Lord Warner Portrait

Lord Warner

Crossbench - Life peer

Lord Warner is not a member of any APPGs
7 Former APPG memberships
Autism, Dementia, Humanist, Life Sciences, Obesity, Personalised Medicine, Proportional Representation
Long-Term Sustainability of the NHS Committee
25th May 2016 - 5th Apr 2017
Draft Modern Slavery Bill
15th Jan 2014 - 3rd Apr 2014
Draft Care and Support Bill
22nd Nov 2012 - 6th Mar 2013
Adoption Legislation Committee
29th May 2012 - 26th Feb 2013
Science and Technology Committee (Lords)
13th Nov 2007 - 15th May 2012
Science and Technology: Sub-Committee I
22nd Jun 2010 - 13th Sep 2011
Minister of State (Department of Health) (NHS Reform)
5th May 2006 - 4th Jan 2007
Minister of State (Department of Health) (NHS Delivery)
10th May 2005 - 5th May 2006
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health)
13th Jun 2003 - 10th May 2005


There are no upcoming events identified
Division Votes
Tuesday 21st January 2020
European Union (Withdrawal Agreement) Bill
voted Aye
One of 34 Crossbench Aye votes vs 21 Crossbench No votes
Tally: Ayes - 239 Noes - 235
Speeches
Wednesday 4th March 2020
Pension Schemes Bill [HL]

My Lords, Amendment 86 is in my name and those of the noble Baronesses, Lady Altmann and Lady Janke. It …

Written Answers
Monday 15th February 2021
Coronavirus: Screening
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assesment has been made of funding and creating extra capacity in (1) NHS, (2) …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
Thursday 30th January 2020
Right to Die at Home Bill [HL] 2019-21
A bill to create a right to die at home.
Tweets
None available
MP Financial Interests
None available

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Lord Warner has voted in 5 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Lord Warner Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Baroness Williams of Trafford (Conservative)
Minister of State (Home Office)
(6 debate interactions)
Baroness Fookes (Conservative)
(5 debate interactions)
Lord Bethell (Conservative)
(4 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Home Office
(7 debate contributions)
Leader of the House
(6 debate contributions)
Department of Health and Social Care
(1 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Lord Warner's debates

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Lord Warner, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Lord Warner has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Lord Warner has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

4 Bills introduced by Lord Warner


A bill to create a right to die at home.


Last Event - 2nd Reading (Lords)
Thursday 30th January 2020
(Read Debate)

First reading took place on 6 June. This stage is a formality that signals the start of the Bill's journey through the Lords.Second reading - the general debate on all aspects of the Bill - is yet to be scheduled.The 2016-2017 session of Parliament has prorogued and this Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to create a right to die at home.


Last Event - 1st Reading : House Of Lords
Monday 6th June 2016

A bill to create a right to die at home.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Lords
Tuesday 9th June 2015

A Bill to create a right to die at home


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Lords
Monday 28th July 2014

Lord Warner has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


59 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
7th Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many deaths were recorded in each calendar month of (1) 2018, (2) 2019, and (3) 2020, up to and including August.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have therefore asked the Authority to respond.

Dear Lord Warner,

As National Statistician and Chief Executive of the UK Statistics Authority, I am responding to your Parliamentary Questions asking how many deaths were recorded in each calendar month of (1) 2018, (2) 2019, and (3) 2020, up to and including August (HL7905); and how many recorded deaths were caused by (1) COVID-19, and (2) any form of cancer, in each calendar month of (a) 2018, (b) 2019, and (c) 2020, up to and including August (HL7906).

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) publishes statistics on deaths in England and Wales. The ONS’ mortality statistics are compiled from information supplied when deaths are certified and registered as part of civil registration. In England and Wales, deaths should ideally be registered within 5 days of the death occurring, but there are some situations that result in the registration of the death being delayed. The ONS has published a report on the impact of registration delays[1].

The ONS produces a monthly report[2] on provisional deaths in England and Wales. The most recent report goes up to July 2020 and provides breakdowns by all deaths combined and a breakdown for deaths due to COVID-19. The ONS also produces an annual report[3] which includes registered deaths by age, sex, selected underlying causes of death, and the leading causes of death.

National Records for Scotland[4] and the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency[5] are responsible for publishing statistics on deaths registered in Scotland and Northern Ireland respectively.

Table 1 shows the number of deaths by all causes, that were registered by month, in 2018, 2019, and 2020, in England and Wales. All numbers for 2020 are provisional. The data for August will be published on 18 September 2020, which we will send to you.

Table 2 shows the number of deaths that were registered where cancer was the underlying cause of death by month, 2018 and 2019, in England and Wales. The corresponding numbers by month for 2020 are not yet available, as detailed data on deaths by underlying cause are not normally published until after the end of the registration year.

Table 3 shows the number of deaths where COVID-19 was the underlying cause of death, January to July 2020, in England and Wales. Provisional data on deaths involving COVID-19 is being published, exceptionally, on an ongoing basis throughout the year: numbers of deaths due to COVID-19 in August will be available on 18 September 2020, which we will also send to you.

Yours sincerely,

Professor Sir Ian Diamond

[1]https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/articles/impactofregistrationdelaysonmortalitystatisticsinenglandandwales/2018

[2]https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/bulletins/deathsregisteredweeklyinenglandandwalesprovisional/weekending28august2020

[3]https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/bulletins/deathsregistrationsummarytables/2019

[4]https://www.nrscotland.gov.uk/

[5]https://www.nisra.gov.uk/

Table 1: Number of deaths registered in 2018, 2019, 2020 by month, all causes, England and Wales[1][2][3][4]

2018

2019

2020

January

64154

53910

56,597

February

49177

45795

43,555

March

51229

43944

49,641

April

46469

44121

88,049

May

42784

44389

52,315

June

39767

38603

42,577

July

40723

42308

40,731

August

40192

38843

September

37137

40011

October

44440

46238

November

43978

45219

December

41539

47460

[1]Figures include deaths of non-residents.

[2]Figures are for the date a death was registered rather than occurred.

[3]2020 figures are provisional.

[4]2020 figures are as published, the back series has not been revised.

Source: ONS

Table 2: Number of deaths registered where the underlying cause of death was cancer, 2018 and 2019, by month, England and Wales[1][2][3][4]

2018

2019

January

14422

13859

February

11602

11667

March

11945

11659

April

11899

12261

May

12372

12425

June

11771

11284

July

12120

12838

August

12297

11959

September

11115

12107

October

13008

12977

November

12394

12197

December

11412

12186


[1]Underlying cause of death was defined using the International Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th edition (ICD-10): Malignant neoplasms (C00-C97).

