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Written Question
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy: Business Interests
27 Apr 2021

Questioner: Edward Miliband (LAB - Doncaster North)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether any officials in his Department receive any remuneration for paid work for organisations or companies outside of Government.

Answered by Amanda Solloway

On 23 April, the Cabinet Secretary wrote to the Chair of the Public Administration and Constitutional Affairs Committee on the management of outside interests in the Civil Service.

The Committee published this letter on 26 April. It can be found here:

https://committees.parliament.uk/publications/5623/documents/55584/default/.

The Cabinet Secretary’s letter sets out a series of steps to improve processes. This programme of work will also take account of any recommendations that emerge from Nigel Boardman’s review.

The Civil Service Management Code sets out, at paragraph 4.3.4, the requirement that civil servants must seek permission before accepting any outside employment which might affect their work either directly or indirectly. The applicable principles are those set out in the Business Appointment Rules. The Civil Service Management Code is published here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/civil-servants-terms-and-conditions.

Where the civil servant is a member of the departmental board any outside employment, as well as other relevant interests will be published as part of the Annual Report and Accounts or other transparency publication.


Written Question
Electricity Interconnectors: Portsmouth
26 Apr 2021

Questioner: Edward Miliband (LAB - Doncaster North)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether the (a) Minister for Business, Energy and Clean Growth and (b) Minister for Climate Change and Corporate Responsibility have had discussions (i) in person and (ii) by e-mail with relevant stakeholders on the Aquind Interconnector project.

Answered by Anne-Marie Trevelyan

Information regarding meetings of ministers with stakeholders is published online[1], and there have been no discussions or email correspondence between my noble Friend the Parliamentary Under Secretary of State and I, and stakeholders from the Aquind interconnector project.

All applications for development consent are dealt with by the Department in line with Government Propriety Guidance. Neither the Parliamentary Under Secretary of State nor I will have any role in the decision.

[1] https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/beis-ministerial-gifts-hospitality-travel-and-meetings


Written Question
Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme
1 Mar 2021

Questioner: Edward Miliband (LAB - Doncaster North)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of allowing extensions on repayment periods from six to 10 years on loss rates from the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme.

Answered by Paul Scully

The Government has enabled lenders to extend the repayment period for Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan (CBILS) facilities beyond 6 years (up to a maximum of 10 years) where this is needed in connection with the provision of forbearance. CBILS term extensions are offered at the discretion of lenders. This measure is designed to help businesses that would struggle to repay their CBILS facility on their existing terms, by reducing monthly repayments.

Work is currently underway with data scientists, other Government departments and external consultants on a range of projects to develop our analysis on various datasets, in order to give us the best possible insight into the scheme.

The Department will report updated estimates of expected credit losses as part of its Annual Report and Accounts for 2020-21, to be published later this year.


Written Question
Bounce Back Loan Scheme and Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme
1 Mar 2021

Questioner: Edward Miliband (LAB - Doncaster North)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what his Department’s latest estimate is of the loss rate of the (a) Bounce Back Loan Scheme and (b) Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme.

Answered by Paul Scully

The 2019-20 BEIS Annual Report and Accounts published on 30 September 2020 provided initial indicative loss ranges for both the Bounce Back Loan Scheme (BBLS) and the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme (CBILS).

For BBLS, losses were estimated as of 11 September 2020 to be in a range of 35-60%. For CBILS, losses were estimated to be in a range of 10-25%. These estimates include both credit and fraud losses.

The initial indicative loss ranges are based on historic losses observed in prior programmes which most closely resemble the current Covid-19 interventions. However, no two programmes or two economic downturns are completely alike.

Work is currently underway to refine these estimates as data available to us improves. The Department will report updated estimates as part of its Annual Report and Accounts for 2020-21, to be published later this year.


Written Question
Bounce Back Loan Scheme
1 Mar 2021

Questioner: Edward Miliband (LAB - Doncaster North)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of the Pay As You Grow scheme on loss rates from the Bounce Back Loan Scheme.

