Alan Campbell Portrait

Alan Campbell

Labour - Tynemouth

4,857 (8.7%) majority - 2019 General Election

First elected: 1st May 1997


Alan Campbell is not a member of any APPGs
Shadow Chief Whip (Commons)
9th May 2021 - 30th May 2024
Committee of Selection
15th Jan 2020 - 25th May 2021
Opposition Deputy Chief Whip (Commons)
8th Oct 2010 - 9th May 2021
Committee of Selection
12th Sep 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Selection Committee
12th Sep 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Committee of Selection
17th Jun 2015 - 3rd May 2017
Committee of Selection
13th Oct 2010 - 30th Mar 2015
Shadow Minister (Home Affairs)
12th May 2010 - 8th Oct 2010
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office) (Crime Reduction)
5th Oct 2008 - 6th May 2010
Committee of Selection
10th May 2006 - 8th Oct 2008
Lord Commissioner (HM Treasury) (Whip)
5th May 2006 - 5th Oct 2008
Armed Forces Bill Committee
19th Dec 2005 - 9th May 2006
Assistant Whip (HM Treasury)
10th May 2005 - 5th May 2006
Draft Charities Bill (Joint Committee)
29th Apr 2004 - 15th Sep 2004
Public Accounts Committee
25th Jul 1997 - 11th May 2001


Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Alan Campbell has voted in 779 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Alan Campbell Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
David T C Davies (Conservative)
Secretary of State for Wales
(2 debate interactions)
Eleanor Laing (Conservative)
(2 debate interactions)
Will Quince (Conservative)
(2 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Cabinet Office
(2 debate contributions)
HM Treasury
(2 debate contributions)
Department of Health and Social Care
(2 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
Legislation Debates
Fisheries Act 2020
(898 words contributed)
View All Legislation Debates
View all Alan Campbell's debates

Latest EDMs signed by Alan Campbell

21st March 2024
Alan Campbell signed this EDM as a sponsor on Thursday 25th April 2024

Town and Country Planning

Tabled by: Edward Leigh (Conservative - Gainsborough)
That an humble Address be presented to His Majesty, praying that the Town and Country Planning (Former RAF Scampton) (Accommodation for Asylum-Seekers etc.) Special Development Order 2024 (S.I., 2024, No. 412), dated 20 March 2024, a copy of which was laid before this House on 21 March 2024, be annulled.
22 signatures
(Most recent: 15 Apr 2024)
Signatures by party:
Conservative: 22
22nd March 2024
Alan Campbell signed this EDM as a sponsor on Thursday 25th April 2024

Town and Country Planning

Tabled by: Priti Patel (Conservative - Witham)
That an humble Address be presented to His Majesty, praying that the Town and Country Planning (Former RAF Airfield Wethersfield) (Accommodation for Asylum-Seekers etc.) Special Development Order 2024 (S.I., 2024, No. 411), dated 20 March 2024, a copy of which was laid before this House on 21 March 2024, be …
2 signatures
(Most recent: 22 Mar 2024)
Signatures by party:
Conservative: 2
View All Alan Campbell's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Alan Campbell, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Alan Campbell has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Alan Campbell has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

Alan Campbell has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

1 Bill co-sponsored by Alan Campbell

Unlawful Killing (Recovery of Remains) Bill 2016-17
Sponsor - Conor McGinn (Ind)


Latest 50 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
14th Jun 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, for what reasons the cost of living bonus for civil servants is pro rata.

Civil Service pay below the Senior Civil Service is delegated to individual departments to determine, subject to adherence with the Civil Service Pay Remit Guidance which is a cost control document. An Addendum to the 2023/24 Pay Remit Guidance was issued on 2 June 2023 to enable departments to make a one-off payment of £1500 per full-time employee. The Addendum stated that departments should have regard to their policies on part time working and making the non-consolidated payment on a pro rata basis.

16th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will issue further guidance on holding weddings during the period of easing the covid-19 lockdown restrictions.

Guidance for small marriages and civil partnerships was published on 22 March and can be found here - https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-guidance-for-small-marriages-and-civil-partnerships/covid-19-guidance-for-small-marriages-and-civil-partnerships#wedding-and-civil-partnership-ceremony-venues

We recognise that any restrictions on wedding venues may be disappointing for those planning such events, but we have to take necessary steps to limit transmission of COVID-19. This includes the closure of some settings and restrictions on social contact, including wedding and civil partnership ceremonies. By their very nature, weddings and civil partnership ceremonies are events that bring families and friends together, making them particularly vulnerable to the spread of COVID-19. We appreciate the sacrifices people have had to make across the COVID-19 pandemic and we do not wish to keep any restrictions in place longer than we need to.

In the COVID-19 Response - Spring 2021, the Government has set out the gradual and cautious approach to reopening in England, guided by science and the data, including the staged return of weddings and civil partnerships, as well as sporting events.

In order to inform the pace and sequencing of the roadmap, the Government commissioned advice and modelling from SAGE and its sub-groups. Scientific evidence supporting the government response to coronavirus is regularly published here - https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/scientific-evidence-supporting-the-government-response-to-coronavirus-covid-19.

Penny Mordaunt
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
9th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what plans the Government has to enable key workers who will be working over Christmas to take the five day easing of covid-19 restrictions period earlier than 23 December.

Key workers make a vital contribution to the country, and the Government is grateful to all those who are working over the Christmas period. I hope employers consider how to make these arrangements work for their staff wherever practical.

Penny Mordaunt
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
21st Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans the Government has to support businesses that want to implement a 32 hour, four-day working week.