[2]Figures for Cancer include deaths of non-residents.

[3]2020 figures are provisional

[4]Figures are for the date a death was registered rather than occurred.

Source: ONS

Table 3: Number of deaths registered where the underlying cause of death was COVID-19, 2020, by month, England and Wales[1][2][3][4][5]

2020

January

0

February

0

March

1631

April

29381

May

12005

June

3634

July

1023

August

September

October

November

December


[1]Underlying cause of death was defined using the International Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th edition (ICD-10): coronavirus (COVID-19) (U07.1 and U07.2).

[2]Figures for COVID-19 exclude the deaths of non-residents.

[3]2020 figures are provisional

[41]Figures are for the date a death was registered rather than occurred.

[5]2020 figures are as published, the back series has not been revised

Source: ONS

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
7th Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many recorded deaths were caused by (1) COVID-19, and (2) any form of cancer, in each calendar month of (a) 2018, (b) 2019, and (c) 2020, up to and including August.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have therefore asked the Authority to respond.

Dear Lord Warner,

As National Statistician and Chief Executive of the UK Statistics Authority, I am responding to your Parliamentary Questions asking how many deaths were recorded in each calendar month of (1) 2018, (2) 2019, and (3) 2020, up to and including August (HL7905); and how many recorded deaths were caused by (1) COVID-19, and (2) any form of cancer, in each calendar month of (a) 2018, (b) 2019, and (c) 2020, up to and including August (HL7906).

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) publishes statistics on deaths in England and Wales. The ONS’ mortality statistics are compiled from information supplied when deaths are certified and registered as part of civil registration. In England and Wales, deaths should ideally be registered within 5 days of the death occurring, but there are some situations that result in the registration of the death being delayed. The ONS has published a report on the impact of registration delays[1].

The ONS produces a monthly report[2] on provisional deaths in England and Wales. The most recent report goes up to July 2020 and provides breakdowns by all deaths combined and a breakdown for deaths due to COVID-19. The ONS also produces an annual report[3] which includes registered deaths by age, sex, selected underlying causes of death, and the leading causes of death.

National Records for Scotland[4] and the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency[5] are responsible for publishing statistics on deaths registered in Scotland and Northern Ireland respectively.

Table 1 shows the number of deaths by all causes, that were registered by month, in 2018, 2019, and 2020, in England and Wales. All numbers for 2020 are provisional. The data for August will be published on 18 September 2020, which we will send to you.

Table 2 shows the number of deaths that were registered where cancer was the underlying cause of death by month, 2018 and 2019, in England and Wales. The corresponding numbers by month for 2020 are not yet available, as detailed data on deaths by underlying cause are not normally published until after the end of the registration year.

Table 3 shows the number of deaths where COVID-19 was the underlying cause of death, January to July 2020, in England and Wales. Provisional data on deaths involving COVID-19 is being published, exceptionally, on an ongoing basis throughout the year: numbers of deaths due to COVID-19 in August will be available on 18 September 2020, which we will also send to you.

Yours sincerely,

Professor Sir Ian Diamond

[1]https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/articles/impactofregistrationdelaysonmortalitystatisticsinenglandandwales/2018

[2]https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/bulletins/deathsregisteredweeklyinenglandandwalesprovisional/weekending28august2020

[3]https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/bulletins/deathsregistrationsummarytables/2019

[4]https://www.nrscotland.gov.uk/

[5]https://www.nisra.gov.uk/

Table 1: Number of deaths registered in 2018, 2019, 2020 by month, all causes, England and Wales[1][2][3][4]

2018

2019

2020

January

64154

53910

56,597

February

49177

45795

43,555

March

51229

43944

49,641

April

46469

44121

88,049

May

42784

44389

52,315

June

39767

38603

42,577

July

40723

42308

40,731

August

40192

38843

September

37137

40011

October

44440

46238

November

43978

45219

December

41539

47460

[1]Figures include deaths of non-residents.

[2]Figures are for the date a death was registered rather than occurred.

[3]2020 figures are provisional.

[4]2020 figures are as published, the back series has not been revised.

Source: ONS

Table 2: Number of deaths registered where the underlying cause of death was cancer, 2018 and 2019, by month, England and Wales[1][2][3][4]

2018

2019

January

14422

13859

February

11602

11667

March

11945

11659

April

11899

12261

May

12372

12425

June

11771

11284

July

12120

12838

August

12297

11959

September

11115

12107

October

13008

12977

November

12394

12197

December

11412

12186


[1]Underlying cause of death was defined using the International Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th edition (ICD-10): Malignant neoplasms (C00-C97).

[2]Figures for Cancer include deaths of non-residents.

[3]2020 figures are provisional

[4]Figures are for the date a death was registered rather than occurred.

Source: ONS

Table 3: Number of deaths registered where the underlying cause of death was COVID-19, 2020, by month, England and Wales[1][2][3][4][5]

2020

January

0

February

0

March

1631

April

29381

May

12005

June

3634

July

1023

August

September

October

November

December


[1]Underlying cause of death was defined using the International Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th edition (ICD-10): coronavirus (COVID-19) (U07.1 and U07.2).

[2]Figures for COVID-19 exclude the deaths of non-residents.

[3]2020 figures are provisional

[41]Figures are for the date a death was registered rather than occurred.

[5]2020 figures are as published, the back series has not been revised

Source: ONS

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
7th Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many recorded deaths were (1) residents of adult care homes, and (2) patients in NHS England hospitals, in each calendar month of 2020, up to and including August.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have therefore asked the Authority to respond.

Dear Lord Warner,

As National Statistician and Chief Executive of the UK Statistics Authority, I am responding to your Parliamentary Questions asking how many recorded deaths were (i) residents of adult care homes, and (ii) patients in NHS England hospitals, in each calendar month of 2020, up to and including August (HL7908).

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) is responsible for publishing mortality statistics for deaths registered in England and Wales. The most recent annual figures published are for deaths registered in 2019[1]. However, we do publish provisional weekly deaths registrations which are currently published for deaths registered up to 28 August 2020[2]. As part of this report, data is published by place of occurrence, which includes hospitals and places outside of hospitals, such as care homes.