Answered by Paul Scully

The Pay As You Grow measures give Bounce Back Loan borrowers more time and greater flexibility to repay their loans.

Work is currently underway with data scientists, other Government departments and external consultants on a range of projects to develop our analysis on various datasets, in order to give us the best possible insight into the scheme.

The Department will report updated estimates of expected credit losses as part of its Annual Report and Accounts for 2020-21, to be published later this year.


Written Question
Paternity Leave
9 Feb 2021

Questioner: Edward Miliband (LAB - Doncaster North)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will publish his Department's estimate of the take up of shared parental leave by fathers (a) on the latest figures available as (i) an absolute number and (ii) proportion of those fathers eligible and (b) for each quarter since the introduction of that policy as (i) an absolute number and (ii) a proportion of those eligible.

Answered by Paul Scully

Shared Parental Leave (SPL) and Pay was introduced in December 2014 for the parents of children due or adopted from 5 April 2015. The scheme enables eligible working parents to share up to 50 weeks of leave and up to 37 weeks of pay in the first year, where the mother does not intend to use her full maternity entitlements.

At the time of introduction, we estimated that c. 285,000 fathers or partners would be eligible for SPL a year and between 2 and 8 per cent of them would take up the entitlement.[1] Information provided by employers to HMRC in respect of claims for Statutory Shared Parental Pay (ShPP) suggests that take up is broadly in line with our initial forecast. Table 1 below shows the number of individuals in receipt of ShPP per quarter.

Table 1: Individuals in receipt of Statutory Shared Parental Pay based on the total number of individuals in that quarter


Statutory Shared Parental Pay (total number of claimants[1] in that quarter)

Q1 15/16

1,500

Q2 15/16

1,900

Q3 15/16

2,200

Q4 15/16

3,000

Q1 16/17

3,100

Q2 16/17

3,300

Q3 16/17

3,000

Q4 16/17

3,300

Q1 17/18

3,400

Q2 17/18

3,700

Q3 17/18

3,300

Q4 17/18

3,400

Q1 18/19

3,600

Q2 18/19

4,200

Q3 18/19

4,000

Q4 18/19

4,100

Q1 19/20

4,500

Q2 19/20

5,500

Q3 19/20

4,600

Q4 19/20

4,800

Q1 20/21

4,200

Q2 20/21

2,600

Notes

  1. Data collected uses HMRC Real Time Information (RTI) system and was extracted in December 2020. RTI is subject to revision or updates, and so there may be small fluctuations in figures reported, and these figures should not be considered “final”. This may especially be the case for the first two-quarters of 2020/21.
  2. Figures have been rounded to the nearest hundred.
  3. The table shows the number of individuals in receipt of ShPP per quarter, based on the total number of individuals in that quarter irrespective of when the payment first started. Quarterly figures should not be added together to make a yearly count of individuals in receipt of Statutory Shared Parental Pay (ShPP) due to double counting claimants from quarter to quarter.
  4. For the 2015-16 tax year, those receiving Additional Statutory Paternity Pay (ASPP) for children born before 6 April 2015 cannot be distinguished from those claiming Statutory Shared Parental Pay (ShPP) within RTI data.
  5. Data for individuals in receipt of Statutory Shared Parental Pay (ShPP) includes both mothers and fathers in receipt of ShPP, however fathers, on average, make up over three-quarters of all ShPP recipients.
  6. This data represents individuals in receipt of Shared Parental Pay only, so those who take unpaid Shared Parental Leave are not included.

Eligible parents can also take unpaid SPL so information relating to claims of ShPP only gives a partial picture of take up. We are currently evaluating the Shared Parental Leave and Pay scheme, which includes large scale, representative surveys of employers and parents, and a qualitative study. We are currently analysing the data from the research that we commissioned and will report on the evaluation of the scheme later this year.