There is no ‘one size fits all’ approach to work arrangements. The government supports flexible working in all its forms, where it has benefits for, and is agreed between, both individuals and employers.

The existing legal framework provides a statutory right to request flexible working, where employees can request a change to their hours, pattern or place of work. Between September and December 2021, the government consulted on changes to this framework to better support the uptake of flexible working arrangements. We will respond in due course.

Kevin Hollinrake
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
19th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether the Government plans to ban the sale of fireworks to the public.

The Government has no plans to ban the sale of fireworks to the public.

Kevin Hollinrake
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
20th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he plans to review legislation in place on fireworks.

There is a comprehensive regulatory framework already in place for fireworks. The Government’s aim is to strike the right balance for people to enjoy fireworks, whilst aiming to reduce risks and disturbances to people, animals, and property.

The Government has no current plans to place further restrictions on the sale of fireworks to the public.

13th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what support and advice is available for single parents in full-time employment and who risk losing that employment in the event that they required to self-advised to isolate for 10 days.

The Government is sympathetic to the significant challenges working parents, and single parents in particular, have faced during the pandemic.

The Government has published guidance on employment rights for those who are self-isolating or unable to attend work due to Coronavirus. This guidance is available here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/if-you-need-to-self-isolate-or-cannot-attend-work-due-to-coronavirus.

The Advisory, Conciliation and Arbitration Service (Acas) also provides authoritative and impartial advice free to employees or employers in relation to employment rights issues via their website - www.acas.org.uk, by telephone helpline 0300 123 1100 or text phone 18001 0300 123 1100. Acas also provides employees and employers with Early Conciliation to help them resolve/settle their workplace dispute without going to court.

10th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the timescale is for the roll out of smart meters that work with any energy supplier.

Energy suppliers are installing second generation smart meters as the default option across Great Britain. These meters are connected to the Data Communications Company’s national smart metering communications network, so are compatible across energy suppliers from the point of installation.

The Government has confirmed that a new four-year policy framework with fixed annual installation targets for energy suppliers will commence on 1 January 2022 to drive the consistent, long-term investment needed to achieve market-wide rollout.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
4th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what progress the Government has made on the smart meter roll out.

Smart meters are replacing traditional gas and electricity meters in Great Britain as part of an essential infrastructure upgrade to make the energy system more efficient and flexible, enabling the cost-effective delivery of net zero greenhouse gas emissions.

The rollout is making good progress, with 22.2 million smart and advanced meters in homes and small businesses across Great Britain, as of the end of September 2020.

The latest data on the rollout of smart meters is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/smart-meters-statistics.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
14th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether the Government is planning to provide any further support with fuel and utility costs for people working from home throughout the covid-19 outbreak.

From 6 April 2020 employers have been able to pay employees up to £6 a week tax-free to cover additional costs to their household bills if they have been told to work from home to stop the spread of Covid-19. On 1 October 2020 HMRC launched a new online portal for employed workers whose expenses have not been covered to apply for tax relief for additional expenses from home-working.

In addition, emergency measures with the energy industry have been agreed by the Government to protect the domestic energy supply of those most in need during the disruption caused by COVID-19. In the first instance, any energy customer in financial distress should get in touch with their supplier. Suppliers can then assist customers appropriately. This could include debt repayments and bill payments being reassessed, reduced or paused where necessary. Disconnection of credit meters have also been completely suspended.

The energy price cap currently protects around 11 million households in Great Britain on standard variable and default tariffs. From January 2021 a further 4 million households with prepayment meters will also come under the protection of the cap after the prepayment meter price cap expires. The cap ensures that loyal energy customers are protected from poor value tariffs, saving consumers a total of around £1 billion on their bills annually.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when he plans to publish (a) the eligibility criteria for and (b) further details on the New Green Homes Grant.

Guidance and further details about the Green Homes Grant voucher scheme were published on 28 August. This included information on eligibility, items where support can be claimed as part of energy efficiency measure installations, as well as items that will not be paid for under the voucher scheme. More details will be published in due course.

28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if the Government will make it its policy to ensure the country of origin is displayed on consumer products bought (a) online and (b) offline.

Under the Consumer Contracts (Information, Cancellation and Additional Charges) Regulations 2013, retailers are required to provide the geographical address at which they are established. This will not necessarily indicate the place of manufacture of the goods but the consumer can request this information from the retailer when making the purchase and the retailer would be obliged under the Consumer Protection from Unfair Trading Regulations 2008 to respond accurately. The Government does not have plans to introduce further requirements.

1st Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, whether she plans to introduce legislation for the uncapped secondary ticketing market.

We are committed to supporting fair and transparent ticket pricing and tackling unacceptable behaviour in this market.

We have strengthened the law in relation to ticketing information requirements and have introduced a criminal offence of using automated software to buy more tickets online than is allowed. We also support the work of enforcement agencies in this area, such as the Competition and Markets Authority, National Trading Standards, and the advertising industry's own regulator, the Advertising Standards Authority.

Ultimately, ticket pricing strategies are a matter for event organisers and ticketing platforms, providing they comply with relevant legislation, particularly regarding transparency to customers on how tickets are priced, in order to help consumers make a fair and informed decision.

30th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if she will provide immediate emergency funding to public swimming pools in order to protect those public leisure facilities in the context of rising energy prices.

We recognise the importance of ensuring public access to indoor and outdoor pools and that swimming is a great way for people of all ages to stay fit and healthy. The responsibility of providing this access lies at Local Authority level, and the government continues to encourage Local Authorities to invest in swimming facilities.