Table 1 below provides the provisional number of deaths registered in care homes and hospitals by each calendar month of 2020, registered up to 28 August 2020, in England. The ‘Hospitals (acute or community, not psychiatric)’ figure includes deaths in NHS hospitals and private hospitals in England. Currently, the ONS does not publish age breakdowns of deaths registered in care homes. The figure includes children and adults, as some care homes may cater for adults as well as children. More detailed analysis on deaths, registered by place of occurrence, is available in our weekly report.

Table 1: Provisional number of deaths registered by place of occurrence, England, deaths registered between 1 January 2020 and 28 August 2020[3][4][5][6][7]

Month

Place of occurrence

Care home

Hospital (acute or community, not psychiatric)

January

12,046

24,615

February

9,231

18,229

March

10,563

20,902

April

26,835

34,520

May

14,870

18,126

June

8,579

15,191

July

7,684

14,528

August

7,151

13,362

Source: ONS

Yours sincerely,

Professor Sir Ian Diamond

[1]https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/bulletins/deathsregistrationsummarytables/2019

[2]https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/bulletins/deathsregisteredweeklyinenglandandwalesprovisional/latest

[3]Based on date a death was registered rather than occurred.

[4]All figures for 2020 are provisional.

[5]Non-residents are excluded in the England totals.

[6]These figures represent death registrations, there can be a delay between the date a death occurred and the date a death was registered. More information can be found in our impact of registration delays release.

[7]Care homes includes homes for the chronic sick; nursing homes; homes for people with mental health problems and non-NHS multi function sites.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
22nd Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government which department is responsible for (1) maintaining the National Risk Register, and (2) ensuring all other departments have up-to-date plans to mitigate risks contained in the National Risk Register; and whether the Ministerial Code includes a duty to ensure departmental risk plans are up-to-date.

The Civil Contingencies Secretariat (CCS) within the Cabinet Office is responsible for maintaining the National Risk Register, working closely with Government departments.

Government departments are responsible for identifying and assessing risks. Each department is also responsible for overseeing levels of preparedness within their sectors, ensuring they have up-to-date plans to mitigate and respond to risks contained in the National Risk Register.

The Ministerial Code sets out the standards of conduct expected of ministers and how they discharge their duties.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
22nd Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government when COBRA first met in 2020 to discuss COVID-19; and on what date they rated the risk of the virus to UK public health as high.

The Prime Minister and Cabinet have been regularly briefed on COVID-19 since the outbreak of the virus. These issues have also regularly been discussed at meetings of the COBR Committee. Additionally, since 16 March, a series of Cabinet Committees have convened to support the Government’s efforts. Specific information on the frequency and content of Cabinet Committees and other Ministerial meetings is not routinely disclosed.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
2nd Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they plan to re-open the public consultation on "Regulating independent educational institutions"; and what measures they will be taking to protect pupils at risk in unregistered settings, including illegal religious schools, until the law is changed.

The department intends to reopen the consultation on 'Regulating independent educational institutions' when stakeholders ability to respond is less likely to be significantly affected by the COVID-19 outbreak. Responses received to date will be combined with responses received after the consultation reopens and fully reviewed after the consultation finally closes.

It is not yet appropriate to set a date for reopening the consultation as the situation in relation to the COVID-19 outbreak continues to change.

Ofsted continues to investigate potential illegal schools including consideration of new intelligence. Where appropriate, Ofsted have liaised with local authorities and other statutory bodies to consider whether there is appropriate action that should be taken, for example, to close settings where people are gathering illegally during the COVID-19 outbreak.

2nd Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the extent to which illegal schools have continued to operate during the COVID-19 lockdown; and how they intend to mitigate the risks to the pupils attending such settings as the lockdown is eased.

The department intends to reopen the consultation on 'Regulating independent educational institutions' when stakeholders ability to respond is less likely to be significantly affected by the COVID-19 outbreak. Responses received to date will be combined with responses received after the consultation reopens and fully reviewed after the consultation finally closes.

It is not yet appropriate to set a date for reopening the consultation as the situation in relation to the COVID-19 outbreak continues to change.

Ofsted continues to investigate potential illegal schools including consideration of new intelligence. Where appropriate, Ofsted have liaised with local authorities and other statutory bodies to consider whether there is appropriate action that should be taken, for example, to close settings where people are gathering illegally during the COVID-19 outbreak.

16th Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assesment has been made of funding and creating extra capacity in (1) NHS, (2) private, and (3) other laboratories, before 31 March 2021.

HM Treasury approved £22 billion of spending this year for the NHS Test and Trace programme. This covers testing to meet demand over the winter. We are providing an additional £7 billion for NHS Test and Trace to support increased testing, including community testing and ongoing improvements to contact tracing. Eighty per cent of this will be directly spent on laboratories, tests and testing kits.

16th Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, in calculating the COVID-19 related laboratory capacity required for NHS and public health purposes in England for the period to 31 March 2021, what are their estimates of the number of tests required per week for (1) NHS staff and patients, (2) adult social care staff and service users, (3) secondary school children over the age of 16, (4) teachers and teaching assistants, (5) full-time students aged 18-22, and (6) public transport staff.

We do not publish data in the format requested.

16th Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the laboratory capacity for COVID-19 tests per week available in England (1) within the NHS, and (2) in private and other laboratories; and what is the utilisation rate of that weekly capacity in each group at the latest date for which information is available.

For the week commencing 18 January 2021 the number of tests conducted in pillar 1 was 592,698 against a capacity of 1,352,685, which is a utilisation rate of 43.82%. In pillar 2, the number of tests conducted was 3,233,418 against a capacity of 4,321,944, which is a utilisation rate of 74.81%.

16th Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether all the laboratories available for COVID-19 tests are (1) currently, or (2) planning to be, working seven days a week and in shifts covering most of each day.

Since the start of the pandemic, we increased the capacity of National Health Service and Public Health England laboratories, as well as setting up an entirely new nationwide network of new Lighthouse laboratories and partner laboratories to process samples. Lighthouse laboratories and partner laboratories have continued to maximise capacity. This includes recruiting staff, mobilising additional equipment and optimising workflows. All Lighthouse laboratories are now working on a 24 hours a day, seven days a week basis.

7th Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what percentage of pathology laboratory testing capacity was available to the NHS in England for COVID-19 tests at the end of March 2020; and what is the current available capacity.

Pillar 2 uses Lighthouse laboratories and has partnership arrangements with public, private and academic sector laboratories. The United Kingdom’s daily COVID-19 testing capacity passed the 500,000 on 31 October. Testing capacity in the UK across all pillars between 29 October and 4 November was at 4,367,049 tests, an increase of 21% compared to the previous week.