We do not hold estimates of the number of fathers eligible for SPL by quarter, however in 2013 we estimated that c. 285,000 fathers or partners would be eligible for SPL a year.[2] We will update and publish an estimate of the number of parents who are eligible for SPL and an updated estimation of take-up rates for the scheme when we report on the evaluation.

[1] Impact Assessment of Shared Parental Leave and Pay, BIS 2013 https://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukia/2013/256/pdfs/ukia_20130256_en.pdf

[2] See footnote 1


Written Question
Paternity Leave
9 Feb 2021

Questioner: Edward Miliband (LAB - Doncaster North)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will publish his Department's estimate of the number of fathers who were eligible for shared parental leave in the latest quarter; and how many new fathers are ineligible for that leave because they do not meet criteria on work history or status.

Answered by Paul Scully

Shared Parental Leave (SPL) and Pay was introduced in December 2014 for the parents of children due or adopted from 5 April 2015. The scheme enables eligible working parents to share up to 50 weeks of leave and up to 37 weeks of pay in the first year, where the mother does not intend to use her full maternity entitlements.

At the time of introduction, we estimated that c. 285,000 fathers or partners would be eligible for SPL a year and between 2 and 8 per cent of them would take up the entitlement.[1] Information provided by employers to HMRC in respect of claims for Statutory Shared Parental Pay (ShPP) suggests that take up is broadly in line with our initial forecast. Table 1 below shows the number of individuals in receipt of ShPP per quarter.

Table 1: Individuals in receipt of Statutory Shared Parental Pay based on the total number of individuals in that quarter


Statutory Shared Parental Pay (total number of claimants[1] in that quarter)

Q1 15/16

1,500

Q2 15/16

1,900

Q3 15/16

2,200

Q4 15/16

3,000

Q1 16/17

3,100

Q2 16/17

3,300

Q3 16/17

3,000

Q4 16/17

3,300

Q1 17/18

3,400

Q2 17/18

3,700

Q3 17/18

3,300

Q4 17/18

3,400

Q1 18/19

3,600

Q2 18/19

4,200

Q3 18/19

4,000

Q4 18/19

4,100

Q1 19/20

4,500

Q2 19/20

5,500

Q3 19/20

4,600

Q4 19/20

4,800

Q1 20/21

4,200

Q2 20/21

2,600

Notes

  1. Data collected uses HMRC Real Time Information (RTI) system and was extracted in December 2020. RTI is subject to revision or updates, and so there may be small fluctuations in figures reported, and these figures should not be considered “final”. This may especially be the case for the first two-quarters of 2020/21.
  2. Figures have been rounded to the nearest hundred.
  3. The table shows the number of individuals in receipt of ShPP per quarter, based on the total number of individuals in that quarter irrespective of when the payment first started. Quarterly figures should not be added together to make a yearly count of individuals in receipt of Statutory Shared Parental Pay (ShPP) due to double counting claimants from quarter to quarter.
  4. For the 2015-16 tax year, those receiving Additional Statutory Paternity Pay (ASPP) for children born before 6 April 2015 cannot be distinguished from those claiming Statutory Shared Parental Pay (ShPP) within RTI data.
  5. Data for individuals in receipt of Statutory Shared Parental Pay (ShPP) includes both mothers and fathers in receipt of ShPP, however fathers, on average, make up over three-quarters of all ShPP recipients.
  6. This data represents individuals in receipt of Shared Parental Pay only, so those who take unpaid Shared Parental Leave are not included.

Eligible parents can also take unpaid SPL so information relating to claims of ShPP only gives a partial picture of take up. We are currently evaluating the Shared Parental Leave and Pay scheme, which includes large scale, representative surveys of employers and parents, and a qualitative study. We are currently analysing the data from the research that we commissioned and will report on the evaluation of the scheme later this year.

