Tristram Hunt

Labour - Former Member for Stoke-on-Trent Central

First elected: 6th May 2010


Tristram Hunt is not a member of any APPGs
2 Former APPG memberships
Archives and History, British Museum
Shadow Secretary of State for Education
7th Oct 2013 - 14th Sep 2015
Parliamentary Privilege (Joint Committee)
3rd Dec 2012 - 30th Mar 2015
Speaker's Advisory Committee on Works of Art
8th Nov 2011 - 5th Nov 2013
Political and Constitutional Reform Committee
12th Jul 2010 - 31st Oct 2013
Shadow Minister (Education)
16th Apr 2013 - 7th Oct 2013
Draft House of Lords Reform Bill (Joint Committee)
23rd Jun 2011 - 26th Mar 2012


Division Voting information

Tristram Hunt has voted in 1081 divisions, and 2 times against the majority of their Party.

2 Dec 2015 - ISIL in Syria - View Vote Context
Tristram Hunt voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 56 Labour No votes vs 139 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 211 Noes - 390
2 Dec 2015 - ISIL in Syria - View Vote Context
Tristram Hunt voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 65 Labour Aye votes vs 153 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 397 Noes - 223
View All Tristram Hunt Division Votes

All Debates

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Michael Gove (Conservative)
Minister for Intergovernmental Relations
(41 debate interactions)
Nick Gibb (Conservative)
(19 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Department for Education
(287 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(66 debate contributions)
HM Treasury
(32 debate contributions)
Home Office
(29 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
Legislation Debates
Criminal Finances Act 2017
(4,116 words contributed)
Homelessness Reduction Act 2017
(1,571 words contributed)
View All Legislation Debates
View all Tristram Hunt's debates

Latest EDMs signed by Tristram Hunt

7th December 2016
Tristram Hunt signed this EDM on Monday 12th December 2016

CHILDREN'S FUNERAL COSTS

Tabled by: Carolyn Harris (Labour - Swansea East)
That this House notes that approximately 5,000 infants and children pass away each year in the UK; further notes that the cost of children's funerals imposes a significant and unexpected financial burden on bereaved parents; recognises that some local authorities, as well as religious officiants and undertakers, currently waive all …
169 signatures
(Most recent: 28 Mar 2017)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 124
Scottish National Party: 17
Liberal Democrat: 9
Independent: 7
Conservative: 4
Democratic Unionist Party: 4
Social Democratic & Labour Party: 2
Ulster Unionist Party: 2
Green Party: 1
Plaid Cymru: 1
19th October 2016
Tristram Hunt signed this EDM on Tuesday 29th November 2016

FUTURE OF THE POST OFFICE

Tabled by: Kelvin Hopkins (Independent - Luton North)
That this House is extremely concerned about announcements made by the Post Office in 2016 which will mean the closure of more than 60 of its flagship branches, the loss of around 2,000 jobs and the closure of its defined benefit pension scheme; notes that these are the latest in …
103 signatures
(Most recent: 18 Jan 2017)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 53
Scottish National Party: 33
Independent: 6
Democratic Unionist Party: 4
Social Democratic & Labour Party: 2
Non-affiliated: 2
Plaid Cymru: 2
Crossbench: 1
Green Party: 1
Liberal Democrat: 1
View All Tristram Hunt's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Tristram Hunt, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


3 Urgent Questions tabled by Tristram Hunt

Monday 30th November 2015
Monday 12th May 2014
Thursday 17th October 2013

1 Adjournment Debate led by Tristram Hunt

Wednesday 7th July 2010

Tristram Hunt has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

Tristram Hunt has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


126 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
2 Other Department Questions
7th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, how many jobs in (a) his Department and (b) each of its non-departmental public bodies, executive agencies, non-ministerial departments, advisory bodies and other accountable statutory bodies (i) have been abolished or relocated from Stoke-on-Trent since 2010 and (ii) will be abolished in or relocated from Stoke-on-Trent by 2020.


The Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) has not had any direct employees in Stoke-on-Trent since before 2010.


I have asked Chief Executives of the Executive Agencies to respond directly to the Hon Member and these are attached. This information is not held by BIS in respect of non-Departmental Public Bodies, non-ministerial departments, advisory bodies and other accountable statutory bodies.

7th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, how many jobs in (a) her Department and (b) each of its non-departmental public bodies, executive agencies, non-ministerial departments, advisory bodies and other accountable statutory bodies (i) have been abolished or relocated from Stoke-on-Trent since 2010 and (ii) will be abolished in or relocated from Stoke-on-Trent by 2020.

Neither the Department, nor any of its accountable statutory bodies, have had jobs abolished or relocated from Stoke-on-Trent in the specified time period.


Andrea Leadsom
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
15th Apr 2016
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many jobs in (a) his Department and (b) each of his Department's non-departmental public bodies, executive agencies, non-ministerial departments, advisory bodies and other accountable statutory bodies (i) have been abolished in or relocated from East Cheshire Local Authority since 2010 and (ii) will be abolished in or relocated from East Cheshire Local Authority by 2020.

None.

7th Jan 2016
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many jobs in (a) his Department and (b) each of its non-departmental public bodies, executive agencies, non-ministerial departments, advisory bodies and other accountable statutory bodies (i) have been abolished or relocated from Stoke-on-Trent since 2010 and (ii) will be abolished in or relocated from Stoke-on-Trent by 2020.

No jobs in my Department or in each of its non-departmental public bodies, executive agencies, non-ministerial departments, advisory bodies and other accountable statutory bodies have been abolished or relocated from Stoke-on-Trent since 2010 or plan to be abolished in or relocated from Stoke-on-Trent by 2020.

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many jobs in (a) his Department and (b) each of its non-departmental public bodies, executive agencies, non-ministerial departments, advisory bodies and other accountable statutory bodies (i) have been abolished or relocated from Stoke-on-Trent since 2010 and (ii) will be abolished in or relocated from Stoke-on-Trent by 2020.

No jobs in my Department or in each of its non-departmental public bodies, executive agencies, non-ministerial departments, advisory bodies and other accountable statutory bodies have been abolished or relocated from Stoke-on-Trent since 2010 or plan to be abolished in or relocated from Stoke-on-Trent by 2020.

6th Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what his policy is on retaining the EU's professional qualifications directive after the UK has left the EU.

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy is working with industry organisations and interests across Government. This input will inform our the Government’s approach as we shape our future relationship with Europe.

15th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, how many jobs in (a) his Department and (b) each of his Department's non-departmental public bodies, executive agencies, non-ministerial departments, advisory bodies and other accountable statutory bodies (i) have been abolished in or relocated from East Cheshire Local Authority since 2010 and (ii) will be abolished in or relocated from East Cheshire Local Authority by 2020.

Historical information that is readily available suggests that the Department and its partner organisations had no jobs based within the East Cheshire Local Authority in 2010 or since.

15th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, how many jobs in (a) her Department and (b) each of her Department's non-departmental public bodies, executive agencies, non-ministerial departments, advisory bodies and other accountable statutory bodies (i) have been abolished in or relocated from East Cheshire Local Authority since 2010 and (ii) will be abolished in or relocated from East Cheshire Local Authority by 2020.

It is confirmed that no jobs in (a) the Department for Energy and Climate Change or (b) any of the Department’s accountable statutory bodies (i) have been abolished in or relocated from East Cheshire Local Authority since 2010 or (ii) will be abolished or relocated from the Authority by 2020.

Andrea Leadsom
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
15th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, how many jobs in (a) his Department and (b) each of his Department's non-departmental public bodies, executive agencies, non-ministerial departments, advisory bodies and other accountable statutory bodies (i) have been abolished in or relocated from East Cheshire Local Authority since 2010 and (ii) will be abolished in or relocated from East Cheshire Local Authority by 2020.

Core DCMS

DCMS has not employed staff to work in East Cheshire Local Authority since 2010 and do not currently employ any staff in the area.

Other Bodies

The abolition or relocation of jobs in the Department’s non-departmental public bodies, executive agencies, non-ministerial departments, advisory bodies and other accountable statutory bodies is a matter for the Chief Executives of each of the bodies.

24th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what plans he has to restart work related to his Department's pre-consultation on moving the May Bank Holiday, published in 2011.

The Government looked at the current pattern of all bank and public holidays as part of the Tourism strategy published in 2011, which concluded there is no overall consensus for change. There are no plans to make another consultation on this subject.

7th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, how many jobs in (a) his Department and (b) each of its non-departmental public bodies, executive agencies, non-ministerial departments, advisory bodies and other accountable statutory bodies (i) have been abolished or relocated from Stoke-on-Trent since 2010 and (ii) will be abolished in or relocated from Stoke-on-Trent by 2020.

The Department has had no offices in the area in the timeframe.

17th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what proportion of the £60 million social mobility funding announced by her Department on 4 October 2016 will be spent on (a) early years funding, (b) the Government's 30 hours free childcare policy and (c) frontline education.

We are considering options for selecting further Opportunity Areas from amongst those areas that face these particular challenges. Details will be available in due course.

We are finalising the performance measures, following initial discussions with key partners in each area. We also plan to assess the implementation process in the first year of delivery so we can learn from this for future developments. In addition, we will be commissioning a full programme of evaluation so we can understand the effectiveness of opportunity areas in transforming outcomes for children, young people and adults in these areas.

We are considering options for how to most effectively distribute the £60 million social mobility funding over the next three years and we will say more in due course.

Work has commenced with each area to draw together the key stakeholders to fully understand the unique issues and challenges being faced in those areas, and discuss how the support available to Opportunity Areas can be best utilised. Tailored delivery plans will be developed in partnership with Opportunity Areas for rapid improvement, making best use of the funding available. This funding will be in addition to funding already announced for early years, childcare and frontline education.

17th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 3 November 2016 to Question 50295, how her Department plans to assess the effectiveness of opportunity areas in improving social mobility; and what performance measures such an assessment will include.

We are considering options for selecting further Opportunity Areas from amongst those areas that face these particular challenges. Details will be available in due course.

We are finalising the performance measures, following initial discussions with key partners in each area. We also plan to assess the implementation process in the first year of delivery so we can learn from this for future developments. In addition, we will be commissioning a full programme of evaluation so we can understand the effectiveness of opportunity areas in transforming outcomes for children, young people and adults in these areas.

We are considering options for how to most effectively distribute the £60 million social mobility funding over the next three years and we will say more in due course.

Work has commenced with each area to draw together the key stakeholders to fully understand the unique issues and challenges being faced in those areas, and discuss how the support available to Opportunity Areas can be best utilised. Tailored delivery plans will be developed in partnership with Opportunity Areas for rapid improvement, making best use of the funding available. This funding will be in addition to funding already announced for early years, childcare and frontline education.

17th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 3 November 2016 to Question 50295, what methodology her Department plans to use in selecting the next four opportunity areas; and when she expects an announcement to be made on the location of those areas.

We are considering options for selecting further Opportunity Areas from amongst those areas that face these particular challenges. Details will be available in due course.