We also recognise the impact rising energy prices will have on businesses of all sizes. Ofgem and the government are in regular contact with business groups and the leisure sector to understand the challenges they face and explore ways to protect consumers and businesses.

Sport England has invested £25,027,478 in swimming and diving projects since January 2017, which includes £15,724,500 to Swim England. This is in addition to the £100 million National Leisure Recovery Fund which supported the reopening of local authority swimming pools throughout the country after the pandemic.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
22nd Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent assessment he has made of the timescale for allowing choirs to sing (a) indoors and (b) outdoors as covid-19 restrictions are eased.

Non-professional performing arts activities such as choirs are currently permitted outdoors, within the legal gathering limits. People should only take part in non-professional performing arts activities outdoors in groups of up to 6 people, or as a group of 2 households. A group made up of 2 households can include more than 6 people, but only where all members of the group are from the same 2 households (each household can include an existing support bubble, if eligible). Social distancing should be maintained between people who do not live together or share a bubble.

Non-professional activity indoors is not permitted indoors at this time. The intention is that this will be permitted from Step 3 of the Roadmap (no earlier than 17 May). This is subject to review and further guidance will be provided in advance of step 3.

COVID-19 spreads from person to person through small droplets, aerosols and through direct contact. Singing, playing some musical instruments, shouting and physical activity increases the risk of transmission through small droplets and aerosols. The cumulative effect of aerosol transmission means the more people involved, the higher the risk of transmission. This means that it is currently important to limit the total number of individuals involved in singing as far as possible.

12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if the Government will review the reopening date for indoor riding schools as covid-19 lockdown restrictions are eased.

Sports and physical activity providers and facilities are at the heart of our communities, and play a crucial role in supporting adults and children to be active.

On Monday 22 February, the Prime Minister announced a roadmap out of the current lockdown in England. The government has introduced a step approach to the return of outdoor and indoor sport areas across England. Across four steps, the roadmap sets out the sequencing and indicative timing for easing restrictions. This is a cautious and gradual approach, led by data, not dates.

Indoor leisure facilities including indoor riding centres are now able to reopen for individual and household use so long as they adhere to relevant government guidance. All children are also able to attend any organised indoor children's activity.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
3rd Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if he will urgently review the tier regulations on the opening and use of ice rinks for individual and non-elite athletes.

Sports and physical activity are incredibly important for our physical and mental health, and are a vital weapon against coronavirus. That’s why we made sure that people could exercise at least once a day even during the height of the first period of enhanced national restrictions and why we opened up grassroots sport and leisure facilities as soon as it was safe to do so.

As the Prime Minister said on 23 November national restrictions ended on Wednesday 2 December, and gyms and sport facilities are reopening across all tiers. Outdoor skating rinks can stay open across all tiers and indoor skating rinks can open in Tiers 1 and 2.

Under Tier 3, Ice Rinks are able to open for disability sport, sports as part of the curriculum in education and supervised sport and physical activity for under-18s (including those who were under 18 on 31 August 2020). Elite and professional athletes may continue to use facilities including ice rinks to train and to compete Behind Closed Doors.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, when indoor play centres will be allowed to open as lockdown restrictions are eased due to the covid-19 outbreak.

On 13 August, the Government announced that indoor play and indoor soft play venues could open from 15 August. We worked with BALPPA, the trade body that represents the industry to develop guidance that lays out detailed measures for indoor play and indoor soft play operators to make venues COVID-secure. These include closing ball pits and sensory areas, reducing capacity of venues and soft play frames, regular deep cleaning, pre-bookable timed sessions, increased sanitation, and a rigorous process to support track and trace. We will continue to engage with the sector and will keep the guidance under regular review.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
20th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if the Government will provide compensation for the additional costs incurred by ice rinks following the revision of Government guidance on 17 July 2020, altering the date when those rinks could open as the covid-19 lockdown restrictions are eased.

Sports and physical activity facilities play a crucial role in supporting adults and children to be active. From 1 August ice-skating rinks should be able to reopen.These facilities will be able to offer on-site services to customers, provided they are COVID-secure and follow Government guidance.

Sport England have announced a £195 million package of support to help community clubs through this crisis. It recently boosted its Community Emergency Fund by a further £15 million to meet the demand, taking the total up to £210 million.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
14th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether her Department has made an assessment of the potential merits of extending universal free school meals across England.

The provision of Free School Meals (FSM) to pupils from households who are on low income or out of work is important to the government. Over two million pupils are currently eligible for benefits based FSM. Close to 1.3 million additional infants receive free and nutritious meals under the Universal Infant Free School Meals policy.

The department does not have plans to change the current eligibility conditions for FSM, nor any plans to extend universal provision, but will continue to keep eligibility under review to ensure that these meals are supporting those who need them most. The department has set a threshold which enables more pupils to benefit, whilst remaining affordable and deliverable for the schools.

The department continues to work with other government departments to monitor the consequences of the rising cost of living and the impact on families.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Education)
14th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether her Department has made an assessment of the potential impact of extending the eligibility for free school meals on (a) the economy, (b) public health and (c) educational attainment.

The provision of Free School Meals (FSM) to pupils from households who are on low income or out of work is important to the government. Over two million pupils are currently eligible for benefits based FSM. Close to 1.3 million additional infants receive free and nutritious meals under the Universal Infant Free School Meals policy.

The department does not have plans to change the current eligibility conditions for FSM, nor any plans to extend universal provision, but will continue to keep eligibility under review to ensure that these meals are supporting those who need them most. The department has set a threshold which enables more pupils to benefit, whilst remaining affordable and deliverable for the schools.