We do not hold estimates of the number of fathers eligible for SPL by quarter, however in 2013 we estimated that c. 285,000 fathers or partners would be eligible for SPL a year.[2] We will update and publish an estimate of the number of parents who are eligible for SPL and an updated estimation of take-up rates for the scheme when we report on the evaluation.

[1] Impact Assessment of Shared Parental Leave and Pay, BIS 2013 https://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukia/2013/256/pdfs/ukia_20130256_en.pdf

[2] See footnote 1


Written Question
Social Security Benefits: Appeals
9 Sep 2019

Questioner: Edward Miliband (LAB - Doncaster North)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what proportion of people who appealed benefits decisions were successful in their appeal in the last 12 months.

Answered by Edward Argar

Information about the outcomes of appeals in the First-tier Tribunal (Social Security and Child Support) is published at: www.gov.uk/government/collections/tribunals-statistics

Decisions on benefit, typically on a person’s entitlement to benefit, or its rate of payment, can be overturned on appeal for a variety of reasons. For instance, further evidence, including oral testimony, may be provided at the hearing. HM Courts & Tribunals Service cannot comment on decisions made by the independent tribunal judiciary.

Latest figures (to March 2019) indicate that since Personal Independence Payment was introduced, 4.1 million decisions have been made, and of these, 10% have been appealed and 5% have been overturned at Tribunals.

Between April 2014 and December 2018, 4.1 million Employment and Support Allowance (post Work Capability Assessment) decisions have been made. Of these, 8% have been appealed and 4% have been overturned.


Written Question
Social Security Benefits: Appeals
9 Sep 2019

Questioner: Edward Miliband (LAB - Doncaster North)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what proportion of people who appealed benefits decisions in Doncaster in the last 12 months were successful.

Answered by Edward Argar

Information about the outcomes of appeals in the First-tier Tribunal (Social Security and Child Support) is published at: www.gov.uk/government/collections/tribunals-statistics

Decisions on benefit, typically on a person’s entitlement to benefit, or its rate of payment, can be overturned on appeal for a variety of reasons. For instance, further evidence, including oral testimony, may be provided at the hearing. HM Courts & Tribunals Service cannot comment on decisions made by the independent tribunal judiciary.

Latest figures (to March 2019) indicate that since Personal Independence Payment was introduced, 4.1 million decisions have been made, and of these, 10% have been appealed and 5% have been overturned at Tribunals.

Between April 2014 and December 2018, 4.1 million Employment and Support Allowance (post Work Capability Assessment) decisions have been made. Of these, 8% have been appealed and 4% have been overturned.


Written Question
Social Security Benefits: Appeals
9 Sep 2019

Questioner: Edward Miliband (LAB - Doncaster North)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what proportion of benefits appeals resulted in a decision being overturned in each Government region in the last 12 months.

Answered by Edward Argar

Information about the outcomes of appeals in the First-tier Tribunal (Social Security and Child Support) is published at: www.gov.uk/government/collections/tribunals-statistics

Decisions on benefit, typically on a person’s entitlement to benefit, or its rate of payment, can be overturned on appeal for a variety of reasons. For instance, further evidence, including oral testimony, may be provided at the hearing. HM Courts & Tribunals Service cannot comment on decisions made by the independent tribunal judiciary.

Latest figures (to March 2019) indicate that since Personal Independence Payment was introduced, 4.1 million decisions have been made, and of these, 10% have been appealed and 5% have been overturned at Tribunals.

Between April 2014 and December 2018, 4.1 million Employment and Support Allowance (post Work Capability Assessment) decisions have been made. Of these, 8% have been appealed and 4% have been overturned.


Written Question
Social Security Benefits: Appeals
5 Sep 2019

Questioner: Edward Miliband (LAB - Doncaster North)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what proportion of benefits decisions in Doncaster have been appealed in the most recent period for which figures are available.

