Debates between Angus Brendan MacNeil and Mr Jacob Rees-Mogg

There have been 6 exchanges between Angus Brendan MacNeil and Mr Jacob Rees-Mogg

1 Thu 24th October 2019 Business of the House
Leader of the House
3 interactions (217 words)
2 Thu 17th October 2019 Business of the House (Saturday 19 October)
Leader of the House
7 interactions (525 words)
3 Tue 15th October 2019 Business Statement
Leader of the House
5 interactions (274 words)
4 Thu 26th September 2019 Business of the House
Leader of the House
7 interactions (290 words)
5 Tue 3rd September 2019 European Union (Withdrawal)
Leader of the House
5 interactions (285 words)
6 Tue 17th April 2018 Military Action Overseas: Parliamentary Approval
Cabinet Office
3 interactions (375 words)

Business of the House

Debate between Angus Brendan MacNeil and Mr Jacob Rees-Mogg
Thursday 24th October 2019

(8 months, 2 weeks ago)

Commons Chamber
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Leader of the House
Mr Jacob Rees-Mogg Portrait Mr Rees-Mogg - Hansard
24 Oct 2019, 6 p.m.

No. I must confess that the logic of that point defeats me, and it seems that it defeats most Members of this House. This will be the third time that the Government have offered a general election, so we are clearly willing to have one. We are willing to take our case to the British people. Why? Because we are confident that our case is strong, just and right. The reason why the Opposition are so afraid of an election is because their case is weak, wobbly and futile.

Angus Brendan MacNeil Portrait Angus Brendan MacNeil (Na h-Eileanan an Iar) (SNP) - Parliament Live - Hansard

Is it not a fact that, halfway through a parliamentary term, Parliament has got a dangerous Prime Minister in a cage and that Parliament would be wise to keep that dangerous Prime Minister in a cage at least until we remove some of his teeth, if not all of them?

Mr Jacob Rees-Mogg Portrait Mr Rees-Mogg - Parliament Live - Hansard
24 Oct 2019, 6:01 p.m.

I am afraid that that reminds me of the joke about the time that one should go and visit the dentist, which is, of course, at two thirty. But the hon. Gentleman—[Interruption.] Somebody laughed. Thank you so much. These sort of jokes amuse my children. We cannot possibly want to remove the teeth of Prime Ministers unless they are rotten, but the Prime Minister has a fine set of gnashers with which to bite through these difficult problems.

Business of the House (Saturday 19 October)

Debate between Angus Brendan MacNeil and Mr Jacob Rees-Mogg
Thursday 17th October 2019

(8 months, 3 weeks ago)

Commons Chamber
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Leader of the House
Mr Jacob Rees-Mogg Portrait The Leader of the House of Commons (Mr Jacob Rees- Mogg) - Parliament Live - Hansard
17 Oct 2019, 11:09 a.m.

I beg to move,

That this House shall sit at 9.30am on Saturday 19 October and at that sitting:

(1) the first business shall be any statements to be made by Ministers; and

(2) the provisions of Standing Order No. 11 (Friday sittings), with the exception of paragraph (4), shall apply as if that day were a Friday.

The good news is that I do not intend to detain the House for long. [Interruption.] The hon. Member for Na h-Eileanan an Iar (Angus Brendan MacNeil) seems delighted that I will be brief.

As Members will be aware, 19 October is a day of jubilee and song, because it is the anniversary of the birth of my hon. Friend the Member for Wellingborough (Mr Bone), who, on a very rare occasion, is not in his place. Other than wishing him a happy birthday, we have to deal with the European Union (Withdrawal) (No. 2) Act 2019, in which Parliament has given the day additional meaning. It has set down a series of requirements that, if we are to leave the EU on 31 October, need to be fulfilled by this House and can only be fulfilled on Saturday, because the European Council will not have finished until the day before. I am sure that many Members can think of other things to be doing on a Saturday rather than coming here, but I admire their diligence in accepting that the basic principle is right. As I have said before, to meet three times in 70 years on a Saturday is not unduly onerous.

Angus Brendan MacNeil Portrait Angus Brendan MacNeil (Na h-Eileanan an Iar) (SNP) - Hansard
17 Oct 2019, 12:45 p.m.

I’m only 49!

Mr Jacob Rees-Mogg Portrait Mr Rees-Mogg - Hansard
17 Oct 2019, 11:09 a.m.

I meant the whole House.

Break in Debate

Mr Jacob Rees-Mogg Portrait Mr Rees-Mogg - Hansard

The right hon. Lady raises an interesting question. There are any number of impact assessments that people have made, but let me give her my assessment of what will happen when we leave the European Union: it will be a golden age for the United Kingdom when we are free of the heavy yoke of the European Union, which has bowed us down for generations and made us less competitive, less efficient and higher-cost. All of that will be gone, and we will be singing hallelujahs.