We are finalising the performance measures, following initial discussions with key partners in each area. We also plan to assess the implementation process in the first year of delivery so we can learn from this for future developments. In addition, we will be commissioning a full programme of evaluation so we can understand the effectiveness of opportunity areas in transforming outcomes for children, young people and adults in these areas.

We are considering options for how to most effectively distribute the £60 million social mobility funding over the next three years and we will say more in due course.

Work has commenced with each area to draw together the key stakeholders to fully understand the unique issues and challenges being faced in those areas, and discuss how the support available to Opportunity Areas can be best utilised. Tailored delivery plans will be developed in partnership with Opportunity Areas for rapid improvement, making best use of the funding available. This funding will be in addition to funding already announced for early years, childcare and frontline education.

26th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what criteria were used to select the first six social mobility opportunity areas; and if she will publish the evidence that that decision was based on.

The first six Opportunity Areas were selected from two different published data sets: the Social Mobility Commission’s Social Mobility Index and the data used to rank local authority districts on school performance and capacity in the March White Paper.

The Social Mobility Commission’s Index ranks 324 local authority districts based on a range of measures grouped under four headings: early years, school, youth and adulthood. We cross-referenced the lowest performing districts according to that index with our school performance and capacity data. This provided a shortlist from which we chose the first six areas.

We want to learn from what works in these areas, capturing which challenges all areas share and what is unique to a particular place. Therefore, the selection of these initial six areas was not based on ranking but a range of factors including regional spread and the type of area.

Social Mobility Index:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/social-mobility-index

Analysis

Education white paper, Educational excellence everywhere:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/educational-excellence-everywhere

Achieving Excellence Area Composite Indicator:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/defining-achieving-excellence-areas-methodology


26th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what ranking her Department gave to Stoke-on-Trent relative to other local authority areas in the assessment made against criteria used to select the six social mobility opportunity areas.

The first six Opportunity Areas were selected from two different published data sets: the Social Mobility Commission’s Social Mobility Index and the data used to rank local authority districts on school performance and capacity in the March White Paper.

The Social Mobility Commission’s Index ranks 324 local authority districts based on a range of measures grouped under four headings: early years, school, youth and adulthood. We cross-referenced the lowest performing districts according to that index with our school performance and capacity data. This provided a shortlist from which we chose the first six areas.

We want to learn from what works in these areas, capturing which challenges all areas share and what is unique to a particular place. Therefore, the selection of these initial six areas was not based on ranking but a range of factors including regional spread and the type of area.

Social Mobility Index:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/social-mobility-index

Analysis

Education white paper, Educational excellence everywhere:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/educational-excellence-everywhere

Achieving Excellence Area Composite Indicator:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/defining-achieving-excellence-areas-methodology


26th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether the Department has had any discussions with the chartered College of Teaching about further Government funding.

There have been no discussions with, and no formal requests from, the independent College of Teaching regarding further public funding.

26th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what meetings (a) she, (b) the Minister for Schools, (c) her advisers and (d) officials of her Department have had with representatives of the chartered College of Teaching since she took up her office.

I have met Professor Dame Alison Peacock in her capacity as the College’s CEO Designate.

Departmental officials have held meetings with representatives of the independent College of Teaching to discuss the Government funding to support the initial establishment of the College. The Secretary of State for Education and her advisers have not yet held meetings with representatives of the College since she took up her office.

26th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether her Department has received a formal request from the chartered College of Teaching for further public funding.

There have been no discussions with, and no formal requests from, the independent College of Teaching regarding further public funding.

15th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much her Department spent on (a) consultancy fees, (b) legal advice, (c) civil service staffing costs and (d) all other expenditure relating to the Education and Adoption Act 2016.

Officials from across the Department were involved in different ways and at different times on work for the Education and Adoption Act. It is therefore not possible to distinguish costs from the wider business of the Department. There was no external legal or consultancy expenditure.

15th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many jobs in (a) her Department and (b) each of her Department's non-departmental public bodies, executive agencies, non-ministerial departments, advisory bodies and other accountable statutory bodies (i) have been abolished in or relocated from East Cheshire Local Authority since 2010 and (ii) will be abolished in or relocated from East Cheshire Local Authority by 2020.

No jobs have been abolished or relocated from East Cheshire Local Authority since 2010.

3rd Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Prime Minister's oral contribution of 2 March 2016, Official Report, column 943, what the evidential basis is for the statement that there are 36,500 fewer pupils in overcrowded schools than in 2010.

I refer the Honourable member to my response to question 29204 submitted to Parliament on Friday 4 March 2016. The answer shows that the total number of primary and secondary pupils in excess of capacity has reduced by 47,513 between 2010 and 2014.

1st Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 29 February 2016 to Question 28207, how many and which local authorities have notified her Department about plans to dispose of grant-funded assets through the (a) sale, (b) transfer and (c) change of use of children's centres.

The decision whether to dispose of grant funded assets is a local issue. We have a thorough process in place to consider whether the local authority should be subject to claw back as a result of the disposal of grant funded assets which was outlined in the response to Question 28207.

1st Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Prime Minister's oral contribution of 10 February 2016, Official Report, column 1576, what the evidential basis is for the statement that there are 47,500 fewer pupils in overcrowded schools than in 2010.

The department collects information from each local authority on the number of schools, the number of places in those schools and the number of pupils on roll through the annual school capacity survey (SCAP). The data is published annually, and the main tables contain national and local authority level data. The latest published data, relating to the position as reported by local authorities at May 2014, can be found on GOV.UK at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/school-capacity-academic-year-2013-to-2014

Previous years are available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/statistics-school-capacity

In both the 2014 and 2010 data publications, the table below shows capacity in state funded primary and secondary schools. In 2010 there were a total of 97,230 primary and secondary pupils in excess of capacity. In 2014 this had reduced to 49,717, meaning that 47,513 fewer pupils were excess of capacity in 2014 than in 2010.

Number of pupils in excess of school capacity

State-funded primary schools

2010

41,680

State-funded secondary schools

2010

55,550

State-funded primary schools

2014

30,737

State-funded secondary schools

2014

18,980

State-funded primary schools

Change 2010 to 2014

10,943

State-funded secondary schools

Change 2010 to 2014

36,570

Total

Change 2010 to 2014

47,513

24th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much her Department has spent on (a) new IT equipment, (b) new furniture, (c) new artwork, (d) catering and events, (e) renovating its buildings and facilities, (f) new plants and shrubs and (g) special advisers' travel expenses since May 2015.

The Department for Education has spent the amounts shown in the table below on the following list of categories from 1 May 2015 to 31 January 2016.

a) New IT equipment

£868,312

b) New furniture

£11,861

c) New artwork

No Expenditure

d) Catering and events

£326,575

e) Renovating buildings and facilities [1]

£9,862,679

f) New plants and shrubs

No Expenditure

g) Special Advisers’ travel expenses (including rail journeys)

£1,555

[1] The figure for renovating buildings and facilities is for DfE and its Agencies and does not include expenditure on school buildings.

The figures are for the Department, its Agencies and Non-Departmental Public Bodies, Government Equalities Office, Equality and Human Rights Commission and Office of the Children’s Commissioner.

24th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps she is taking to ensure that the supply of newly-qualified teachers is not affected by imbalances in the distribution of teacher training places at a sub-regional level.

The Department for Education has changed the approach to initial teacher training (ITT) allocations for the 2016 to 2017 academic year. The National College for Teaching and Leadership are not allocating a specific number of places to individual organisations for postgraduate ITT courses due to start in the 2016 to 2017 academic year. Instead, eligible schools, school-centred initial teacher training providers (SCITTs) and higher education institutions (HEIs) will be able to recruit as many trainees as they feel they need (subject to a limited number of controls), until the overall system has recruited a sufficient number.

As School Direct and SCITT partnerships cover large geographical areas, we are monitoring recruitment at a regional level only. To date, the only challenge in geographical distribution of ITT places has been found in the London region in recruitment to primary, which was recruiting slower than other regions. In this case we have allowed school led routes (i.e. School Direct (tuition fee) and SCITTs) in this region to continue to recruit to primary courses to ensure that enough trainees are recruited.

We are prepared to use reserve recruitment controls in other subjects, or for other regions as required.

24th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, which higher education institution providers of initial teacher education have reduced their allocation for PGCE secondary training in (a) history, (b) geography, (c) English and (d) STEM subjects in 2015-16; and what that reduction is as a proportion of that provider's 2014-15 allocations in each case.

For the 2014/15 and 2015/16 academic years, we operated an allocations system to distribute initial teacher training (ITT) places directly to School Direct lead schools, school-centred initial teacher training providers (SCITTs) and higher education institutions (HEIs). For recent years detailed initial and final allocations data for individual HEIs can be found on GOV.UK:

*STEM subjects include: Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Mathematics, Design & Technology and Computing.

24th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, on how many occasions a special adviser of her Department has accompanied a Minister on a foreign trip since 1 October 2015; and what the cost of that travel has been.

Special advisers have not accompanied any Ministers on an international visit since 1 October 2015.

24th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if she will make an assessment of the adequacy of the supply of newly-qualified mathematics teachers in Stoke-on-Trent.

The Department for Education uses the Teacher Supply Model (TSM) to estimate the national requirements for the number of postgraduate Initial Teacher Training places to meet demand, including mathematics.

The 2016/17 version of the TSM, which was used to inform the 2016/17 ITT recruitment process, along with a user guide explaining the methodology in detail, is available at the following link: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/teacher-supply-model

24th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what discussions (a) Ministers, (b) special advisers and (c) senior officials of her Department have had with representatives from the National Baccalaureate Trust since May 2015.

I am not aware of any discussions that have taken place with representatives from the National Baccalaureate Trust.

The Department recently consulted on the English Baccalaureate (EBacc) asking for views on how schools will manage the challenges associated with implementing the commitment that the EBacc becomes the default position for all mainstream secondary pupils. The consultation closed on 29 January and we received 2,755 responses.

24th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if she will make an assessment of the adequacy of the distribution of teacher training places in the (a) North Staffordshire sub-region and (b) West Midlands region.

The Department for Education has changed the approach to initial teacher training (ITT) allocations for the 2016 to 2017 academic year. The National College for Teaching and Leadership are not allocating a specific number of places to individual organisations for postgraduate ITT courses due to start in the 2016 to 2017 academic year. Instead, eligible schools, school-centred initial teacher training providers (SCITTs) and higher education institutions (HEIs) will be able to recruit as many trainees as they feel they need (subject to a limited number of controls), until the overall system has recruited a sufficient number.

School Direct lead schools, SCITTs and universities across all regions have been given greater freedom for the 2016/17 academic year to manage their recruitment according to local need.

We are monitoring regional recruitment across all subjects, including the West Midlands region. However, as School Direct and SCITT partnerships cover large geographical areas, we are not monitoring recruitment at a sub-regional level.

To date, the only challenge in geographical distribution of ITT places has been found in the London region in recruitment to primary, which was recruiting slower than other regions. In this case we have allowed school led routes (i.e. School Direct (tuition fee) and SCITTs) in this region to continue to recruit to primary courses to ensure that enough trainees are recruited. For all other regions, recruitment is broadly the same as in 2015/16 with some areas showing an increase.