Answered by Justin Tomlinson

Information on appeal outcomes in relation to Employment and Support Allowance (ESA) Work Capability Assessments by several geographical areas is available on Stat-Xplore.

https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/

Guidance on how to use Stat-Xplore can be found here:

https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/webapi/online-help/index.html

Information on the percentage of initial Personal Independence Payment (PIP) decisions that have been appealed, by region and for Great Britain, is shown in the table below.

Table: Initial PIP decisions and appeals lodged by region, initial decisions in 2018-19

Region

Appeals lodged

Initial decisions

% of initial decisions appealed

East Midlands

3,190

54,280

6%

East of England

3,460

61,030

6%

London

5,920

87,470

7%

North East

3,220

48,920

7%

North West

7,000

109,170

6%

Scotland

5,880

82,980

7%

South East

4,840

80,430

6%

South West

3,760

63,150

6%

Wales

2,820

47,490

6%

West Midlands

4,560

77,680

6%

Yorkshire and The Humber

4,740

72,050

7%

Great Britain

49,380

784,690

6%

For Doncaster Local Authority, 4,790 initial PIP decisions were made in 2018-19, of which 5% have been appealed.

Notes

  • Data has been rounded to the nearest 10.
  • Percentages have been rounded to the nearest percent.
  • Components may not sum to totals due to rounding.
  • Appeals data taken from the DWP PIP computer system’s management information. Therefore this appeal data may differ from that held by Her Majesty’s Courts and Tribunals Service for various reasons such as delays in data recording and other methodological differences in collating and preparing statistics.
  • Appeals data up to March 2019. Claimants who have received benefit decisions more recently may not yet have had time to complete the claimant journey and progress to appeal.
  • The Local Authority and Government Office Region geography relates to the origin of the claim (i.e. derived from claimant’s postcode) rather than the location of where the tribunal was held.

To provide the information requested across all other DWP administered benefits would incur disproportionate cost.


Written Question
Social Security Benefits: Appeals
5 Sep 2019

Questioner: Edward Miliband (LAB - Doncaster North)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what proportion of benefits decisions have been appealed in each Government region in the most recent period for which figures are available.

Answered by Justin Tomlinson

Information on appeal outcomes in relation to Employment and Support Allowance (ESA) Work Capability Assessments by several geographical areas is available on Stat-Xplore.

https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/

Guidance on how to use Stat-Xplore can be found here:

https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/webapi/online-help/index.html

Information on the percentage of initial Personal Independence Payment (PIP) decisions that have been appealed, by region and for Great Britain, is shown in the table below.

Table: Initial PIP decisions and appeals lodged by region, initial decisions in 2018-19

Region

Appeals lodged

Initial decisions

% of initial decisions appealed

East Midlands

3,190

54,280

6%

East of England

3,460

61,030

6%

London

5,920

87,470

7%

North East

3,220

48,920

7%

North West

7,000

109,170

6%

Scotland

5,880

82,980

7%

South East

4,840

80,430

6%

South West

3,760

63,150

6%

Wales

2,820

47,490

6%

West Midlands

4,560

77,680

6%

Yorkshire and The Humber

4,740

72,050

7%

Great Britain

49,380

784,690

6%

For Doncaster Local Authority, 4,790 initial PIP decisions were made in 2018-19, of which 5% have been appealed.

Notes

  • Data has been rounded to the nearest 10.
  • Percentages have been rounded to the nearest percent.
  • Components may not sum to totals due to rounding.
  • Appeals data taken from the DWP PIP computer system’s management information. Therefore this appeal data may differ from that held by Her Majesty’s Courts and Tribunals Service for various reasons such as delays in data recording and other methodological differences in collating and preparing statistics.
  • Appeals data up to March 2019. Claimants who have received benefit decisions more recently may not yet have had time to complete the claimant journey and progress to appeal.
  • The Local Authority and Government Office Region geography relates to the origin of the claim (i.e. derived from claimant’s postcode) rather than the location of where the tribunal was held.

To provide the information requested across all other DWP administered benefits would incur disproportionate cost.