10th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Bethell on 15 June (HL4726), whether the COVID-19 Hospital Discharge Service Requirements authorised NHS Trusts to make incentive payments to care homes to admit patients discharged from acute hospitals, irrespective of whether they posed an infection risk to other residents in the care homes; and whether such payments are permissible.

It is our priority to ensure that everyone is discharged safely from hospital and to the most appropriate available place.

Funding announced alongside the COVID-19 Hospital Discharge Service Requirements was not conditional on care homes accepting discharged patients. Discharges from hospital are decided by local clinicians and only happen when doctors determine it is in an individual patient’s best interests.

This is an unprecedented global pandemic and at every stage we have been guided by the latest scientific advice. We keep our policies under continuous review, based on the emerging international and domestic evidence.

10th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Bethell on 15 June (HL4730), how many (1) claims, and (2) payments,  have been made to the families of deceased care homes staff under the terms of the life assurance scheme for frontline National Health Service and social care staff; and what steps they have taken to draw the attention of families of deceased care homes staff to this scheme.

The Government launched the NHS and Social Care Coronavirus Life Assurance scheme on 20 May 2020. The scheme is non-contributory and pays a £60,000 lump sum where staff who had been recently working where personal care is provided to individuals who have contracted COVID-19 die as a result of the virus.

As of 13 July 2020, the scheme administrator has received 29 claims for social care as a whole in England, of which 25 claims are from the families of staff who had been providing adult social care in a care home. This is out of a total of 57 claims to the scheme. Of these 25, eight have been agreed for payment subject to receiving probate, nine require further information and eight are in the process of consideration.

The Department worked closely with stakeholders in the adult social care sector to ensure the details of the scheme were made as widely available as possible. This included cascading the information to employers through provider representatives, and also through the Care Quality Commission.

10th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government on what dates any guidance on COVID-19 was issued to care homes by (1) Public Health England, (2) the Care Quality Commission, and (3) any other public body, between 1 February and 30 June; and whether any such guidance has been made available to Parliament.

Public Health England, the Care Quality Commission (CQC) and the Department have all published guidance relevant to care homes.

Due to the fast-moving situation with the pandemic, all guidance has been published online in order to reach target audiences quickly. The CQC has also released their guidance through a regular weekly bulletin.

A table listing the guidance with dates of issue, and showing those documents shared with Parliamentarians, is attached due to the size of the data.

10th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what review arrangements are in place to assess whether care homes’ access to personal protective equipment, including masks, meets their requirements; and what national schemes are in place to ensure an adequate supply of such equipment to care homes (1) now, and (2) in the future.

During this unprecedented global outbreak, we have kept our social care guidance under constant review and have been working tirelessly with the sector to reduce transmission and save lives. The Government is fully committed to ensuring care homes feel confident in their personal protective equipment (PPE) supply. We are now confident in the stocks and sources of supply of PPE to meet the needs of health and social care over the next seven and 90 days.

More widely, in the long term, we have set out a comprehensive action plan to support the adult social care sector throughout the COVID-19 outbreak. This has included £3.2 billion of funding for councils and providing millions of items of PPE.

10th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government to publish the latest waiting times for key NHS hospital diagnostic tests, including (1) MRI, (2) CAT, and (3) ultrasound, scans; and the equivalent figures for (a) six, and (b) 12, months previously.

Data for median waiting times for MRI, CT and Non-obstetric Ultrasound tests is provided in the following tables. It should be noted that all data is provisional and subject to review.

Data provided is between the months of May 2020 – May 2019 this is the most recent data available as collection and reporting has a two-month delay.

MRI

Date

Waiting time median (weeks)

May 2020

7.7

April 2020

6.5

March 2020

3.1

February 2020

2.1

January 2020

1.9

December 2019

2.6

November 2019

2.0

October 2019

2.1

September 2019

1.9

August 2019

2.2

July 2019

2.1

June 2019

2.0

May 2019

2.2

CT

Date

Waiting time median (weeks)

May 2020

4.7

April 2020

5.3

March 2020

2.6

February 2020

1.8

January 2020

1.6

December 2019

2.3

November 2019

1.7

October 2019

1.8

September 2019

1.7

August 2019

1.8

July 2019

1.8

June 2019

1.7

May 2019

1.9

Non-obstetric ultrasound

Date

Waiting time median (weeks)

May 2020

7.8

April 2020

6.4

March 2020

3.0

February 2020

2.0

January 2020

1.8

December 2019

2.6

November 2019

1.9

October 2019

2.1

September 2019

2.0

August 2019

2.3

July 2019

2.2

June 2019

2.1

May 2019

2.2

10th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what extra funding has been made available in 2020 to (1) GPs, (2) NHS community health services, and (3) Public Health England, to address the COVID-19 pandemic.

Public safety remains the Government’s top priority and the Chancellor of the Exchequer has been clear from the outset that the National Health Service will get whatever funding it needs to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic.

£31.9 billion of support for healthcare was set out in the summer economic update. This includes over £15 billion for personal protective equipment (PPE), and £10 billion for NHS Test and Trace. The Government has also confirmed a further package of £3 billion for the NHS as part of the COVID-19 recovery strategy, covering support for winter. The total level of funding that is needed may change further.

Details on a funding package for general practitioners (GPs) of nearly £200 million have been confirmed. This covers the legitimate additional costs of the response borne by GP practices due to the pandemic. NHS providers are currently able to claim for COVID-19 costs retrospectively under the temporary finance regime that has been put in place until the end of September. This is operating at trust/foundation trust level rather than for specific services such as community health services. Allocations totalling an additional £2.7 billion are then being made available to local systems for the rest of the year. Funding specific to Public Health England forms part of the NHS Test and Trace budget and the PPE budget the specific distribution to PHE is currently being agreed.

3rd Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many COVID-19 tests are currently being completed each week in (1) NHS and other public sector, and (2) private, laboratories.

To provide a more comprehensive response to a number of outstanding Written Questions, this has been answered by an information factsheet Testing – note for House of Lords which is attached, due to the size of the data. A copy has also been placed in the Library

3rd Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether NHS patients will be able to obtain through their GPs a test to establish if they have COVID-19 as part of their NHS primary care services; and if so, when.

With the support of NHS England, we have been piloting COVID-19 swab testing in a small number of general practices around the United Kingdom. The aim was to improve access to testing by enabling general practitioners to test symptomatic patients who present to general practice settings, when deemed it clinically appropriate, for example for some patients who are vulnerable and may otherwise struggle to access a test through the main testing routes.