We are prepared to use reserve recruitment controls in other subjects, or for other regions, as required.

24th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many and which local authorities have notified her Department about plans to dispose of grant-funded assets through the (a) sale, (b) transfer and (c) change of use of children's centres under the requirements of the Sure Start Early Years and Childcare Grant.

Where local authorities dispose of or change the use of buildings or other assets funded wholly or partly through Sure Start capital grants, they must repay the money through the claw-back process.

The Department for Education has a thorough set of monitoring arrangements in place regarding claw-back rules. Local authorities are required to notify the department of each and every proposed change of services and provide details about the level of early years services that are to continue. The department then considers if the local authority has continued to offer a sufficient level of early years services for children and their families from the building in question to meet the original aims of the grant.

If the department is satisfied that the funding for the asset will continue to be used for purposes consistent with the grant, the department may defer claw-back. Deferring claw-back means that we accept the change of usage at that time, however, the department retains its interest in the asset and if in the future the asset has its usage changed, is transferred or otherwise disposed of, and does not continue to meet the purposes of the grant the local authority must inform the department and we will claw-back the funding. The department’s interest in an asset funded by Sure Start capital grants is 25 years from designation of the building. If the grant was used to purchase capital items or re-furbish an existing asset, the length of time and value of any claw-back depends on the depreciation value of the items, according to local authority depreciation rules.

24th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what criteria her Department uses to assess whether a local authority should be subject to a Sure Start claw-back.

Where local authorities dispose of or change the use of buildings or other assets funded wholly or partly through Sure Start capital grants, they must repay the money through the claw-back process.

The Department for Education has a thorough set of monitoring arrangements in place regarding claw-back rules. Local authorities are required to notify the department of each and every proposed change of services and provide details about the level of early years services that are to continue. The department then considers if the local authority has continued to offer a sufficient level of early years services for children and their families from the building in question to meet the original aims of the grant.

If the department is satisfied that the funding for the asset will continue to be used for purposes consistent with the grant, the department may defer claw-back. Deferring claw-back means that we accept the change of usage at that time, however, the department retains its interest in the asset and if in the future the asset has its usage changed, is transferred or otherwise disposed of, and does not continue to meet the purposes of the grant the local authority must inform the department and we will claw-back the funding. The department’s interest in an asset funded by Sure Start capital grants is 25 years from designation of the building. If the grant was used to purchase capital items or re-furbish an existing asset, the length of time and value of any claw-back depends on the depreciation value of the items, according to local authority depreciation rules.

24th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what official foreign visits she has undertaken since 1 October 2015; and what the cost to the public purse was of those visits.

Details of the Secretary of State’s international travel, including cost to the public purse, is published on a quarterly basis. International travel that has taken place since October 2015 will be published in due course.

7th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many jobs in (a) her Department and (b) each of its non-departmental public bodies, executive agencies, non-ministerial departments, advisory bodies and other accountable statutory bodies (i) have been abolished or relocated from Stoke-on-Trent since 2010 and (ii) will be abolished in or relocated from Stoke-on-Trent by 2020.

No jobs in either the Department for Education or any of its non-departmental public bodies, executive agencies, non-ministerial departments, advisory bodies or other accountable statutory bodies have been abolished or relocated from Stoke-on-Trent since 2010, and no such jobs will be abolished or relocated from Stoke-on-Trent by 2020

10th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what benefits she is seeking through amendment of the provision of teachers' pay and conditions warning notices.

The Education and Adoption Bill proposes to amend the Education and Inspections Act 2006 to improve the warning notice process, both for those given on teachers’ pay and conditions grounds, as well as those on performance, leadership or safety grounds.

Under the bill, the current fixed 15 day warning notice compliance period will be replaced with a variable compliance period. This will give local authorities, and where applicable regional schools commissioners, more scope in terms of the requirements which they can place on a school’s governing body. They will no longer be constrained by what the governing body can reasonably achieve within just 15 days.

These changes apply to all forms of warning notices. Unlike warning notices on performance, leadership or safety grounds, which will be able to be issued by both local authorities and regional schools commissioners on behalf of the Secretary of State for Education, teachers’ pay and conditions warning notices will only be available to local authorities.

10th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether all schools classified as coasting will be issued with an academy order.

The Education and Adoption Bill proposes that schools found to be coasting will not automatically be issued with an academy order. Where heads and governors have an effective plan to drive sufficient improvement they will have the time and space to do so. Where this capacity to improve is not evident, the Regional Schools Commissioners will, under the bill, be given the power to require the school to accept support, including making an academy order and bringing in an established academy sponsor where necessary.

10th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether a warning notice will be issued before each academy order is issued.

The Education and Adoption Bill proposes that swift action will be taken when a school is judged inadequate by Ofsted and under the Bill an academy order would be made without first issuing a warning notice.

Where a school meets the new Education and Adoption Bill definition of coasting it would become eligible for intervention automatically without the need for a warning notice. Becoming eligible for intervention in this way will not necessarily mean the Regional Schools Commissioner will issue an academy order however. Under the bill, Regional Schools Commissioners will be able to intervene where a coasting school does not have the capacity to improve.

In other cases of underperformance, the school may be issued with a warning notice. Where there is failure to comply an academy order may be made.

10th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when she plans to bring forward legislative proposals to determine the power to delegate decisions on academy orders to regional schools commissioners; who will have that power; and if she will make a statement.

The Secretary of State is able to delegate individual decisions within her remit to Regional Schools Commissioners without legislation, just as she can to other civil servants. She remains accountable for those decisions which are taken in her name.

10th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps her Department will take to ensure that new providers who take over schools that have been issued with academy orders are better suited to provide education for pupils in those schools.

To be approved as an academy sponsor, applicants go through a rigorous assessment process and are required to demonstrate that they have the skills and expertise to help under-performing schools improve rapidly. The criteria considered can be found at: www.gov.uk/sponsor-an-academy

Outcomes of all applications are determined by the relevant Regional Schools Commissioner, advised by their Head Teacher Board of outstanding academy leaders.

10th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what criteria will be used to determine whether a school is coasting.

Draft regulations on the definition of coasting will be published at Committee stage.

These will be based on performance over a number of years. The number of schools categorised as coasting will therefore vary from year to year, depending on the outcome of examination and test results.

The definition will focus on data, will reflect performance over time and will capture schools that are failing to support their pupils to fulfil their potential.

10th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate her Department has made of the number of (a) primary and (b) secondary schools that will be categorised as coasting.

Draft regulations on the definition of coasting will be published at Committee stage.

These will be based on performance over a number of years. The number of schools categorised as coasting will therefore vary from year to year, depending on the outcome of examination and test results.

The definition will focus on data, will reflect performance over time and will capture schools that are failing to support their pupils to fulfil their potential.

10th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if she will publish a definition of coasting schools before the Second Reading of the Education and Adoption Bill.

Draft regulations on the definition of coasting will be published at Committee stage.

These will be based on performance over a number of years. The number of schools categorised as coasting will therefore vary from year to year, depending on the outcome of examination and test results.

The definition will focus on data, will reflect performance over time and will capture schools that are failing to support their pupils to fulfil their potential.

10th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the cost to her Department is of a school to academy conversion.

The rates vary according to type of project, and it would therefore be very difficult to provide an average cost per academy based on total spent/numbers opened.

Information on the grants available to academies can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/academy-funding.

28th May 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many (a) school places and (b) schools have been created by the Priority School Building Programme to date.

The Priority School Building Programme (PSBP) will address the condition needs of 537 schools.

PSBP1 is a centrally managed programme set up to address the needs of the schools in worst condition across the country. Through the programme, 260 schools will be rebuilt or have their condition needs met by the Education Funding Agency (EFA).

25 PSBP1 schools have now opened providing rebuilt or refurbished buildings for 11,216 school places.

In May 2014 the Government announced a further £2 billion for the second phase of the programme, PSBP2. A list of the 277 schools to benefit from this second phase was published on 9 February 2015.

28th May 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many (a) school places and (b) schools will be created by the Priority School Building Programme by September (i) 2016, (ii) 2017 and (iii) 2018.

The Priority School Building Programme (PSBP) will address the condition needs of 537 schools.

PSBP1 is a centrally managed programme set up to address the needs of the schools in the worst condition across the country. Through the programme, 260 schools will be rebuilt or have their condition needs met by the Education Funding Agency (EFA).

25 PSBP1 schools have now opened providing rebuilt or refurbished buildings for 11,216 school places. PSBP is primarily a rebuild and refurbishment programme and has not been designed to provide additional school places.

The construction timescales for each school are dependent on a number of factors, including, for example, ground conditions and planning permission.

In May 2014 the Government announced a further £2 billion for the second phase of the programme, PSBP2. A list of the 277 schools to benefit from this second phase was published on 9 February 2015.

28th May 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many of her Department's employees are working on the free school programme; and what the annual cost of such work is.

Of the total number of employees in the Department of Education, the equivalent of 95.24 full-time free schools group staff assess free school applications, work with successful applicants as they prepare to open their free schools and support the schools once opened. In 2014-15, the cost of the free schools group was £6.15 million.

28th May 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, on what occasions and dates she has held meetings with (a) Jon Wood and (b) representatives of Quantum Securities Ltd; and which such meetings have been held on her Department's premises.

The Secretary of State for Education has held no official meetings with Jon Wood or representatives of Quantum Services Limited.

28th May 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps her Department is taking to ensure that all independent schools are abiding by the Independent Schools Regulations.

Meeting the independent school standards is a condition of continued registration for independent schools. All of them are inspected on a regular cycle. If a school does not meet the required standards, the Department for Education takes appropriate regulatory action to ensure that the situation is rectified in the shortest possible time, or the school is closed.

The department has underpinned this approach by commencing the relevant provisions of the Education and Skills Act 2008 (‘the Act’), so that the role of the three independent inspectorates, and Ofsted’s role in quality assurance of those inspectorates, is put on a statutory footing. In accordance with the Act, the independent school standards were revised and strengthened from January 2015, introducing a new leadership and management standard. These changes form part of the reform programme outlined by Lord Nash in his letter of 28 March 2014 to the Chair of the Select Committee.

28th May 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if she will publish the full list of capital investment on a school-by-school basis for each wave of the free school programme.

The Department for Education publishes final capital costs for all free schools on the GOV.UK website at:

www.gov.uk/government/publications/capital-funding-for-open-free-schools

28th May 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many places were created by the free schools programme in (a) wave 1, (b) wave 2, (c) wave 3, (d) wave 4, (e) wave 5, (f) wave 6, (g) wave 7 and (h) wave 8; and what number and proportion of such places have been created in areas of high and severe need for primary school places.

When the schools are at full capacity, around (a) 58,000 primary schools places, (b) 104,000 secondary school places and 50,000 places at all-through schools will be created by the free schools that have already opened or that are working towards opening in September 2015 and beyond. Special, 16-19 and alternative provision free schools will provide an additional 15,000 places.