The department continues to work with other government departments to monitor the consequences of the rising cost of living and the impact on families.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Education)
12th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps her Department is taking to support students who have not received a degree mark due to strike action by university staff; and if she will take steps to compensate those students affected by the time taken to provide a mark.

Unlike some other education sectors where the government has taken part in negotiations with trade unions, universities are autonomous. They are therefore responsible for the pay and pension provision of their staff.

The University and College Union (UCU) announced the end to the marking and assessment boycott on 6 September 2023. While the government plays no formal role in such disputes, the department has been deeply concerned about the impact of the marking and assessment boycott on students. It is unacceptable that students, many of whom have already suffered significant disruption to their studies over recent years, face further disruption and uncertainty. This disruption is particularly damaging to those students who have graduated and looking to enter the jobs market or progress to further study. The department has made clear that whatever the rights and wrongs of the current dispute, action that damages students' prospects is the wrong thing to do.

The majority of students have been unaffected by the industrial action and, in most cases, have received their full results on time, and progressed or graduated as normal. However, the department appreciates that, at some higher education (HE) providers, the impact of the boycott has been more significant.

This government believes students should be at the heart of the HE system. This is why the Office for Students (OfS) has been set up to regulate the HE sector in England, protect student rights and ensure the sector is delivering real value for money. The OfS have also published guidance to students on their rights during industrial action and will continue to monitor this ongoing situation through their normal regulatory mechanisms. Further information can be found here: https://www.officeforstudents.org.uk/.

I held discussions with the Russell Group, Universities UK and the Universities and Colleges Employers Association (UCEA) to better understand the impact on students and the mitigating actions their members have taken to minimise disruption. I also wrote to the Russell Group and Universities UK, encouraging them to continue to do everything within their powers to protect the interests of students during this phase of industrial action. On 11 August, I wrote to the UCEA and the UCU urging them both to resume negotiations to bring an end to industrial action.

Universities have worked to reduce the impact on students in a variety of ways, including reallocating marking to other staff members and hiring external markers. Moreover, many universities have awarded degrees when they have enough evidence of a student’s prior attainment to do so. Others have assigned provisional grades to students to allow them to progress, and, once all papers have been marked, most institutions will award degree classifications that either remain as provisionally assigned or are uplifted to reflect the student’s achievements.

Students who have complaints about their HE experience should contact their institution in the first instance. Students in England and Wales may also raise a complaint with the Office of the Independent Adjudicator (OIA), which was set up to provide an alternative to the courts and is free of charge to students. Depending on the complaint, the OIA may recommend that compensation be awarded. Whilst compensating students for disruption is the responsibility of HE institutions, the OIA expects institutions to comply with their recommendations. Further information on the OIA is available at: https://www.oiahe.org.uk.

7th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if she will make an assessment of the potential merits of amending the eligibility rules for 30 hours of free childcare so that children become eligible in the month following their third birthday.

Eligible working parents of 3 and 4-year-olds are currently eligible for 30 hours of free childcare per week, over 38 weeks a year. In the 2023 Spring Budget, the government announced a number of transformative reforms to childcare. This includes the expansion of the free childcare offer so that eligible working parents in England will be able to access 30 hours of free childcare per week, for 38 weeks, per year from when their child is 9 months old to when they start school.

The department expects to be spending in excess of £8 billion every year on free hours and early education by 2027/28, helping working families with their childcare costs. This announcement represents the single biggest investment in childcare in England.

From April 2024, all eligible working parents of 2-year-olds will become eligible for 15 hours of free childcare, with eligible parents of 9 months to 2-year-olds eligible for 15 hours from September 2024 onwards. The offer will be rolled out in full, with eligible working parents of children aged 9 months to 3 years able to access 30 hours, from September 2025.

To be eligible for this offer, parents will need to earn the equivalent of 16 hours a week at National Minimum or Living Wage, and less than £100,000 adjusted net income per year.

As set out in the regulations underpinning the entitlements, eligibility for the current free early education entitlements, including 30 hours free childcare, begins from 1 September, 1 January or 1 April following the child’s third birthday, or their second birthday if they are eligible for the 15 hours for disadvantaged 2-year-olds. Parents must apply for 30 hours free childcare in the term their child turns 3 if they wish to take up a place from the start of the following term. Further information on the recommended dates at which parents should apply is available at: https://www.gov.uk/30-hours-free-childcare?step-by-step-nav=f517cd57-3c18-4bb9-aa8b-1b907e279bf9.

These termly deadlines ensure that children can receive at least two years of early education and/or reception before they reach compulsory school age, which is the beginning of the term following their fifth birthday. They also allow local authorities and childcare providers to better plan and ensure that sufficient early years places are available for parents each term, as there are clear periods for when children are likely to start a place.

In the meantime, parents can also access other childcare offers such as Tax-Free Childcare and Universal Credit. Tax-Free Childcare can help parents with childcare for children aged from 0-11, and for disabled children until the age of 17. Universal Credit Childcare provides support with childcare costs for children aged 0-16. The government is taking action to support parents in receipt of this with childcare costs upfront when they need it, rather than in arrears.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
27th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if she will make an assessment of the potential merits of a debt forgiveness programme for students who were financially affected by covid.

Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, the government was clear that universities were expected to maintain academic standards and the quantity of tuition should not drop. All universities were expected to continue to deliver excellent learning, in line with guidance from the Office for Students, to provide students with a full experience.

The tuition fee and student loan system in England is designed to be sustainable, fair to students and taxpayers, while ensuring that those who benefit financially from higher education make a fair contribution towards its cost.