2nd Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the capacity of beds that are fully staffed, funded and available for use by patients in each of the Nightingale hospitals in England; what have been the occupancy levels of these hospitals since their opening; and how many (1) doctors, and (2) nurses, are currently employed in each of these hospitals.

The available capacity and staffing of the Nightingale hospitals is decided locally by National Health Service trusts and varies over time based on demand. At present, the Nightingale hospitals are on standby but are ready to be stood up if needed. The continued future use of the Nightingale hospitals is currently under consideration.

The Government has stated that the NHS will get what it needs in terms of funding during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The number of patients admitted to each of the Nightingale Hospitals is not available in the format requested. Admission data for COVID-19 patients is published online by NHS England and NHS Improvement at trust level but not for individual hospitals.

2nd Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether any of the Nightingale hospitals in England are being used for (1) inpatient, or (2) outpatient, treatment of patients with (a) cancer, or (b) cardiac conditions, whose treatment had been delayed due to COVID-19.

The development of the Nightingale hospitals was a response to an unprecedented challenge as they provided extra capacity to manage surges in demand due to COVID-19.

To provide additional capacity for the National Health Service the Nightingale hospitals have been flexed to respond to changing demand and it was recently announced that Harrogate and Exeter Nightingale hospitals are to be used to increase diagnostic capacity in a COVID-19 free environment. Regions and host trusts will continue to consider future use and the Nightingales will be an important part of ensuring the NHS has the capacity required at this time and in the coming months.

2nd Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many patients from (1) nursing homes, or (2) care homes, have been transferred to Nightingale hospitals in England since these hospitals were opened.

The information requested is not collected centrally.

2nd Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether there is an NHS tariff price for COVID-19 pathology tests; if so, what is their price; and if not, how are these tests priced.

To provide a more comprehensive response to a number of outstanding Written Questions, this has been answered by an information factsheet Testing – note for House of Lords which is attached, due to the size of the data. A copy has also been placed in the Library

19th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many care homes have reported a suspected outbreak of symptomatic or confirmed COVID-19 since 15 March; and whether those outbreaks were reported to the Care Quality Commission.

Data on outbreaks are published weekly on COVID-19: number of outbreaks in care homes – management information data set. The latest published analysis from 21 May provides data on outbreaks between 2 March until 17 May 2020 and shows that 5,876 care homes in England have reported an outbreak of suspected or confirmed COVID-19. The latest weekly update and summary report are attached.

Public Health England has shared a care home situation report which provides data on outbreaks with the Care Quality Commission on a daily basis since 1 April 2020.

19th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government (1) what instructions were given to NHS acute hospital trusts on, or around, 15 March about discharging patients to make beds available for COVID-19 patients; (2) how many beds in total the NHS in England was trying to make available; (3) which organisation issued the instructions; (4) following these instructions, (a) what proportion of patients were discharged to nursing or care homes, and (b) what proportion of those patients were tested for COVID-19 before discharge; and (5) what advance information and guidance was given to care homes about this mass discharge from acute hospitals.

On 19?March 2020, the Department and the National Health Service co-published COVID-19 Hospital Discharge Service Requirements,?setting out guidance on supporting the safe discharge of patients who no longer need acute care. A copy of this guidance is attached.

The guidance also sets out the steps that care providers should be taking and we provided £1.3 billion to support the process. We have provided advice to care homes throughout the pandemic in response to the latest conditions and emerging evidence.

The COVID-19 hospital discharge service requirements were expected to help free up 15,000 hospital beds across England.

On 2 June, NHS England published an analysis on discharges to care homes. This data was not previously available. The data showed that the proportion of people discharged to care homes, nursing homes and hospices between 15 March and 16 April was 2.8%.

A small number of people who have tested positive for COVID-19 may be discharged from the NHS within the 14-day period from the onset of COVID-19 symptoms and also require ongoing social care. If a care home provider does not feel they can provide the appropriate care for these individuals, the individual’s local authority should secure alternative appropriate accommodation and care for the remainder of the required isolation period.

19th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what communication they have had with individual nursing and care homes about emergency sources of supplies of personal protective equipment since 15 March; whether the Care Quality Commission was involved in any such communications; and whether a lack of personal protective equipment for staff during a pandemic is grounds for questioning a care home’s Care Quality Commission registration.

Every Care Quality Commission (CQC) registered provider received at least 300 face masks in mid-March to meet a spike in demand for personal protective equipment (PPE). Providers can contact their Local Resilience Forum (LRF) if they are unsuccessful in obtaining PPE and can request an emergency PPE pack through the National Supply Disruption Response system if they cannot access PPE through their LRF. The CQC has disseminated guidance and information on PPE from central Government to the health and social care sectors and has engaged social care stakeholders to check understanding and provide clarity. The CQC’s Emergency Support Framework also considers issues arising out of a lack of PPE. Any enforcement action, which could impact on a provider’s registration, is balanced against wider pressures including obtaining PPE.

19th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they have taken to ensure that their extra funding for care homes announced since 15 March has arrived in the bank accounts of care homes; and what consideration they have given to transferring such funding direct to care homes.

The Government has taken significant steps to provide financial support for public services during COVID-19, including making £3.2 billion available to local authorities so they can address pressures on local services caused by the pandemic, including in adult social care. To improve transparency, local authorities should also publish on their websites the support they are offering to providers of residential and domiciliary care services, as well as any other social care services they are supporting. We have asked for these to be published by 29 May 2020.

Furthermore, on 15 May we published details of an additional £600 million Infection Control Fund for Adult Social Care to support adult social care providers in England reduce the rate of transmission in and between care homes and to support workforce resilience. The Government will continue to monitor pressures in the National Health Service and local government and will keep future funding under review.

19th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the scheme for paying £60,000 to families of NHS staff who died in the COVID-19 pandemic will apply to families of care home staff who died in the pandemic.

The Government has launched a life assurance scheme for frontline National Health Service and social care staff. The scheme is non-contributory and pays a £60,000 lump sum where staff who had been recently working where personal care is provided to individuals who have contracted COVID-19 die as a result of the virus.

Care home staff are eligible, providing that their work requires them to be present in frontline settings where COVID-19 is present, and that they are employed by an organisation registered by the Care Quality Commission (CQC) to provide social care services.

Furthermore, any social care staff working in non-CQC registered settings are also eligible, if their employer receives public funding.

