-22

232816

Source: Live Table 122,123 https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/live-tables-on-net-supply-of-housing

1 Net additional dwellings includes new builds but also dwellings supplied through conversions of existing buildings, change of existing buildings use, other gains/losses, offset by demolitions. The detail, with each component, is published in Live Table 123.

Estimates of the number of new homes delivered, broken down by flats or houses, are not centrally collected.

Estimates of the proportion of building control reported new build dwelling completions by flats or houses for England, in each financial year, are shown in Table 2 below. These cover new build dwellings only and should be regarded as a leading indicator of overall housing supply.

Table 2. Housebuilding: Percentage of permanent dwellings completed, by house and flats, England, 2004-05 to 2021-222.

House

Flats

2004-05

59

41

2005-06

54

46

2006-07

53

47

2007-08

52

48

2008-09

50

50

2009-10

55

45

2010-11

65

35

2011-12

64

36

2012-13

67

33

2013-14

71

29

2014-15

75

25

2015-16

77

23

2016-17

75

25

2017-18

77

23

2018-19

78

22

2019-20

80

20

2020-21

81

19

2021-22

83

17

2022-23

82

18

Source: Live Table 254 https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/live-tables-on-house-building

2. Approximately half of the data used to produce the house building statistics are supplied by the National House-Building Council. These data contain additional detail on the size and type of new homes being completed and can be used to provide annual estimates of the proportion of new build dwellings that are houses as opposed to flats. The caveat is that these estimates are indicative only, as based on just 1 of the 3 sources of building control data (Local Authority Building Control, Independent Approved Inspectors and National House Building Council Data).

14th Nov 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government how many new homes have been created each year since 2005 for which figures are available, broken down between (1) flats, and (2) houses.

The department publishes an annual release entitled ‘Housing supply: net additional dwellings, England’, which is the primary and most comprehensive measure of housing supply, with estimates of new homes delivered, in each financial year shown in Table 1 below.

Table 1. Housing Supply Net Additional Dwellings, England, 2004-05 to 2021-221.

2004-05

185553

2005-06

202653

2006-07

214936

2007-08

223534

2008-09

182767

2009-10

144870

2010-11

137394

2011-12

134896

2012-13

124722

2013-14

136605

2014-15

170693

2015-16

189645

2016-17

217345

2017-18

222281

2018-19

241877

2019-20

242702

2020-21

211865

2021-22

232816

Source: Live Table 122,123 https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/live-tables-on-net-supply-of-housing

1 Net additional dwellings includes new builds but also dwellings supplied through conversions of existing buildings, change of existing buildings use, other gains/losses, offset by demolitions. The detail, with each component, is published in Live Table 123.

Estimates of the number of new homes delivered, broken down by flats or houses, are not centrally collected.

Estimates of the proportion of building control reported new build dwelling completions by flats or houses for England, in each financial year, are shown in Table 2 below. These cover new build dwellings only and should be regarded as a leading indicator of overall housing supply.

Table 2. Housebuilding: Percentage of permanent dwellings completed, by house and flats, England, 2004-05 to 2021-222.

House

Flats

2004-05

59

41

2005-06

54

46

2006-07

53

47

2007-08

52

48

2008-09

50

50

2009-10

55

45

2010-11

65

35

2011-12

64

36

2012-13

67

33

2013-14

71

29

2014-15

75

25

2015-16

77

23

2016-17

75

25

2017-18

77

23

2018-19

78

22

2019-20

80

20

2020-21

81

19

2021-22

83

17

2022-23

82

18

Source: Live Table 254 https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/live-tables-on-house-building

2. Approximately half of the data used to produce the house building statistics are supplied by the National House-Building Council. These data contain additional detail on the size and type of new homes being completed and can be used to provide annual estimates of the proportion of new build dwellings that are houses as opposed to flats. The caveat is that these estimates are indicative only, as based on just 1 of the 3 sources of building control data (Local Authority Building Control, Independent Approved Inspectors and National House Building Council Data).

3rd Jul 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what plans they have, if any, to require all suitably orientated roofs on new buildings, including domestic properties, to be fitted with solar photovoltaic panels.

The Building Regulations continue to set a performance-based approach. This means that our approach to achieving higher standards remains technology-neutral, to provide developers with the flexibility to choose the most appropriate and cost-effective solutions for their site.

Baroness Scott of Bybrook
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
3rd Jul 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the potential costs and benefits of requiring plans for all new commercial and public car parks to include solar panels.

We recently consulted on proposals for a new permitted development right which would enable the construction of solar canopies in ground-level off-street car parks in non-domestic settings without a planning application. Further announcements will be made in due course.

Baroness Scott of Bybrook
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)