The table below summarises the number of primary, secondary school and all-through places created in each free school application wave. 46,150 primary places (80%) are in areas with a projected shortfall of primary places at the time the free school application was approved.

Application wave

Places created (to nearest 1,000)

Wave 1

13,000

Wave 2

31,000

Wave 3

43,000

Wave 4

45,000

Wave 5

5,000

Wave 6

19,000

Wave 7

20,000

Wave 8

34,000

28th May 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many (a) primary and (b) secondary school places have been created through the free school programme.

When the schools are at full capacity, around (a) 58,000 primary schools places, (b) 104,000 secondary school places and 50,000 places at all-through schools will be created by the free schools that have already opened or that are working towards opening in September 2015 and beyond. Special, 16-19 and alternative provision free schools will provide an additional 15,000 places.

The table below summarises the number of primary, secondary school and all-through places created in each free school application wave. 46,150 primary places (80%) are in areas with a projected shortfall of primary places at the time the free school application was approved.

Application wave

Places created (to nearest 1,000)

Wave 1

13,000

Wave 2

31,000

Wave 3

43,000

Wave 4

45,000

Wave 5

5,000

Wave 6

19,000

Wave 7

20,000

Wave 8

34,000

28th May 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, upon which criteria Wave 9 free school applications will be assessed.

Wave 9 free school applications will be assessed against the criteria set out in “Free school applications: criteria for assessment”, which is published on the Gov.UK website: www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/401234/free-school-applications-criteria-for-assessment-mainstream-and-16-to-19_feb_2015_final.pdf

The criteria make clear that the assessment of an application will include an assessment of the extent to which the proposed school addresses any shortage of school places in the area (“need for pupil places”). The assessment will also judge the extent to which the school will add to the diversity of local provision, offer higher standards than other local schools and respond to parental demand (“local demand for new provision”).

All wave 9 applicants will be notified in writing of the outcome of their free school application. In due course, the successful applications and outcome letters sent to successful applicants will be published on the GOV.UK website.

28th May 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if she will publish the applications to Wave 9 free schools and all correspondences between her Department's officials and Wave 9 applicants; and by what process applicants will learn of the outcome of their applications.

Wave 9 free school applications will be assessed against the criteria set out in “Free school applications: criteria for assessment”, which is published on the Gov.UK website: www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/401234/free-school-applications-criteria-for-assessment-mainstream-and-16-to-19_feb_2015_final.pdf

The criteria make clear that the assessment of an application will include an assessment of the extent to which the proposed school addresses any shortage of school places in the area (“need for pupil places”). The assessment will also judge the extent to which the school will add to the diversity of local provision, offer higher standards than other local schools and respond to parental demand (“local demand for new provision”).

All wave 9 applicants will be notified in writing of the outcome of their free school application. In due course, the successful applications and outcome letters sent to successful applicants will be published on the GOV.UK website.

28th May 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to paragraph 1.2 of Free Schools: how to apply, published by her Department in February 2015, what definition her Department uses for the term, need for pupil places.

Wave 9 free school applications will be assessed against the criteria set out in “Free school applications: criteria for assessment”, which is published on the Gov.UK website: www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/401234/free-school-applications-criteria-for-assessment-mainstream-and-16-to-19_feb_2015_final.pdf

The criteria make clear that the assessment of an application will include an assessment of the extent to which the proposed school addresses any shortage of school places in the area (“need for pupil places”). The assessment will also judge the extent to which the school will add to the diversity of local provision, offer higher standards than other local schools and respond to parental demand (“local demand for new provision”).

All wave 9 applicants will be notified in writing of the outcome of their free school application. In due course, the successful applications and outcome letters sent to successful applicants will be published on the GOV.UK website.

28th May 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to paragraph 1.2 of Free Schools: how to apply, published by her Department in February 2015, what definition her Department uses for the term, local demand for new provision.

Wave 9 free school applications will be assessed against the criteria set out in “Free school applications: criteria for assessment”, which is published on the Gov.UK website: www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/401234/free-school-applications-criteria-for-assessment-mainstream-and-16-to-19_feb_2015_final.pdf

The criteria make clear that the assessment of an application will include an assessment of the extent to which the proposed school addresses any shortage of school places in the area (“need for pupil places”). The assessment will also judge the extent to which the school will add to the diversity of local provision, offer higher standards than other local schools and respond to parental demand (“local demand for new provision”).

All wave 9 applicants will be notified in writing of the outcome of their free school application. In due course, the successful applications and outcome letters sent to successful applicants will be published on the GOV.UK website.

28th May 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if she will publish forecasts for the demand for (a) primary school places and (b) secondary school places in each local authority area in each of the next five years.

The Department for Education publishes forecasts for pupil numbers in each local authority annually. The latest available data can be found in the 2014 capacity tables published online at:

www.gov.uk/government/publications/school-capacity-academic-year-2013-to-2014

Table 4 provides local authority forecasts of pupils of primary school age through to 2018/19. Table 5 provides local authority forecasts of pupil of secondary school age through to 2020/21.

For primary school places, the department has published information on the number of places added by local authorities, the number of places for which there are firm plans for delivery, and the number of places that the department estimates are still needed. This information is published in the local authority basic need scorecards which are published online at:

www.gov.uk/government/publications/primary-school-places-local-authority-basic-need-scorecards

The way in which the department estimates the shortfall of places is described in the technical annex of the scorecards. The department no longer articulates the shortfall of places in terms of ‘severe’, ‘high’ or ‘moderate’. Instead, it focuses on the estimated number of additional places needed to meet demand. The department’s aim is to ensure that all children have access to a good school place.

The basic need scorecard published in April 2014 focused on the estimated number of additional places needed to meet demand in 2015/16. It is our intention to continue to publish local authority pupil forecasts, school capacity data and shortfall calculations in a similar way.

28th May 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how her Department calculates areas of high and severe need for primary school places.

The Department for Education publishes forecasts for pupil numbers in each local authority annually. The latest available data can be found in the 2014 capacity tables published online at:

www.gov.uk/government/publications/school-capacity-academic-year-2013-to-2014

Table 4 provides local authority forecasts of pupils of primary school age through to 2018/19. Table 5 provides local authority forecasts of pupil of secondary school age through to 2020/21.

For primary school places, the department has published information on the number of places added by local authorities, the number of places for which there are firm plans for delivery, and the number of places that the department estimates are still needed. This information is published in the local authority basic need scorecards which are published online at:

www.gov.uk/government/publications/primary-school-places-local-authority-basic-need-scorecards

The way in which the department estimates the shortfall of places is described in the technical annex of the scorecards. The department no longer articulates the shortfall of places in terms of ‘severe’, ‘high’ or ‘moderate’. Instead, it focuses on the estimated number of additional places needed to meet demand. The department’s aim is to ensure that all children have access to a good school place.

The basic need scorecard published in April 2014 focused on the estimated number of additional places needed to meet demand in 2015/16. It is our intention to continue to publish local authority pupil forecasts, school capacity data and shortfall calculations in a similar way.

28th May 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if she will publish all departmental forecasts for projections of high and severe shortages of (a) primary and (b) secondary school places in (i) 2015, (ii) 2016, (iii) 2017, (iv) 2018 and (v) 2019.

The Department for Education publishes forecasts for pupil numbers in each local authority annually. The latest available data can be found in the 2014 capacity tables published online at:

www.gov.uk/government/publications/school-capacity-academic-year-2013-to-2014

Table 4 provides local authority forecasts of pupils of primary school age through to 2018/19. Table 5 provides local authority forecasts of pupil of secondary school age through to 2020/21.

For primary school places, the department has published information on the number of places added by local authorities, the number of places for which there are firm plans for delivery, and the number of places that the department estimates are still needed. This information is published in the local authority basic need scorecards which are published online at:

www.gov.uk/government/publications/primary-school-places-local-authority-basic-need-scorecards

The way in which the department estimates the shortfall of places is described in the technical annex of the scorecards. The department no longer articulates the shortfall of places in terms of ‘severe’, ‘high’ or ‘moderate’. Instead, it focuses on the estimated number of additional places needed to meet demand. The department’s aim is to ensure that all children have access to a good school place.

The basic need scorecard published in April 2014 focused on the estimated number of additional places needed to meet demand in 2015/16. It is our intention to continue to publish local authority pupil forecasts, school capacity data and shortfall calculations in a similar way.

27th May 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the Schools Direct recruitment target is for initial teacher training in all years for which figures are available.

There is no target for the number of trainee teachers to be recruited to the School Direct scheme. The Department for Education aims to recruit in line with the number of trainees needed across all routes, as estimated by our Teacher Supply Model.

The Teacher Supply Model figures for the academic year 2015/16 have been published as part of management information about initial teacher training allocations. This is published online at:

www.gov.uk/government/publications/initial-teacher-training-allocations-for-academic-year-2015-to-2016

Allocations for 2014/15 and 2013/14 are published online at:

www.gov.uk/government/collections/statistics-teacher-training

27th May 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the total cost of the hiring of agency teachers by state-funded schools was in (a) 2010-11, (b) 2011-12, (c) 2012-13 and (d) 2013-14.

Information on the income and expenditure of local authorities and schools (including academies) can be found in the Department for Education’s local authority and school finance data publications, available online at:

www.gov.uk/government/collections/statistics-local-authority-school-finance-data

27th May 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many teachers have been recruited on the Troops to Teachers scheme; what the annual recruitment target for the scheme has been; and what the annual retention rate is of teachers recruited on to that scheme.

The Troops to Teachers undergraduate programme started in January 2014 and 94 trainees have started so far. A further cohort will start in September 2015.

There are no recruitment targets set for this programme. This programme is part of the Department for Education’s commitment to the cross-government military covenant and is part of a package of measures designed to support service leavers.

Of the 94 that started, 80 trainees remain on the programme.

27th May 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the terms of reference are for the research commissioned by her Department from the University of Nottingham on retentions levels in the teaching profession; and when that research will be published.

In October 2014 the University of Nottingham was commissioned by the Department for Education to conduct research to obtain up to date evidence on teachers’ reasons for leaving the profession, the quality of both leavers and returners, and the school-level factors influencing retention. This was to include a survey of headteachers, leavers and returners.

A pilot of the survey carried out between January and March 2015 did not succeed in attracting sufficient responses for data to be meaningful. The department therefore ended the contract and research project before the main stage was conducted. We are currently reconsidering the methodology and expect to re-commission some form of research once viable ways of finding better data or responses has been identified.

27th May 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many agency teachers were hired by state-funded schools in (a) 2010-11, (b) 2011-12, (c) 2012-13 and (d) 2013-14.

The Department for Education collects details of all teachers working in state funded schools through the annual School Workforce Census. However, this census does not separately identify agency teachers.

27th May 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many final-year mathematics trainees there were in (a) 2011, (b) 2012, (c) 2013 and (d) 2014; how many such people were awarded qualified teacher status; and how many such people awarded qualified teacher status were in employment within six months.