19th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what guidance about COVID-19 has been given to supported living facilities since 15 March to enable residents and staff of such facilities to be protected; and how many residents of such facilities have died or are suspected to have died of COVID-19 since the pandemic began.

Previously, Public Health England published guidance for supported living providers. This was withdrawn on 13 May and updated guidance for the sector is being developed.

Guidance on the provision of home care was published on 22 May and is available in an online only format at GOV.UK. This may also be relevant to supported living settings where domiciliary care is provided.

The Care Quality Commission advised that it is not possible to isolate death notifications where providers register for multiple service types. Therefore, they have analysed deaths reported by providers who are registered to provide supported living services only.

Between 10 April and 15 May 2020, there were 39 deaths notified - 18 of which have been COVID-19 related, whether suspected or confirmed. It is important to note that this may not offer a complete picture of all deaths in supported living settings.

23rd Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they will cite the scientific and public health evidence that they used to justify the blanket restriction on the movement of people with no underlying health conditions outside their own homes; and what consideration they gave to the alternative of introducing measures to ensure people without underlying health conditions maintained social distancing and wore personal protective equipment to prevent infection to themselves and others but were otherwise free to move as they desired.

The Government has published the scientific evidence supporting its action on social distancing. In the document, Potential effect of non-pharmaceutical interventions on a COVID-19 epidemic in the UK 26 February 2020, the Scientific Pandemic Influenza Group on Modelling assessed four different response options. It outlined that social distancing for 13 weeks could reduce the peak by up to 50-60%, showing that this measure would have the largest impact than the other proposed measures in containing the outbreak. A copy of Potential effect of non-pharmaceutical interventions on a COVID-19 epidemic in the UK 26 February 2020 is attached.

The Government continues to be led by the evidence in our response to COVID-19. Following the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies’ advice, we think there will be some benefit for people wearing face coverings for epidemiological reasons and for giving people confidence as we return to work.

We will set out plans soon on what role face coverings may have as we look towards easing any lockdown measures.

22nd Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government on what date they first requested help from the British Healthcare Trades Association to obtain personal protective equipment, and other equipment, needed as a result of COVID-19; and what action has been agreed as a result of their discussions with that Association.

The Department meets with a number of trade associations, including the British Healthcare Trades Association, on a weekly basis. There have been regular discussions at these meetings on the challenges of responding to COVID-19. The Government issued a ‘call to arms’ for industry partners and other manufacturers to respond through a central hub for COVID-19 support. So far, we have received over 12,000 offers of support.

27th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the remarks by Lord Bethell (HL Deb, cols 248 and 253), what measure of inflation they used in the cash figures for the four financial years included in the NHS Funding Bill.

Under the NHS Funding Bill 2019-20, the Government commits to increase investment in the National Health Service in the years to 2023-24 (compared with 2018-19) by £33.9 billion in cash terms.

At the time the NHS settlement was confirmed in January 2019, real terms growth calculations used the GDP Deflator forecasts, as set out in the Economic and Fiscal Outlook in October 2018.

The NHS funding settlement was fixed in cash terms and it is these cash budgets that underpin the NHS Long Term Plan.

27th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the remarks by Lord Bethell (HL Deb, cols 248 and 253), whether (1) NHS Trusts with loans will have to repay those loans or service them from the cash figures in the NHS Funding Bill, (2) new loans will be available from those cash figures for Trusts in financial difficulty, and (3) the new financing framework promised for 2020–21 will be published before the start of the financial year.

The National Health Service is funded through the NHS funding settlement for finance costs on loans drawn from the Department. Individual trusts are, therefore, expected to finance loan repayments from either their internal resources or surplus cash generated from operating activities. Those cash reserves are ultimately financed by the NHS funding settlement.

Loans are provided to trusts from the Department’s own cash limit set as part of HM Treasury Parliamentary Supply Estimates that are presented to and voted upon by Parliament. The NHS is expected to achieve financial balance within the figures set out in the NHS Funding Bill and that includes covering any deficits associated with loans that have been provided.

As explained in the NHS planning guidance dated January 2020, we are considering whether reforms to the cash regime might be appropriate and will provide further detail on this ahead of 2020-21. The following table shows loans issued to trusts in difficulty in the current financial year until 31 December 2019.

Interim revenue support

Interim capital support

NHS trusts

£830 million

£70 million

NHS foundation trusts

£630 million

£120 million

Total

£1,460 million

£190 million

27th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how much funding they have provided to the NHS for the 2020–21 financial year for tackling the £6.5 billion backlog in building maintenance.

Part of National Health Service capital expenditure by NHS organisations is self-financed and used to address their operational capital requirements, including backlog maintenance rather than through funding that has been centrally allocated. The extent of spend on backlog is dependent on local operational planning which is currently underway.

Additionally, some backlog maintenance will be tackled through the larger transformational capital programmes by replacement of old run-down estate with new facilities. Since 2017, the Government has announced over 170 Sustainability and Transformation Plan capital schemes amounting to around £3.3 billion, including the 20 hospital upgrades announced in August 2019. In addition, as part of the Health Infrastructure Plan launched in September 2019, the Government announced £2.8 billion funding to back its commitment to build 40 new hospitals. However, while these programmes will often address significant backlog maintenance the related funding element is not separately identified.

27th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of the amount of loans to NHS Trusts in financial difficulty at the end of the current financial year.

The National Health Service is funded through the NHS funding settlement for finance costs on loans drawn from the Department. Individual trusts are, therefore, expected to finance loan repayments from either their internal resources or surplus cash generated from operating activities. Those cash reserves are ultimately financed by the NHS funding settlement.

Loans are provided to trusts from the Department’s own cash limit set as part of HM Treasury Parliamentary Supply Estimates that are presented to and voted upon by Parliament. The NHS is expected to achieve financial balance within the figures set out in the NHS Funding Bill and that includes covering any deficits associated with loans that have been provided.

As explained in the NHS planning guidance dated January 2020, we are considering whether reforms to the cash regime might be appropriate and will provide further detail on this ahead of 2020-21. The following table shows loans issued to trusts in difficulty in the current financial year until 31 December 2019.

Interim revenue support

Interim capital support

NHS trusts

£830 million

£70 million

NHS foundation trusts

£630 million

£120 million

Total

£1,460 million

£190 million

27th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to monitor progress by NHS England in the delivery of its Long Term Plan for the NHS against the cash figures in the NHS Funding Bill; whether those arrangements will identify specific progress in relation to mental health services and community health services, including the deployment of additional staff; and what plans they have to keep Parliament and the public informed on progress in delivering the Long Term Plan.

