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Written Question
Allergy UK: Patients
Monday 30th May 2022

Asked by: Viscount Stansgate (Labour - Excepted Hereditary)

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of Allergy's UK's Patient Charter, published on 5 May; and what steps they will take to support it.

Answered by Lord Kamall

Whilst no formal assessment has been made, we have noted the Charter’s focus on quality standards of care, access to accurate information and equality.

Allergy services in England are commissioned through clinical commissioning groups to meet the needs of the local population. A small number of specialist allergy services for patients with rare and complex conditions are commissioned through NHS England and NHS Improvement’s specialised commissioning. The service specification specifies that centres provide equity of access to best practice standards for diagnosis and management, based on current national and international guidelines.

The Department and NHS England and NHS Improvement continue to engage with stakeholders to understand the needs of people with allergies and how services could be improved. This includes patient and public voice membership in NHS England and NHS Improvement’s clinical reference group which provides clinical advice and leadership on specialised immunology and allergy services.


Written Question
Regency Act 1937
Monday 21st February 2022

Asked by: Viscount Stansgate (Labour - Excepted Hereditary)

Question to the Cabinet Office:

To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to amend the Regency Act 1937.

Answered by Lord True - Shadow Leader of the House of Lords

The Government has no plans to amend the Regency Act.


Written Question
Aircraft: 5G
Friday 28th January 2022

Asked by: Viscount Stansgate (Labour - Excepted Hereditary)

Question to the Department for Transport:

To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking in respect of the concerns raised by the aviation industry about the potentially dangerous effects of 5G networks on certain categories of aircraft.

Answered by Baroness Vere of Norbiton

We continue to monitor US Aviation industry concerns that the US 5G network could affect equipment onboard aircraft.

The UK Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) is leading on assessing any risks from the implementation of the UK 5G network on aviation safety, in conjunction with the Ministry of Defence, OFCOM, and industry stakeholders. The CAA has issued guidance to UK operators throughout the world on 5G status in other countries, including the US.

The UK CAA will continue to monitor the situation, and both my department and the CAA is in close contact with industry, the US Federal Aviation Administration, the EU Aviation Safety Agency and other stakeholders on this.


Written Question
Royal Prerogative: Statute Law
Monday 24th January 2022

Asked by: Viscount Stansgate (Labour - Excepted Hereditary)

Question to the Cabinet Office:

To ask Her Majesty's Government which, if any, prerogative powers have been removed using statute law; and on what occasions.

Answered by Lord True - Shadow Leader of the House of Lords

The Royal Prerogative is the residual power inherent in the Sovereign, and which is now exercised mostly on the advice of Ministers. It may be divided into the following broad categories: constitutional or personal prerogatives and prerogative executive powers.

The Dissolution and Calling of Parliament Bill, which is currently going through your Lordship’s House, will make the Royal Prerogative powers relating to the dissolution of Parliament and the calling of a new Parliament exercisable again, as if the Fixed-term Parliaments Act 2011 had never been enacted. We have a sound legal basis for the position that prerogative powers can be revived, and there is no doubt on this question if this is made clear in statute. Clause 2 of the Bill makes the necessary express provision accordingly.

Parliament can and has legislated to modify, abolish, or supersede Royal Prerogative powers. It is rare that statutes abolish Royal Prerogative powers explicitly. It is, therefore, a matter of legal judgement whether a prerogative is abridged by implication.


Written Question
Royal Prerogative: Statute Law
Monday 24th January 2022

Asked by: Viscount Stansgate (Labour - Excepted Hereditary)

Question to the Cabinet Office:

To ask Her Majesty's Government which, if any, prerogative powers have been restored using statute law; and on what occasions.

Answered by Lord True - Shadow Leader of the House of Lords

The Royal Prerogative is the residual power inherent in the Sovereign, and which is now exercised mostly on the advice of Ministers. It may be divided into the following broad categories: constitutional or personal prerogatives and prerogative executive powers.

The Dissolution and Calling of Parliament Bill, which is currently going through your Lordship’s House, will make the Royal Prerogative powers relating to the dissolution of Parliament and the calling of a new Parliament exercisable again, as if the Fixed-term Parliaments Act 2011 had never been enacted. We have a sound legal basis for the position that prerogative powers can be revived, and there is no doubt on this question if this is made clear in statute. Clause 2 of the Bill makes the necessary express provision accordingly.

Parliament can and has legislated to modify, abolish, or supersede Royal Prerogative powers. It is rare that statutes abolish Royal Prerogative powers explicitly. It is, therefore, a matter of legal judgement whether a prerogative is abridged by implication.


Written Question
Royal Prerogative
Monday 24th January 2022

Asked by: Viscount Stansgate (Labour - Excepted Hereditary)

Question to the Cabinet Office:

To ask Her Majesty's Government how they define a prerogative power.

Answered by Lord True - Shadow Leader of the House of Lords

The Royal Prerogative is the residual power inherent in the Sovereign, and which is now exercised mostly on the advice of Ministers. It may be divided into the following broad categories: constitutional or personal prerogatives and prerogative executive powers.

The Dissolution and Calling of Parliament Bill, which is currently going through your Lordship’s House, will make the Royal Prerogative powers relating to the dissolution of Parliament and the calling of a new Parliament exercisable again, as if the Fixed-term Parliaments Act 2011 had never been enacted. We have a sound legal basis for the position that prerogative powers can be revived, and there is no doubt on this question if this is made clear in statute. Clause 2 of the Bill makes the necessary express provision accordingly.

Parliament can and has legislated to modify, abolish, or supersede Royal Prerogative powers. It is rare that statutes abolish Royal Prerogative powers explicitly. It is, therefore, a matter of legal judgement whether a prerogative is abridged by implication.


Written Question
Coronavirus: Vaccination
Tuesday 21st December 2021

Asked by: Viscount Stansgate (Labour - Excepted Hereditary)

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask Her Majesty's Government when COVID-19 booster vaccines will be recorded in the Covid Pass within the NHS app.

Answered by Lord Kamall

The NHS COVID Pass can now be used to demonstrate proof of a booster or third dose for outbound international travel. This is visible through the NHS App and NHS.UK within the NHS COVID Pass for Travel.


Written Question
Coronavirus: Ivermectin
Friday 26th November 2021

Asked by: Viscount Stansgate (Labour - Excepted Hereditary)

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the potential use of ivermectin to treat COVID-19 patients; and what bodies were involved in any such assessment.

Answered by Lord Kamall

The Therapeutics Taskforce is monitoring data from clinical trials taking place worldwide to assess whether ivermectin is a safe and effective treatment for COVID-19. Ivermectin is not currently a licensed treatment for COVID-19 and evidence from clinical trials as a treatment for COVID-19 is inconclusive. This assessment is based on the views of the Therapeutics Taskforce, the UK COVID-19 Therapeutics Advisory Panel and the Research to access pathway for investigational drugs for COVID-19. This assessment is also consistent with the views of the World Health Organization, the Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency. We will continue to keep this assessment under review as more data becomes available from clinical trials, including the Government-funded PRINCIPLE clinical trial.


Written Question
Jeremy Farrar
Thursday 11th November 2021

Asked by: Viscount Stansgate (Labour - Excepted Hereditary)

Question to the Cabinet Office:

To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the decision of Sir Jeremy Farrar not to participate in subsequent meetings of the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies.

Answered by Lord True - Shadow Leader of the House of Lords

We can confirm that Sir Jeremy has stood down from the Covid SAGE activation. SAGE continues to provide the Government with independent expert scientific and technical advice.