Data on final year mathematics trainees from 2011/12 and 2012/13 is published by the Department for Education and available online at:

www.gov.uk/government/collections/statistics-teacher-training

Information for 2010/11 is published online at:

http://dataprovision.education.gov.uk/public/page.htm?to-page=publicOpencmsStaticPage&cms-page-id=tta-public/en/publicAdditionalReports/publicDownloadTheProfiles.html

Information for the 2013/14 academic year will be published this autumn.

27th May 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many final-year physics trainees there were in (a) 2011, (b) 2012, (c) 2013 and (d) 2014; how many such people were awarded qualified teacher status; and how many such people awarded qualified teacher status were in employment within six months.

Initial teacher training performance information for physics courses in the 2010/11, 2011/12 and 2012/13 academic years is provided in the following table. Information for the 2013/14 academic year will be published this autumn.

All trainees

Awarded qualified teacher status

Awarded qualified teacher status and in a teaching post

2010/11

641

526

439

2011/12

787

631

535

2012/13

791

626

536

Figures exclude Teach First.

Source: The National College for Teaching and Leadership Initial Teacher Training Data Management System.

27th May 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what proportion of initial teacher training allocations will be filled by the Schools Direct Programme in (a) 2015, (b) 2016, (c) 2017, (d) 2018 and (e) 2019.

The information requested in part (a) is published by the Department for Education and is available online at:

www.gov.uk/allocation-of-initial-teacher-training-places

We have not yet made any decisions about the distribution of places after the 2015/16 year. Lead schools and accredited initial teacher training providers will be invited to register their interest in due course.

27th May 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the conversion rate is from initial teacher training to newly qualified teacher accreditation for the last three years for which figures are available.

The information requested is published by the Department for Education and is published online at:

www.gov.uk/government/statistics/itt-performance-profiles-management-information-2012-to-2013

This data shows the proportion of teachers that secure employment in a teaching post within six months of qualification. It does not capture those teachers who might choose to delay their entry into the workforce.

27th May 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many recruits will be taken on by (a) the University of Birmingham UTS and (b) Cambridge University UTS in September (i) 2015, (ii) 2016 and (iii) 2017.

Neither of the two university training schools is open and therefore neither currently holds an allocation of places.

In the first year of opening (2015/16), the University of Cambridge Training School has no plans to take on any trainees. It plans to take on up to three trainees per year in the 2016/17 and 2017/18 academic years.

In the first three years of opening, the University of Birmingham Training School plans to host up to 12 trainees or placements from partner schools.

27th May 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when her Department will publish the next School Workforce Census.

The results of the November 2014 School Workforce Census will be published on 2 July 2015 as previously announced:

www.gov.uk/government/organisations/department-for-education/about/statistics#forthcoming-publications

27th May 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what proportion of the allocation of (a) physics and (b) mathematics teacher recruitment places are allocated to (i) higher education institutions and (ii) Schools Direct.

The Department for Education has published data on the allocation of initial teacher training (ITT) places for the 2015/16 academic year online at:

www.gov.uk/allocation-of-initial-teacher-training-places

Since 2013, the department has placed no limit on the number of physics or mathematics places that any school or ITT provider can deliver.

27th May 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what her Department's (a) physics teacher recruitment target and (b) recruitment levels of qualified physics teachers were in each year between 2011 and 2015.

The Department for Education does not have teacher recruitment targets – individual schools and academy trusts are responsible for recruiting the teachers they need. At the time of the last census; vacancy rates were just 0.2% of the total number of teachers in schools.

The total number of trainee physics teachers is published each year in the ‘Initial Teacher Training: Trainee Number Census’ statistical series by the National College for Teaching and Leadership, and is published online at:

www.gov.uk/government/collections/statistics-teacher-training

The total number of secondary school teachers teaching physics (to year groups 7 to 13) is published each year in the ‘School Workforce in England’ statistical series published online at:

www.gov.uk/government/collections/statistics-school-workforce

However, there is no information available to show how many newly recruited physics teachers are teaching in secondary schools.

27th May 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what her Department's (a) mathematics teacher recruitment target and (b) recruitment levels of qualified maths teachers were in each year between 2011 and 2015.

The Department for Education does not have teacher recruitment targets – individual schools and academy trusts are responsible for recruiting the teachers they need. At the time of the last census; vacancy rates were just 0.2% of the total number of teachers in schools.

The total number of trainee mathematics teachers is published each year in the ‘Initial Teacher Training: Trainee Number Census’ statistical series by the National College for Teaching and Leadership and is published online at:

www.gov.uk/government/collections/statistics-teacher-training

The total number of secondary school teachers teaching mathematics (to year groups 7 to 13) is published each year in the ‘School Workforce in England’ statistical series, published online at:

www.gov.uk/government/collections/statistics-school-workforce

However, there is no information available to show how many newly recruited mathematics teachers are teaching in secondary schools.

27th May 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what her Department's target is for the number of new trainee teachers to begin in schools in each year between 2015 and 2019.

Each year the Department for Education produces the Teacher Supply Model, an estimate of the number of trainee teachers required to meet the needs of the school sector in England. The last estimate produced was for the 2015/16 academic year.

The department has published the Teacher Supply Model for 2015/16 in full. This identifies the inputs and assumptions applied to produce our estimate, including central projections of the overall number of teacher entrants needed up to the 2019/20 academic year and beyond. This information is published online at: www.gov.uk/government/publications/teacher-supply-model

27th May 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to paragraph 23 of the paper, The Importance of Teaching, published in November 2010, Cm 7980, what steps her Department has taken to establish a new collaboration incentive, which financially rewards schools which effectively support weaker schools and demonstrably improve their performance; what level of incentive was offered to how many schools under that scheme; what her policy is on continuing that policy; and what level of incentive to how many schools she plans to offer over the next five years.

Collaboration and partnership working are essential components of the academies and free schools programme. Over 50% of academies are in multi-academy trusts and a Department for Education report last year showed that 87% of academies support other schools. The department has also supported collaboration through the development of system leaders, enabling the best school leaders to drive improvement.

The department has implemented the Teaching Schools programme, with 644 teaching schools as of 21 May 2015. Since 2011, when the Teaching Schools programme began, £100m has been committed to developing the Teaching Schools network. Teaching schools are required to establish alliances of schools with which they work directly to provide school based initial teacher training, school-to-school support, research and development activity, and continuous professional development.

The department has also grown the number of National Leaders of Education (NLEs) from 470 in 2010 to 1040 as of 21 May 2015. NLEs are outstanding leaders who support other schools in challenging circumstances to improve. Each NLE receives a £6,000 annual bursary which covers the costs their school incurs in providing collaborative support to underperforming schools.

The department also introduced a School-to-School Support Fund in September 2014. The School-to-School Support Fund provides grant funding for teaching schools and NLEs to support school improvement by working with underperforming schools in the areas of greatest need through specific time-limited interventions.

27th May 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what forecast her Department has made of the number of unfilled teacher training routes in (a) mathematics, (b) physics and (c) all combined teacher training routes beginning in September 2015.

Figures published by the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service on 28 May 2015 show that the Department for Education is on course to exceed its recruitment target for primary trainee teachers. Good progress is also being made in recruiting secondary trainees.

The department has increased bursaries and scholarships to up to £25,000 and is paying a £5,000 salary bonus to mathematics, physics and computing trainees on our School Direct salaried scheme. The Prime Minister announced on 11 March 2015 further investment of £67 million over the next five years to recruit an extra 2,500 mathematics and physics trainee teachers and retrain 15,000 existing teachers.

6th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many staff are employed in each regional school commissioner's office; and what the annual budget is of each such office.

Each Regional Schools Commissioner’s office employs between 6 and 8 members of staff and has a budget of approximately £460,000 for the 2014-15 financial year.

6th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps her Department is taking to increase the number of children walking to school.

Local authorities are required to ensure that safe walking routes are available to those pupils who are expected to walk to school. They are also under a duty to promote sustainable travel and transport. The duty applies to children and young people of compulsory school age who travel to receive education or training in a local authority’s area. Local walking, cycling, and bus strategies should inform the local authority’s performance of its duty to promote sustainable school travel.

On 18 July 2014, the Department for Education issued revised home to school travel guidance which gives examples and provides further information on sustainable transport, including walking to and from school. The guidance is published online at:

www.gov.uk/government/publications/home-to-school-travel-and-transport-guidance

8th Sep 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when the National College of Teaching and Learning will publish the final initial teacher training allocations for 2014-15.

We intend to publish the final allocation of initial teacher training (ITT) places for the 2014/15 academic year as management information in the coming weeks. Data on the initial allocation of places is published online at:

www.gov.uk/government/publications/initial-teacher-training-allocations-for-academic-year-2014-to-2015.

8th Sep 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the final number of trainee teachers recruited in each region was in (a) 2010-11, (b) 2011-12, (c) 2012-13 and (d) 2013-14.

The table attached shows the total number of trainee teachers in each region from 2010/11 to 2013/14.

This is taken from the initial teacher training (ITT) census, which is taken on the second Wednesday of October each academic year. Further information is published online at:

www.gov.uk/government/statistics/initial-teacher-training-trainee-number-census-2013-to-2014.

8th Sep 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate her Department has made of the number of trainee teachers required in each region in (a) 2010-11, (b) 2011-12, (c) 2012-13, (d) 2013-14 and (e) 2014-15.

The requested information on the number of trainee teachers required in each region is not available.

Information on the number of initial teacher training (ITT) allocations and places requested for the 2014/15 academic year grouped by region is available in the “Initial teacher training allocations for academic year 2014 to 2015” publication (summary by region tab). This is published online at: www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/300720/itt_allocations_management_information_21_nov_2013.xlsx.

8th Sep 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate her Department has made of the number of trainee teachers required through the School Direct programme in 2014-15.

There is no requirement for a particular number of trainee teachers to be recruited to School Direct places. We aim to recruit in line with the number of trainees needed across all routes, as estimated by our Teacher Supply Model.

The Teacher Supply Model figures for the academic year 2014/15 have been published as part of management information about initial teacher training (ITT) allocations. This is published online at:

www.gov.uk/government/publications/initial-teacher-training-allocations-for-academic-year-2014-to-2015.

14th Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when her Department will publish the experimental data for the 16 to 19 2012-13 performance tables.

Experimental statistics were published on 26 June 2014 on the destinations of key stage 4 (KS4) and key stage 5 (KS5) students[1]. The statistics remain experimental with new institutions, such as independent and special schools, being included for the first time. KS4 education destinations are included in performance tables, but the employment, training and characteristics data need to be fully tested and evaluated before the rest of KS4 and all of KS5 data can be published in performance tables. The next publication is due in early 2015 and will cover 2012/13 destinations.

Experimental statistics on level 1 and 2 attainment in English and mathematics by 16 to 18 students for academic year 2012/13 will be published by October 2014.