Borrowers are only liable to repay after leaving study when earning over the relevant repayment threshold. The student finance system continues to protect lower earners and borrowers who experience a reduction in their income. Repayments are calculated as a fixed percentage of earnings above the relevant repayment threshold (£27,295 for a post-2012 undergraduate plan and £21,000 for a post graduate loan), and do not change as a result of interest rate charges or the amount borrowed. If a borrower’s income drops, so does the amount they repay. If income is below the relevant repayment threshold, or a borrower is not earning, then they do not have to make repayments at all. Any outstanding debt, including interest accrued, is written off after the loan term ends (or in the case of death or disability), at no detriment to the borrower.

To further protect borrowers, the government, by law, must cap maximum student loan rates to ensure the interest rate charged on the loan is in line with market rates for comparable unsecured personal loans. On 8 February 2023, the Student Loan Company announced that the interest on Plan 2 and Plan 3 student loan repayments will be capped to 6.9% from 1 March 2023. Without this cap, student loan borrowers may have faced interest rates between 9 to 12%.

19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether children entitled to age related free school meals should be receiving them (a) at home or (b) for collection during covid-19 lockdown.

All infant pupils in reception, year 1 and year 2 in England’s state-funded schools, including academies, are entitled to a free school meal (FSM) under the universal infant free school meal (UIFSM) policy introduced in September 2014.

Whilst attendance restrictions are in place for the majority of pupils, schools should provide meal options for all pupils who are in school, including vulnerable children and the children of critical workers. Meals should be available free of charge to all infant pupils and pupils who meet the benefits-related FSM eligibility criteria.

Under normal circumstances, schools do not provide FSM to eligible pupils who are not in school. During the national lockdown, we have provided additional funding for schools to continue supporting pupils eligible for benefits-related FSM (including infant pupils who meet the benefits related criteria) who are at home during term-time.

Schools continue to receive their usual funding for UIFSM and can use this to provide infant pupils with a meal at home, where they are not otherwise eligible for benefits-related FSM.

Schools will fully open to all pupils on 8 March 2021 and from this date pupils will eat lunch at school, unless they are self-isolating.

The government remains committed to ensuring the most disadvantaged children continue to be supported. The government has provided an additional £170 million through the Covid Winter Grant Scheme for local authorities in England to support the hardest-hit families with children and other vulnerable people with the cost of food and essential utilities.

19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he make a further assessment of the potential merits of reimbursing university students for (a) tuition fees and (b) accommodation throughout the covid-19 lockdowns.

This has been a very difficult time for students, and the government is working with the sector to make sure all reasonable efforts are being made to enable students to continue their studies. I want to thank all higher education (HE) staff for their tireless work to ensure that young people do not have to put their lives or their academic journeys on hold.

I welcome the huge amount of resource universities have given to ensuring online teaching is of the high quality expected by the government and the Office for Students (OfS). The government’s clear and stated expectation is that universities should maintain the quality and quantity of tuition and seek to ensure that all students, regardless of their background, have the resources to study remotely. This is more important than ever at the moment, with the vast majority of students studying solely online.

Universities are autonomous and responsible for setting their own fees within maximum fee limits set by regulations. The OfS, as regulator of HE providers in England, has made it clear that HE providers must continue to comply with registration conditions relating to quality and academic standards, which set out requirements to ensure that courses are high quality, that students are supported and achieve good outcomes and that standards are protected, regardless of whether a provider is delivering its courses through face-to-face teaching, remote online learning or a combination of both.

We continue to regularly engage the sector in discussion on this issue. I wrote to the OfS on 13 January outlining the government’s expectations of the HE sector following the new national lockdown. Following this, the OfS wrote to provider Accountable Officers, setting out the actions they are taking in connection with providers’ compliance to existing regulatory requirements. We expect providers to ensure that continuing and prospective students receive the clear, accurate and timely information needed to make informed decisions.

Whether or not an individual student is entitled to a refund will depend on the specific contractual arrangements between the provider and student. If students have concerns, there is a process in place. They should first raise their concerns with their university. If their concerns remain unresolved, students at providers in England or Wales can ask the Office of the Independent Adjudicator (OIA) for Higher Education to consider their complaint.

The OfS does not get involved in individual student complaints, that is for the relevant HE provider and possibly the OIA. Students can, however, notify the OfS of issues that may be of regulatory interest to it. These are called ‘notifications’. The OfS uses this information as part of its regulatory monitoring activity and keep HE providers under review to ensure that they comply with the ongoing conditions of registration. OfS has produced a guide for students to support them in this process.

With regards to accommodation, universities and private accommodation providers are autonomous and are responsible for setting their own rent agreements. The government plays no direct role in the provision of student residential accommodation.

We recognise that in these exceptional circumstances some students may face financial hardship. The Department for Education has worked with the OfS to clarify that providers are able to use existing funds, worth around £256 million for academic year 2020/21, towards hardship support. We are also making available an additional £50 million of hardship funding this financial year. In total we have made £70 million of additional funding available for student hardship, given the £20 million made available to higher education providers in December 2020. The government urges universities and private accommodation providers to be fair in their decisions about rent charges for this period. We welcome the news that a number of universities and large companies have already offered rent rebates for students that have been asked to stay away from their accommodation.

The OIA website is available via the following link: https://www.oiahe.org.uk/.

The Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) has published guidance on consumer contracts, cancellation and refunds affected by the COVID-19 outbreak. This sets out the CMA’s view on how the law operates to help consumers understand their rights and help businesses treat their customers fairly. This is available via the following link: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/cma-to-investigate-concerns-about-cancellation-policies-during-the-coronavirus-covid-19-pandemic/the-coronavirus-covid-19-pandemic-consumer-contracts-cancellation-and-refunds.