We have agreed a number of headline metrics against which progress on delivering the NHS Long Term Plan will be measured. NHS England published these headline metrics along with initial proposals for the specific measures to underpin them in July 2019. The metrics and proposed measures include real spend on primary and community health services, as well as on mental health services, rolling out community services response times, and the number of adults and children accessing mental health services.

We are working with NHS England and NHS Improvement to finalise the underpinning measures. Both metrics and the measures will be embedded in the Government’s statutory mandate to NHS England from 2020-21, and performance against them will therefore be reflected in the Government’s annual assessment of NHS England’s performance which includes performance against the mandate. Both the mandate and the annual assessment will be laid in Parliament and published.

25th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have, if any, to ensure that social care workers doing equivalent jobs to NHS workers are paid equivalent rates.

The majority of social care in England is delivered by private companies. It is a matter for those employers to determine the rate of pay for their staff, including social care workers. The National Minimum Wage is the legal minimum employers must pay their workers. In addition, local authorities, as commissioners of adult social care were given market shaping duties by the Care Act 2014 and must work with care providers to determine a fair rate of pay for fair work based on local market conditions.

The relative levels of pay in the National Health Service and social care are kept under frequent review.

25th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the costs of aligning the pay of NHS and social care workers.

The majority of social care in England is delivered by private companies. It is a matter for those employers to determine the rate of pay for their staff, including social care workers. The National Minimum Wage is the legal minimum employers must pay their workers. In addition, local authorities, as commissioners of adult social care were given market shaping duties by the Care Act 2014 and must work with care providers to determine a fair rate of pay for fair work based on local market conditions.

The relative levels of pay in the National Health Service and social care are kept under frequent review.

25th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of (1) the level of unmet and partially-met need within adult social care, and (2) the cost of addressing that need in 2024–25.

The Department has made no assessment of unmet and partially met need within adult social care. Therefore, it has made no assessment of cost of any unmet or partially met need for 2024-25.

This Government has enshrined in legislation, through the Care Act 2014, councils’ statutory responsibility to meet eligible needs. This eliminates the postcode lottery of eligibility across England.

25th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the stability of the adult social care provider market.

We are pleased that 84% of adult social care providers are rated as good or outstanding by the Care Quality Commission (February 2020).

However, we know the social care sector is under pressure due to growing need for care. We are providing councils with a £1 billion grant for adults and children’s social care on top of maintaining £2.5 billion of existing social care grants for 2020/21.

Local authorities are best placed to understand and plan for the care needs of their populations, and to develop and build local market capacity. This funding will support local authorities to meet rising demand and continue to stabilise the social care system.

25th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the answer by Baroness Blackwood of North Oxford on 28 January (HL489), how many places in care or nursing homes the NHS funded in the last financial year for which figures are available; what was the total expenditure incurred; and how many homes were involved.

The Adult Social Care Activity and Finance Report for 2018/19 shows that, in that year, from the potential clients who applied for adult social care packages, 14,030 received a package that was 100% funded by the National Health Service. There are likely to be other packages that are funded in part by the NHS, but this information is not held centrally.

Information on the overall expenditure of the NHS on care home placements and the homes concerned is not held centrally.

28th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many contracts were handed back to local authorities in England in the financial years (1) 2017/18, (2) 2018/19, and (3) 2019/20 by (a) nursing homes, (b) residential care homes, and (c) domiciliary care organisations; and which local authorities were involved.

This information is not collected centrally.

28th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to stabilise the funding of the adult social care sector in England in order to enable the agreement of a long-term funding plan for that sector.

We are providing councils with access to an additional £1.5 billion for adults and children’s social care in 2020/21. This includes an additional £1 billion of grant funding for adults and children’s social care, and a proposed 2% precept that will enables councils to access a further £500 million for adult social care. This £1.5 billion is on top of maintaining £2.5 billion of existing social care grants and will support local authorities to meet rising demand and continue to stabilise the social care system.

Putting social care on a sustainable footing, where everyone is treated with dignity and respect, is one of the biggest challenges we face as a society. The Government will bring forward a plan for social care this year.

28th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what was the expenditure at constant prices of the Better Care Fund for each financial year since its inception; what is the expected expenditure of that Fund in the current year; and what is the forecast expenditure for financial year 2020/21.

The total expenditure through the Better Care Fund (BCF) from 2015-16 to 2018-19 in nominal and constant prices is set out in the following table. This includes National Health Service clinical commissioning group (CCG) contributions, the Disabled Facilities Grant, the improved BCF and additional voluntary NHS and local government contributions.

In 2019-20, the BCF will be a minimum of £6.422 billion in nominal prices. This excludes voluntary contributions, which were over £2 billion in 2018-19.

For 2020-21, the 2019 Spending Round announced that the NHS CCG minimum allocations would continue into 2020-21 with a real-terms increase of 3.4%, and that the improved Better Care Fund would be maintained at flat cash.

Total BCF Contribution

Nominal prices

2018/19 prices

2015/16

£5.3 billion

£5.7 billion

2016/17

£5.9 billion

£6.1 billion

2017/18

£7.3 billion

£7.5 billion

2018/19

£7.7 billion

£7.7 billion

28th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they have commissioned any independent evaluation of the effectiveness of the Better Care Fund in (1) improving the discharge of patients from acute hospitals and (2) reducing pressure on local authority adult social care budgets.

The Policy Research Unit on Quality and Outcomes of Person-Centred Care (QORU) was commissioned by the Department to carry out a system’s level evaluation of the Better Care Fund (BCF) covering its first year in 2015/16. A system-level evaluation of the Better Care Fund: Final Report was published in 2018, a copy of which is attached.

QORU found that areas which spent more BCF money per person had fewer delayed transfers of care than areas with low spending and concluded that the BCF reduced delays. The evaluation also found that local areas planned to spend a quarter of their BCF funding on maintaining social care services in 2015/16, underlining the contribution that the BCF makes to maintaining social care expenditure.

We continue to monitor and evaluate the BCF, to inform our approach to the Fund going forward. Last year, 93% of local areas agreed that joint working had improved as a result of the BCF.

28th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimates they have made of the proportion of patients in acute hospital wards in England that are there inappropriately because of the absence of adult social care services; what the annual cost of such patients is to the NHS; and what plans they have to reduce such proportions and costs.

The information is not available in the format requested.