[1] www.gov.uk/government/collections/statistics-destinations

30th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many trainee (a) English, (b) mathematics, (c) all sciences, (d) general science, (e) biology, (f) chemistry, (g) physics, (h) ICT, (i) design and technology, (j) modern languages, (k) geography, (l) history, (m) art and design, (n) music, (o) physical education, (p) religious education, (q) business studies, (r) citizenship, (s) 14 to 19 diploma subjects, (t) other subjects, (u) secondary and (v) primary school teachers were recruited through (i) Teach First, (ii) EBITT, (iii) HEI-led and (iv) in total in (A) 2010-11 and (B) 2011-12; and what proportion of his Department's supply targets the number recruited in each category in each year represents.

The data held by the Department on initial teacher training (ITT) recruitment is contained within the ITT Census.

The ITT Census contains data on recruitment to courses and routes.

Supply targets are included in ITT Census publications, but are only generated at overall subject level and do not include Teach First numbers for the years in question.

The ITT Census for 2010-11 and 2011-12 is published online:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/statistics-teacher-training#performance-data

Teach First recruitment was as follows:

2010/11

2011/12

English

161

199

Maths

129

175

Sciences

84

129

ICT

12

20

D&T

3

10

ML

36

45

Geography

20

14

History

22

30

Art & Design

3

Music

7

15

RE

14

19

Business Studies

23

22

Citizenship

27

9

Secondary

541

687

Primary

19

85

Total

560

772

Only those subjects listed above were included in the Teach First programme.

30th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many trainee (a) English, (b) mathematics, (c) all sciences, (d) general science, (e) biology, (f) chemistry, (g) physics, (h) ICT, (i) design and technology, (j) modern languages, (k) geography, (l) history, (m) art and design, (n) music, (o) physical education, (p) religious education, (q) business studies, (r) citizenship, (s) 14 to 19 diploma subjects, (t) other subjects, (u) secondary and (v) primary school teachers were recruited through (i) Teach First, (ii) School Direct (salary), (iii) School Direct (fee), (iv) other EBITT, (v) HEI-led and (vi) in total in (a) 2011-12 and (B) 2012-13; and what proportion of his Department's supply targets the number recruited in each category represents.

The data held by the Department on initial teacher training (ITT) recruitment is contained within the ITT Census.

The ITT Census contains data on recruitment to courses and routes, but does not include Teach First (TF) for 2012-13.

Supply targets are included in the ITT Census publications, but are only generated at overall subject level and do not include TF numbers for the years in question.

The ITT Census for 2011-12 and 2012-13 is published online:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/statistics-teacher-training#performance-data

Teach First recruitment for 2011-12 and 2012-13 was as follows:

2011/12

2012/13

English

199

226

Maths

175

191

Sciences

129

193

ICT

20

18

D&T

10

5

ML

45

77

Geography

14

26

History

30

40

Music

15

13

RE

19

15

Business Studies

22

13

Citizenship

9

6

Secondary

687

823

Primary

85

174

Total

772

997

Only those subjects listed above were included in the Teach First programme.

30th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many trainee (a) English, (b) mathematics, (c) all sciences, (d) general science, (e) biology, (f) chemistry, (g) physics, (h) ICT, (i) design and technology, (j) modern languages, (k) geography, (l) history, (m) art and design, (n) music, (o) physical education, (p) religious education, (q) business studies, (r) citizenship, (s) 14 to 19 diploma subjects, (t) other subjects, (u) secondary and (v) primary school teachers were recruited through (i) Teach First, (ii) EBITT, (iii) HEI-led and (iv) in total in (A) 2009-10 and (B) 2010-11; and what proportion of his Department's supply targets the number recruited was in each category in each year represents.

The data held by the Department on initial teacher training (ITT) recruitment is contained within the ITT Census.

The ITT Census contains data on recruitment to courses and routes.

Supply targets are included in ITT Census publications, but are only generated at overall subject level and do not include Teach First numbers for the years in question.

The ITT Census for 2010-11 is published online:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/statistics-teacher-training#performance-data

The data for 2009-10 recruitment is published in: ‘Additional tables 2: SFR06/2011':

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/school-workforce-in-england-november-2010-provisional

These data do not contain supply target figures.

Teach First recruitment was as follows:

2009/10

2010/11

English

119

161

Maths

90

129

Sciences

103

84

ICT

15

12

D&T

7

3

ML

25

36

Geography

17

20

History

20

22

Art & Design

7

3

Music

7

7

RE

12

14

Business Studies

10

23

Citizenship

26

27

Secondary

458

541

Primary

27

19

Total

485

560

Only those subjects listed above were included in the Teach First programme.

30th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many teacher training places were allocated in (a) English, (b) mathematics, (c) all sciences, (d) general science, (e) biology, (f) chemistry, (g) physics, (h) ICT, (i) design and technology, (j) modern languages, (k) geography, (l) history, (m) art and design, (n) music, (o) physical education, (p) religious education, (q) business studies, (r) citizenship, (s) 14 to 19 diploma subjects, (t) other subjects and in all (u) secondary and (v) primary schools across all initial teacher training pathways in (i) 2009-10, (ii) 2010-11, (iii) 2011-12 and (iv) 2012-13.

The Department did not allocate places directly to primary or secondary schools in 2009-10, 2010-11 and 2011-12. Places were allocated to accredited initial teacher training (ITT) providers and it is their responsibility to arrange school placements.

For 2012-13, School Direct allocations were assigned to lead schools. This was published alongside all other ITT allocations by the Training and Development Agency. School Direct places are below.

School Direct places 2012-13

Primary

Primary (all specialisms)

121

Priority secondary

Chemistry

87

Mathematics

151

Modern languages

87

Physics

82

Non-priority secondary

Art and design

9

Biology

15

Dance

1

Drama

8

Economics

2

English

93

Geography

10

History

29

Music

10

Physical education

25

Religious education

10

Applied business

1

Applied ICT

1

Business studies

3

Design and technology

11

General or combined science

3

Health and social care

2

ICT

7

Psychology

3

Social sciences (except economics)

1

Total Secondary

651

Grand Total

772

5th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when he will respond to the letter from the hon. Member for Stoke-on-Trent Central received by his office on 29 May 2014, relating to the recent situation in Birmingham.

I refer the hon. Member to the statement made by my Rt hon. Friend the Secretary of to the House on 9 June 2014, which addressed the questions raised in his letter.

15th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many jobs in (a) her Department and (b) each of her Department's non-departmental public bodies, executive agencies, non-ministerial departments, advisory bodies and other accountable statutory bodies (i) have been abolished in or relocated from East Cheshire Local Authority since 2010 and (ii) will be abolished in or relocated from East Cheshire Local Authority by 2020.

Not all of the Defra Group (Core and her non-departmental public bodies, executive agencies, non-ministerial departments, advisory bodies and other accountable statutory bodies) collect data on posts that have been abolished or relocated; although all collect management information about the people working in the East Cheshire Local Authority area.

  1. In the Department we do not hold data on posts that have been abolished or relocated in the East Cheshire Local Authority area between March 2010 and now. There are currently no plans to abolish jobs in or relocate any jobs from the East Cheshire Local Authority area by 2020.

  2. Not all of the Department's non-departmental public bodies, executive agencies, non-ministerial departments, advisory bodies and other accountable statutory bodies hold data on posts that have been abolished or relocated in the East Cheshire Local Authority area. Of those that do hold this data, during the period March 2010 to now 20 posts have been abolished. There are also currently no plans to abolish jobs in the East Cheshire Local Authority area by 2020.

7th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many jobs in (a) her Department and (b) each of its non-departmental public bodies, executive agencies, non-ministerial departments, advisory bodies and other accountable statutory bodies (i) have been abolished or relocated from Stoke-on-Trent since 2010 and (ii) will be abolished in or relocated from Stoke-on-Trent by 2020.

The Department for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, its executive agencies non-ministerial departments, advisory bodies and other accountable statutory bodies have no offices in Stoke-on-Trent, and therefore no jobs have been abolished since 2010 nor are any to be abolished or relocated by 2020.

15th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, how many jobs in (a) her Department and (b) each of her Department's non-departmental public bodies, executive agencies, non-ministerial departments, advisory bodies and other accountable statutory bodies (i) have been abolished in or relocated from East Cheshire Local Authority since 2010 and (ii) will be abolished in or relocated from East Cheshire Local Authority by 2020.

Neither DFID nor its non-departmental public bodies have had, nor plan to have, any jobs based in East Cheshire Local Authority during the periods in question.

7th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, how many jobs in (a) her Department and (b) its non-departmental public body, non-ministerial departments, advisory bodies and other accountable statutory bodies (i) have been abolished or relocated from Stoke-on-Trent since 2010 and (ii) will be abolished in or relocated from Stoke-on-Trent by 2020.

Neither DFID nor its non-departmental public bodies have had, nor plan to have, any jobs based in Stoke-on-Trent during the periods in question.

6th Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps he is taking to improve the (a) connectivity and (b) affordability of rail travel between Stoke-on-Trent and London.

For the next InterCity West Coast franchise we ran a public consultation from 10 May to 2 August this year seeking both the public’s and stakeholders’ views and priorities to help inform potential bidders to ensure they meet the needs of the passengers. This included questions about connectivity and minimum levels of service. We are now reviewing and analysing the information and a summary will be published in due course.

We have capped the rail fares we regulate at inflation (Retail Price Index) for four years running, and will continue to do so for the life of this parliament. This means those fares we regulate will rise by no more than 1.9% in 2017.

Passengers on long-distance routes such as Stoke on Trent to London can also benefit from unregulated Advance fares, which have helped to make some leisure travel services significantly cheaper for passengers who are able to book ahead and commit themselves to travelling on a specific departure, and has also helped to fill emptier trains.

Paul Maynard
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
15th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many jobs in (a) his Department and (b) each of his Department's non-departmental public bodies, executive agencies, non-ministerial departments, advisory bodies and other accountable statutory bodies (i) have been abolished in or relocated from East Cheshire Local Authority since 2010 and (ii) will be abolished in or relocated from East Cheshire Local Authority by 2020.

In the Department for Transport itself, no posts have been based in East Cheshire Local Authority since 2010.

The Department’s Executive Agencies (Maritime and Coastguard Agency, Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA), Vehicle Certification Agency and Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency) have had no posts based in East Cheshire Local Authority since 2010, other than DVLA.

DVLA Chester Local Office was closed in November 2013, as part of a programme of closures, rationalising the DVLA estate and centralising work at the main headquarters in Swansea. There were 16 Civil Service posts based out of this office. Staff were offered the opportunity to relocate to the DVLA in Swansea. Two staff chose to transfer out to other government departments within the region; one member of staff came to the end of their contract and 13 staff chose to take redundancy rather than relocate.

There are currently no plans to increase or decrease the number of posts in the East Cheshire Local Authority between now and 2020.

We are not aware of any jobs being based in East Cheshire Local Authority since 2010 in the wider accountable statutory bodies.

7th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many jobs in (a) his Department and (b) each of its non-departmental public bodies, executive agencies, non-ministerial departments, advisory bodies and other accountable statutory bodies (i) have been abolished or relocated from Stoke-on-Trent since 2010 and (ii) will be abolished in or relocated from Stoke-on-Trent by 2020.