Written Question
Social Security Benefits: Appeals
5 Sep 2019

Questioner: Edward Miliband (LAB - Doncaster North)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what proportion of benefits decisions have been appealed in the most recent period for which figures are available.

Answered by Justin Tomlinson

Information on appeal outcomes in relation to Employment and Support Allowance (ESA) Work Capability Assessments by several geographical areas is available on Stat-Xplore.

https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/

Guidance on how to use Stat-Xplore can be found here:

https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/webapi/online-help/index.html

Information on the percentage of initial Personal Independence Payment (PIP) decisions that have been appealed, by region and for Great Britain, is shown in the table below.

Table: Initial PIP decisions and appeals lodged by region, initial decisions in 2018-19

Region

Appeals lodged

Initial decisions

% of initial decisions appealed

East Midlands

3,190

54,280

6%

East of England

3,460

61,030

6%

London

5,920

87,470

7%

North East

3,220

48,920

7%

North West

7,000

109,170

6%

Scotland

5,880

82,980

7%

South East

4,840

80,430

6%

South West

3,760

63,150

6%

Wales

2,820

47,490

6%

West Midlands

4,560

77,680

6%

Yorkshire and The Humber

4,740

72,050

7%

Great Britain

49,380

784,690

6%

For Doncaster Local Authority, 4,790 initial PIP decisions were made in 2018-19, of which 5% have been appealed.

Notes

  • Data has been rounded to the nearest 10.
  • Percentages have been rounded to the nearest percent.
  • Components may not sum to totals due to rounding.
  • Appeals data taken from the DWP PIP computer system’s management information. Therefore this appeal data may differ from that held by Her Majesty’s Courts and Tribunals Service for various reasons such as delays in data recording and other methodological differences in collating and preparing statistics.
  • Appeals data up to March 2019. Claimants who have received benefit decisions more recently may not yet have had time to complete the claimant journey and progress to appeal.
  • The Local Authority and Government Office Region geography relates to the origin of the claim (i.e. derived from claimant’s postcode) rather than the location of where the tribunal was held.

To provide the information requested across all other DWP administered benefits would incur disproportionate cost.


Written Question
Pension Credit: Doncaster North
16 Jul 2019

Questioner: Edward Miliband (LAB - Doncaster North)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people in Doncaster North constituency that are eligible to claim pension credit do not claim that benefit.

Answered by Guy Opperman

The information requested on the number of people who are eligible to claim Pension Credit but do not claim the benefit is only available at national level.

Official statistics on the take-up of income related benefits at Great Britain level, including pension credit, can be found in the ‘Income-related benefits: estimates of take-up in 2016 to 2017’ publication.

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/income-related-benefits-estimates-of-take-up-financial-year-2016-to-2017


Written Question
Deportation: Human Trafficking
16 Jul 2019

Questioner: Edward Miliband (LAB - Doncaster North)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what support his Department provides to young people that were victims of trafficking after they have been returned to their country of origin.

Answered by Caroline Nokes

All confirmed victims of modern slavery who have no right to reside in the UK, or who are seeking or have sought asylum, are entitled to use the Voluntary Return Service funded by the Home Office. Individuals will receive a tailored package of support, which can include flights, help with travel documents, medical assistance and financial and reintegration support.

Arrangements for children to be returned to their country of origin, where this is in the best interests of the child, can be made by local authorities who have the legal responsibility for those children. A child’s wishes (for example to be reunited with family) as well as any safeguarding or trafficking risks will be considered in the round as part of the best interest’s decision.

The Home Office is also working with other governments and NGOs to make sure that when victims do decide to return home, they continue to access the support they need to prevent re-trafficking. For example, The Salvation Army has signed an MoU with La Strada Foundation in Poland to facilitate cooperation to support the safe return of Polish victims and their dependents.

The Home Office is also funding support and reintegration assistance to victims of trafficking in Nigeria and Vietnam, which includes support for those returning from the UK, and a similar programme is under development in Albania.