28th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the average daily cost of a bed in (1) an acute hospital ward; (2) a nursing home; and (3) a residential care home, in England in the latest financial year for which information is available.

The average daily costs of a bed in an acute hospital ward and in a care home setting are calculated differently and come from different sources, so are not directly comparable.

15th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many (1) nursing homes, and (2) nursing home beds, were registered with the Care Quality Commission at the end of September in the financial years from 2015/16 to 2019/20.

The following table shows the number of nursing homes registered with the Care Quality Commission (CQC) along with the number of nursing home beds, between 2015 and 2019.

Active at

Number of nursing homes

Number of beds

30 September 2015

4,515

219,733

30 September 2016

4,446

218,972

30 September 2017

4,436

220,317

30 September 2018

4,440

222,216

30 September 2019 1

4,379

221,283

Source: CQC database as at 16 January 2020.

Notes:

1The data is as at 16 January 2020.

All other data is as at 1 April 2019.

‘Nursing homes’ are defined as locations with the service type of 'care home service with nursing'.

15th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to allocate funds over the next four financial years for the increase of "step down care" nursing home beds to relieve pressure on acute care hospitals and adult social care services.

The Care Act 2014 placed a duty on councils to offer a meaningful choice of services, so that people have a range of high quality, appropriate care options to choose from and that they get the services that best meet their needs. Decisions on how to allocate funding to comply with this duty are for councils.

We are also providing councils with an additional £1 billion of grant funding for adults and children’s social care, on top of maintaining £2.5 billion of existing social care grants next year. In addition, the Government has proposed a 2% precept that will enable councils to access a further £500 million for adult social care.

15th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have, if any, to transfer responsibility for the funding provision of nursing home care to the NHS.

The Government has no current plans to transfer responsibility for the funding provision of nursing home care to the National Health Service.

The NHS already provides NHS-funded nursing care. This is funding for care homes which supports the provision of nursing care by registered nurses to individuals who are assessed as eligible for funded nursing care.

15th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to implement all sections of Part 1 of the Care Act 2014; and whether the proposals of the Dilnot Commission will be taken into account in their future plans for funding adult social care.

Putting social care on a sustainable footing, where everyone is treated with dignity and respect, is one of the biggest challenges we face as a society. The Government will bring forward a plan for social care this year. There are complex questions to address, which is why we will seek to build cross-party consensus. We will consider all options available to ensure that every person is treated with dignity and offered the security they deserve, and that nobody needing care is forced to sell their home to pay for it.

22nd Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what penalties a police officer can impose on an individual over 70 years old, who has no underlying health conditions and adheres to other government social distancing guidance, who leaves their home to visit family members during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The powers to restrict individual movements are contained in the Health Protection Regulations 2020, under the Public Health Act 1984, which was certified as Human Rights Act compliant by the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, Rt Hon Matt Hancock.

The penalties for those who do not comply apply to anyone aged 18 and over. If members of the public do not comply with these new measures, then the police response will follow the 4 Es approach – engaging, explaining, encouraging, and then, as a last resort, enforcing, including through issuing fixed penalty notices and dispersing gatherings.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
22nd Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what specific legislative provisions are in use currently to curb the movement outside their own homes by people aged over 70; and whether that legislation is considered as compatible with the Human Rights Act 1998 and has been certified as such by a Minister of the Crown.

The powers to restrict individual movements are contained in the Health Protection Regulations 2020, under the Public Health Act 1984, which was certified as Human Rights Act compliant by the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, Rt Hon Matt Hancock.

The penalties for those who do not comply apply to anyone aged 18 and over. If members of the public do not comply with these new measures, then the police response will follow the 4 Es approach – engaging, explaining, encouraging, and then, as a last resort, enforcing, including through issuing fixed penalty notices and dispersing gatherings.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
25th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to involve councils in decisions about reform of the immigration system in relation to the adult social care workforce.

The Government published details of the new UK’s Points Based System on 19 February.

A comprehensive programme of communication and engagement will be launched this month, focusing on users and key sectors. It will involve relevant stakeholders, including local authorities.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
30th Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether it is permitted for up to 15 people to attend a humanist wedding; and if so, whether they have plans to clarify rules for marriages and civil ceremonies.

Humanist wedding ceremonies can take place at this time with 15 people present. This is also the case for marriages and civil ceremonies.

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Home Office)
15th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is their planned increase in expenditure in the 2020/21 financial year, at 2019/20 prices, on (1) adult, and (2) children's, social care.

It is for local authorities to determine their spending on social care. The Government is providing councils with access to an additional £1.5 billion for adults and children’s social care in 2020/21. This includes an additional £1 billion of grant funding for adult and children’s social care, on top of maintaining £2.5 billion of existing social care grants. The Government has proposed a 2 per cent precept that will enable councils to access a further £500 million for adult social care specifically.

Viscount Younger of Leckie
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
15th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how much was spent at constant prices on (1) adult, and (2) children's social care, in each financial year from 2009/10 to 2018/19; and what is the estimated expenditure for the 2019/20 financial year.

Local authority expenditure on children’s social care between 2014/15 and 2018/19 in constant prices is published in table 1b here https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/local-authority-revenue-expenditure-and-financing-england-2018-to-2019-final-outturn. Due to significant changes to local authorities’ responsibilities in 2014 it is not possible to compare expenditure before and after this date. Expenditure for the years 2009/10 to 2013/14 is published (attached) here https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/local-authority-revenue-expenditure-and-financing#2013-to-2014

Expenditure for adult social care between 2010/11 and 2018/19 is published here https://digital.nhs.uk/data-and-information/publications/statistical/adult-social-care-activity-and-finance-report/2018-19/appendix-b-final. This data includes Better Care Fund income from the NHS and other historic transfers, as detailed in the report. The same information is presented in constant prices in the table below.

Year

Real terms expenditure (18-19 prices)

2009-10

£18.39bn

2010-11

£18.50bn

2011-12

£17.58bn

2012-13

£17.01bn

2013-14

£16.86bn

2014-15

£16.63bn

2015-16

£17.15bn

2016-17

£17.39bn

2017-18

£17.49bn

2018-19

£17.92bn

Local authorities’ budgeted expenditure for both adults and children’s social care in 2019/20 is published (attached) here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/812505/Local_Authority_Revenue_Expenditure_and_Financing_2019-20_Budget__England.pdf This data excludes Better Care Fund income and so is not comparable to the data above.

Viscount Younger of Leckie
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)