In the Department for Transport itself, no posts have been based in Stoke-on-Trent since 2010.


The Department’s Executive Agencies (Maritime and Coastguard Agency, Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency, Vehicle Certification Agency and Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency) have had no posts based in Stoke-on-Trent since 2010, other than the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency, who respond as follows:


As part of the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency’s (DVSA) testing transformation programme, which has the aim of taking testing closer to the customer, DVSA’s Goods Vehicle Testing Station (GVTS) in Stoke-on-Trent was closed in April 2015. Twenty nine roles were based at this testing station. The staff previously based at the station are still working for DVSA in the area; twenty four of these roles are now based at other DVSA sites and the remaining five staff are being redeployed to other roles in DVSA. There are currently no plans to close any further DVSA Good Vehicle Testing Stations (GVTS) or Driving Test Centres (DTC) in the Stoke-on-Trent area between now and 2020.


We are not aware of any jobs being based in Stoke-on-Trent since 2010 in the wider accountable statutory bodies.

15th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many jobs in (a) his Department and (b) each of his Department's non-departmental public bodies, executive agencies, non-ministerial departments, advisory bodies and other accountable statutory bodies (i) have been abolished in or relocated from East Cheshire Local Authority since 2010 and (ii) will be abolished in or relocated from East Cheshire Local Authority by 2020.

The number of people employed in DWP offices in East Cheshire Local Authority area at March 2011, which is the earliest information available, was 198. The current number of people employed as at March 2016, which is the latest information available, is 135. The reduction is in line with increased efficiencies and reducing workloads as more people have moved into work.

Health and Safety Executive (HSE) has only had an office presence in East Cheshire Local Authority area, in Crewe, since 25 January 2016. This follows the relocation of 31 staff from Stoke-on-Trent on that date with no staff losses at that time. As of March 2016 HSE has 30 staff based in Crewe.

DWP and HSE have not yet developed detailed workforce plans up to 2020. There are currently no further plans for relocation or specific reductions of posts in East Cheshire.

7th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many jobs in (a) his Department and (b) each of its non-departmental public bodies, executive agencies, non-ministerial departments, advisory bodies and other accountable statutory bodies (i) have been abolished or relocated from Stoke-on-Trent since 2010 and (ii) will be abolished in or relocated from Stoke-on-Trent by 2020.

(a i) The number of people employed in DWP offices in Stoke-on-Trent at June 2010, which is the earliest information available, was 744. The current number of people employed as at November 2015, latest information available, is 464.

(b i) Health and Safety Executive (HSE) has an office in Stoke-on-Trent. The number of people employed at 1 January 2010 was 52. Current number of people employed is 31.

The North Staffs Remploy factory based at Trentham, Stoke-on-Trent closed on 4 December 2012 and 110 people left the factory.

(a ii) Detailed workforce planning up to 2020 is not yet available. Although reducing and rationalising the estate could result in relocations, there is no centrally driven relocation target to this effect. Any relocation is done based on the operational needs of the department.


(b ii) The HSE office in Stoke-on-Trent will relocate on 25 January 2016 and 31 people will move to Crewe from that date.

6th Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what recent assessment he has made of the potential merits of making selective dorsal rhizotomy surgery available on the NHS for young people with cerebral palsy.

NHS England currently has in place a programme called Commissioning through Evaluation (CtE). This is designed to enable a limited number of patients to access treatments that are not funded by the National Health Service, but nonetheless show significant promise for the future, while new clinical and patient experience data are collected within a formal evaluation programme. The benefits of Selective Dorsal Rhizotomy (SDR) procedures are currently being assessed through this scheme.

The SDR CtE is supported in five designated hospital trusts across the country. There are two main phases for any treatments entered into NHS England's CtE programme. The first phase of the SDR CtE concluded in March 2016. During this phase a predetermined number of patients were recruited within a few selected centres across England and a formal evaluation programme was established.

The second phase - the analysis phase - has now commenced. Once the CtE evaluation report is available, NHS England’s published policy for access to SDR will be reviewed. NHS England expects to receive an evaluation report in March 2017.

15th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many jobs in (a) his Department and (b) each of his Department's non-departmental public bodies, executive agencies, non-ministerial departments, advisory bodies and other accountable statutory bodies (i) have been abolished in or relocated from East Cheshire Local Authority since 2010 and (ii) will be abolished in or relocated from East Cheshire Local Authority by 2020.

No jobs with the core Department have been abolished or relocated from East Cheshire and none will be abolished in or relocated from East Cheshire by 2020.

The information about non-departmental public bodies, executive agencies, and other accountable statutory bodies is not held centrally by the Department and the information for all those organisations has been provided by those bodies. This has resulted in a ‘nil return’, on both aspects of the question, from each of his Department's non-departmental public bodies, executive agencies, non-ministerial departments, advisory bodies and other accountable statutory bodies operating within East Cheshire.

24th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what progress his Department has made on developing a national measure of child development at age two to two-and-a-half as part of the public health framework; and when he expects that measure to be introduced.

The Department is leading work to develop an indicator of child development at age 2-2½ to be included in the Public Health Outcomes Framework (PHOF) from 2017. The population measure will give a national picture of child development at age 2 and will also help local areas to assess the impact of services for 0-2 year olds and inform local commissioning.

Since April 2015, the Department has asked all health visiting teams in England to use the evidence based Ages and Stages Questionnaires (ASQ-3) as part of children’s health and development reviews at age 2-2½ to generate data for the indicator. The Department has worked with Health Education England to develop e-learning materials to support health professionals using ASQ-3 as part of the two year review.

From October 2015, health visiting providers were asked to report ASQ-3 scores to the Children and Young People’s Health Services dataset, which is being developed by the Health and Social Care Information Centre. The dataset is expected to publish its first report in April 2016.

Public Health England will draw on ASQ-3 data from the children’s dataset to report the PHOF outcome measure of child development at age 2-2½, reporting on a yearly basis the percentage of children with a positive outcome across all five domains of development in ASQ-3 at age 2-2½. The first reporting of the outcome measure is planned for inclusion in the PHOF in spring 2017.

7th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many jobs in (a) his Department and (b) each of its non-departmental public bodies, executive agencies, non-ministerial departments, advisory bodies and other accountable statutory bodies (i) have been abolished or relocated from Stoke-on-Trent since 2010 and (ii) will be abolished in or relocated from Stoke-on-Trent by 2020.

Information about the number of jobs that (i) have been abolished or relocated from Stoke-on-Trent since 2010 and (ii) will be abolished in or relocated from Stoke-on-Trent by 2020 is set out in the attached tables. The information about non-Departmental public bodies, executive agencies, and other accountable statutory bodies is not held centrally by the Department and their information, as indicated below, has been provided by those bodies.

15th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, how many jobs in (a) his Department and (b) each of his Department's non-departmental public bodies, executive agencies, non-ministerial departments, advisory bodies and other accountable statutory bodies (i) have been abolished in or relocated from East Cheshire Local Authority since 2010 and (ii) will be abolished in or relocated from East Cheshire Local Authority by 2020.

No posts in the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, or any of the Department's non-departmental public bodies, executive agencies, non-ministerial departments, advisory bodies and other accountable statutory bodies have been abolished in, or relocated from, East Cheshire Local Authority since 2010 and none will be abolished in, or relocated from, East Cheshire Local Authority by 2020.

7th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, how many jobs in (a) his Department and (b) each of its non-departmental public bodies, executive agencies, non-ministerial departments, advisory bodies and other accountable statutory bodies (i) have been abolished or relocated from Stoke-on-Trent since 2010 and (ii) will be abolished in or relocated from Stoke-on-Trent by 2020.

(a) None. The Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) does not have any staff in Stoke-on-Trent, and has not abolished or relocated any jobs from Stoke-on-Trent since 2010.

(b) None. The FCO’s non-departmental public departments and executive agencies do not have any staff in Stoke-on-Trent, and have not abolished or relocated any jobs from Stoke-on-Trent since 2010.

26th Oct 2016
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what meetings (a) he, (b) his advisers and (c) officials of his Department have had with representatives from the Bank of England to discuss the effect of quantitative easing on inequality since his appointment.

It is a matter of public record that the Chancellor of the Exchequer meets the Governor of the Bank of England to discuss a wide range of economic and financial issues consistent with their roles. Treasury officials and representatives of the Bank of England also meet routinely in order to carry out their responsibilities.

15th Apr 2016
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many jobs in (a) his Department and (b) each of his Department's non-departmental public bodies, executive agencies, non-ministerial departments, advisory bodies and other accountable statutory bodies (i) have been abolished in or relocated from East Cheshire Local Authority since 2010 and (ii) will be abolished in or relocated from East Cheshire Local Authority by 2020.

No jobs in the Treasury or non-Departmental public bodies, executive agencies, advisory bodies falling under its remit have been abolished or relocated in the regions or time frames stated in the question.

In April 2011, HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) – a non-ministerial Department falling under the remit of the Chancellor – closed Crewe House, an Enquiry Centre (EC), and relocated to Hornbeam House in Crewe. In 2014, following HMRC’s decision to close all ECs, the EC in Crewe was closed.

In May 2011, Craven House, Macclesfield was closed and the EC relocated to Macclesfield Town Hall. In 2014, following HMRC’s decision to close all ECs, the EC in Macclesfield was closed.

15th Apr 2016
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the (a) staff and (b) other costs to his Department were for the production of chart 1.5 on page 21 of the 2016 Budget Book.

A number of Treasury officials were involved in preparing the Chancellor’s Budget Report. The government does not calculate the costs of producing individual charts at fiscal events.

24th Feb 2016
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, how much and what proportion of National Infrastructure Pipeline spending has been allocated to projects in (a) Stoke-on-Trent local authority, (b) Cheshire East local authority, (c) the West Midlands region, (d) the South East region and (e) London.

The information requested can be obtained from “National Infrastructure Pipeline”, published in July 2015 and is available here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/national-infrastructure-pipeline-july-2015

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
24th Feb 2016
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, how much infrastructure investment was allocated to projects in (a) Stoke-on-Trent local authority, (b) Cheshire East local authority, (c) the West Midlands region, (d) the South East region and (e) London.

The information requested can be obtained from “National Infrastructure Pipeline”, published in July 2015 and is available here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/national-infrastructure-pipeline-july-2015

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
7th Jan 2016
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many jobs in (a) his Department and (b) each of its non-departmental public bodies, executive agencies, non-ministerial departments, advisory bodies and other accountable statutory bodies (i) have been abolished or relocated from Stoke-on-Trent since 2010 and (ii) will be abolished in or relocated from Stoke-on-Trent by 2020.

No jobs within HM Treasury, Office for Budget Responsibility , Government Internal Audit Agency, Debt Management Office and Government Actuaries Department have been abolished or relocated from Stoke-on-Trent since 2010 and there are currently no plans for any to be abolished or relocated from Stoke-on-Trent by 2020.