The OfS has also published guidance on student consumer protection during the COVID-19 outbreak, which is available via the following link: https://www.officeforstudents.org.uk/for-students/student-and-consumer-protection-during-coronavirus/.

The OfS has also produced a guide to help students raise concerns, which is available via the following link: https://www.officeforstudents.org.uk/publications/office-for-students-notifications/.

Michelle Donelan
Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology
1st Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether his Department has made an assessment of the potential merits of all children repeating a full academic year as a result of the covid-19 outbreak.

The Government recognises that extended school and college closures have had a huge effect on children and young people’s education, which will take more than a year to make up. On 27 January 2021, the Government announced a further £300 million of new funding for high quality tutoring to help children and young people catch up. The Government will be working in collaboration with the education sector to develop specific initiatives for summer schools and a COVID-19 premium to support catch up, alongside developing a long-term plan to support pupils to catch up over the course of this Parliament. Further detail on this funding and support will be confirmed in due course.

28th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what plans he has to review the criteria for critical workers in order to reduce the number of children attending school during the covid-19 outbreak.

The Department has made guidance available on children of critical workers and vulnerable children who can access schools or educational settings. The document sets out the high-level role types, for which the children of critical workers would be considered eligible to continue to attend school. The list in the guidance is not exhaustive, but it should offer sufficient information to help parents and carers to identify if their work falls under one of the umbrella groups. The guidance is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-maintaining-educational-provision/guidance-for-schools-colleges-and-local-authorities-on-maintaining-educational-provision.

Parents whose work is critical to the COVID-19 outbreak and EU transition response include those who work in health and social care and in other key sectors. Children with at least one parent or carer who is a critical worker can go to school if required. Schools should speak to parents and carers to identify who needs to go to school, and parents and carers who are critical workers should keep their children at home if they can.

The Department knows that every school will have a different number of children of critical workers who need to attend. It is important that on-site provision is provided for these pupils. There is no limit to the numbers of these pupils who may attend, and schools should not limit attendance of these groups. We expect schools to work with critical worker parents to ensure their child is given access to a place if it is required, so that parents can continue providing vital services. This is because we are reducing overall social contact across areas and the country rather than individually by each institution.

The Department publishes weekly national-level data on pupil attendance. The latest published data (for 28 January 2021) shows that attendance in state primary schools in England was at 22% and at 5% in state secondaries: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/attendance-in-education-and-early-years-settings-during-the-coronavirus-covid-19-outbreak. Where the Department is aware that schools are facing operational challenges, our regional teams will work with local authorities and schools to help find a solution.

28th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what guidance his Department has published on support staff attending schools during the covid-19 lockdown announced in January 2021.

During the period of national lockdown, schools remain open to vulnerable children and young people and the children of critical workers only.

Following the reintroduction of shielding, clinically extremely vulnerable staff are advised that they should not attend the workplace. Staff who are in this group will previously have received a letter from the NHS or their GP telling them this.

All other staff can attend the workplace where it is not possible to work from home. This includes school support staff. It is for school leaders to determine the workforce that is required in school, taking into account the updated guidance for those staff who are clinically extremely vulnerable. The Department’s published guidance provides information for school leaders on some of the options for staff deployment to help inform their plans including use of trainee teachers, newly qualified teachers, support staff and supply staff. The expectation is that those staff not attending school will work from home where possible. The guidance is available here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/950510/School_national_restrictions_guidance.pdf.

The Department have worked closely with the Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) and Public Heath England (PHE) to develop specific guidance for schools. The guidance is available here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/950510/School_national_restrictions_guidance.pdf. Where schools implement the system of controls outlined in the guidance, in line with their own workplace risk assessment, PHE and DHSC confirm that these measures create an inherently safer environment for children and staff where the risk of transmission of infection is substantially reduced. All staff attending schools should follow these measures to minimise the risks of transmission.

20th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many laptops have been distributed to support remote learning to date, by parliamentary constituency; and how many of those laptops have been distributed to non-state schools.

The Government is investing over £400 million to support access to remote education and online social care services, by securing 1.3 million laptops and tablets for disadvantaged children and young people. As of Monday 25 January 2021, over 870,000 laptops and tablets had been delivered to local authority maintained schools, academy trusts and local authorities.

All schools, academy trusts and local authorities have now been given the opportunity to order devices.

The Government is providing this significant injection of devices on top of an estimated 2.9 million laptops and tablets already owned by schools before the start of the COVID-19 outbreak. On 12 January 2021, the Department announced that it will be providing a further 300,000 devices over the course of this term.

Figures on the number of devices delivered are available at: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/laptops-and-tablets-data.

These figures are broken down by local authority and academy trust. Figures on delivery by constituency are not available.

30th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether the Government has plans to publish additional advice on the return after the 2020 Christmas holidays for middle schools operating within the three-tier school system during the covid-19 outbreak.

From Wednesday 6 January a new national lockdown came into effect and schools should already be following the new rules. Schools, including middle schools, should only allow vulnerable children and the children of critical workers to attend face to face education. All other pupils will learn remotely.

We know that receiving face to face education is best for children’s mental health and for their educational achievement, and we will review the restrictions on schools to ensure that children and young people return to face to face education as soon as the pressures are easing on the NHS. Limiting attendance at this time is about reducing the number of contacts that people have with other households given the rapidly rising numbers of cases across the country and the intense pressure on the NHS.

For those pupils and staff still attending school, the system of protective measures that the Department has asked schools to implement continues to ensure that any risks are well managed and controlled.

4th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what his planned timescale is for reviewing guidelines on wearing face masks in educational settings during the covid-19 outbreak.