Angus Brendan MacNeil Portrait Angus Brendan MacNeil - Hansard
17 Oct 2019, 11:09 a.m.

The right hon. Gentleman boasts that the backstop has gone. Of course, there is no need for the backstop now, given that the UK Government have capitulated on the customs union and the single market. Will they do the same for Scotland and keep us in the customs union and the single market? If it is good enough for Northern Ireland, it is good enough for Scotland.

Mr Jacob Rees-Mogg Portrait Mr Rees-Mogg - Hansard
17 Oct 2019, 11:09 a.m.

I am astonished that the hon. Gentleman, who I thought was a feisty highlander, calls for capitulation. [Interruption.] All right, the hon. Member for Caithness, Sutherland and Easter Ross (Jamie Stone) is even higher. Her Majesty’s Government have not capitulated, in the same way as the hon. Member for Na h-Eileanan an Iar would be the last person to capitulate. The Government have, in fact, succeeded. We will be out of the customs union and out of the single market, and Northern Ireland will be in a single customs union area with the United Kingdom as a whole. This is fantastically exciting and a very important development.

Business Statement

Debate between Angus Brendan MacNeil and Mr Jacob Rees-Mogg
Tuesday 15th October 2019

(8 months, 3 weeks ago)

Commons Chamber
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Leader of the House
Mr Jacob Rees-Mogg Portrait Mr Rees-Mogg - Parliament Live - Hansard
15 Oct 2019, 2:18 p.m.

I am not entirely sure about the counting ability of Liberal Democrats, but it is always a right of members of the public to lobby MPs when the House is sitting. It is one we should be very proud of.

Angus Brendan MacNeil Portrait Angus Brendan MacNeil (Na h-Eileanan an Iar) (SNP) - Parliament Live - Hansard

The UK Parliament has an international reputation for hardly being able to run a bath as run a Brexit. Today is Tuesday and the UK Parliament cannot tell us if we are sitting on Saturday. This will be Brexit Saturday if we sit. Brexit Saturday will be in the company of world war two Saturday, Suez Saturday and Falklands Saturday. This calamity that the Leader of the House wants to visit on the country is not in the best of company. What will happen between now and Thursday that might be able to clear his mind up as to whether we are sitting on Saturday? Decide, man! Decide!

Mr Jacob Rees-Mogg Portrait Mr Rees-Mogg - Parliament Live - Hansard
15 Oct 2019, 2:19 p.m.

I always thought one was in the habit of drawing a bath, rather than running a bath, and I am sure that the House would be most capable of drawing a bath. To come to the hon. Gentleman’s main point, we are waiting upon events. There is a European Council taking place on Thursday and Friday upon which the events on Saturday will depend. It seems to be relatively—

Mr Jacob Rees-Mogg Portrait Mr Rees-Mogg - Hansard
15 Oct 2019, 2:19 p.m.

The hon. Gentleman heckles, elegantly and loudly as always, saying that today is Tuesday— I know today is Tuesday, and it will be followed by Wednesday and a European Council on Thursday and Friday. Things will be decided at that Council that will allow us to decide whether we need to meet on Saturday.

Business of the House

Debate between Angus Brendan MacNeil and Mr Jacob Rees-Mogg
Thursday 26th September 2019

(9 months, 2 weeks ago)

Commons Chamber
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Leader of the House
Mr Jacob Rees-Mogg Portrait Mr Rees-Mogg - Parliament Live - Hansard
26 Sep 2019, 2:41 p.m.

The principle that constituencies should have the same number of electors is a very good and important one.

Mr Jacob Rees-Mogg Portrait Mr Rees-Mogg - Hansard
26 Sep 2019, 2:41 p.m.

I make an exception for the hon. Member for Na h-Eileanan an Iar, which, for geographical reasons, has slightly fewer constituents, but they are some of the finest people in this country. I would not quite say they count double, but they are heading in that direction. When this matter was being debated some years, I thought we should create a rotten borough for him, because he brings so much levity and pleasure to the House through his interjections.

Break in Debate

Mr Jacob Rees-Mogg Portrait Mr Rees-Mogg - Parliament Live - Hansard
26 Sep 2019, 2:42 p.m.

I am very sympathetic to what my hon. Friend says. The statutory instrument is prepared but is being considered and will be introduced if there is a suitable opportunity.

Angus Brendan MacNeil Portrait Angus Brendan MacNeil (Na h-Eileanan an Iar) (SNP) - Parliament Live - Hansard
26 Sep 2019, 2:42 p.m.

God bless you, Mr Speaker.

I add my voice to that of the right hon. Member for Putney (Justine Greening) and make a plea for the Refugees (Family Reunion) (No. 2) Bill, which is among those private Members’ Bills that should see some progress.