As announced in November 2015, HM Revenue and Customs plans to close Blackburn House in Stoke-on-Trent in 2019/20. The 256 posts currently in Stoke will transfer to new regional centres and the Department has committed to working with its staff to ensure that as many of those who do want to continue working for HMRC will be able to do so.

15th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many jobs in (a) her Department and (b) each of her Department's non-departmental public bodies, executive agencies, non-ministerial departments, advisory bodies and other accountable statutory bodies (i) have been abolished in or relocated from East Cheshire Local Authority since 2010 and (ii) will be abolished in or relocated from East Cheshire Local Authority by 2020.

The Department records actual staffing levels, but does not centrally record the number of jobs by location. Records show that since 2010 neither (a) the Department or (b) the Department’s executive non-departmental public bodies and statutory bodies, including Advisory and Tribunal NDPBs, have had staff based within the Cheshire East local authority area.

There are therefore no plans for posts to be reduced in this area. The Department’s executive non-departmental Public Bodies are:

• the Independent Police Complaints Commission;

• the Gangmasters Licensing Authority;

• the Office of the Immigration Services Commissioner;

• the Security Industry Authority; and

• the Disclosure and Barring Service

Furthermore the National Crime Agency, a non-ministerial government department, and the College of Policing also do not have offices or staff based in Cheshire East.

7th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many jobs in (a) her Department and (b) each of its non-departmental public bodies, executive agencies, non-ministerial departments, advisory bodies and other accountable statutory bodies (i) have been abolished or relocated from Stoke-on-Trent since 2010 and (ii) will be abolished in or relocated from Stoke-on-Trent by 2020.

The Department records actual staffing levels, but does not centrally record the number of jobs by location. Actual staffing levels for (a) the Department, between March 2010 and March 2015, have slightly reduced (less than 10 FTE¹) in Stoke-on-Trent. However, this does not necessarily mean that posts have been abolished or relocated as a consequence.

The Department is still planning its workforce requirements for 2020 in line with the Spending Review settlement; this level of detail is not yet known.

(b) For the Department’s executive non-departmental public bodies and statutory bodies, there have been no staff or offices based in Stoke-on-Trent during this period. The Department’s executive non-departmental Public Bodies are:

• the Independent Police Complaints Commission;

• the Gangmasters Licensing Authority;

• the Office of the Immigration Services Commissioner;

• the Security Industry Authority; and

• the Disclosure and Barring Service

None of the Department’s Advisory and Tribunal NDPBs employ staff or have offices in Stoke-on-Trent.

¹Data Source: Data View, the Home Office's single source of Office for National Statistics compliant monthly snapshot corporate human resources data Period Covered: Figures are as at 31 March each year.

Extraction Date: 1st April each year

Organisational Coverage: March-10 - Figures include core Home Office and the Executive Agencies; United Kingdom Border Agency, Identity and Passport Service and the Criminal Records Bureau March -15 - Figures include core Home Office (including Border Force, UK Visas & Immigration, Immigration En-forcement and Her Majesty's Passport Office.) Employee Coverage: Data is based on headcount and FTE of all current paid and unpaid civil servants as at 31st March each year

9th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many murders related to domestic violence there have been in each year between 1997 and 2014.

The available information is given in the table and is taken from the Home Office Homicide Index.

Data are based on the number of homicides where the victim’s relationship to the principal suspect was partner or ex-partner.


Table A: Offences currently recorded as domestic homicide1,2, 1997/98 to 2013/14

England and Wales

Relationship to principal suspect

Partner/ex-partner

Number of victims

1997/98

131

1998/99

105

1999/00

112

2000/01

127

2001/02

146

2002/03

136

2003/04

122

2004/05

145

2005/06

113

2006/07

120

2007/08

110

2008/09

135

2009/10

114

2010/11

118

2011/12

107

2012/13

93

2013/14

108

Source: Homicide Index, Home Office

1. As at 5 November 2014; figures are subject to revision as cases are dealt with by the police and by the courts, or as further information becomes available.

2. Offences where the victim's relationship to principal suspect is 'spouse (including civil partner), cohabiting partner, boyfriend/girlfriend, ex-spouse/ex-cohabiting partner/ex-boyfriend/girlfriend, adulterous relationship, lover’s spouse or emotional rival' are shown.

15th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many jobs in (a) his Department and (b) each of his Department's non-departmental public bodies, executive agencies, non-ministerial departments, advisory bodies and other accountable statutory bodies (i) have been abolished in or relocated from East Cheshire Local Authority since 2010 and (ii) will be abolished in or relocated from East Cheshire Local Authority by 2020.

This information is not held in the format requested.

In April 2010 and January 2016 there were less than 10 Ministry of Defence (MOD) civilian personnel employed at locations within the Unitary Authority of Cheshire East.

Full details of how the planned reductions in MOD civilian staff numbers announced in the Strategic Defence and Security Review 2015 will be profiled over the next five years are not yet available and will be developed as programmes mature.

7th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many jobs in (a) his Department and (b) each of its non-departmental public bodies, executive agencies, non-ministerial departments, advisory bodies and other accountable statutory bodies (i) have been abolished or relocated from Stoke-on-Trent since 2010 and (ii) will be abolished in or relocated from Stoke-on-Trent by 2020.

This information is not held in the format requested.

In April 2010 there were 20 Ministry of Defence (MOD) civilian personnel employed at locations within the Unitary Authority of Stoke-on-Trent; in October 2015 there were 10. All numbers are rounded.

Full details of how the planned reductions in MOD civilian staff numbers announced in the Strategic Defence and Security Review will be profiled over the next five years are not yet available and will be developed as programmes mature.

15th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, how many jobs in (a) his Department and (b) each of his Department's non-departmental public bodies, executive agencies, non-ministerial departments, advisory bodies and other accountable statutory bodies (i) have been abolished in or relocated from East Cheshire Local Authority since 2010 and (ii) will be abolished in or relocated from East Cheshire Local Authority by 2020.

No jobs have been abolished or relocated since 2010, or will be abolished or relocated by 2020, in East Cheshire Local Authority in my Department or its Arms Length Bodies.

24th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what assessment he has made of the potential contribution of community land trusts to increasing the supply of affordable housing in the UK.

The Department does not assess the potential contribution that individual classes of organisation, including Community Land Trusts, can make to the delivery of affordable housing. However, we recognise the role they can play in delivering locally led and innovative housing development and we are confident they will make a valuable contribution to the 400,000 affordable housing starts we have committed to deliver by 2021.

7th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, how many jobs in (a) his Department and (b) each of its non-departmental public bodies, executive agencies, non-ministerial departments, advisory bodies and other accountable statutory bodies (i) have been abolished or relocated from Stoke-on-Trent since 2010 and (ii) will be abolished in or relocated from Stoke-on-Trent by 2020.

No jobs in either my Department or each of its non-departmental public bodies, executive agencies, non-ministerial departments, advisory bodies and other accountable statutory bodies have been abolished or relocated from Stoke-on-Trent since 2010 or will be abolished in or relocated from Stoke-on-Trent by 2020.

9th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, (a) how many and (b) what proportion of the total number of households have been owner occupiers in each of the last 10 years in each London (i) borough and (ii) constituency.

The Department for Communities and Local Government does not hold this information at local authority level. The 2011 Census (Office for National Statistics) provides local authority estimates for 2011.


9th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what estimate he has made of the proportion of new replacement homes for housing association homes to be sold under the proposed extension of right-to-buy entitlements which will be (a) local authority owned social housing, (b) housing association social housing and (c) private rented sector housing.

Under the voluntary agreement with the National Housing Federation and housing associations, every home sold to tenants will result in an additional home being provided. This will lead to an increase in overall housing supply.

Associations will have the freedom to replace the properties sold with alternative tenures such as shared ownership, where this is more appropriate for their community.

15th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many jobs in (a) his Department and (b) each of his Department's non-departmental public bodies, executive agencies, non-ministerial departments, advisory bodies and other accountable statutory bodies (i) have been abolished in or relocated from East Cheshire Local Authority since 2010 and (ii) will be abolished in or relocated from East Cheshire Local Authority by 2020.

Within the Ministry of Justice, only the National Offender Management Service (NOMS), HM Courts and Tribunals Service (HMCTS) and Children and Family Court Advisory and Support Services (Cafcass) have or have had offices within the East Cheshire postal address.

In September 2010 Cafcass closed its Sandbach office following consultation with staff. All 11 posts were relocated to the nearby Warrington office.

Within HMCTS, one post has been re-located from the East Cheshire Local Authority Area since 2010 and 16 posts have not been replaced when vacated by the previous post-holder. As part of the HMCTS Estates Reform Programme, both Macclesfield Magistrates' and Macclesfield County Courts are due to close in September 2016. Discussions are ongoing with HMCTS staff in post as to potential redeployment options that include courts in Crewe, however no decisions have yet taken place.

24th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 7 January 2016 to Question 21452, how many jobs at the Staffordshire and West Midlands Probation Trust were abolished or relocated from Stoke-on Trent between May 2010 and 1 June 2014.

The former probation trusts ceased operation on 31 May 2014, as part of the previous Government’s Transforming Rehabilitation reforms. The trusts’ archived records are now held by the National Offender Management Service.

Within the specified timescale, it is not possible to ascertain whether or not the information requested is held in the archives. I will write to the hon. Member in due course to let him know the position and to provide the information if we have it.

Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
7th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many jobs in (a) his Department and (b) each of its non-departmental public bodies, executive agencies, non-ministerial departments, advisory bodies and other accountable statutory bodies (i) have been abolished or relocated from Stoke-on-Trent since 2010 and (ii) will be abolished in or relocated from Stoke-on-Trent by 2020.

Within the Ministry of Justice, only the National Offender Management Service (NOMS) and HM Courts and Tribunals Service (HMCTS) have offices within the Stoke-On-Trent postal address. There is one Juvenile Centre with a Stoke-On-Trent postal address, HMYOI Werrington. No posts have been abolished or relocated since 2010. There are currently no plans to abolish or relocate any posts by 2020. There are three National Probation Service (NPS) locations with a Stoke-on-Trent postal address. The NPS has only existed from 1 June 2014. Since that date there are no records of any posts being abolished or any relocation activity in the NPS Midlands Division which includes Stoke-on-Trent. There is an organisational change programme within the National Probation Service, that is ongoing and that will impact all area of NPS activity. It is too early to define the impact on a particular geographical location. HMCTS are unable to disaggregate information collected for the North Staffordshire area, so the following includes staff based within Stoke-on-Trent and Newcastle-under-Lyme. Since 2010, there has been a net reduction of 8 posts. There are currently no plans to further change the staffing in the North Staffordshire area.
15th Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland, what discussions he has had with Ministers of the Scottish Government on the effect of declining oil prices on public finances in Scotland.

I regularly engage with Ministers of the Scottish Government on a wide range of economic matters. As last week’s independent OBR estimates show, revenues from the North Sea are forecast to be negative for the next three years. March’s GERS figures show Scotland’s public spending was almost £15 billion more than its tax revenue in the last financial year. Thankfully, the north east of Scotland can rely on the broad shoulders of the United Kingdom to see it through these difficult times.