The Department has worked closely with Public Health England to develop a system of controls to reduce the risk of transmission in schools. This system of controls includes use of face coverings in schools in certain circumstances, as set out in our guidance: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/face-coverings-in-education/face-coverings-in-education. When implemented in line with a revised risk assessment, these measures create an inherently safer environment for children and staff where the risk of transmission of infection is substantially reduced.

At each stage of its response to the COVID-19 outbreak, the Government has listened to and acted on the latest medical and scientific advice. As the prevalence of the virus across the country and communities changes, the Government has always been clear that it will not hesitate to take swift and decisive action to control the virus and save lives.

16th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what guidance his Department has provided to schools on supporting autistic children to return to school during the covid-19 outbreak.

The government recognises the significant challenges the COVID-19 outbreak has presented for autistic children, young people and their families. As I set out in my letter of 2 September to children and young people with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND), their families and carers and those who work to support them, we know that it is critical that all pupils and students can once again benefit from a full-time on-site education 5 days a week. Schools and colleges should ensure that they receive the education, therapeutic or specialist support and reasonable adjustments required for a successful return to school or college. To support this, we have published guidance for the full opening of schools, which is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/actions-for-schools-during-the-coronavirus-outbreak/guidance-for-full-opening-schools.

We have also published guidance for the full opening of special schools and other specialist settings, which provides a framework, approved by Public Health England, that sets out the high-level actions that should be taken. and is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/guidance-for-full-opening-special-schools-and-other-specialist-settings/guidance-for-full-opening-special-schools-and-other-specialist-settings.

The guidance makes it clear that coproduction and collaboration with families is crucial.

The department funds the Autism Education Trust (AET) to deliver training to education professionals and embed good autism practice in schools and colleges across England. AET has developed a hub of guidance and resources for families, teachers and other professionals aimed at supporting children and young people during the COVID-19 outbreak and in this period of adjustment as they return to school. The guidance is available at: https://www.autismeducationtrust.org.uk/?s=covid.

This includes guidance for schools on making appropriate reasonable adjustments and practical strategies for managing increased anxiety, changes in routine and environment and transitions to new settings.

The department has also launched a new programme run by mental health experts, backed by £8 million, to provide schools and colleges across England with the knowledge and access to the resources they need to support children and young people, teachers and parents, if they have been affected by the COVID-19 outbreak. This includes a focus on the specific mental health and wellbeing needs of children with autism and SEND.

28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to his Department's guidance for parents and carers of children attending out-of-school settings during the coronavirus (covid-19) outbreak, published on 10 July 2020, when similar guidance will be published for parents with children under five years old.

The guidance for parents and carers with children under five is available at:
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/what-parents-and-carers-need-to-know-about-early-years-providers-schools-and-colleges-during-the-coronavirus-covid-19-outbreak.

It was first published on 18 June 2020.

31st Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will review the effectiveness of legislation on fireworks in protecting the welfare of animals.

HM Government takes the issues associated with the sale and use of fireworks seriously. There is a comprehensive regulatory framework already in place for fireworks which aims to strike the right balance for people to enjoy fireworks, whilst aiming to reduce risks and disturbances to the welfare of animals. Information on how to use fireworks responsibly can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/staying-safe-with-fireworks.

It is an offence under the Animal Welfare Act 2006 to cause an animal unnecessary suffering - and this includes through the misuse of fireworks. Users of fireworks need to use them responsibly and be aware of animals close by, and those found guilty of causing animals unnecessary suffering can face up to five years’ imprisonment.

A number of animal welfare organisations also provide advice and guidance for pet owners on how to keep their animals safe around fireworks.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
31st Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when she plans to bring forward legislative proposals on the compulsory microchipping of pet cats.

We plan to lay regulations by the end of 2022 which will bring compulsory cat microchipping into force after a transition period.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
31st Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, for what reason cats have not been included in the proposed pet abduction offence in the Animal Welfare (Kept Animals) Bill.

HM Government fully understands the deep distress caused by the theft of a much-loved family pet and the importance of dealing with pet theft given the impact it can have on owners. HM Government launched the Pet Theft Taskforce in May 2021 in response to the apparent rise in pet theft since the start of the pandemic. The Taskforce's recommendations include the creation of a new 'pet abduction' offence to recognise that pets are not mere items of property and to recognise the potential impact on their welfare when they are taken by strangers.

The offence is one of the measures in the Animal Welfare (Kept Animals) Bill currently being considered by Parliament. As currently drafted the offence focuses on dogs, with enabling powers. The inclusion of the enabling powers means that the Secretary of State will be able to extend the offence to other species of companion animal in the future by making regulations. HM Government listened closely to views expressed on this issue during Commons Committee stage, in particular whether cats should also be included with dogs at the outset, and the Government is currently considering this issue carefully.

The Animal Welfare (Kept Animals) Bill was reintroduced to the House of Commons in May 2022 and will progress to Report Stage as soon as parliamentary time allows.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
28th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what progress his Department has made on discussions with the British Veterinary Association to address concerns on veterinary capacity to complete and issue Animal Health Certificates.

The Animal Health Certificate (AHC) format is mandated by the EU, and the Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA) has taken steps to help Official Veterinarians (OVs) complete them including by developing a model AHC together with accompanying printable guidance and associated training. APHA has publicised the availability of the training relating to completing AHCs. The model AHC is easily available online and can be accessed by all qualified OVs at any time.

We are continuing to engage with the British Veterinary Association (BVA) to develop additional guidance to support vets in completing and issuing AHCs. This includes the development of a 'checklist', which can be used in addition to the comprehensive guidance already available to vets, and an explainer video that will guide vets through a worked-up AHC example.