May I add, Mr Speaker, that the Chamber today has been a model of civility all afternoon compared with last night? Parliament is back to what it was. May I suggest that to get rid of the toxicity and disorder last night that Acts of Parliament be referred to by their proper names as assented to by the Queen, so that we do not get these tabloid monikers and pejorative titles? The Leader of the House is one of the sticklers and I am sure would like this to happen. Perhaps the Speaker might rule it disorderly. It was the references to an Act that stoked the fires of toxicity and disorder last night.

Mr Jacob Rees-Mogg Portrait Mr Rees-Mogg - Hansard

Stickler though I am—[Interruption.] Pardon? [Interruption.]

European Union (Withdrawal)

Debate between Angus Brendan MacNeil and Mr Jacob Rees-Mogg
Tuesday 3rd September 2019

(10 months, 1 week ago)

Commons Chamber
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Leader of the House
Mr Jacob Rees-Mogg Portrait Mr Rees-Mogg - Hansard
3 Sep 2019, 7:32 p.m.

I am sorry to say that the most obvious understanding of the ordinary use of the English language, which normally the hon. and learned Lady is pretty good at, makes it quite clear that the two statements are entirely compatible. The Prorogation is the normal Prorogation to have a new Session; it is not to stop debate on matters related to the European Union.

Mr Jacob Rees-Mogg Portrait Mr Rees-Mogg - Hansard
3 Sep 2019, 7:33 p.m.

It is, of course, a pleasure to give way to the hon. Gentleman.

Angus Brendan MacNeil Portrait Angus Brendan MacNeil - Hansard
3 Sep 2019, 7:34 p.m.

I thank the right hon. Gentleman for giving way. He spoke earlier about candour. The need for candour means that he has to accept that, when it comes to WTO, all countries bar about three in the world are in regional trade associations—the three that are not are South Sudan, Somalia and East Timor, and they will probably soon be joined by the UK if we have a hard Brexit. The fact that all these countries, bar three, are in regional trade associations means that they do not exclusively trade on WTO terms. Therefore, when he talks about taking the UK to a place where we exclusively trade on WTO terms, he is talking about moving us away from free trade with 500 million people, making trade more expensive. That is his policy. The other question is this: did he know about the Prorogation on 16 August?

Mr Jacob Rees-Mogg Portrait Mr Rees-Mogg - Hansard
3 Sep 2019, 7:34 p.m.

On 16 August, I was at Lords watching a game of cricket, unless it was one of the days when it rained. On the WTO issue, our trade with the United States on WTO terms—I know that the hon. Gentleman is expert in these matters—has grown faster since the creation of the single market than our trade with European Union.

Military Action Overseas: Parliamentary Approval

Debate between Angus Brendan MacNeil and Mr Jacob Rees-Mogg
Tuesday 17th April 2018

(2 years, 2 months ago)

Commons Chamber
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Cabinet Office
Mr Jacob Rees-Mogg Portrait Mr Jacob Rees-Mogg (North East Somerset) (Con) - Hansard
17 Apr 2018, 2:29 p.m.

Parliament has done its correct duty—admittedly assisted by you, Mr Speaker—in ensuring that there were six hours of debate yesterday and a further three hours of debate today, but these constitutional issues are not new. Indeed, this matter is at the heart of the Glorious Revolution, and one of the clauses of the Bill of Rights, which is still our law, states that

“the raising or keeping a standing Army within the Kingdome in time of Peace unlesse it be with Consent of Parlyament is against Law.”

That is why every five years an Armed Forces Bill is passed—to ensure that the armed forces that are available to the Executive are approved by Parliament.

This last happened in 2016 when the Armed Forces Act was renewed. On that occasion, the Bill passed Second Reading without a Division, and it passed Third Reading without a Division. There was uniform consent in this House that the armed services should exist on a similar basis to that on which they have existed since 1689. The Leader of the Opposition did not choose to put down an amendment to put any limits on how the armed services could operate. He did not choose to put down an amendment to say that the Government could not act without the specific consent of Parliament. At every stage, the Bill was passed, and it recognised the proper constitutional settlement and the separation of powers. An Executive and a legislature are different things and have different responsibilities.

As hon. Members know, I have the highest respect for the leader of the Scottish National party in this House—the right hon. Member for Ross, Skye and Lochaber (Ian Blackford)—but I think that he made an error in his speech when he suggested that this House ought to give pre-approval, because the job of the House is to hold the Executive to account, not to try to run the Executive by remote control.

Angus Brendan MacNeil Portrait Angus Brendan MacNeil - Hansard
17 Apr 2018, 12:24 p.m.

If it is the Executive’s idea to go to war or engage in military action, should not this House hold the Executive to account for their thoughts, ideas and policies?

Mr Jacob Rees-Mogg Portrait Mr Rees-Mogg - Hansard
17 Apr 2018, 2:30 p.m.

The Executive are being held to account today. The Prime Minister spent six hours yesterday being held to account in this House and a further hour today.