Defra is taking steps, working with the BVA and other stakeholders, to increase veterinary capacity across all sectors. We have secured the place of veterinary surgeons on the Home Office Shortage Occupation List, making it easier for UK employers to recruit vets from overseas. In addition, we are looking at ways to further enable the use of allied professionals where appropriate to help reduce the workload of the vet professional, including giving careful consideration to the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons’ proposals for reform of the Veterinary Surgeons Act 1966.

The number of OVs (working in private practice) who are able to issue AHCs is currently 7,896. Defra does not hold information on the related number of veterinary practices that are able to issue AHCs.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
28th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what progress the Government has made in its discussions with the EU on changing the status of the UK to a Part 1 country so that Animal Health Certificate’s would no longer be required.

The UK has been formally ‘listed’ as a ‘Part 2’ third country for the purposes of the EU pet travel scheme, which means that new rules apply to pet movements from Great Britain to the EU and to Northern Ireland. The pet health and documentary requirements for such pet travel are set out under the EU Pet Travel Regulations.

Defra recognises the impact that these changes are having on pet owners and assistance dog users. We are continuing to seek agreement from the European Commission on awarding GB ‘Part 1’ listed status and recognition of the UK’s tapeworm-free status, and we see no valid animal health reason for these not to be granted.

Achieving these would alleviate a number of pet travel rules for all travellers, including the need for an Animal Health Certificate. We have one of the most rigorous pet checking regimes in Europe to protect our biosecurity and we are engaging with the EU to progress this issue.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
17th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if his Department will take steps to issue guidance on the use of buckle belts following advice issued by the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency and in the context of local authorities use of home to school transport services.

I recognise the importance of vulnerable young people being able to travel safely to school and elsewhere and I understand why some local authorities have chosen to use these devices to try and keep children safe. However, there are potential safety issues in the event of an emergency, and for this reason DVSA has sent two direct notices to public service vehicle operators to highlight the potential issues.

However, this is a complicated matter and the DVSA has no plans to target enforcement action against their use, instead it will support PSV operators and other transport providers and DVSA is working with industry to develop solutions to maintain the safe transport of PSV users.

Richard Holden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
24th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what progress has been made on an exchange agreement to allow holders of a Ukrainian licence to drive both manual and automatic vehicles in the UK.

The current driving licence exchange agreement with Ukraine allows the licence holder to drive both manual and automatic vehicles, providing the Ukrainian driving licence was issued following a test taken after 28 December 2021.

The law only allows drivers who took a test in Ukraine before 28 December 2021 to be granted entitlement to drive automatic cars when the GB licence is issued. This is because the Ukrainian driver licensing authority does not retain information to confirm whether a test was taken in a manual or automatic vehicle before this date. This restriction also applies to licence exchange agreements with other countries where the licence issuing authority does not retain information about the type of vehicle in which a test was taken.

However, the Department for Transport appreciates the unique circumstances that Ukrainians who have come to the UK find themselves in. The Department for Transport is exploring options to enable this group to use their Ukrainian driving licences for longer and minimise the administrative burden they face and will keep this House and the Ukrainian community in the UK updated on this work.

Richard Holden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
12th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what progress has been made on an exchange agreement to allow holders of a Ukrainian licence to drive larger vehicles to exchange it for a UK equivalent.

The Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency is progressing the work needed to introduce an exchange agreement for Ukrainian lorry and bus licences as quickly as possible. This will be subject to a public consultation and the necessary legal processes.

Richard Holden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if the Government will urgently review the status of South Africa on its traffic light covid-19 travel list.

At the most recent review on 26 August, it was decided that South Africa would remain on the red list as South Africa continues to present a high public health risk to the UK from variants of concern.

All classification changes have been decided by ministers, informed by the latest data and analysis by the Joint Biosecurity Centre (JBC) and wider public health considerations. The country allocations are reviewed on a regular basis and the Government will not hesitate to take action where a country’s epidemiological picture changes.

Robert Courts
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
6th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what progress the Government has made on negotiations with the US Administration on the opening up of a travel corridor between the UK and US.

The Prime Minster and President Biden have made clear the importance of bringing about the return of safe trans-Atlantic travel as soon as possible.

The recently formed joint UK-US Experts’ Working Group is underway, and we are working closely with our US partners on delivering the practical solutions to effectively restoring travel.

Travel from the UK to the US is currently restricted under Presidential Executive Order and regulations 212(f) and meaningful travel cannot begin in earnest until the US lifts these restrictions. As announced by Secretary of State for Transport on 8 July, we are confident that vaccines will play an important role in normalising travel between the UK and US this summer.

Robert Courts
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
25th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether the Government recovery package for the aviation industry will include assistance for Concessionaire businesses that do not have rateable value (RV) numbers but provide the same trade association and contribution toward the airports as businesses with RV numbers.

The Airport and Ground Operations Support Scheme will provide support to eligible commercial airports and ground handler companies up to the equivalent of their business rates liabilities in the 2020/21 financial year, subject to certain conditions and a cap per claimant of £8m. The scheme is not available to other businesses.

Robert Courts
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
19th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether the Government's airport support scheme will include support for retail businesses based within airports.

The Airport and Ground Operations Support Scheme announced on 24 November will provide support to eligible airports and ground handling companies, up to the equivalent of their business rates liabilities in the 2020/21 financial year, subject to certain conditions and a cap per applicant of £8m. AGOSS will be launched shortly when full details on eligibility will be set out.

Robert Courts
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)